xt7c599z2x7h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7c599z2x7h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19691106  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  6, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  6, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7c599z2x7h section xt7c599z2x7h MTOCECY
Thursday Evening, November 6,

19G9

MRNEL

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

SG Committee Against
UK-Of L Merging

n

f

i

Vol. LXI, No. 52

U

By FRANK COOTS

Assistant Managing Editor
The Student Government
commission charged with studyof L
ing the proposed UK-merger has advised against a formal merger of the two institutions but recommends a "close
affiliation and cooperation on
an informal basis."
The commission's
report,
which was released yesterday and
will be presented to the UK
Board
of Trustees
Friday,
strongly urges the General AsJ
, . J 11
mi sembly to bring the University
tV
of Louisville into the state educaChillie Falls (at black board) and other SC merger commission
tional system. This might best be
members (left to right at table) Dee Dearcn, Steve Mason, Dctlcf
accomplished by a scaled inMoore, Chairman Bill Dexter, and Jan Teuton present their report crease of state funds over a period
of L merger advising against a formal merger between of six to 10
on the UK-years until full state
the two institutions, but recommending a close affiliation. The
support is attained."
commission report will be presented to the UK Board of Trustees
Follows Baker Report
Kernel Photo by Dave Herman
Fridav.
Student Government
pres- U

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-

.,..,..,

Cooperation
Urged

,,!.:

fcWn

Civil Liberties Union Organizes UK Chapter

DOTTIE BEAN
Associate Editor
A group of about twelve students met Wednesday to organize a campus chapter of the

Central Kentucky Civil Liberties
Union CKCLU).
Announcing the purpose of the
to
chapter as being
function as a complaint committee for the University community
and to educate students in the
area of civil liberties Dr. Fred
Fleron, of the Political Science
Department and a member of
CKCLU, presented the idea of
forming the organization.
two-fol- d

Allocation

Dr. Fleron told the group
that he had obtained an alloca

tion of $100 from the CKCLU
to permit the campus group, if
organized, to publish information on specific areas of civil
liberties which pertain especially to students.
"I see this organization as
an essential student enterprise,"
he said. "I think it would enable
us to fill an important gap in
information here on campus.
Such a group would not be subjected to the pressures found in
the formal structure of the University when students file complaints."
Education
Dr. Fleron emphasized the
importance of the education function of the organization. "Stu- -

Nixon Might Reform Draft
If Congress Fails To Act
that date
born
FITCH
By RICK
College Press Service
I
WASHINGTON
CPS) -- As

-

prospects diminish that both legislative branches will pass the
administration's lottery draft proposal by the end of this year,
chances increase that President
Nixon will enact by executive
order a "conveyor belt" system
of induction in early 1970.
Under this form of conscripwould be made
tion,
the "prime age group" for draft
calls with their liability to the
draft limited to one year. Age
would determine the order of
induction. A person whose 19th
birthday fell during January
would be called up before a person with a February birthday.
Since it discriminates against
those with birthdays early in the
year (persons born In October,
November or December might
never be subject to the draft),
the conveyor belt would be less
equitable than a lottery, under
which one of the year's 365 days
would be picked at random and

Nov.lO Deadline

For ID

Pick-U- p

on
all
made draftable.
Both approaches to procuring
military manpower would reduce
a person's draft vulnerability
from seven years to one, making
him draft free at age 20; both
would defer college students,
placing them in the pool of draft-able- s
for one year after graduation; and both would defer graduate students until they have
completed the full academic year.
Senate, House Must Vote
But the lottery, unlike the
conveyor belt, can't be established with congressional approval. Both the Senate and
Ilouse have to vote to change
a provision in the 1967 Selective
Service Act prohibiting random
selection of draftees. And everyone, from Sen. Edward Kennedy
leading proponent of
draft reform, to Sen. JohnStennis
chairman of theSenate
Armed Services Committee, is
predicting this won't occur until
Congress reconvenes next year.
The reason is that many legislators, desiring more sweeping
Selective Service reforms, are unwilling to go along with the administration and its congressional leadership in speedily passing

the lottery without considering
The Graduate Student Asso- amendments.
Identificiation Health Insurance
In a press conference sponcation Cards for Blue Cross and sored by the National Council to
Blue Shield can be picked up
Repeal the Draft, Reps. Shirley
in Room 537 of the Office Tower Chbholm, Edward Koch and
before Nov. 10.

