xt7c599z157v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7c599z157v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581014  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 14, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 14, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7c599z157v section xt7c599z157v A

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Dull Moments

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There Were No
At The Lances Carnival Friday Night At Sloll Fiehl
Results Of The Competition Will Be Released At The Lances Dance October 25

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1

'Coal' Issue Still Smoking

State Official Calls
Kernel Story 'Unfair'
State Finance Commissioner Orba F. Taylor has said the
Kernel's news story and editorial concerning the Medical Volume L
Center's
heating plant gave "unfair conclusions
and incorrect facts."
coal-burnin- g

Traylor's comments were made
in a letter to Jim Hampton, Kernel
editor-in-chie- f.
The articles, both
based on an analysis of potential
fuels for the plant made by
Ellerbe and Co., project consultants, were published Oct. 9. Considerable controversy arose after
the story was picked up by other
newspapers.
The commissioner's letter said
the Ellerbe report was inaccurate
in estimating both initial installation and operational costs. The report said
equipment
could be installed at a saving of
$370,000 ever
equipment. It also showed fuel costs
would be $27,950 a year less for
gas than for coal.
In refuting these figures, the
commissioner's letter said Ellerbe
and Co. has had little experience
with coal power plant installations.
"Furthermore,"
the letter continued, "fcr Ellerbe and Co. to use
retail costs of coal when the state
Division cf Purchases buys in bulk
and compare such cost with not
the most expensive gas or to compare the most elaborate coal installation to relatively cheaper gas
installations is to present an inaccurate report."
According to Traylor, the coal
equipment will cost $130,000 more
system but coal
than a
operating costs will be $42,000 per
year less. This, he said, will amortize the additional construction
cost In about three and one-ha- lf
years.
In reference to the Kernel's editorial cartoon, "Where Coal Burns,
There's Smoke," the letter stated:
"On the possibility of smoke
becoming a nuisance, this plant
will be equipped with the' most
modern and elaborate
and firing equipment which is
designed to control the smoke
problecbr It Is thought 'that ' this
will be much more desirable than
the 'stub-stac- k'
which had been
designed by Ellerbe f or .
d
boilers. It was thought that the
fas-power-

ed

coal-burni-

gas-elect-

ng

ric

coal-handli-

"

ng

gas-fire-

coal storage has been solved
through arrangements with the
National Coal Institute and railroad lines serving Lexington.
"Instead of fleets of trucks as
depicted by your cartoon," it said,
"no more than three or four trucks
will be utilized, and all will be
used on the return trip to haul
ashes."
The letter also mentioned that
the Ellerbe design, calling for gas-firboilers, did not allow for
conversion to coal in event of national emergency or gas shortage.
It said the state thought it imperative that not only the cheapest
but the most stable fuel be chosen
in case of national emergency.
' A University official said Saturday that the recommendation to
use gas, based on the figures in
the Ellerbe reports was made to
the state after considering costs,
storage difficulties and possible
smoke and soot problems. This
recommendation was submitted to
Prof. James W. Martin, then commissioner of finance. Martin deequipcided to use
ment.

k.'

coal-burni-

ng

Avards Given
To 45 Cadets
Wreaths of Academic Achievement were given to the top ten
percent of students in military
science,

Based upon military science
grades earned through the school
year
the awards were
given to the upper ten students
of military science I, II, III.
Receiving the award in mili1957-195-

8.

tary science

III

were

John

A.

II. Hanson, Ben A. Johnson, William D. Lambert and James L.
Sowell.
The award was given military
science II cadets Donald It. "Neel.

fumes to

Hix-so- n,

:

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Lexington, Ky., Tuesday, Octolcr

11. 1933

Number

13

Expansion To Add
M ore Parking Areas
By BILL BLAKEMAN

ed

might hare allowed
Frank A. Schollett. Eugene B.
te drawn into the
Chappell R, Wilson, Smith
system in the hos- Staten,
Kenneth R.
pital and other buildings ' and D. Broadbent,D. Guy. David Hume
Sammie
create a problem.
and Cornelius. WSulier Jr.
"Already the University M servMilitary science I cadets receiviced by coal power plants," the
award were Richard H.
letter continued, "and smoke has ing the
Armstrong. William D. Arnett,
'stub-stac-

