xt7c599z153h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7c599z153h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581024  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 24, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 24, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7c599z153h section xt7c599z153h HO

UNIVERSITY Of KENTUCKY

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Lexington.

Volume L

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91 Firms To Be Represented
A t Career Carnival Next Week

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arranged. Different phases of business, industrygovernment and the
professions are to be exhibited.
Invitations to attend the car-- ,
nival have been sent to presidents of central Kentucky colleges and to principals of Lexington high schools.
President Dickey will hold a tea
Monday in the SUB ballroom from
3 to 6 p.m. for students, faculty
and representatives of the firms.
E. E. Elsey, professor of en- gineering research and chairman
of the carnival committee, said
that the following firms will have

The second annual Career Carnival will be held" at Memorial
Coliseum Tuesday and Wednesday
p.m.
from
carnival, open to the pubThe
lic, is held especially for those
high school and college students
who have not yet decided upon A
vocation. Eighty-tw- o
of the 91
companies represented will have
exhibits and all firms will have
printed material.
College seniors will have an opportunity to meet the representatives of the companies although
scheduled interviews will not be

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fTVir

Bonnet Shoivn

Dr. Douglas Swartz stands beside the Exhibit of the Month in the
Anthropology Museum. This month's exhibit is a war bonnet from
the Oglalla Sioux nation of South Dakota, which contains 30 eagle
feathers and two ermine pelts. War bonnets of this type were worn
on special occasions by honored men of the tribe. Each feather
represents a war exploit of the individual.

European History Scholar
Blazer tectures
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Thepeakerhasrnadeiwotrips

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BSU Sends

76 Students
To Meeting

Lances Queen,
Top Booths
To Be Named

Absentee Voting
Applications Due
Tomorrow is the final day to
apply for absentee ballots for the
Nov. 4 general election. Deputy
clerks in the registration office
said yesterday that applications
postmarked before midnight Saturday would be accepted.
Ballots must be voted and returned to the county clerk before
the close cf polls on election day.
Registration
books now are
clrsed and under state law no
other voters, may register until
alter the Nov. 4 election.

:

When the musicians of the
Danish National Orchestra arrived
at their hotel Tuesday afternoon.
one of them didn't make it past
the lobby. Instead, he found him- self ushered out the door, into a

HJpMA ftW- - ' '
The state BSU Choir, made up
of 100 voices from 17 different
BSU's in Kentucky, will sing during the different sessions.
Ftfjvifc:

Ashland Oil and Refining Co.;
Meter Co.; Baltimore fe
Ohio Railroad Co.; Boy Scouts of
America; Bureau of Ordnance;
Bureau of Reclamation; Bureau of
Ships; Bureau of Yards V Docks;
Burroughs Corp.; The Philip Carey
Manufacturing Co.; The Central
Pharjnacal Co.
The .Cincinnati Gas A Kleetrin
Co.; The Cincinnati Shaper Co.;
Cochran Foil Co.: Continental Oil
Co.; Convair; General t.lectric
Co.; Federal Chemical Co.; General Shoe Corp.; General Telephone Co. of Kentucky.
Girl Scouts of America; Goodyear Atomic Corp.; International
Business Machines Corp; Internil
Revenue Service: Investors Diver
Continued on Page 8
Bailey

Vandalism
Starts Action
At Donovan

tour":

whom he had never seen before.

He was visiting friends in Bos- For the average person, such a ton and met a ham lnere He be
reception might have seemed un-- 1 came so interested that he
even among traditionally turned to Denmark, boned ud on
hospitable Southerners. But these his radio theory and Morse code,
men were, not "average" and UWtrj assed his government examina- meeiing. arranged some nme ago, tion and received his license.
was brought about by their mutual
And, after the reception he rehobby, amateur radio.
ceived from Albers
when
he
These two "hams," as amateur arrived here, it's a safe bet that
radio operators call themselves, jarit0v is more convinced than
were Ralph Alters, chief engineer ever that hams are just about the
at the University's radio station friendliest 'hobbyists in the world.
WBKY, and lb Jarlkov, a percus- ,

re-usu-

al

j

Damage to Donovan Hall phones
prompted a meeting Monday night
between Dean Martin. Donald L.
Armstrong. Donovan Hall director,
and student floor representatives,
to study the problem.
Suggestions were advanced for
both short and long range solutions. It was suggested that doors
be-pon the individual phone
booths and b keyed only to thost
rooms whose residents would me
the phones. A more satisfactory,
but more expensive, solution wa
for phones to be installed in each