students.
The commission relied heavily
on the "Baker Report," which
Futrell described as the "bible"
of merger studies, for background
of UK

information and a list of alternatives.
The commission pointed out
that U of L "is now operating
on a budgeted debt of approximately $16 million and there
has been some indication that city
and county support may be re-

duced. It appears that without
increased state support, progress
at the University of Louisville
would be at a standstill."
Cooperation

U

Local CKCLU Group Will Have Double Purpose
By

ident Tim Futrell appointed the
commission, composed entirely

Continued on Pare 2, Col.

1

dents are in a position to keep
in touch with other students and
to better see violations and inform other students of them. I
can see grounds at the University for all kinds of student complaints on a variety of issues."
One of the students attending the meeting asked if any
"other groups on campus were
affiliated with the CKCLU for
the purpose of protecting civil
liberties of students.
"Other groups on campus are
constituted for other reasons,"
Dr. Fleron replied. "This is not
to say that they are not interested in the area of student civil
liberties, but this is not their
primary function. In the case
of this organization, the primary
function would be to preserve
student civil liberties."
Function
Dr. Fleron then explained how
the organization would operate.
In its function as a complaint
committee, the student members
would be available to other students for registering complaints.
The members would then briefly
investigate the complaint, and if
they found it to be within the
area of civil liberties violations,
would refer it to the CKCLU.
In its education function, the
organization would make information available to students

on civil liberties and inform them
of their rights in these areas.
As a legitimate student organization, the chapter would have
access to space in the Student
Center or other University buildings for meeting with students.
CKCLU do?s not have office

space elsewhere in Lexington.
Origins

The wife of a University faculty member also spoke to the
group and urged that meetings
of the chapter, if formed, be open
to faculty members who might
be able to provide a continuing
base for the organization as well
as to offer advice on student
rights matters.
The idea of the chapter itself
grew out of the student demonstrations at UK last spring. At
that time. Dr. Fleron organized
a meeting of students to discuss
the possibility of setting up such
an organization.
After a briefdiscussiononhow
to apply for University status as
an organization, two of the students attending the meeting volunteered to explore the matter
of filing a constitution for the
organization.
Further Plans
Immediately before the meeting Wednesday, Dr. Bradley
Canon, also of the Political
on

....

Meeting

3, Col. 4

lecom-mendatio-

ns

Results

Here are the results of the
questionnaire:
Students responding to the
questionnaire were asked whether they were "very informed, in-

formed, some informed or know
of L
nothing" about the UK-merger. The vast majority, 59
percent at both schools, said
they were "some informed."
Asked whether they favored
a "closer affiliation between UK
and U of L." The UK students
on the question while
split 50-555 percent of the U of L students
favored this move and 45 percent
it. The commission
opposed
0

pointed out that the opposition

was "amazingly high at U of L"
and termed this a "surprise."
Offered a list of alternatives
ranging from complete merger to
U of L receiving some state funds,
students most strongly supported
a plan calling for U of L to "receive some state funds but re-

maining partially independent."
The commission, however,
said this would be only a "temporary solution." A plan calling
for UK and U of L to have a
Continued on Pate 3, Col. 3

cr

,

r:

fit

Organizational

rate

The "cooperation" called for
by the commission would entail
each institution receiving primary support for the academic
areas which they are best
equipped to emphasize.
Although the commission
talked to administrators at both
institutions, it based its
"heavily" on the results of 2,000 questionnaires submitted to students at both UK
and U of L.

-J

Dr. Fred Fleron of the UK Political Science Department (standing
at far left), a member of the Central Kentucky Civil Liberties
Union (CKCLU), addresses a small group of students meeting
Wednesday to organize a campus chapter of the CKCLU. The
campus group will rceive some financial aid from the CKCLU
in fulfilling its purposes of educating students in the area of civil
liberties and acting as a complaint committee for the University
community.

