xt7c862b904j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7c862b904j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19200423  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 23, 1920 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 23, 1920 1920 2012 true xt7c862b904j section xt7c862b904j The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY., APRIL 23, 1920

VOL. X.

Brilliant Prospects in Vie w for Future
Athletics in University of Kentucky Dr.

No. 27

U. K. WOMAN'S LEAGUE

STAFF ELECTS

KERNEL

HEARS MEDICAL EXPERT EDITORS

Wildcats Shake Off Jinx In
Three Victories of
Last Week

NEW

T

rf

COACH COMING

Athletics at the University of Kentucky has been on a boom for the last
10 days. Good luck seems to be pouring in from all directions, and success
ha3 crowned every effort of the Wildcats within that time. Three successive
victories In two days is a record of
which the school is justly proud, and
the acceptance of the position of athletic coach by William J. Juneau, of
Texas, carried the students' enthusiasm to a still higher pitch.
After standing through several minutes of April showers the Kentucky
lads were able to shout Friday afternoon after the Miami victory: "One
dobber down!" And Saturday afternoon on Stoll Field came the second
of the big victories, when to the surprise of many of the spectators, Kentucky walked away with the
track meet, and then
arose the second war cry of victory:
"Two dobbers down!" As the crowd
was dispersing from Stoll Field that
afternoon the wires brought the glorious news that 'Centre had fallen before the vicious onslaughter of the
Wildcats, and then the student body
went into ecstasies of enthusiasm.
It has been said that good luck
never comes singly. This is surely
true in tho case of athletics at the
University. Following closely upon
tho heels of the three victories of the
Wildcats the news was given out that
Mr. Juneau, the famous football coach,
had accepted the University of Kentucky's offer of the position of footThis
ball coach in this institution.
acceptance assures tho University of
one of the biggest seasons in football
next fall that it has over experienced.
Athletes from all parts of tho country will scramblo for berths on the
1920 football squad, and a successful
season will surely be ours. The privilege of receiving training under a
man who has led many teams to conference and Stato championships, Is
not to bo passed lightly. The effects
of tho signal victory over Vandorbllt
in track last week have already been
received from several sources. High
school champions 'are expressing their
intontlon of casting their lot with tho
Wildcats next fall. Kentucky's era
of succoss is just in the boglnning
fltagos, but it is suro to come!
Road tho articles In this Issue of
tho Kernol on tho various victories
that have been ours recently; then go
out and holp boost tho team. Catch
At every
tho old Kentucky spirit!
contest where tho Kentucky lads are
lined up against n common foo como
out and yell "to a

ATTRACTIVE EXHIBIT UNIVERSITY BAND IN
BY ART DEPARTMENT! CHAPEL LAST TUESDAY
Rare China and Oriental Rugs on
play In Studio

Dis-

The Art Department of tho University under the supervision of Miss
Mlna Beck, gave a treat to students
and citizens of Lexington in the exhibit of rare china and oriental rugs
in the studio Friday afternoon.
The main studio was hung with
coverlids In exquisite colors, some of which were loaned by
their owners and others that were
offered for sale. They furnished a
background for what was considered to be the best exhibit of old
and rare china ever seen In Lexington.
The other studio was arranged to represent an oriental bazaar, with the
walls hung with exquisite rugs and a
divan covered with a blue Chinese
rug arranged In one end of the room.
In this room, Air. Haddad, who brought
the rugs to America, gave an interesting and Instructive talk telling of
the weaving, coloring and artistic designs of each rug. One rug that atwas a
tracted particular attention
prayer rug, having the first chapter of
the Koran woven into it in Arabian
characters. Mr. Haddad said that although It had been in use sixty-fiv- e
years or more that it was just as
beautiful in coloring and texture as it
had been when it came from tho loom.
There were many lovely pieces of
China, among them a pitcher and a
Sevres, plate which were two hundred
years old and several pieces of imported band plates one hundred years
old. Several pieces of pottery made
by Mrs. Frank L. McVey excited much
admiration.
Miss Beck was assisted in receiving
by Dean Josephine SImrall and Miss
Bell Bates, of the University, and
Dean Dorothy Stlmson, of ransylvanla.
Tho students who were dressed in
oriental costumes and passed tea and
wafers were Eleanor Morse, Ruth
Gorman, Anna Mae Dawson, Annaboll
Hall. Ruth Sullivan, Mary Lyons,
Kathleen Rcnlck, Elizabeth Hayes.
hand-wove-