KIE IE HIE IL

been no problem. The new Baptist
A. Arnold. Walter L.
Hospital uses Coal, and this U in Nicholas
Graham E. Beard.
the same area. It depends on how Arrington. Brown, Troy L,
Michael W.
the power plants are operated."
on Pace 2
The letter said the' problem, of
Bur-Continu-

ed

The master plan forJUK expan
sion calls for 4,891 parking spaces
on campus to accommodate the
increasing number of automobiles
driven to school by students.
Vice President Peterson said the
University is moving as fast as is
consistent with economic condi-

to provide more parking
spaces. He said that there are
numerous plans underway, but
they have not yet materialized
tions

Dan Millott
Is Elected
SP Chairman
The Students' Party elected Dan
Millott as its chairman at the
party's fall election.
Millott served as SP from January of 1957 until April of this
year when he resigned his position. His resignation came after
an unsuccessful bid for the party's
nomination for SC president.
Jim Heil. Millott's successor
last April did not accept another
nomination. Millott was elected
by acclamation.
e,
Other officers included Jack
vice chairman; Carolyn
Jones, secretary, and Bob Wain-scot- t,
treasurer.
Wainscott is presently serving
as JSC. Secxetarof Strides Aifsiw.
The election of Millott was the
fourth time the SP elected him
to the post. He is presently the
Tuesday editor of the Kernel. He
also writes a column for the paper
which appears on Thursday, but
the future of this column is in
doubt.
The column, "On The Spot,"
deals mostly with campus affairs
and since the SP chairmanship is
partisan. Millott has said he may
drop the column.
The newly elected chairman expressed gratification to the party
and added. "I hope the party's
trust in my past service will be
vindicated in the coming months."
Mc-Ghe-

.

enough for an announcement to
be made.
During the summer 118 parking
spaces were added to existing
spaces to bring the total spaces
on the campus to 1.366. New
spaces were added behind the
Pharmacy Building, and at the
north end of the Fine Arts
Building.
Existing spaces were lengthened
by one and one-ha- lf
feet and the
diagonals were widened to facili- tate parking of newer and larger
cars.
To create more parking space
the yellow lines were shortened to
the minimum required for fire
and pedestrian safety.
A new
parking lot will be
opened within the next few weeks.
The lot will be across from the
Dairy Products Building and on
the west side of Rose St.
By next summer 267 parking
spaces will be available due to
the removal of houses from Col50-c- ar

lege View.
Leslie L. Martin," dean of
said there will be between
and 1,800 cars registered by
dents during the school

men,
1.500
stu-

year.
figures are not an all time
These
high as this was reached in 1948-4- 9
when 2,800 cars were registered.
Dean Martin reported the increasing number of automobiles
operated by students has made
strict traffic enforcement a neces- v.....'.. " '
sity. ,'v .
average of $2,000 la collecAn
ted each year for parking violations and $6,000 is received each
year from the issuance of parking
permits.
This money is used to run the
lots and to maintain traffic control. Any money left over at the
end of the year is placed in
scholarship funds.

GUIDE MEETING
meeting

of all Welcome
will be held on
Week
Wednesday at 4 p. m. in. the
SocUl Room of the SUB.
A

guides

ATTENTION:
All organizations who have not

purrhaied a page in the

1959

Krntuckian. please do ' so immediately. If you are interested
n
contract come to the
Journalism Bldg. Room 219.
This must be done right away..

I

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IvVl.

To UK Faculty
Thirty-thre- e
newly elected members were Introduced at the first
tail meeting of the Univrslt
Faculty in the Assembly room of
Lafferty Hall yesterday afternoon.
The University Faculty is a representative body that meets regularly on the . second Monday ol
each month.
Newly elected members were th
following:
From the College of Arts and
Sciences Robert J. Buck. Bernard
Fitzgerald. Robert D. Jacobs. Nlel
Plummer. Paul K. Whitaker. Sidney J. Kaplan, Charles E. Snow,
Herbert N. Drennon. John Ball.
James A. Shear, Louis Boyartky,
John M. Carpenter, Morris Scher-ag- o,
Edward L. Newbury, Lee W.
Olldart and Thomas G. Roberts.