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sionist in the Danish orchestra.
Their acqualnzance and, finally,
their meeting grew out of a con-- j
tact made with each other by
amateur radio in September of
last jear.
Albers, whose callsign is W40EE,
was talking to Jarlkov, whose
Danish license Is OZ5KQ, and during the transoceanic conversation
Jarlkov mentioned that he played
in the Danish National Orchestra
and had been In Lexington in
1952. That was the group's first
appearance as part of the Concert
Series.

After the Danish ham said the
orchestra was going to tour the
United States again this year, Al- -

'

Yolii DdtlCC SorfvtV
An orfJinUalion

ut

mting 'for

studentS interested in forming a
club devoted to folk dancing
will be held in the women's gym
Monday night at 7 p. m.
The first part of the evening
will be a discussion of the
nature and scope of the activi-

room.
Proposals- will be discussed tn
meetings of ail the residents and
passed on to the dorm directors
and Dean Martin for considera-

ties and objectives that students
would like to have. European
and American folk ways, Indian
dancing, folk dancing and in-

tion.

In a random survey yesterday, it
was found that of 16 phones. 12
worked properly. One appeared

strumental music may be part
of the activities.

complete but did not function, and
three had been stripped of pur Us.
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SuKy SemlOff
for the
The SuKy send-of- f
Wildcats will leave from in front
of the SIB at 11:05 a.m. today.
The team leaves at 11:38 for the
Georgia game tomorrow.
Members of the Chamber of
Commerce from Lexington are
providing transportation for any
student wishing to participate.

rs

Corp.

bers made plans to meet him when
the group arrived in Lexington.
Wnile ham radlo ls a somewnat
;
tecnnical hobby most nams are
not engineers or people who make
tneir living in eiectronic.s. Jarlkov.
for lnstance saw his first radio
station during tne Danish or- -

By JIM HAMPTON

fThestrari952-conce- rt

to Russia, once before World War
.. I Jf
II and again in 1955. He is author
of a number of books, including
"Europe and Two World Wars"
and "The Hapsburg Monarchy."
His most recent work, "Western
Civilization Since the Middle of
the 17th Century," has just been
published.
Prof. May has lectured at several Austrian and German universities. He has studied in
Europe under Guggenheim and
ARTHUR MAY
Fulbright fellowships.
A graduate of Wesleyan University, May also studied at the
University cf Pennsylvania,
Columbia University and the University of Vienna. He has been on
the University of Rochester faculty
since 1925.
The 'Blazer Lecture Series,
iginated 11 years ago by Mr. and
Mrs. Paul G. Blazer of Ashland,
provides lectures in history and the
Over a thousand students from
social studies each year.
Kentucky will assemble today in
Bowling Green' for the annual
state Baptis; Student Union convention. The theme is "Disciplined
For Today's Demands."
Seventy-si- x
students will represent UK. Georgetown College is
the only other college sending
more students than UK.
The convention will be held at
the First Baptist Church of BowlFraternity and sorority carnival
booth winners and the Lanres ing Grjen. In connection with
queens will be announced at Lanoes Western Kentucky State College
and Bowling Green University.
Dance tomorrow at 8 p. m.
Students will travel' in cars and
Clyde Trask's orchestra will play
will stay over night in homes out
at the SUB ballroom dance.
Trophies are scheduled to go to in town or in the various dormiin the tories at Western Kentucky State
winners and runners-u- p
concessions and the queen and two College.
Speakers are Dr. Vernon B.
attendants.
Richardson, pastor. University
Lances grossed $1,150 from the
carnival. held Oct. 10 at Stoll Field. Baptist Church, Baltimore, Md.;
The profits from the carnival wiir Dr. Ralph T. Overman, chairman.
Special Training Division, Oak
go to scholarships.
Ridge, Tenn., and Dr. Gabe A.