fit-ti-

SERVICE MEN, NOTE!
Will any former service men from
tho following counties pleaso see
Dean Melchor at once: Crittenden,
Caldwell, Livingston, Lyon, Marshall,
Calloway, McCracken, Graves, Fulton,
Hickman, Carlisle, Ballard.
IMPORTANT NOTICE!
Tlioro will bo a senior class meeting In chapel Tuesday afternoon, April
27, 1920, at 3:45 to act on Important
business.
BLAND, President.

Musical

Program Enjoyed
Students.

One of tho most delightful

By

the

chapel

exercises of the year was given Tuesday, when the University band, directed by Professor Carl Lampert, rendered the following program:
Lake
"March Blue"
Hayes
"Scenes From Operaland"
Hayes
"A Little Bit of Pop"
"My Isle of Golden Dreams". . .Luders
Luders
"Tho Prince of PHsen"
Encore
"Master Trombone"
"II Trovatore"
Verdi
A feature of the musical program
was the two cornet duets, given by
Messrs. Woodward and Sidebottom.
Professor Lampert and his band
have rendered valuable services to the
lUniversIty and judging from the
amount of applause given at the
splendid rendering of each of the selections, the University fully appreciates their successful efforts to set up
a new standard of orchestral and band
music at the University.

DATE

OF PHILOSOPHIAN
PLAY

IS POSTPONED

Changes Made In Cast of
Literary Society

Production
The Philosophlan play that had
been dated to appear on the nights of
April 22 and 23 has been postponed
until early in May. This postponement was necessary on account of the
recent change made In the cast.
Mary E. James, who was playing
tho part of Miss Prior, was switched
over and is now doing superior acting In the portrayal of Mrs. Prior.
Kitty Conroy, who is especially talented, was given tho role of Miss Prior
only a few days ago, but has already
learned her linos and from present
prospects she will bo the outstanding
actress of the production.
The cast of characters as havo finally been decided upon nro as follows:
Mr. Mllllken. Elizabeth Kraft.
Miss Pryor, Kitty Conroy.
Lady Klcklebury, Ruth Kolloy.
Lord Klcklebury, Margaret Harbison.
Howell, butler, Jennie Simmons.
Bulkloy, butler, Edna Suapp.
Captain Touehitt. Mlna White.
Mrs. Pryor, Mary E. James.
Mr. Bonnlngton, Katherlno Rood.
Mrs. Bonulngtou, Frances Bethel.
Arabella Mllllken, Lucille Moore.
Gooi-gMllllken, Elizabeth Brown.
Pago, Mary Hurdy Llgon.

FOR

NEXT YEAR

Frances Hollingshead Robert Raible and Martha
Speaks at Meeting In
Buckman To Manage
Little Theatre
Student Publication

OFFICERS

NOMINATED APPOINTMENTS

"The woman who has tho keenest
wit, the greatest conscience, and the
most determination Is the woman who
will succeed In any profession, especially in the medical profession," said
Dr. Frances Hollingshead, lately returned from overseas service, who
spoke at the meeting of the Woman's
League, fifth hour, Wednesday, In
tho Little Theatre, on "Social Service
In the Medical Field."
The following nominations
were
made-ba committee for officers of
the Woman's League; for president,
Catherine Christian; vice president,
secretary,
Kay;
Claribel
Lucille
Moore
and Mary Lyons; treasurer,
Martha Van Meter and Mary Hardy
Llgon. The nominating committee is
composed of Mary Van Meter, Louise
Will, Lucille Harbold, Margaret Bird,
Anne McAdams, and Blanche Ilhardt.
Dr. Hollingshead
said in 'part:
There arc three great classes for
medical service. That of nursing, the
most popular and the one which will
always belong largely to women; that
of nursing, now more popular than
over, and dentistry, which is a great
opportunity for social service. Criticism and competition for women in
the medical profession is good. In
dentistry, there is a great opportunity
for preventive work as much sickness
is caused by bad teeth.
The social
side of medicine is the side of the
future. Every single individual must
be brought to a higher standard.
Women have this in charge because
women always assume great responsibility of the care of children. Preventive measure are also to be developed in the future.
"Whilo training for the medical
profession, large financial backing is
Financial returns of
not necessary.
are good.
the medical profession
Dentistry pays most. But women's
great field is broader; one of public
health and service. The large universities are now open for women in the
medical field."
In closing, Dr. Hollingshead said:
"War has placed In all a 'holy unrest'." Women feel that they must be
They can't settle
doing something.
back until they have something to settle back on."