Krn'

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nan

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,
Thursday, Nov. f,

19

Congressmen Split On Lottery, May Not Act On Bill

Conlinufd from Tate One
Leonard Farbstein, all New York

their lives as U.S. citizens, providing they qualified for alterna-

tive service.
Abolish Draft
Farbstein's would abolish the
draft except when Congress declared war. In peacetime there
would be a volunteer army. One
other congressman, William
Ryan, also a Democrat from New
York, has proposed an amendment which would forbid the
assignment of a draftee to duty
in Vietnam, unless he volunteered
or Congress declared war.
Several student leaders, in-

Democrats, criticized the lottery
proposal as too minor a reform.
They called for total abolition of
military conscription.
ChLshoIm'j Objections
Rep. Chisholm had three objections:
By continuing the practice
of granting student deferments,
the lottery would sanction further class and race discrimination in that white middle and
upper class students could avoid
military service by going to college whereas poorer
youth unable to afford college,
would be inducted.
It would be more difficult
for
youth to acquire
Jobs while in the age bracket
between 17, the average age of
high school graduation, and 19,
the year of the lottery. Career
plans would thus have to be denon-whit-

cluding Charles Palmer, president of the National Student
Association NSA), David Hawk,
of the Vietnam Moratorium Committee, and Dan
Siegel, student body president
of the University of California
at Berkeley, Joined the representatives at the press confer-

e

non-colle-

ence.

Palmer said the lottery

layed.
Any form of conscription is
unfair since if involves involuntary servitude, and passage of
the lottery would constitute affirmation of an injustice.
Koch and Farbstein had

pro-

posal did little but "plant hasty
patches on an already patchwork
system." Any system of forced

service to the government "seriously endangers human freedom," he said. Hawk said sincerely motivated reform of the

draft would "abolish the student

deferments that compel the sons
of the poor, the black, the working cbss to fight the war that
the sons of the middle class so
loudly protest while remaining
safely behind academic and oc-

said have acted in an"arbitrary"
manner, often times denying registrants their rights.
While many are optimistic
about the lottery's chances for
approval by the House, it is almost certain the Senate will postpone action. Senator Stennis
holds the key. It is his committee

on armed

.Wtifj emu

Brenda's donor for the first
operation in 1964 was her mother,

It's so easy to be
smitten with fall
dresses. They're
stringbean slim or
limp and flowing.
Some button like
coats, some wrap

Center official said that recently
the girl began to show indications of rejection of the kidney.

make you fit to be
eyed, all are at

21

Second Transplant Successful

amendments. Koch's would
what he termed "selective
conscientious ob jection" a category of persons objecting to a
particular war on moral or religious grounds. They would be
given alternate civilian service.
Those currently in jail or Canada as a result of their pacifist
beliefs would be able to resume

A
Dayton, Ky.,
girl underwent her second kid- ney transplant within five vears
luesdayand was listed in good
conditon" by a Medical Center
spokesman Tuesday night.
For her second transplant,
Brenda Hodges received a kidney
from her
sister, Mrs.

per-m- it

Mr. Evrtt

VinAm

A VI

By JIM FUDGE
Kernel Staff Writer
A jam session is to be held
Saturday night to raise money
to help finance a trip to a Washington Vietnam War Moratorium
observance later this month.
The funds for the trip are being
raised by a group of interested
students and local residents who
will be making the antiwar trek.
The revenue from the jam
session will be used to off-sexpenses that may arise from the
journey of approximately 200 people from UK and the Lexington
area to Washington.
Leaving Thursday
According to Don Pratt, one
of the cooidinators of transportation to the Moratorium, most
of the people from the Lexington
area who have cars will be leaving Thursday and are giving some
people rides.
Quite a few people have yet
to secure rides. Buses are being

chartered in Louisville and Cincinnati, but are expected to cost
$23 and $15 dollars respectively
for round-tritransportation.
This sum is supposed to include
a place to stay while in Washington, and possibly a box lunch.
p

VIVA..-

-

ir, l

like kimonos. All

-

The girl was in shock for
such an extended time after a
Linda Cabbard, also of Dayton. traffic accident five years ago
that her kidneys ceased to function and had to be removed, said