Alhs-Chalme-

Danish Musician, UK Man
Meet Through Ham Radio

"To-Op- en

Prof. Arthur J. May, noted
scholar cf European history, will
be the first speaker in the University's Blazer Lecture Series
opening tonight.
Prof. May's address will be
given in conjunction with the
University's 35th annual" Education Conference. The historian will
speak on "Soviet Russia Revisited"
at 8 p.m. in Memorial Hall.

exhibits:
Aeronautical Chart and Information Center; Air Material Command; Air Reduction Sales Co ;
Manufacturing Co ;
American Air Filter Co ; Otis C.
Amis AsMHiates;
Armco Steel

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Behind The Scenes
The public only sees the actors in the world
of the stage, but rarely behind the scene action.
Students preparing for the Guignol Theatre
on
opening of "Caine Mutiny Court-MartiaNov. 3, are David Dick, program advertising ;
l"

Barbara Kohn, box office; Wayne Smith, hoo
manager; James Read, electrician; Jackie Mud-del- l,
stage manager; James Hall, publicity, and
Betty St Clair, costume mlitrevi. The production ruus through Nov. 8 at Guljnol Theatre.

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J -- Till: KENTIXKY KERNEL. Iiiiby. Oft.

lfT8

21.

)$(! Travel lliirrau
Svl Up For Students

Children ISVrds
To I5r Discussed

WKYT-T-V

Begins Series

Congress has recently
travel bureau to enable

Student

i

Boiled dogwood makes a musk-ra- t
Kentucky's state bird has no
trap more attractive.
political affiliations.
"It's a woman's world," a woman
Ponce Del'nn started the Floronce observed.
ida land rush.

a

Miss Flo Gould. Merrill-Palmer1d
"
School, will present a demonstra- or for hol.d .ys.
present Its
f(,r
weekends
TIip University will
lion at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow in
first show in n new television UK's Taylor Education nuildinR.
It has a iile of drivers and riders
f.rrif-tomorrow at 12:30 p.m.
will highlight the first annual which is available to any student
by the This
The srrie h
meet in? of the Kentucky Associa- - without charge,
Cincinnati Council on World Af- tion on Children Under Six.
Names of people who wish to
Channel 12.
fairs and WKRC-Tshare rides will be available as
point? to the Merrill-Pal-- !
Before
Cincinnati, and Is seen locally
mer School, Miss Gould was conn- - well as those who want riders.
WKYT-TV- ,
Channel 27.
over
Further information may be obColleges and universities in the selor to freshman and sophomore
women students at the University tained from the Student Congress
will prepare
Cincinnati aiea
on world affairs Copies, of Georgia and was instructor in Office, room 127 in the SUB. Inat. Iowa State
dividuals may leave their names
keyed as background to current child development
College, Ames, Iowa.
for the files there.
news situations. 'Back
major
Featured speaker at the meeting
of the series.
ground" is the title
UK's nroKram for Saturday will will be Dr. Hazel F. Gabbard. U. S.
he "The Cnited Nations and the Department of Education, who will
Df
ION
Individual." Mr. William Jenkins speak on "Building Good Programs
SCftffN
of I'K's Around the Needs and Interests of
Jr., assistant
Cditinuovs um 2 fM
Indonesian program will moderate the Children in the Group."
.1 panel discussion. Tanel particiDr. Gabbard also will speak at
October 24-2- 5
pants will be Mr. Duck Soo Lee, a dinner at 6:15 p.m. today in
SERGEANT YORK
from Korea, Mr. Jack Neal from room 2CG, Student Union Building.
Gary Cooper Walter Brennan
l'ngland, and Mr. Poo An Thio President Frank G. Dickey will
Also
from Indonesia. All three are stu-- . greet the group and Dr. Robert R.
who Martin, state superintendent, of
ilents from foreign countries
SANDS OF IWO JIMA
attend t'K.
education, will report on the progJohn Wayne John Agar
The program is being produced ress of private schools in Kenty Professor Stuart Hallock of the tucky.
Starting Sunday
Radio Arts Department.
Dr. Lyman V. Ginger, dean of
Color
HAPPY FEELING
the UK College of Education, will
Jergens
Debbie Reynolds Curt
speak on the importance of pre- Also
school education at 8:30 a.m. to-- j
morrow. Miss Vivian Burke, head
SIERRA BARON
Color
of the University School kinder-- ,
Rick Jason
Brian Keith
garten, is chairman of the con-- j
Cartoon
Lee Giles and Laura Prior, both ference.
seniors in radio arts, were the
recipients of the 1958 Kentifcky
Broadcasters Association scholar- .
ships. They were each presented
checks for $150 by Dean M. M.
'1