MADE

Robert J. Raible, Junior journalist,
was elected by acclamation as
of tho Kernel, Wednesday
afternoon at a meeting of the Kernel
staff. Mr. Raible has been since his
freshman year one of the most valued
men on the Kernel staff, and well de
serves the honor conferred upon him.
Martha Buckman, also a Junior In
the Journalism Department, and charter member of Phi Sigma, Journalistic
local fraternity, was elected to the
position of managing editor.
Miss
Buckman was one of the editors of
the Bulletin of Weekly Announcements, tho past year, and has done
splendid work on the reportorial staff
of the Kernel. J. P. Barnes was reelected to the office of business manager,
t
Professor Grehan announced the appointments from the Journalism Department for the other University
publications. The State 'Press Bulletin which has- been edited for the past
year by Robert Raible and Margaret
McClure, will be taken charge of by
Mary Archer Bell, a junior journalist,
one of the charter members of tho
Phi Sigma, honorary journalistic fraternity and Francis Bethel, a freshman.
The bulletin of weekly announcements edited by Martha Buckman and
Catherine Tucker, will be edited in
the future by Anna Louise Connor and
Giltner Segenfelter.
E. Swisshelm has been appointed to
succeed Francis Marsh as president
of the State Student Press Association. Margaret Smith will take charge
of the National Student Press Association which has been handled by Adele
Slade since Us organization in Noof these
vember. The secretaries
two press associations have not yet
been appointed.
editor-in-chi-

MATH. ASSOCIATION
ELECTS U. K. MEN
Downing

President
ville Meeting.

Is Made

at

Dani

Professor H. H. Downing, of the
University of Kentucky, was elected
president of tho Kentucky section of
Association
the Mathematical
of
America and Dr. Guy W. Smith, also
of the University of Kentucky, was
NOTICE!
secretary
at the regular
spring meeting o ftho association at
Tho Graduate Club will moot next Danville, Kentucky, on April 17.
Monday evening at 7:30 o'clock in
Dean Boyd, Professor Rees, Profesroom of tho Educa- sor Downing, Doctor Smith and Mr.
Doctor Ton-ill'tion lluildlng. Mr. Miller will havo Osborn. all of tho University of Kenchurgo of tho program.
tucky and Professor Richardson, of
Georgetown College, appeared on tho
Advertisers program at tho meeting.

Patronize Our

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 2

STRAND

CONCERTS DAILY, AFTERNOON AND EVENING

THE
"The

STRAND ALL AMERICAN
ORCHESTRA

test Orchestra

In

WOLF. WILE PLAYERS
GIVE SECOND

Three Plays by Town Actors
Excite Favorable
Comment
The VolfAVUe players entertained
the Campus Playhouse patrons Monday evening with a series of three
t
plays, Including
Interesting
"The Groove" nnd "Tradition," by
George Mlddlcton and "Three Rogues
and a Rascal'.'
Miss Lulu Kitchen, as Sarah, the
older sacrificing sister, who was held
In the humdrum life of boredom, with
Miss Naomi Wright as Constance, the
younger sister who was out of the
groove, showed ease and poise, toof
gether with the dainty
the boudoir in the first number, "The
Groove."
"Three Rogues and a Rascal" is an
amusing slice of life condensed by the
skill of Wilna Wigginton. The four
members of the cast seemed to enjoy acting as much as the audience
joyed the clever revelation of human
nature. The cast was:
The Judge, George Richardson.
Mr. Sims, Holton Ball.
The Lawyer, Ollie Rush.
The Rascal, a darky, O. Alford.
His success in "Tradition" may lead
Mr. Sam Yoeman to believe that as
an assistant in the Wolf, Wile Company, he may be missing his calling.
As the kindly old father, who is, howand bound by
ever, narrow-mindewhat his fathers had done before him,
Mr. Yoeman gave the audience a
humorous natural characterization.
""Miss Ann Brandenburg as Mary, the
daughter against tradition, and Miss
Helen Rockett as Emily, the mother,
a victim of tradition, deserve much
credit for their work in this short,
gripping play.
All rehearsing was done by the
Wolf-Wil- e
players in the evenings
after being dismissed from work. They
one-ac-

