xt7cc24qks90 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cc24qks90/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1952 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 44, No. 4, 1952 text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 44, No. 4, 1952 1952 2013 true xt7cc24qks90 section xt7cc24qks90 _i
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  B U L L 12 T 1 N 0 F
The University 0f Kentucky
  1 9 5 2
  Summer 86552072
L E X I N G T 0 N L

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 1
1952 l
Ex Oflicio Members
Lawrence \\’. \\7ctl1er1>y. Governor
\\’endell P. Butler, Superintendent ol Public lnstruc·tion
Ben S. .-\ ·l
E CALENDAR FOR 1952 SUMMER SESSION  
¤ E
` june 16 Monday, 7:45 a.m.— Classification tests and physical exam-  
inations for all new students  
june 17 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.— Registration and classili- Q
cation of all students, according to an alphabetical  
schedule il
june 18 Wednesday — Class work begins i
june 21 Saturday~Last date one may enter an organized class for
the summer session
june 28 Saturday-Last date one may drop a course without a {
grade  
june.27, 28 Friday and Saturday—Period for filing applications for A
degrees I
july 4, 5 Friday and Saturday- Independence Day holiday i
August 8 Friday — Summer Session Commencement
August 9 Saturday Noon — End of Summer Session
REGISTRATION SCHEDULE FOR 1952
SUMMER SESSION
june 16-Monday, 7:45 a.m.— All new students, except those entering the  
Graduate School, will report to Memorial Hall for classification tests  
and physical examinations. These must be completed before registration.
june 17 -—Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.— Registration and classification of
all students, according to the following alphabetical schedule:
Tuesday Forenoon Tuesday Aftemoon  
8:00 to 8:50-Ke through Ni 1:30 to 2:20-Clo through_Ge i
9:00 to 9:50-No through Si 2:30 to 3:20-Gi through Ka
10:00 to 10:50-Sj through Z 3:30 to 4:00—Miscel1aneous
11:00 to 11:50-A through Cli A thr0ugh_Z  
june 18—Wednesday, 7:00 a.m.-Class work begins 2
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Pages
l (lalendar ......................................,.................,..............,..................,..4......,........................... 3 ·
Administrative Organization ...................................,.......................,................................ 4
Part 1. General information ................4......................,................4................................. 5
The Summer Session for 1952 ..4......4...... . ........,.........................,............................. 7
` Accredited Relations ..............................................................,.....,.............,.......,....... 8
I '1`he Environment of the University ......................................4...........................   8
1 Student Union Building ...................,...............,...........................,............................ 9
Placement Service ...........................,..............................................,............................. 10
Recreational Activities .......................,...................................4..............,................... ll
` The University School and Student Teaching .........,...............,.......................... 12
f Length of Session ..4..................................................................................................... 12
Admission ..................... . .....,............................................,........................................i.... 12
Numbering of Courses .......... . ......... . ..............,...................................................,.... I5
Student Load ........................,...................,.................,................t.............................. 15
Fees ................................ . ............................................................................................., 15
Refunds .........................................y...............,..........,........,............,............................... 15
Late Registration ................ . ..................,....................................................,.............. 15
Marking System ................,................................,.................. . .............................,...... 16
Room and Board .....,..,..................................................................,.................,.......... 16
  University Health Service .......................,.................................,.................,......t....... 18
’ Requirements for Graduation ........,......,....,.................................................,.,......l.. 18
College of Arts and Sciences ..............,..........,..............,...................,...........,........... 19
College of Agriculture and Home Economics .........................,...............,............ 22
College of Engineering ....................,.......................,...............,................................. 24
College of Law ...,.......,....................,..........................,...........,.................................... 24
College of Education ....................................,............................................................. 25
College of Commerce .........................,..........................,............................................. 27
College of Pharmacy ....,............................................................................................. 28
i Graduate School ...,................,.....................................................u..... . ........................ 28
  Part II. Schedule of Classes ............................................................................................. 31

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E ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION
  Herman Lee Donovan, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., President
A Leo M, Chamberlain, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Vice President li
- Frank D. Peterson, A.B., University Comptroller \
john Sharpe Chambers, M.S., M.D., Director of University Health Service
Louis M. Clifton, M.A., Director of University Extension
Lysle Warrick Croft, M.A., Ph.D., Director of University Personnel Oihce
Bruce F. Denbo, M.A., Director of University of Kentucky Press  
Thomas L. I-Iankins, M.S., Director of Northern Extension Center  
Sarah Bennett Holmes, M.A., Dean of Women  
Albert Dennis Kirwan, M.A., Ph.D., Dean ol Students  
Elmer Griffith Sulzer, M.S., Director of Radio Studios y
Lawrence Sidney Thompson, M.A., Ph.D., Director of Libraries  
Richard Lovejoy Tuthill, M.A., Ed.D., University Registrar  
V Raymond \iVesley Wild, Ph.M., Director of Public Relations  
!