Marchers Raising Funds
For Moratorium Journey

services which must

cupational deferments."
Drafting the
first,
he said, "will no more diffuse
college antiwar protest than removing Ceneral (Lewis) Hershey
(as Selective Service Director)
affected student participation in
the Oct. 15 moratorium." Disenchantment in the high schools
would increase, he said.
Legislation 'Insufficient'
Siegel, who led Berkeley students into a confrontation with
police over the People's Park
issue last school year, said the
administration's legislation is insufficient because it contains no
provisions for federal regulation
of local draft boards, which he

decide whether to send the bill
to the Senate floor.
Stennis reportedly has taken
the position that he will bring
up the lottery proposal in committee this year only if he has
assurances that no amendments
will be offered once it is on the
floor. Members of his own party
have not even agreed to withhold
their amendments.

I

V

Dr. Arthur Hellebusch, the surgeon who headed the team that
performed Tuesday's operation.
The surgeon further stated,
"We have a much better match
this time."
A Medical Center official explained that when the donated
kidney comes from a living relative the chances-o- f
success are
about 85 percent.,

?n i.
ourcntharc
Wbmens Apparel

The Poise 'n Ivy Shop, Downtown

and in Eastland
Downtown

open Monday

and Friday, 9:30 to 9

Eastland open Monday.. Thursday, and Friday,

10 to 9

No Housing Needed
However, Joe McGuire said
those from Kentucky who leave
Thursday night or Friday mornwill not need a
ing Nov.
place to stay because all the remaining time in Washington will
be spent in the scheduled
13-1-

et

4

36-ho-

march.

Pratt asked everyone at the
meeting who could get a car,

or convince someone who owned
a car to go because of the "se-

vere" transportation shortage.
He also made a plea to students, professors and community
members who can't go to help
with contributions to defray expense for the trip.

Last 3 Days
ANGELUCCI'S

5

UTiU

l

u

"n

--

(

I

Ann iversary
Sa Ie

n nI
UJ
I

Economics, Nutrition, Social Action
Clue... Take this coupon, which happens to b e
worth

250, to the Ponderosa. Then order the Rib
Eye Steak dinner, or the Open Face Rib Eyd
Steak sandwich, or the Chopped Sirloin Steal;
dinner. Slip the coupon to the cashier, and she'll
only charge you $1.04.
N
WORTH 25

jrjj

May the answers to all your

iZt

SUITS
SPORT COATS
SLACKS

I
I

CAR COATS

I
I
I

RAINCOATS

J

j

tests be so easy and
MM

89.95. now 80.95
50.00, now 44.95
79.95. now 76.95

45.00, now 38.95
55.00, now 45.95

Shop Angelucci's and Save!

right!

mm

STEAK HOUSE

286
Open

11 A.M.

Southland Road

to 9 P.M. Daily. Frl. and

Sat

to 10 P,

-

J

VS

Downtown Ltilngton

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Thursday, Nov. f. l9-- 3

Nunn To Voice Complaints
Against OEO Program
FRANKFORT

'AD Gov.
Nunn will carry "the
case of the taxpayers versus the
Office of Economic Opportunity"
to Washington Thursday when he
testifies before the House Committee on Education and Labor.
Louie

Student Legislation Stuck In Committee

WASHINGTON !CPS) Of at
least 15 bills on the subject of
student unrest submitted to the
U.S. Congress this session, not
one has yet come out of com-

Nunn's office said the governor would "touch on the subjects of political activity, circumvention of congressional intent as to how the OEO program
should be operated, maladministration and coercion of recip-

B.

mittee.

Trustees Will Hear Report
Continued from Pajcr One
common Board of Trustees but
separate presidents ran a close
second. The complete merger
plan received the least support.
Although a large majority of
students said they could accept
a merger"realizingconcesslons,"
most of those that responded said
they could not accept a new name
for their school.
While the majority of U of L
students said they could accept
a compromise in tuition rates,
the majority of UK students said
they could not. This difference
could be expected since a tuition
compromise would involve raising UK's tuition and lowering

ients."

Because he has had less than
24 hours notice to prepare his
case, Nunn said he would be
unable to present all the evidence he has against the OEO.