frou-fro-

d

Operi 10 A. M. to

11

the South"
Everybody Says So.

u

P. M. Admission

Adults

HOME OF

Paramount, Artcraft, Metro, Realart,
Goldwin and Select Pictures.

Children, 18c, plus War Tax, Tetal 20c.

27c, plus 3c War Tax, Total 30e.

REMEM1ER

were coached by Professor Farquhar, "WATCH YOUR WATCH"
whoso efforts and energies are being
In
given so generously to the success of Get Your Watch Cleaned and Put
Order. A Watch That Will Not
Little Theatre movement.
the
Keep Time Is Equivalent to no
Watch at all. Careful Watch ReSatisfaction
Guarantee
pairing.
SIGMA CHI DANCE.
Plus Promptness.

R. W. SMOCK
The Lambda Lambda of Sigma Chi
entertained with their annual dance
157 South Limestone.
on Friday evening In Buell Armory.
(Formerly with Caskoy Jewelry Co.)
The hosts are among the most gal
lant and popular students of the University nnd the dance was a delightVICTOR BOGAERT
LEADING JEWELERS
ful and beautiful event.
The armory was converted Into a
Established 1883
bower of blue and gold, the fraternity
"THE HALLMARK STORE"
colors, with electrical effects in great
Lexington, Ky.
W. Main St.
illuminated copies of the fraternity
emblems, shields and badges, streamers forming a canopy in ray fashion
nnd falling to the floor at the walls,
palms and ferns screening the orches PATTERNS
tra platform and the pretty booth, THAT APPEAL TO
where fruit frappe and cakes were
COLLEGE MEN
served all during the evening.
The active chapter: Messrs. Emery
See Them At
L. Frazier, Thomsom Guthrie, Law
TAILORING
rence Thomson, W. Preston White, JUSTRIGHT
COMPANY
William Benton, R. W. Owen, Joseph
Dodge, William Nisbet, S. T. Wilson,
145 W. Main St.
James D. Gay, H. M. Clay, Curtis Ben
jamin, Scoggan Jones, John Carr,
Suits made by us pressed
Hillen and
Gould Porter, William
for one year free of charge.
pledges W. R. Price, William Dorman
received the guests.
The programs were dainty little
booklets with the Greek
W. B. GRIGGS
cross on a blue ground and tied with
Opposite Agriculture Building
blue silk cords and pencils. The University orchestra furnished gay music CIGARS, CIGARETTES, TOBACCO
AND SOFT DRNKS
for the dancing.
STEP IN AND SEE ME

"THE

IE ST

IN MOVING PICTURES

THE CLASSY PLACE
FOR THE COLLEGE STUDENTS
CANDIES AND LUNCHES

HOME-MAD- E

McGurk & O'Brien
"EVERYTHING NEW"

PHOENIX FRUIT STORE
FOR FRUITS, CANDIES, NUTS
PHOENIX BLOCK

133-13- 5

shield-shape-

Send Your Suit in Early to Avoid the Easter Rush!
BECKER DRY CLEANING CO.
C. R. McGraghey, Proprietor
CLEANERS THAT SATISFY.
WE ARE ALWAYS ON THE JOB WHEN YOU WANT ANYTHING
CLEANED, PRESSED OR REPAIRED.
PHONE

621--

Cropper's Laundry
(Incorporated)

d

PHONE 210

114 N.

Mathematics Club.
The White Mathematics Club met
Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock in
the Civil and Physics Building. Professor W. P. Angel made a talk on
"Bohr's Picture of the Atom."