THE COLLEGES  
Martin Marshall \/Vhite, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
Frank james ¥\’elch, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture and
Home Economics, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, Di·
rector of Agricultural Extension
Levi   Horlacher, M.S., Associate Dean, College of Agriculture and Home
Economics
p Daniel Voiers Terrell, C.E., Dean of the College of Engineering
Elvis   Stahr jr., M.A., A.B. in _]ur., B.C.L., Dean of the College of Law
Frank G. Dickey, M.A., Ed.D., Dean of the College of Education
  Cecil C. Carpenter, M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Commerce 1.
  Earl Platt Slone, Ph.G., M.S., Dean of the College of Pharmacy `
  Herman Everette Spivey, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
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Ii GENERAL INFORMATION
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2 GENERAL INFORMATION
` THE SUMMER SESSION FOR I952
‘ The course offering during the 1952 Summer Session will be ulmost as
extensive uml vuried us during the regulur scl1ool yeur. As indicuted in u
luter section of this bulletin, courses will be offered for gruduutes uml under-
y gruduutes in the College ol .\rts uml Sciences. the College of Agriculture uml
l Home liconoinics, the College ol Engineering. the College of Luw. the Col-
` lege ol` lfducution, und the College of (Zonnnerce.
ln purtitulur, the needs ol the following groups huve been kept in mind
l in plunning the Summer Session program for 1952;
g l. The high school boy or girl who gruduutes this spring uml wishes to
l begin colle<»e work without deluv. .
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2. 'I`he reterun who is eligible for educutionul benefits under Public Luw
16 or SHG. It will he desiruble lor the veterun recently dischurged to
begin his mollege studies ut the eurliest dute possible. Those ulreutly
enrolled will End it desiruble to continue in school through the suin-
iner, in order lhut gruduution muy be uchievecl with the leust loss ol
thne.
Il. 'liezuhers. primipuls, supervisors, uml superintendents who wish to
lurther their ire >urution lor edmutionul work. 'I`he in-service edu-
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AERIAL VIEW —— This is how the U.K. campus looks from the air.
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  cation of teachers lagged greatly during the war, and it is expected
l that hundreds of teachers and other school officials will now wish
 li to continue their summer studies.
  4. All students, women and men. who are in college and wish to accel-
i· crate their programs of study.
  5. Other persons who need certain courses to advance in their specific
  vocations, and to meet the requirements of the postwar economy. E?.
,§ Over and above its program of liberal education, the University Sum-
ii mer Session provides numerous opportunities for persons to prepare for
Q specific occupations. The extent of the opportunities is indicated by the
  following vocational areas in which summer courses will be offered; In-
` dustrial Chemistry, journalism, Medical Technology, Pre-Medicine, Pre-
i Dentistry, Pre-Nursing, Music, Library Science, Public Service, Art, Bacteri-
. ology, Geography, Geology, Psychology, Radio Arts, Social Work, Sociology,
i Agriculture in its various phases, Pre—Forestry, Pre-Veterinary, Home Eco-
  nomics, Architectural Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering, Civil Engineer-  
. ing, Communications Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engi-
, neering, Metallurgical Engineering, Mining Engineering, Law, Elementary
i Teaching, High School Teaching, Educational Supervision and Administra-
, tion, General Business, Commerce-Law, Industrial Administration, and Secrc-  
yi tarial \Vork.