University
Methodist Chapel
Corner Harrison

and Maxwell

Sermon

Nunn said, "Although personalities are involved, it is not an
attack on personalties." He
added that he strongly opposes
the program "because of waste
and also because of the manipulation not only of funds involved but of needy citizens of
the Commonwealth."
Nunn was in Washington
Wednesday on state business and
said he discussed the OEO program with several members of
President Nixon's cabinet and
UofL's.
White House, staff members.

by

Rev. Fornash
At

a.m.

11

WORSHIP SER' JrlCE

At 5:30 p.m.
Speaker: Farter

ertler

A

Unitarian
Universalist
Church

NICHOLAS

J.

DeNOIA and KENNETH BERMAN

Present

NOW rh

I'

278-625- 9

'

'

NOVEMBER 23

PHONE FOR RESERVATIONS NOW!

252-524- 0

- 847 S.B roadway, Lexington
Red Mile Clubhouse
Cocktails from 6:15
Dinner at 7uO
Performance at 8:15
FRI. and SAT. $8.50
NIGHTLY, Except Monday f7JS0
1
ALL NEW YORK CAST
Special Group Ra:es Available.
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
ED TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, AND SUNDAY
$5.50

10:30 a.m.
Speaker:
JAY WESTBROOK
Topic:

"Draft Resistance and
Personal Responsibility"

SOUTHERN HILLS METHODIST CHURCH
2356JHARRODSBURG

DONALD R. HERREN, Minister

RD.

Sermonby Dr. Herren
Transportation Provided for

Campus
Religious

Stufits

Call

277-617-

6

or

277-402-

Koinonia House

Speaker:

412 Rose

SUNDAY MORNING

PETER L. SCOTT

60

xpanding

a.m.

...

In

254-188- 1

PROGRAM

6:30 p.m.
The Campus Ministry of the Christian Church (Disciples),
Presbyterian Churches and United Church of Christ.

STUDENT CENTER

7:30 p.m.

aires

my
Room

is

picks

up

Journalism Bldg.

111

1:30 p.m. - 430 p.m.
aam

VICTOR

SAre

turbances.

S. 2520, introduced by Thomas
Eagleton of Missouri to amend
the Higher Education Act of 1965
to provide a means of preventing
s
civil disturbances from
from disrupting federal
assistance programs and activities at institutions of higher education.
House bills include:
H.R. 10074, introduced by William Harsha of Ohio to require
the suspension of federal financial
assistance to colleges and universities which are experiencing
campus disorders and fail to take
appropriate corrective measures
within a reasonable time and
to require the termination of federal financial assistance to teachers, instructors, and lecturers
guilty of violation of any law
in connection with such disor-

Continued from Page One
ence Department, told the group
of a film dealing with violations
of civil liberties occurring during

the Democratic National Convention in Chicago in 1968.
The film, entitled "The Seasons Change," will be shown at
8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 10 in the
Student Center Theatre. It is
sponsored by the Kentucky Civil
Liberties Union and the UK Law
Students Civil Rights Research
Council.
Dr. Canon said an attempt
was made to obtain a film made
by the city of Chicago on the
demonstrations, but that it was
not available.
The time and place of the
next meeting of the new organization will be announced Monday night after the film

ders.

H.R. 10136, introduced by Dan
Kuykendall of Tennessee to require the suspension of federal
financial assistance to colleges
and universities which are experiencing campus disorders and
fail to take appropriate corrective measures forthwith and to require the suspension of federal
financial assistance to teachers
participating in such disorders.

Black Panther Sentenced
To Prison For Contempt

CHICAGO
G.
Seale, national chairman of the
Black Panther Party, was held
in contempt of U.S. District Court
Wednesday and sentenced to four
years in prison by Judge Julius
J.Hoffman.
Judge Hoffman
sentenced
Seale to three months in prison
for each of 16 incidents of contempt in the trial of the Panther
leader and seven other men on
conspiracy charges growing out
of riots at the 1968 Democratic
National Convention.
At the same time, the judge
declared a mistrial for Seale,
separating him from the other
defendants. He set April 23 for a
new trial of Seale on the charges.
:AP)-Bo-

bbv

The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky. Lex
ington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed live times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4SU8.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1913.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
faUe or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

Seale is being held in the
Cook County Jail on a fugitive
warrant from NewHaven.Conn.,
where he is charged with the murder of another member of the
Black Panther Party.
Judge Hoffman's ruling

.

ill

'

w-

-

mm
it

ap-

peared to resolve the impasse
growing out of Seale's repeated
interruptions of the trial with
the demands that he be allowed
to defend himself. The judge
ordered Oct. 29 that Seale be
bound and gagged in an effort to
stifle the disruptions.