--

riVur'the

lture

Don

Schneider,

College of "AgricuR. Jacobson. O. W.
Dewey O. Steele. O.

T. Brown. A. J. Brown.
From Home Economics

Helea
Marshall.
From the College of Engineering D. KL Blythe. R.' S. Mateer,
C. B. Wooldridge, H. A. Roman-owi- ti.
From the College of Law Will-bu- rt
D. Ham.
From the College of Education
Harold Blnkley. Carsle Hammonds.
From the College of Commerce
Luclan II. Carter, Vergil L. Chris-

tian Jr.
From the College of Pharmacy
Harry Smith and Arthur Qlasser.

* Till". KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tncvl.iy.

U

)l.

II,

1958

ODK

UK Thoroughbred Debates

Aiilicttions

ArpHratinn for lnoinhr rsliip
in Omlcrnn Drlt.i Kapp.i, na16-1- 8
tional mm' leadership honorary, n.ust he Mi'imittrd by toState, Indiana, South Carolina,' morrow at nonn. forms should
Vnndcrbilt, Mississippi Southern. he pirkrd up at the Dean of
Dheaton, Wisconsin State (Eau Men's office and rrtnrnrd there.
Senior or second semester junClaire , and UK.
Mantling
The University will be repre- - ior men with3.0overall eligible to
are
of at Ipast
fentf d by Tex Fitzgerald. Hichard apply.
Roberts, Marietta Foraker. Oeri
Dcnbo, Deno Curris. and Ronald
Polly. Th teams are coached by
Dr. Gifford Blyton.
A complete schedule of all debates will be available Thursday
Six students in the UK College
in the foyer of the Fine Arts
of Agriculture and Home EcoBuilding.
nomics have been awarded $100
scholarships by the state dairy
industry to study dairy manufacturing and production in the Department of Animal Industry.
The scholarships, furnished by
various dairy concerns and by the
American Daiiy Association of
Kentucky, were initiated in 1956.
They provide $100 each for the fall
semester and an additional $100
A former
basket- in the spring.
ball player and a member of the
Winners this year are Kenneth
1948 Olympic basketball team will
Evans, Flemingsburg; Kenneth
be one of the speakers during a
Somerset; Dewane Bishop,
youth revival at Immanuel Bap- Whitis.
Springfield; Aubrey Etherington,
tist Church Oct.
Lawrcnceburg;
Garnett Crask,
Dr. Jackie Robinson played on Lawrenceburg; and Carl Caudiil,
Olympic team Morehead.
the Rupp-coachand had Wah Wah Jones, Kenny
Rollins and other members of the
UK. first five as teammates. At
the present time, Dr. Robinson Is
pastor of the First Baptist Church
of Augusta, Georgia.
Dr. Duke McCall, president of
the Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary in Louisville, will be the
speaker at the meeting Oct.
Edward Clark, music director of
the First Baptist Church, Owens- boro, will lead the singing during

Scheduled For Oct.
Krnlucky

nnnual

Tho first
'Ihcrmifchbrrd

Debate

Tourna-

Sixment will be held Oct.
teen colliers and universities arc
1.1-1-

to debate

the

8.

proposition

D:

That the further

velopment

de-

nuclear weapons
. of
be prohitfifed by an Inter-

national agreement.
The first round of debates

Is

scheduled to begin Thursday at
4 p. m. The following schools are
expected to attend: Bellarmine,
Centre, Dartmouth, David Lipscomb. Dennison, Kent State. Ohio

.

Awards

Continued from Tage

chett, Joseph'

1

George
A. Duncan, James P. Edwards.
John B. Farra, Abe R. Fosson,
William E. Gott, John P. Green,
Jess M. Garkey, Ralph G. Hart,
James P. Hill. Gary T. Lester,
Franklin D. Master, John S. Owen,
James A. Parrot, Ronald H. Reed,
Paul R. Roberson. Jimmy D. Robinson, Frederick Rosenberg, Frank
L. Rothfuss, Edward P. Smith,
Gerald F. Strugeon, Edwin C.
Thomas and Chester J. Whitaker.
W. Cooksey,