STUDOTS

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Orfe Youir

V,

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pro-pra-

ms

Class Rings

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MOW

;

Friday-Saturda-

rife

y,

Any Year
Back Dales Included
No Extra Charge

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Kennedy

tT-II- S

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Two HA Seniors
Gel Scholarships

ACROSS FROM SUB

j

all America sees the one that's truly nciv!

Now

White Tuesday afternoon.
The scholarships are awarded
annually by the KBA to two radio
arts majors who have done out- .'landing work in the department
and who plan to enter the field of
broadcasting.

Self Service
Book Store

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CLASSIFIED ADS

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"'vV'''''

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FOR SALE
TAPE RECORDER. "Revere." one yeir
c!d. like new, first $75.00 buys it. Cull
220ct.:it

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uW.VA

ATTENTION
htuili'nts atid wivi's that I
jobs with Life. Timo
.iLici
Sports Illustiiitccl. .plo.isi' ini'i't in
How in.m H.ill l(ii!if". W.i hiiiylon St
' H i. ai o.
p. in.
S;itui cl.i.v. Oct. 25 at
Tr.is s;ili's mot'thm is inpoi tiiiit. Try t.
bi' then-- . Anyone cl.--e who. is inlirtti J
Miiy iittenrl. John CVulcv.

All

intov-vit'we-

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"

IMPORT'S- - GIFJS

Southland Dr.
Have

you

Phone

met the NEBBISHES?

Like all '59 Chevies, the Impala Sport Sedan ha3 Safety Flate Glass all around.

Designed tor
the man who
has nothing,
and is going
nowhere
He is on every-

thing trom
co.isters to
stationery (for
people who
have nothing
to say).
Come in

they're temporarily in
behind in style.

stock-y- ears

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VT

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It's shaped to the neic American taste. It brings you more spaciousness and comfort with a new
ltody by Fisher. It has a tietc hind of finish. iS'ew bigger brakes. Vast new areas of visibility.
New lli'Thrift 6. Its new right down to the tires!

a Swingline

Stapler no

bigger than a
pack of gum!

Chevy's all new for the second

When you take the wheel, you
find Chevy's newness goes down
deep. A new steering ratio make3

ftraipht year! Here with a fresh

Slimline design that brings entirely new poise and proportion
to automobile styling. Inside the
new ,an(J roomier .Body hy Fi?her--you'lfind truly tasteiful elegance.
And you'll have clear seeing from
every seat. The new
windshield curves oveVista-Panoram-

ic

rheadwindows are bigger, too.

...

handling easier than ever. New
engineering gives
ZTrtZZclxr,: ' Unix v Stable
?su s
ride.' There's a new
C that goes and goes on a gallon
suspension

l

Hi-Thr-

.

ift

d
V8's. New
of gas.
and bigger brakes. Even tougher,
safer Tyrex cord tires.
Vim-packe-

iThere's still more! A new finish
that keeps its shine without waxing or polishing for up to three
years. Impressive new Impals
models. Wonderful new wagons
Iric7tfcttrtg"one with a fear-facing rear seat. And, with all that's
new, you'll find those fine Chevrolet virtues of economy anr
practicality. Stop in now and see
the '59 Chevrolet.
-'

in

SWINuLINt "TOT'
Millions now in use.

I

UnconJi-tionall-

y

n

guarriicej. Makes book
covers, fastens papers, arts anJ
crafts, mends, tacks, etc. Avail
able at your college bookstore.
SWINCUNE

KK"

Cb" Slop!" $1.29
'

10N3

rsfUSL- YOU. INC.
ClTf.

N. V..

see your local authorized Chevrolet dealer for quick

appraisal-ea- rly

delivery!

* Til!. KIM

Hazard Editor Speaks Today
Pi

,

.