He relented, without explanation, Monday and Seale continued to voice his demands to
cross-exami-

witnesses.

The dispute reached the break- ing point earlier Wednesday when
defense lawyers wmum m.
Knnstler and Leonard 1. Wein- e
glass refused to
a California sheriffs deputy who
testified about Seale. They said
they did not represent Seale.
Other defendants are David
T. Dellinger, 54; Rennard C.
Davis, 29; Thomas E. Hayden,
29; Lee Weiner. 30; John R.
Froines, 29; Jerry Rubin, 30, and
Abbie Hoffman. 32.
cross-examin-

MM

x HAvt?
lessee... THCSC
TO fur
rtAce--

where hearings w ire held in May.
No further action has been taken.
The Senate bills include:
S. 2035. introduced by Norris
Cotton of New Hampshire to provide that institutions of higher
education that have failed to take
necessary steps to maintain a reasonable degree of discipline upon
their campuses shall be unable
to receive federal contracts.
S. Joint Res. 100, introduced
by Walter Mondale of Minnesota to provide for a study of student unrest on U.S. campuses.
S. 2S03, introduced by Robert
Byrd of West Virginia to encourage institutions of higher education to adopt rules to govern the
conduct of students and faculty, to assure the right of free
expression and to assist such institutions in their efforts to prevent and control campus dis-

disbur-bance-

WORSHIP

The Chapel

SUNDAY EVENING

Drugs 6 d Used In
Church
rvices

DEAHfuL

9

UNITED CAMPUS MINISTRY

Liberals

Room 115

not."

Show Film

Minister

SUNDAY
AT THE CHURCH

Topic:
"Should Mi LJ

It is difficult to determine
what effect the commission's recommendations will have on the
Board of Trustees. It should be
pointed out that its findings may
have been rushed since the commission was appointed only two
weeks ago.
Besides this, the board may
be slow to accept the recommendations of a commission which
bases its findings largely on the
opinions of a group of students
who are only "some informed."
A member of the commission,
Chillie Falls, has argued against
such an attitude because "students will be affected (by the merger) whether they are informed or

CKCLU Will

Clays Mill Pike
PETER LEE SCOTT,
Phone 277-628- 4
or

Four bills have been referred
to the Senate Labor and Public Welfare Committee where action is pending. Eleven other bills
were referred to the House Special Subcommittee m Education

Established 1883
127 W. MAIN STREET

* Mediocrity Par Excellence, Signifying Nothing
In the wake of President Nixon's Vietnam
address perhaps the United States should declare
a day of mourning. Not a mourning for the
armed forces in Vietnam, but for the entire
nation which has to suffer for electing a chief
executive who has shown himself to be totally
imperceptiveto the call of justice.
Granted, the President may actually have
acurately represented the sentiments of the
great, silent, unthinking, uncaring majority
of apathetic Americans, but in the process
Nixon has completely ignored the basic issue
of why an admittedly unjust war should be

war is justifiable and he will continue it or to
take a course not in line with the attitudes
of what is at best a slight majority of the
American people.
The President's address presented nothing
new in regard to the war itself. It did say
Nixon was concerned enough about peace to
write a letter to Ho Chi Minh requesting
a vague resolution to the war. This was promptly rejected by Ho as worthless. The President
also announced the existence of a secret schedule
of gradual withdrawal of American troops from
Vietnam.

would have no cause to so completely disconnect himself from the Vietnam war.
Our President stressed repeatedly that he
would be guided by the uninformed attitudes
of a portion of America's population which
regard the war as a necessary evil to be carried
out by someone who knows a little more about
it. This is indeed a case of the blind leading
,the blind. From this it can be inferred the
President lacks the fortitude to either say the