GEO. T. MARTIN'S
SHAVE

HAIR CUT 25c

PLAIN,

SHOWER AND
BATHS

Basement,

139

15c

TURKISH

East Main Street

Best Styles
for Young Men
At the

Graves-Co- x

Store is the Place to See Them.

You want the kind of suits we have here for
you; we knew you'd want them that's why we have
them here. They're made in the smartest styles for
Men and Young Men.

TENNIS CLOTHES, too; DUCK TROUSERS,
white
SHIRTS, TENNIS SHOES, etc.
soft-collar- ed

Shirts are a big thing with us. We carry a big
assortment and give you big value.
Here they are in beautiful silks, in new patterns and color effects at $6.00 to $16.50.
Madras and percale of fine quality in stripes and
solid colors. Shirts that fit, wash and wear well,
$1.75 to $6.00.

Neckwear in Cut and Knit Silk, $1.00 to $6.00.

United Qfiifimi

Stores

Graves, Cox Co.
Imcorpontte4.

UPPER

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

ABOUT THE CAMP.US

PAGE 8

Down Town

MEMORY BOOKS $4.50.
KODAK ALBUMS 50 Cents ot $8.00.

Doctor Terrell hns returned from
Madison, Wisconsin, where he attended the meeting of the Western Philosophical Association last Friday and
Saturday. Tho meeting this year was
a very Important as well as Interesting and matters pertaining to present
day problems .especially to democracy, were discussed at great length,
E. M. Prowltt, Department

Dairying,
has been successful in forming a Calf
Club among tho boys in Oldham County. This is another step toward better dairying in the State as only registered calves are admitted to the register of the club. When they become
fresh the milk supply is officially test
ed and the leading animals will be
given awards. This will give an official record of the animals during the
whole lifetime.

LITERARY SOCIETIES
Patterson.
The Patterson Literary Society met
last Friday in the gymnasium building. A committee from the Union visited the society and the arrangements
debate were comfor an
pleted. This debate will be held
Thursday, April 29 in the meeting hall
of one of the societies.
Te debate between the men's literary societies was formerly one of the
big events of the year and every member of the societies is requested to
be present so that the old spirit of
rivalry may be revived.

PENNANTS $1.00 and up.

Meeting Place

Orders taken for special College and
Pennants and Banners.

for

FRATERNITY STATIONERY
If we haven't your Fraternity Paper we can
get it for you.

University Boys

COLLEGE STATIONERY,
DANCE INVITATIONS,
DANCE PROGRAMMES
SENIORS, ATTENTION!
Please leave your order now for Caps and
Gowns, also engraved cards.

Open Until 8 P. M. Every Evening

High Class
Haberdashery
College Boys Styles in Our Special Designed Clothes

UBlver siiy Book store
Basement Main Building.

DOBBS FIFTH AVENUE HATS
MANHATTAN SHIRTS

233 West Short St.

Most Complete Assortment of Silk Shirts
We Earnestly Solicit Your Patronage

Inter-societ- y

Luigart's

Mammoth Garage Co.

Phoenix Block

(Incorporated)

The Store For the Well Dressed Man.

Horace Mann Literary Society.
The regular meeting of the Horace
Mann Literary Society was held last
Thursday evening in the Education
Building. Mr. Jett gave an entertaining discussion of "The Book of Birds
and Poets." After a short talk by
Doctor Noe the club adjourned.

Studebaker
Automobiles

Philosophlan.
Members of the Philosophlan Literary Society were given the opportunity of gaining some valuable knowledge concerning the working girls of
New York when Doctor Best read his
article on the "Conditions of the
Working Girl on the East Side," at
the last two meetings of the society,
on Wednesday evening at 6:45 o'clock
in the Recreation Roo mof Patterson
Hall.
In the article Doctor Best gave
many of his personal experiences in
social work on the East Side of New
York and his own observations of
the poor conditions of the girls.

That Good Gulf Gasoline
and Supreme Auto Oils

University Pharmacy
offers to the students of the University a complete

assortment of Stationery, Candies and Toilet Articles. Prescriptions filled promptly.
CIGARETTES, CIGARS and TOBACCO

Bring Your Kodak Films Here.
Opposite Campus.