,

Health Laboratory U.mtoiv He
is a member of the group's committee that will scire t the rtvipient
of a thousand dollar research
award in methodology.
The second is a meeting of the
American Public Health Organization. Dr.' Scherago is chairman
of the liaison committee of the
ZETA RET A TAU PLEIXIESJ
The pledge class of Zeta Beta laboratory section of the organiTau recently elected Shclton H. zation and will give a lecture as
Mann as president. Other officers one of the invited speakers- at
are Vice President Neil F. Wasser-man- this meeting.
Secretary Donald S. Drey-fus- s;
Treasurer Alec J. Spielberg,
and Sergeant-at-arm- s
Sidney
-

n;

LUNCHEON

the

The Department of Social Work Cohen
will sponsor a luncheon for faculty
n t Donovan Hall at 12 noon. Mon- Y.MCA ELECTS OFFICERS
day. Charles M. Sylvester of the; The UK Freshman YMCA
al
of the old age and ted officers at its regular meeting,
staff
f urvivor's insurance
program will 7 p. m. Monday.
They were Julian Heron, preste the guest speaker.
ident; John Williams, vice
dent; Tom Cherry,
LUTHERAN PICNIC
urer. and Dick Thomas, social
The Lutheran Student
chairman.
will hold its annual fall picnic
Sunday. Rides will be provided in
PHARMACY SENIORS
of Kinkead and Holmes'
Scmor cIass officcrs in the Co1"
halls and the Alpha Xi Delta
Kiority house at 0:45 a.m. All lege l Prmacy were elected
intrrpstpH
stnHpnt
mil P.1 vin JCSterdaj
Those elected were Howard RalsLuhlig at
ton, president; Bob Schrier, vice
president; Jim Arnold, secretary;
PI TAU SIGMA PLEDGES
Lloyd
treasurer,
and
Pledges were picked Tuesday for Charles Tackett.
Cheatham, sergeant at
arms.

Kl KM

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Presents

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The
Clefmen

flV

PLAN YOUR PARTIES NOW

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL

or
Dancing Friday and Saturday from 9 'Til 12
2-41-

$1 PER COUPLE

"SADDLE AND SPUR"
GEORGETOWN ROAD

PHONE 4 5839

elec-ifgion-

"In Cor"

ELECTRIC

HEATERS

i

TONIGHT AND SATURDAY
First Area Showings!
Randolph Scott Craig Stevens
In Color

"Buchanan Rides Alone"
And

"Kill Her Gently"
(Escaped Cons With Hostage!)

;

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South On U.S. 27
Triple Bill
FRIDAY

SATURDAY

&

October

TONIGHT AND SATURDAY
Open 6 p.m.
Begins 7 p.m.
Robert Taylor Richard Widmark
Patricia Owens
In Color

"The

Marriage is a state of bliss. So
is ignorance.
We need more thinkers today, a
Univac once said.
It's not that men don't under-- 1
stand women. It's just thU some- times they don't like what they
hear.

Short Drive

A

24-2- 5

Jake Wade"

Law and

First Run

frem

Brian Keith

Zimbnlist, Jr.

"Violent Road"
COMING SUNDAY!
The Book! The Place! The People!

"Peyton Place"

In Scope
B.

Stanwyck

B.

Sullivan

"FORTY GUNS"
Also

2J

sot," .
Robert

4

.

mi

Vyginia LEITH

NOW!

KINTUdOr

Vv

IV

TUB

nRBnninrj
QnimaScopE

Now Showing
rARTHUR

26-2-

;

J

7

tit

SO GREAT TOGETHER t

TIES

ANY NIGHT.

PHONE FOR INFORMATION

ON THE PARIS PIKE

tAttil intAxMi

iWH

HUO

JH

DANCE TONIGHT
-- NP-jTl

TO THE MUSIC OF

Jackie Hodgkin

t

INGRID

GRANT

BERGMAN

f
I

h7

VWRMR

.

Look

CECIL PARKER
riCIUKt

BROS.

C.

Jergens
I

Ploy'BANKO' Tuesday
S.

October

28-29--

OM

The House Rockers

v,'vi

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,

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your setting cards
mailiss. g levy dys.-

ffoir

Also
Bob Mitchum

U

pa n n

l

CSfOT
CALVERT

UMUIS

Dance Tomorrow Night

Walt Disney's "Paul Bunyan" Cartoon
and "Switzerland" Featurett

ADDED!