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Six Ag Students
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The first Shirt Satellite is finally a reality ! Just yesterday,
during tlu ir lunch hour, Van

The case of the typing paper
that erased without a trace

Shirt. This clever device will
constantly send back electronic reports on the condition
of the collar, so, for 1200 years,
we earthlings will have absolute proof that the soft collar
on Van Heusen Shirts won't

Hcusen scientists launched a
Van Ht'Uen Century Shirt
into t he strut ophere. It 's now
. circling t heeart h lSO.OOtfmiles
up. in an orbit o larp that a
wrinkle . . . ever. Should you
grown mau couldn't walk it,
ever have any doubts, just
"even in a whole day! Travtl-"a- n
drop in to the Van Heusen
he U ct"jhiile.s per ""ollice, and listen to the reports
hour, it is expcled thr.t tho
coming back from the Shirt
Van Hri;e;i Century Shirt:
Satellite.
Saulliu- will ivmah up there
Or.o more thi.rr - the Van
in the v.w b"y,Kd Tor at
Hei!sc-Century Shirt SatelJL'OO .wars. And, v.Itli luck,
lite will dropbae'; to the earth
n;ayH iL'ol.
in t he spring of .'51 ."7 (possibly
"But," you will a!:, "what
31 5S) and you're ail invited to
value will tho Shirt Satellite
the return party! If, in the
have for science?" "Jim this,
meantime you want to see

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Van Heusen physicists have
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attached an electronic
Yrinkle-ri?.tr-t- o

tht eclbr

the Van. Heusen Century

Shirt, you can at your campus
haberdashery. He has them
in 5 collar styles, in white,
stripes and colors. $4 & $5.
At better stores everywhere
or write: Phillips-Va- n
Heusen
Corporatrem,- 417 'Fifth Aftr.,"
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* 3

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Postcard Collection
A Library Attraction

Maih Wvixd
Sets Changes
In 'reaching

GIURGEVICH

SHOE

jacket currs. bands

ZIPPER REPAIR
SHOE ACCESSORIES

The Margaret I.. King Library obtain valuable information fur
Dr. J.ur.rs C. Fave. head of the
an unusual collection of 'research papers fnm Miss Tuttles
by Mies Margaret collection. which contains cards Mathematics and Astronomy
started
Tuttle. head of departmental and dating back to 1930 and possibly partment, was puf st speaker at the
recent meeting of the Upper
collegiate libraries.
earlier.
Cumberland Division of the KenThe collection was started in
People from all over the count reOctober. 1932. and was modeled contribute to the collection, and tucky Education Association.
The purpose of the meeting was
,lt.er a collection in the St. Louis occasionally when she has duplito organize mathematics teachers
Library.
cates of a card. Miss Tuttle will
in that area. Dr. Eaves' topic was
That year she received over trade with other collectors.
"The Mathematics Program in
(0,700 cards, and now averages as
All cards, whether they are reKentucky Schools."
,infny as 8,000 In one year. At cent or old. postmarked or
unused,
present the collection consists of are
In his speech, Dr. Eaves outwelcomed and carefully filed
(77.208 cards from every state in
lined probable changes in elc-- i
and preserved for posterity.
the union, and about 60 foreign
mentary and secondary school
countries.
mathematics and pointed out the
In addition to ordinary card"?
need for high school math teach--'er- a
Miss Tuttle also has cards made
to prepare themselves for.
j teaching.
Xiom wood, aluminum,
&taU&UCi. analytic
leather,!
copper, and French embroidery.
;
cuius and some of the concepts of
The postcards are filed accord- modern mathematics.
.
i
ing to state, country or category,
Miss Tuttle has over 3,000
and
from Kentucky alone. Two inter- csting pictures are of the UK foot- Several University students atball teams of 1909 and 1910.
tended a leadership conference at
Besides providing an interesting
hobby, postcards are often used Camp Daniel Boone sponsored by
for information
on
historical the Kentucky Ecumenical Student
events of bygone eras as well as Conference last weekend.
Dr. Robert Nelson of Vander-bi- jt
dress and customs of earlier
University was the principal
1 oiiod-:spt aker. He is the author of sevEtutfonts and professors often
eral bi(oks on the subject of university students and Christian
M(!ve
WORLD
faith.
"Ecumenical
StuArithmetic
Travel with
dent, Christianity, College
.- ?"
1
Unbelievable Low Cost v.s the theme for this convocation which began at G p.m. Friday
and ended at noon Sunday.
About GO students representing
60 Doy JZlm ' $645
religious groups from campuses
all over the state attended the
conference according to Anne
43-6- 5
0oy. jsL.
$78 Marie Salgat, UK PWCA director.
Many foyri indud
co'cg crtdit.
Miss Salgat, John King. Westt
ript to Maxico minster Fellowship sponsor; NewAlio
$169 up. South America $699 up,
Hawaii Stud Tour $349 up and ton Fowler, Disciple Student FelMinor Repair Frf
ll
NI
Around th World $1798 up lowship sponsor; and ten
I
students
Across from Memorial
I
Atk Your Travel Agent
Hall On S. Limestone
representing all major protestant
if I
545 5th Ave..
26Jh (C
organizations attended the conNew York 17
tear
ference as UK representatives.
one tmvu, inc.
MU2 6544