Everything for the Automobile

Dick Webb, President.

East Main Street.

.WALTER S. WELSH
SUCCESSOR TO
WELSH & MURRAY CO.

LOVE STORIES OF THE ALPHABET

Midsummer Madness.
"Marriage makes monotony," mused
morbidly. Meanwhile, Mr.
Marcus M. Moore marched magnificently
"Marry me, most marvelous maid,"
murmured Marcus masterfully. "Make
my mlstressless mansion merry."
"Marry Marcus? Merciful Morphemuch
us!" marveled
moved. "My Mr. Martin married me
Monday. March, Marcus my man."
"Monstrous," mumbled Marcus, manfully minding manners.
marriage means my madness!"
Marcus marched mutely.
"My mlstressless mansion," mournmarried
ed Marcus.
e
money;
murdered me!"
Marcus madly munched morphine,
making mansion minus Marcus.
Mina-Mari-

e

MIna-war-

MIna-Marl-

CO.

ENGRAVING

I

Incorporated

"K

AND

THE COLLEGE BOYS' STORE

DIE STAMPING
FRAT and DANCE PROGRAMS

Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Shoes and Tailoring

N. LIMESTONE

124-12- 0

Planoi

DE LUXE
Ladies' and Gents' Tailors

Player Pianos
Columbia Orafonolas
Aeollan-Vocalio-

LEXINGTON,

KY.

MONDAY.

n

PHONE 592
Established
1899

Instrument

Player Rolls
Sheet Music

The E, C. Christian Music Co.

P. ANQELUCCI

a

Mina-Mari-

MORE

COLLEGE STATIONERY

j

e

"Mina-Ma-rle'-

"MIna-MarI-

GRADDY-RYA- N

Competent Home Tailon
1770-205-20-

7

Everything Pertaining to Music
Moving, Tuning, Repairing and Refinishing
Pianoa a Specialty
Lexington, Ky.
East Main