..A

TUES.-WED.-THUR-

I,

"DM

VUI MIL

CARY

A

OirecM

Eisim

O'CONNIll

MONDAY

&

October

PHYLLIS

BEAUTIFUL CASINO AND CLUD
HOUSE ARE AVAILADLE FOR PRIVATE PAR-

And His Collegiate All Stars

SUNDAY

I

UNO
THE

COLOR by DE LUXE

Plus

'Ll

JoYLANDiS

John Wayne

--

JX
tI

Jeffrey HUNTFR
. Joanne WOODWARD

WAGNER

HXtNOTOM

.

..

ira

the

-

If you cannct keep the appointment notify

30

KIM

THE.KEMTUCKIAN immediately.

NOYAK
JEFF

rrHl, CHANDLER

Color and Scope
Mel Ferrer

"FRAULEIN"

s-:S

f

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Just

-,-

IS.

'Saddle & Spur

.

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SOCIAL WORK

!

en-21-

WESTMINSTER PICNIC
The Westminster Fellowship will
have a picnic this afternoon at the
Lloyd Mayhem farm. Cars will be
leaving from the Westminster
House at 3:45 and 5:30 p.m. Interested parties may call
for reservations.

i;s

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Dr. M :n s. ;.. ....
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!
(iep.ntir.t
l,. li t ioiii,
t
lh"
will atletul tu n..:ni,.
u St.
Lo,ii tin.-- , comir.e
k. One is a
ccnfneiue of the M.ite Public

ru-h- e
Tan Sienu. rm lunii ,
incrrln honorary, at the wcrkly
1
mretinn of the mechanical
gim-e- i
in nsrmbl.v.
' The pledges nrc It. H. Ciatlin. S
R. Halbert, Raymond Hoskins. s.
P. Smith. O. T. Williams. C. L.
.White. P. E. Fhillips, R. I).
Tramble.
Initiation will take place at u
banquet In the Lafayette Hotel on
Nov. 12. Dr. Thomas Roberts of
the University geology department
will speak on Alaska.

Tied W. Luicart Jr.. editor of
H.7ard Herald, will spoak on
'Community Publishers" in room
of the Journalism Building at
3 p.m. today.
A 1S50 UK Journalism graduate,
1 uigart also has edited the Whites- lurg Mountain Eagle and the
Woodford Sun. He spent four years
In the U. S. Air Force as a psy- chological warfare officer.

l ( KV

Greeks and Seniors who have not signed up for their sifting
SIGN UP NOW in room 210 Journalism Building, or call University extension 2273.

* The Kentucky Kernel
Entnrd

1e Tof

f ublifched

University of Kfniicky
ntuy rrgular whmil mutter
at tonl U
Leinntn.
th

Office at
lour timci a

A SCHOOL

SIX DOLLARS

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chi-

Ad

f.f March

holidays and

eatm.

Chief Sports Editor

Ann Roberts, Society Editor
Norman McMullin, Advertising Manager
AiKLrr, Business Manager
John Mitchell, Staff Thotographcr
Marilyn Lyver and Judy Fennebakcr, Troofreadcrt
FRIDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Bill

Hammons, Editor

Scottie Hflt

)lN Harrison, Associate Editor

UK-U.of-

Recently the editor of University of
Louisville's Cardinal asked us if we
believed UK should schedule U. of L.
in basketball. He's in favor of siuh
a game. Though it probably 'would
be a good contest, we are opposed
to scheduling it.
The trouble is that, as years went
on, a UK-U- . of L. rivalry would probably develop into too good a contest,
grasping the imagination of student
and especially adult fans throughout
-- fans - air-gthe
surprisingly involved in the destinies of their favorite teams and
their rivals.
For example, according to Athletic
Director liernie Shively, UK and
Centre had quite a football rivalry
going in the twenties, the years when
Centre was enough of a football
power to gain national attention.
"The Praying Colonels" startled the
."nation" one year by beating HarvardAlter 1920, UK cut off football
relations w ith Centre. The reason
was that fans let the rivalry influence
their attitude toward the schools in
general. Mr. Shively says that Centre
alums, seeing their alma mater losing
,
talked
to UK by such scores as
against the University whenever the
subject was brought up. Their in- --

state.-Sometimes-th-

Sports Editor

Game Opposed

L.