repair
KEYS MADE

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Incorporated

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BUT TODAYS L&M GIVES

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hundred points in a
basketball game by one
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couldn't be done. But in
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wrote the record books

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scoring feats, including a
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Change to L'M and get 'em both. Such an unproved filter and more taste! Better
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* On The Road

The Kentucky Kernel
Entered

Univirmiy of Kim i cry
I.fincn, Krntuly M(jul.irnml rl;ii mttr nnt
hIkmiI
rar Mi'1t
a w(k during
n

th Fot Olficr t
FuUislit J lour timrt

t

WASH INCHON
r

the

A SCHOOL

SIX DOLLARS

Jim Hampton,

Editor-ln-Clii-

Vo-X-

M.trch 1, 1879.

-W

-

x.im.

t

YEAR

cf

Larky Van IIoose, CiV Sports Editor
AmT ErnnsoN, CWc iVu Ecifor
Ann Roberts, Society Editor
Fkpry Ashley, Business Manager
Norman McMullin, AJtcrfing Manager
John Mitchell, Sfo Thotographcr
Marilyn Lyvcrs and Judy Fcnnebaker, Proofreaders
TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF -

Aike'Reddinc, Associate Editor

Dan Millott, Editor

Pacl Scott,

Sports Editor

Student Insurance Plan
Last week the Student Congress
began steps which could lead "to a
big welfare improvement on our
ampus. The governing bcxly .has
taken initial steps in the formulation
of a student insurance plan.
We express a great respect for this
idea as i( JSas all indications of being
a step forward.
The idea behind this plan is to
provide insurant e coverage for students not only while they arc on
campus, but traveling to and from
the campus as well.
The final plan which" will be adopted is still a mystery, but since the
beginning steps are now being taken,
we feel that it is time to set a goal
for a standard which this Student

insurance plan should attain.
First of all, the plan should be as
broad as possible. It should be sound,
but it should provide UK students
with a guarantee of medical care as
well as payftig out accident benefits
when this becomes necessary.
One point that has been brought
forward on the proposed plan is the
question of whether it should be compulsory or voluntary. If the plan is
successful, no doubt it will eventually
have universal subscription here, but
many have expressed the idea that it
should be voluntary only.
We have considered this thoughtfully, but to us there is no solid
justification for a voluntary plan.
At present UK does offer free
limited medical care in the infirmary.
This is paid for out of each student's

tuition fee. It should follow that
broader and better health coverage
should also be available to all the
students.
Under a plan of compulsory student insurance it appears quite evident that the cost per student would
decrease considerably if the plan were
placed on the compulsory basis.
To us," and we believe to the students in general, this is a vital feature. Student insurance is important,
but it is bound to lose its value if the
"Students are asked to purchase something over and above their regular
lees. In short, student insurance must
be made a part of the accepted list of
services provided by the students lor
the students.
Just as so much of each students
tuition goes to Student Congress, the
Student Union, the Kernel and other
services, so it should follow that a
certain amount should be set aside for
student benefit in an insurance program.