* THE KENTUCKY' KERNEL

PAGE 4

And on tho hour every day

much as you like.) Smith and Boyd
will bo tho two contestants.
As Is the
rule, one will take tho afflrmntlvo and
lHbllshc(l every Friday throughout tho College year by the student body
Somewhere near a stair, there Is a one tho negative side of tho question.
of tho University of Kentucky, for tho bonollt of the students,
alumni nnd faculty of tho institution.
A volley-hal- l
master clock.
faculty game between tho
The Kentucky Kornol is tho official newspaper of tho University. It Always broke stale Joke ought to Arts and Science, nnd Ags. vs. EngiIs Issued with a view of furnishing to its subscribers nil the college news
be in hock.
neers, and Law Faculty members will
of Kentucky, together with a digest of Items of Interest concerning the
glvo us students a chance to got even.
Universities of other States and Canada.
Wo can say, "Ah, he Is rotten; his
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR AND FIFTY CENTS A YEAR.
,
FIVE CENTS THE COPY.
looks like an Egyptian Helrogly-phlc- "
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflco as second-clasReckless-time- ,
or "Darwin was right." The
EDITORIAL STAFF.
.
line-uis: Arts nnd Ags., Smith capA. GAVIN NORMENT.
tain, Whiting, Buchhclt, Downing,
.Managing Editor
Loulse Will
.Assistant Managing Editor
Robert Ralble
Clock stops so the bell won't ring,
Butt, Lamport, and tho Eng., Law,
Editor
Adelo Slado
Prof's, forgot and everything;
Summers, captain, Bureau, Wolf, Ham
.Squirrel Food Editor
Mary Elizabeth James.
Sport Editor
Donald Dinning
"Are we late" Is tho song wo sing,
ilton, Freeman nnd Goebel.
Exchange Editor
Margaret McClure
"You Beo the boll forgot to ring,"
Remember, all this time tho orchesEditor
Feature
Frances Marsh
O' tuneless decoration.
tra will bo playing, probably, "You'd
REPORTERS.
Elizabeth Marshall, Elizabeth Card, Mary Archer Bell, James A. Dixon,
Bo Surprised."
Bartlett and Troupe,
Margaret Smith, Martha Duckman, Robert Mltchel, Torrll Corn.
Somewhere
who wore onco on tho stage, not as
Mann.
Harry Cottrcll, Arthur Hodges, Adallne
in a rubbish heap
grnnd opera singers, but as gymnasts,
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager
J. P. Barnes
Gone and forgotten
will amuse us, or better, thrill us with
Circulation Manager
B. Loyd
H.
Sleeps tho King of Sound.
n llttlo standing on eyebrow, muscling
Assistants
J. Burton Prewltt, Gilbert Smith
A martyred outcast
out table, standing on one arm in a
WELCOME TO THE LITTLE SISTER MOVEMENT.
,
Decreed so
chair In
and other tame feats.
By a new fangled system
The girls, under tho direction of
Again tho Kernel takes opportunity to express its gratification at tho
Of tinkling bells.
Miss Blandlng will glvo the spectators
Inauguration in the University of a now movement this time the Little Sisa little Aesthetic Dancing, while tho
meeting of tho Women's
ter Movement, which was Introduced at a recent
These tapping tin Informers fre- band plays "Slow and Easy," or some
Self Government Association.
quently refuse to tap. Tho at times other national
anthem. The girls
This movement did not have Us origin at the University of Kentucky,
If ones delicate ear chance to bo lin- have some unusual dances worked up
positive service to many of the larger colleges and unibut It has become a
gering within eye sight of this worth- to a high state of perfection, and acversities In recent years. The purpose is, In brief, to do away with the unless bit of mechanism, an audible flut- cording to the boys, this should be
fortunate feeling of strangeness which is experienced by freshmen
ter maybe heard.
the best number on the program. We
University at the beginning of the year, without
some of whom enter the
say this without the least bit of boastknowing anyone here personally. It Is undoubtedly true that In those first
strong heart awake the king,
ing, but they have been called "Wondays of homesickness and isolation, much of tho aspiration and sometimes the 0'
And put him on his throne.
derful," at least the dance has. In
girl who may feel that college life Is not coming up to
determination of the
Let us hear the master's voice
fact, this will be one of the first times
her expectations disappears, and the result is that if she does not actually
No matter where we roam.
Lexington audiences have had a
leave the University, she at least gets an unfortunate start.
chance to see such fanciful foot work.
living in the We could hear him in the morning
Under the Little Sister Movement each upper class
Tho we were miles away.
Incidentally, buy your tickets early,
dormitories agrees to become a Big Sister to an incoming freshman, whose
We know 'tis time to go to work;
as there Is only a limited number on
name and address has been obtained from the Registrar. Being a Big Sister
So we would cease our play.
sale. The price of admittance is fifty
involves first, correspondence during the summer, which will give the Little
And at the close of the hour
cents. The proceeds go to the imSister ample opportunity to ask all the questions she may desire to ask, conprovement of the
l
Our king would always speak;
Athletic
cerning preparation for entrance into the University. Then, if necessary, the
go to every class
Field.
Big Sister will meet her on her arrival, help her to find her room, lead her So we could
On time thruout the week.
safely through the always fearsome line at registration, and perhaps help her
to select her classes. Here her services may end, but It is probable that by
CHI OMEGA OBSERVES
Page the engineer, and tell
BOY:
will have realized that she has found a friend
this time, the freshman
SILVER ANNIVERSARY
him to find that "Old Steam Whistle."
updn whom she may rely for advice and help throughout the year.

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

The hell's supposed to ring.

Auto-win-

1

fig-tir- e

TO

KJUML

30

Senior Class To Lead Impressive Ceremonies on
University Campus

Alwnys-behlnd-

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Worth-a-dlmc-

.EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Co-e- d

mid-nir-

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Inter-Mura-

N'

I

ARBOR DAY EXFHCISES

co-e- d

In the words of an enthusiastic promoter of the movement: "No longer
With apologies to Poe, Kipling, Serneed the freshman, all hands and feet, slip shly down to the dining room, and
vice, O'Henry and Mclnteger.
trythrough the mob of old girls who are greeting each other, to find a place
"FRIZZY."
at the table; no longer need she be a forlorn little wall flower in the Rec.
Hall or pass unnoticed to the secrecy of her own room to sob until her eyes
Mademoiselle On Dlt says:
resemble small button holes, or to write homesick letters back to friends
"Now little vamp,
and relatives at home. Instead' there will be some one to take her through
Don't you cry.
the formidable registration line; to introduce her to professors and to her felYou'll get his frat pin
low students; to show her the many interesting places to be visited, and in
Bye and bye."
general give her a secure feeling that she has at least one friend among so
many strangers."