et

ese

33-0-

fluence even carried to the legislature,
where appropriations are said to have
been juggled in relation to legislators' opinions of the athletic teams
of the University.
Further back in UK athletic history,
there were games with Transvlvania
in football. This rivalry reached the
point where Main Street became the
boundary line between two hostile
camps. A UK student who went north
of the line did so at risk of being hit
--

with

a-

-

by a Transy

brick-thro- wn

loyalist.
Seeing the el feet that overemphasis
of sports by the fans could have, UK

playing other .Kentucky
schools in football. Such overemphasis is impossible to avoid if the
games are once scheduled and played.
stopped

schools in basketball up until 1911 such minor
teams as Georgetown and Berea. But
there havenT been any contests with
basketball powers like Western, Eastern and U. of L., except in national
UK played

in-sta-

Economic Upturn

3, 1879.

ef

Larry Van Hoosr,

Aran Eppf.bson, Chief News Editor

rMT

yr rxirit
YEAR

dunna

wr--

inlrr tl

Briclitcr Outlook

A

te

tournaments.
We think the University now has a
minimum of hostility arising from the
games it plays in major sports. We
can't see the wisdom of bringing back
the days of bitterness to UK clue to
the way a ball bounces.

HOI'

SPRINC.S.

V.i.

(V)-SuxCi-

Aiy

o( Commerce Weeks lias predicted the
country will pass the 450 billion dollar
production r.uc before New Year's Day
and will move on to set new production records in 95..
1

Weeks gave reporters his appraisal
alter a lengthy dosed conference with
government economic officials and the
nearly 100 top orjoration heads who
comprise the Commerce Department's
Ihisiness Advisory Council.
Reporters were told that the great
prconcleraTue of the industrialists who
discussion
took part in the round-robiheld the view that
of business prosjetts
the recovering economy will continue its
upsurge at least for the next six months.
'J can tell you one thing the boys arc
lecling a lot better than they did six.
months ago," Weeks grinned.
The secj clary gave newsmen a briefing on the day's discussion, with help
Irom T. V. llouser, chairman of the
council's lxonomit Policy 'Committee,
llouser is a director and former board
chaiimau of Sears, Roebuck and Co.
Although neither Weeks nor llouser
so informed reporters, it was learned that
Houser's committee predicted that the
nation's total production may reach a
ISO billion dollars a year rate or more
by next summer.
This compares with a rate of less than
Y2C) billion dollars at the low point of
the recession early this year and an
estimate of 110 billion dollars
in the
quarter.
llouser and Weeks said the industrialists expect a reasonable price stability
for the next several months. The job of
un-ollici- al

July-Septembe-

Kernels:
After attending the funeral services
for a business friend, a man had
planned to hurry back to his office,
but his car got wedged in behind the
hearse. He followed sedately in line
toward the cemetery until he came to
an intersection, where he ducked off
and away.
About a half mile further on he
mirror, that
noticed, in the rear-viethe entire funeral parade was still
tagging along behind him.
Seized witlf an understandable panic, he stepped on the gas, skidded
w

around a turn, parked off the road
and pretended he was an utter stranger changing a tire. The procession
drove mournfully past and disappeared clown the wrong road w here,
he's never had the nerve to inquire.
The Raiders Digest
0

"What did you operate on that man
lor?" asked the young medical

r

RtniinfngntfationrTancTOTTe7k
labor and government do a proper job.
"Believing as I do that inflation is
wage-pricunreasonable
by
caused
said, "I believe that we
pushes," Weeks
can go along in pretty stable shape if
we can get reasonable wage contract
settlements like those just concluded in
the auto industry."
Weeks predicted that unemployment
added,

would be reduced by another 500.000 to
600,000 this month, rouhlv approim.it-in- g
the September absorption of jobless
workers.
There were 4,100,000 unemployed last
month, and the total has averaged about
five million during the first nine mouths
of this year.

if industry,

e

"Two hundred dollars.
"1 mean what did he have?"
"Two hunched dollars," the surgeon
replied. Union County Advocate

... omen
W
like gongs.

.
..
ii
oeaicn icguuuiy,
snouiet ioe i
1

Oscar Wilde.