The emotion laden tone on Nixon's address
perhaps shows that he realizes the total lack of
rationale behind his argument and has been
forced to descend to the George Wallace level
of dripping emotion in order to gain support
for his policies, or lack of them. To say "I know
it is not fashionable to speak of patriotism"
is indicative of the President's level of comprehension of the issues at stake. But the President
continues, saying, "Two hundred years ago this
nation was weak and poor." The remainder
of his line of thought was that actions such as
his have brought the nation to its present
level of wealth and power. In line with this
thought Nixon accused those who disagree
with him of being unpatriotic and lacking in
faith in the
greatness of his

continued indefinitely.
The extent to which the President went to
dissociate himself from the war illustrates once
again that he does not accept the responsibility
for the initiation or continuance of the war.
It is obvious Nixon does not think the war is
in the national interest, if this were not so he

i

ed

country. If our President is as dogmatic as his
statements gave us reason to believe, he has no
place presiding over a nation as diverse and
divided as this. It is indeed hard,. as Mrs.
Martin Luther King said, "to escape the impression that President Nixon is trying to end
the massive opposition to the war rather than
seeking to end the war itself."
We are forced to agree with Senator Edward
Kennedy who says, "I do not wish to be harsh
nor overly critical, but the time has come to
say it: As a candidate Richard Nixon promised
us a plan for peace once elected; as chief executive, President Nixon promised us a plan for
peace for the last 10 months. Last night he
spoke of a plan a secret plan for peace sometime. There now must be doubt whether there
is in existence any plan to extricate America
from this war in the best interest of America
for it is no plan to say what we do depends
upon what Hanoi does."
But our President has asked us to trust
After
him while he proceeds on his
all, Nixon stressed that he had a deep and
abiding personal interest in ending the war:
He has to sign 83 letters each week to the
families of men killed in Vietnam. Now if he
could just arrange the depth of his feelings
to correspond to the depth of sorrow at which
these families must exist, we might see a significant change in the progress of the war.
non-cours-

e.

nc

a vocal minority, however fervent its cause, prevails over reason and the will of the majority this nation lias no
future as a free society. . . And so tonight to you, tJic great silent majority of my fellow Americans I ask for
your support."

To Educate Voters, Lengthen Campaigns?

Irresponsibility
Homecoming '69 has come and
gone. But, unfortunately, one element of the annual event always
comes but seldom exits as quickly.
Again this year rambunctious
supporters of a few Homecoming
queen candidates have left reminders of their candidate painted all
over light poles, sidewalks and trees
around campus.
If the abbreviated portion of the
Creat Wall did not supply enough
space for the student painters, they
could have taken the time and
some money to a book store, bought
k
and displayed
posters and
these signs at various campus locations.
The posters could easily have
been torn down after Saturday instead of remaining as signposts to
student irresponsibility
the remainder of the academic year.
dri-mar-

The

of John V. Lindas mayor of New York City
say
provides an encouraging sign in
regard to big city politics.
Lindsay was defeated earlier
this year in the Republican primary. Waging an aggressive campaign as an independent candidate,
Lindsay came from far behind to
capture the mayor's race. As recent

ly as last week Lindsay was commonly ruled out of the race.
An analysis of this change in
attitude proves an interesting task.
John J. Marchi, who defeated Lindsay in the Republican primary recently urged a later primary date
in order to shorten the campaign.
It is entirely understandable why
this would benefit Mr. Marchi. The

The Kentucky
of
University

ESTABLISHED

1894

Kentucky

ernel

THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 6.

1969

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
James W. Miller. Editor-in-ChiBob Brown, Editorial Page Editor
Ccorgo
Jtpion, Managing Editor
Kolx?rt Duncan, Advertising Manager
Dottie Bean, Associate Editor
Dan Cossett, Arts Editor
Chip Hutcheson, Sports Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Carolyn Dunnavan, Features Editor
Frank Coots,
Mile Herndon,
Jeannie Leetlom, Bill Matthews, Jean lW nuWr
Assistant Managing Editors
11.

Republican candidate called the
campaign "medieval torture" and
applied his share of torture to his
opponent by waging a below-the-be- lt
campaign in the homestretch.
Many social scientists have
argued that the Am