Ill GYM. WEDNESDAY

Wrestling Matches, Faculty
Volley Ball Game, Aesthetic Dances Are

FOOD
The Knight of the Lexington Drug
aimlessly pocketed a handful of
matches and said: "The best thing
about the movies is the fact that you
can see so many women in tho pictures opening their mouths and not
saying a word."
"No," contradicted Mademoiselle On
Dlt, resplcndant in dark blue trlco-lett"You mean that the best thing
about tho movies is the fact that you,
yourself, get a chance to talk uninterrupted."

Features

the most prosperous
man in the
"No, Miss Interlocutor, who is it?"
"Why the astronomer, of course, because his business Is always looking
up."
And now while the sleuths go
through the crowd In the back house
a
for wood alcohol, Miss Arabello
will render the popular air,
"From Prawltown I Come to Thee."

THE RINES OF

A CROSSEYED

MAN.

The Kentucky Colonel expostulates, There are many decorations on this
"But my dcah suh, the man who alold hemisphere,
ways has his own way is liable to be
That are always pleasing to the eye.
a little disappointed when he looks Then there are faclnatlons so tuneful
around and listens for the applause."
to the ear,
That a listener cannot help but sigh.
In the Campus Playhouse.
'Suy, Bones, can you tell me who is Upon a wall there is a bell.
world?"
Tis a lifeless little thing,

Everyone in school is cordially invited to attend the "Athletic Carnival" to bo held in the gymnasium
Wednesday night, April 28, at 8
o'clock. Girls, boys and faculty will
take part in an affair which will even
rival the Olympic games, or the death
of Othello In the last act.
This carnival has been staged by
"Daddy" Boles. The music for the
auspicious event is to be furnished by
the University Jazz Orchestra, of
which the noted "Bud Sloamer" is the
director. The first thing on tho program Is a piece of music, maybe two
pieces of music by the orchestra. Then
"Key West Point" Enlow will meet
Harold, 'iPost Graduate" McGregor in
wrestling bout.
a
Next "Handsome" Benson will meet
"Mr." Aiken in a "best man wins"
wrestling bout, strangle hold barred.
Five rounds of boxing will be the
next thrilling number.
(Note, girls,
you can yell "Kill 'em, Kill 'em," as

Transylvania and Kentucky Join
Observing Date of Founding.

in

anniversary of the
The twenty-fiftfounding of the Chi Omega fraternity
was commemorated by a banquet
given by Chi chapter of Transylvania
and Lambda Alpha chapter of the University Friday evening in the ballroom
of the Phoenix Hotel.
On the tables, which were arranged
in the form of the Greek letter, Chi,
wore baskets of crimson roses tied
with yellow tulle, and ferns arranged
In the shape of the Greek letters. The
name cards and programs were embossed with the coat of arms in silver, corresponding with the silver anniversary.
Mrs. Cecil Cantrlll, formerly Miss
Florence Shelby, of Chi chapter, acted
as toastmistress.
After a charming
speech of welcome she introduced the
following:
"The Flame on the Altar," Miss
Elizabeth Pinkerton.
"Our Scyllas and Charybides," Miss
Clarlbel Kay, delivered by Miss Ethel
Fletcher.
"Patriarchal (Reflections," Mrs. Willis Stewart, Mrs. Thomas Holloway.
"Some Neophytes I Have Known,"
Myrtle Barr.
"From the Mouth of the Sybil," Eugenia Young.
The most interesting and impressive
event of the evening was the awarding
of the honor cups to the most repre
sentative initiate of the year in both
chapters.
After a consideration of
scholarship, enthusiasm In college life,
and Interpretation of fraternity spirit
in the various pledges, Chi chapt