Tlve dullard's envy of brilliant men
is always assuaged by one suspicion
that they will come to a bad end.
Six Max Beerbohm.

The Chinese Opinion Of The United States
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The recent
crisis in the Far East has brought
the United States face to face with
a cold war foe that virtually defies
western understanding. It's massive
Red China, whose rulers exercise
control over the very thoughts of
(i50 million people. Benedicto S.
David, a Marquette-trainec-l
reporter
for the Manila Times, recently returned from 21 days behind., the
Bamboo Curtain where American re-porters are banned. Here is his report.)
By BENEDICTO

S. DAVID
Manila Timet Reporter
Written Far The Associated Press

The average young Chinese thinks

'

of the United, States as a weak but
imperialistic nation, a sort of "pajer
tiger" more to be ridiculed than
".feared.
He firmly believes American soldiers use germ bombs and- execute
helpless wome.n and children and
that the American people are to be
pitied for being oppressed by a cor-nigovernment, bent on aggression.
He h is no opportunity to think or
believe an) thing else. Those who
know better refuse to correct the
impression.
To the Chinese, the very idea of a
woild djiletent Irom the one painted
for him by his Communist lulcis is
fantastic. There is simply no place
for truth to make a start.
lively bit of news led to G50 mil
-

pt

lion Chinese people comes through
the Hsinhua or Xew China News
agency. Every newspaper and magazine is published only with the imprimatur of the Peiping government.
To doubt is to be reactionary and
the fear of being tagged a reactionary
is much greater than the fear of being
called a liar or a hypocrite.
During our
tour of the key
industrial cities of Wuhan, Anshan,
21-da-

y

Mukden, Peiping and Shanghai our
-- newsmen
experiparty
enced, to a limited extent, the fear
of the completely helpless.
Since there is no civil or criminal
cexle, the average Chinese does not
know exactly how far he can go before he is accused of crime or "reactionary tendencies." The expression
-of-- Filipino

of dissatisfaction- - wight- - be - allowed
oive.day, punishable by imprisonment
the next and even by death the day

after.
It is not strange, then, that lies
about the United States flourish unmolested.

feeling being
generated constantly by press, radio,
posteis, operas, movies and even
drawings for children reached its
logical peak in mass demonstrations
staged all over China during the
Middle East crisis demanding the
withdrawal ol Ameiicah troops from
Lebanon.
We saw demonstrations in Canton

The

Anti-America- n

millions of

and Peiping involving
banner-waving-

slogan-shoutin-

and

,

Chinese

drum-beatin- g

gong
of all

ages.

The Peiping demonstrations lasted
and three nights without
pause. They were supposedly "spontaneous" but appeared
even to such details as loudspeakers
strung out along the "Street of Eternal Peace," the main street of the
Communist capital.
- stations and
- Emergency - first-aitemporary comfort stations were set
up by the time the first demonstrators
around
and half-raPeiping voicing protests against what
the Chinese press' called "armed, imperialistic and unjustified aggression" on the part of the U. S. and
Britain..
Practically all business in Peiping
stopped during three days. Oi l ic es,
factories and stores were closed to
allow employees to participate in the
mammoth rallies.
"Down with America" posteis and
pictures ol alleged American "atrocities and war climes" are found all
over China. Statements from the lew
American turn-coatin China are
given piominence and are taken as
gospel by the average Chinese.
The pictuie of the United Spues
as presented in China is one ol almost
complete tonuption.
Posteis,
periodicals and other
three

das

well-organize-

d

half-walke-

n

d

s

d

means of mass communication constantly harp on such things as race

prejudice, "exploitation" ol the working class by the capitalist class, immorality, and juvenile delinquency.
Our guides and interpreters kept
drawing distinctions between the
U. S. government and its people.
They believe there is an almost complete separation between the two.
Such faMastic notions as the invasion of China by the United States,
the use of germ bonjbs on China
proper, the execution of helpless
women and children by American
soldiers are accepted as "fact" by the
ordinary Chinese.
At the '"Workers' Cultural Palace"
in Peiping there is an entite row of
glass cases devoted to pictures of
"American war crimes and atrocities
committed during the Korean War:""
Even pitiful cases of frostbite
treated by American doctors in Korea
have been used to criticize the United
States. Captions read: "Ameiican doctors could have saved t