It should also follow that the administration of this program should
go with the group that is initiating
the idea, the Student Congress itself.
They, in conjunction with the company administering the policy and
the administration of the University,
must be in close contact if such a
plan is to be at all successful.
Rest assured, the Kernel proclaims
its support for student insurance, but
we are not for just any insurance
program. Completeness is the essence
here.

War On Trick Ads
WASHINGTON (AP)-T- he
govtrick-crernment has declared war on
and falsification in price adver-

y

tising.

by sellers.

The Federal Trade Commission

ihe

merchants pass off regularly priced
merchandise as bargains, Gwynne
said, and hopes for voluntary

is--su- ed

a set of rules for its staff fixing
borderline between legal adver-

tising and illegal fiction, and served

notice that intensified enforcement
has been ordered.
In what was perhaps the key directive, the commission told its investigators to judge the impact of advertisements in their entirety since
some price claims "may be entirely
misleading although every sentence
separately might be literally true."
increasingly
. The agency has" been
active in filing complaints against
t
iirms which
goods with inflated price tags then advertise deep
pre-ticke-

cuts in prices. But Commission Chairman John W. Gwynne's announcement said:
"While our staff already has been
hitting hard at those who lie about
their bargain prices, we believe the
problem is growing worse."
The commission will woik with
better business bureaus, the Advertising Federation of America, and
civic organizations to alert the public
to the tricks by which unscrupulous

million Aincti,ins aic tiaveliug
cadi day. Thev'U be away b;2 days
on the avciage, and aic unlikely to
vcntuic moic than 200 miles from

and television commercials as well
as to advertising in newspapers,
magazines, handbills, direct mail,
placards and billboards.
In proclaiming the code of forbidden practices, Gwynne emphasized
the commission will not excuse dealers who falsify out of ignorance or
misunderstanding, or those whose ads
mislead merely because of omissions
or tyjK)graphical treatment. The
damage to customers, and ... houeM
competitors is the same, the chairman
said.
"Advertisements are not intended
to be carefully dissected witlr a dictionary at hand, but rather to produce an impression upon prospective
purchasers," his directive said.
"Laws are made to protect the
trusting as well as the suspicious
. . . pricing claims, however made,
which are ambiguous should be interpreted in the light of the FTC's
purpose, whic h is to pi event claims
which have the tendency and ihe
capacity to mislead."
.

.

away.

The South

was the destination of

per cent of last gear's (ravclcis.
About 2(i per cent headed for the
midwest and plains states 19 per cent
for the West and 18 per cent for the
Northeast.
About half of all trips were to visit
friends and relatives. About one in
four was for vacation and pleasure.
33

home.

These were the principal lindings
in a census bureau travel survey.
The sampling, covering trips made in
1957, was paid for by the National
Association of Travel Organizations.
The bureau also learned that
Southerners do more traveling than
residents of other regions. Also, the
South is the destination of more
trips than any other section.
Of the 231 million trips made by
Americans last year, about 33 per
cent originated in the South. The
figures for other sections: Midwest
and plains states, 29 per cent; the
Northeast, 19 per cent, and the West,
18 per cent.
A trip was defined as one involving being away from home Ov ernight

One in five was for business.
Automobiles were used for 87 per
cent of all trips. Airlines, tiains and
buses were used most .frequently for
long journeys. About two out of three
trips were to places within 200 miles
of home.
Americans with annual incomes of
$10,000 or more were away the longestan average of about seven clays.
average,
Ranked next, with a
were people with income of under
.

six-da- y

, $3,000.

The Readers' Forum
Then, later on,

station was moved
to Lexington, and was continued under
the auspices of the University.
Otherwise, the aitidc was excellent,
and one which has been much needed,
as so many students don't icalie theie
is a radio station on the campus.
Also, may I congratulate vou on your
Kernel. I read each
issue and enjoy it thoroughly.
Sincerely,
Ann Young Gregory, '56
(The Kernel appreciates this correction by Mrs. Gicgory. She is a former
station manager at WBKY.
THE

'Grillology' Attacked
To

he Editor:
It is distressing to me that the Kernel
is so devoid of meaningful material that
it has had to stoop to "news" such as
is found in (the) .article 'Overheard
in
8.
the Grill." Wednesday, Oct.
It is unfortunate that personnel in a
position to exercise tremendous influence
over the student body's thinking are of
the fibre that would consider "grillology"
as "a very important phase of college
:
life."
Since the Kernel is supposedly a reflection of all the students' attitudes, desires, etc., allow me to say a word for
more than a few of us. We do riot consider "grillology" as "a very imjortant
phase of college life" and are desirous
that future comments apparently born
of a hangover not be treated as noteworthy news in our paper.
Sincerely,
Jackie F. Robinson
-- THE EDITOR).
(They won't.
T

the-

-

k

EDITOR).

Kernel Needs Humor
To the Editor:
to congratulate you
on your ability to edit a daily paper
intelligently. I would like, though, to
add this, although I believe you are
keeping abreast of national affairs and
the news on campus, there is to nie a
noticeable avoidance of humor.
When I look through the paper I
expect to sec the majority of subjects
portrayed seriously, but I would like,
and 1 believe other students would also
like to see more humor and maybe a
personal column ic. "Happy Birthday
To Dave G. from J. G. T. Although You
Don't Deserve It," or mavbc a epiote
"There are more important things in life
besides money, but they won't go out
"with you unless you have- - some," Alfred
E. Neuman.
'
So concludes my menial suggestions
toward the improvement of our paper.
James Glenn Thompson
College of Arts and Sciences
P. S. Its traders to slip a rozzer the
dropsy in snide.

This little note

Error About WBKY
To the Editor:.
After reading and enjoying the article
about WBKY in Thursday's Kernel, I
have a small correction to make.
The article said the call letters WI1KY
are derived from the slogan "We Broadcast Kentucky." This is not entirely true,
as the letters . actually . come. from the
station's first . location, Beattyville, Ky.
WBKY was first licensed by the FCC
as a station to broadcast to live remote
listening centers in the Kentucky mountains, thereby making educational programming available to people who had
previously had no access to radio whatsoever. This hapjcned over 25 years ago.
.

The crackdown will apply to radio

or going to a place at least 100 miles

lU2

(.I')-AI)- out

.

is

Good Work, M&O
planning and
proper utilization oi men and equipment during the summer months, the
University maintenance department
has managed to begin various construction jobs on campus, including,
repairing the sidewalks, when classes
have' started. The noise is welcomed
by both students and instructors.
Otherwise dull classes have been
made exciting by the development of
contests between student and instruc- tor in what has been said during
lecture and discussion periods. The
'
regularly scheduled classes have
changed to voice projection and command voice exercises, both of which
are needed by all -- all who are en
By excellent prior

.

rolled in ROTC, that is.
What could be more conducive to
mental concentration than the sounds
of a jack hammer breaking concrete,
or trucks being loaded and unloaded,
or any of the other noises made by
the University workmen doing their
various and sundry jobs? Nothing,
probably.
If anyone has anything in mind
which M&.0 might build, tear clown
or alter, please drop them a little
note with your suggestion. They
already have enough ptojecis on
tap to keep the racket going until
June, but it's never too eatly to stait
planning for next year.

* Tilt

0t.

KENTTCkY KERNEL. T.hmI.iv.

II,

5

l')VS- -",

Getting To Know You
We

kivv J Jut
tlut yo'i

IB

ill
i

lur-penim-;

t!'

i; l.'i. .1 I'
to II; .n
Kepl.u ir.v; km
Jrhap- with I l ir.nJ.i ale the

newweeks
them.
comers
been completely conScarab bacrlcts and
fused. TT.cic h.ur teen n million sorority
pledge
pins predom-iiut- c
over senior class rlns and
times when you said, "I want to
no home!"
charms. Dates with "college men'
We know that you have a great for Saturday
night ballgames
amount of wonderful and new make the. high school boyfriends
Ideas to share with this campu. seem far, far away.
As fast as old customs and
It won't "be too long before you
get into the old swing and offer traditions are being discarded,
many improvements.
new fads and fashiorus are being
There is a great deal in tore adopted. Casual styles seem to
for the University of Kentucky blend perfectly with the good
campus simply because of you, and times of college life, particularly
what we will learn from getting the shorter, fuller skirts for walkto know you.
ing and relaxing. All over the
By raising college hemline and dorms the girls are frantically
droppin