~ ACCREDITED RELATIONS
The University of Kentucky is a member of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Secondary Schools and the Kentucky Association of Colleges
and Secondary Schools. lt is accredited in its respective colleges or depart-
ments by the Association of American Law Schools, the American Association
of Collegiate Schools of Business, the American Association of Schools and
'_ Departments of journalism, the American Library Association, the Association
of Research Libraries, the National Association of Schools of Music, the Engi-
neer's Council for Professional Development, the American Chemical Society,
1 the National Association of Schools of Social Administration, the American
S Council on Pharmaceutical Education, the American Association of Colleges
of Pharmacy. the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education,
and the National University Extension Association.
.· THE ENVIRONMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY
‘ The University of Kentucky is located in Lexington in thc center of
i the Bluegrass, a delightful country of scenic beauty and of great historical
i interest.
Q- Many of the famous horse farms, some individual establishments ton
  taining more than a thousand acres, are open to visitors throughout the
gl year. These farms, with their broad pastures, sparkling streams, wood-
  lands, and paved roads provide Fayette County with a system of parks
  which is unique. Elmendorf; Walnut Hall; Calumet, home of Citation:
  Castleton; Hamburg Place; Dixiana; and Coldstream, are among the beauti-
  ful horse farms in Fayette County open to visitors.
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SUMMERTIME—A campus scene between classes.
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Points of particular interest in Lexington. other than the nearby farms.
are Ashland, the home of Henry Clay; General john Hunt Morgan's home:
the home of Mary Todd. wife of Lincoln: the vast tobacco warehouses; the
Keeneland Race Track; the track of the Iientucky Trotting Horse Breeder’s
.v\ssociation; the United States Vetc·rans’ Hospital; and the U.   Public
Health Service Hospital.
\Vithin a relatively short distance from Lexington are Frankfort, the
(Ia Jital (lit i, with its many historical features; Herrin ton Lake; Shakertown:
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l·ort Harrotl and its adjacent Pioneer (l('I1lCl(‘l`}’C the Old Kentucky Home;
the Palisades of the Kentucky River: and many other points of historical and
scenic interest.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
'l`he Union Building is the center of student activity on the carnpus.
Various rooms are available for the enjoyment of students during leisure
, hours. ()ne may meet friends or read leading magazines and newspapers in
the Great Hall; engage in billiards or pingpong in the Game Room and
play cards, checkers, or chess in the Social Room.
For the convenience of students, the building maintains an information
desk, check-rooms, telegraph and telephone service, a modem barber shop, a
cafeteria serving foods of quality, an attractive snack grill, conference rooms
and comfortable lounges.
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'l`he Student Unio11 Board is eager for all University students to take  _
advantage of the services and facilities of the building.  A
l PLACEMENT SERVICE
'l`here is a constantly growing demand for the services of the graduates
of the University of Kentucky. Placement services are maintained by several
colleges on the campus and every attempt is 1nade to procure for the students
and for the graduates of the University the type of employment which will
» enable each one to achieve the best results
In the College ol Connuerce is the Senior-Commerce Employment    
sociation which is self—supporting and is headed by a permanent secretary. Y
'l`he Association has been very successful in placing graduates with nationally LS
operating industrial concerns. credit investigating and reporting companies, i
wholesale houses, banks. insurance companies, chain store companies, gov-
ernmental agencies both federal and state. and in teaching positions. These I
positions included secretarial work. accounting, advertising, selling. personnel, ,
and statistical work. [
The Teacher Placement Bureau ol the College of Education is designed l
to assist in the placement of superintendents, principals. and teachers. Each
student in attendance at the University who desires a teaching position should
I
ARCHERY-A pleasant pastime for Summer Session Students.
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  tonnis, and golf are among the       A_ il  
summer recreational activities  V; Ly; A. V I V        
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register with the l’lacement Bureau. Room Il5, liducation Building. Superin-
tendents and college administrators who desire capable teachers should write
directly to the bureau for recommendations and credentials.
The long list ol successful Alumni of the (lollege ol l·]ngineering is
indicative ol its reptttation for educating men lor careers in the engineering
and industrial world. lts graduates are continually in demand and contact be-
tween industries and the College is maintained through an Employment
Placement Service. This service is considered as part of the (lollege`s obliga-
tion to its students and every eliiort is made to give each graduate the oppor-
tunity for a position ol` his prelerence.
RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES
'l`he summer months are vacation attd recreation tinte. Provision is tttade
lor Summer Session students to participate in numerous recreational activities
and to learn the lundantental skills and technicptes involved. 'l`he l’hysical
Education Department is olfering recreational courses lor tnen and women
students in archery, badminton. tennis, social attd folk dancing. volley ball.
bowling, swimming, camping, and intranntral sports, 'I`his is an opportunity
for every summer session student to receive expert instruction in any or all
ol the above mentioned activities. If you are a novice it is your chance to
learn; il an expert performer, it is your chance to participate under whole-
some and enjoyable circumstances.
i The printary purpose of the recreational courses is to provide pleasant
1 and profitable leisure time activity for all students and to improve their per-
` lormance ability. Teachers and supervisors ol` physical education and class-
room teachers will find the courses valuable in organi/ing teaching tnaterial
and methods. Recreational leaders attd directors will get new ideas on pro-
moting leisure time activities.
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E During the stunmer, ma11y features will be added. The weekly movies _
l . will be continued. Musical programs, faculty recitals, lectures, summer opera  
l in Cincinnati and Louisville, Blue Grass tours, picnics, dances, receptions,
gv :md teas are examples of some of the extracurricular offerings.
  In addition to the overall program, departmental programs are many and -`
  varied. For instance, both the music and dramatic departments conduct pro-
  grams for summer school students. All Summer School students will find these .
  activities profitable and enjoyable. The fourth annual Family Life Institute {
  will be held july I-3, with headquarters at Memorial Hall. The Institute  
  will be open to students and other interested citizens. Programs may be ol)- y
  tained from the Department of University Extension.  
if V
`_ THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL AND STUDENT TEACHING  
i 'l`he University Elementary School will be in session from Monday, l
    june 9, through Friday, _]uly 25. Classes in the school will meet live days a V
w· week from 8:00 to 12:00 o’clock. No tuition is charged for the summer session.
  Summer school students who have children of elementary school age have an
@ opportunity to place them in the University School. The Elementary School I
Y maintains a modern program of education that shouldbe of interest to
y parents attending the University ol` Kentucky summer session. Persons desir-
= ” ing to avail themselves of the opportunities of the University School should
if write the Director requesting reservations for their children.
  Students desiring to register for student teaching should make appli- {
I cation on or before May 23, to Professor Lyman Ginger, Director of the Uni-  
;_ _ versity School. Students are urged to file their applications for this course as c
early as possible as time should be allowed to check the prerequisites before
registration. Students are requested to call at the ofhce, 126 William S.
Taylor Education Building for additional information. ‘
Student teaching during the summer session will he limited to persons
Q who have had previous teaching experience. Student teaching at the second-
  ary level will he provided through the facilities of public schools within the
- area of the University.
, LENGTH OF SESSION
The Summer Session of the University of Kentucky for 1952 will be
_ eight weeks in length, six days a week. The session will open _]une 16 and
close August 9. Classes during the Summer Session will begin at 7:00 a.m.
·: ADMISSION
[ Students will be admitted to the University as their previous education
` warrants. They will be admitted to the freshman class, to advanced stand-
lil ing. as special students, as graduate students, or as auditors.
ii, Applicants for admission should write the Registrar's Oiiice for forms on  
Q.; which to submit their applications, stating at the time whether they wish
  forms for admission to the freshman class, to advanced standing, or to the ,
  Graduate School. Applications and transcripts of credit should be filed in  
  advance. Students entering with advanced standing and those entering the
  Graduate School should present transcripts from each institution they have
  attended.
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ii To the Freshman Class. Applicants who are graduates of accredited high I
i schools will be admitted to the University on certificate, provided they have
at least fifteen units of acceptable high school work. A unit represents the
study of any subject for a school year of at least thirty-two weeks, with hve
y recitation periods a week, each of at least forty—f1ve minutes in length, or the {
equivalent thereof, Double periods are required in shop, drawing, typewrit» {
ing, and all other courses which demand no out-of-class preparation. One l
Q unit is the minimum credit accepted in any foreign language, and one-half i
i unit the minimum in any other subject. I
j \/Vhile the University does not prescribe a pattern of work for admission.  
{ it recommends that at least ten of the units presented be chosen from English,  
E the social studies, mathematics, the foreign languages, and the laboratory l
t sciences, and that within these ten units the student offer at least three units i
in English, one and one-half in algebra, and one in plane geometry. Should A
a student lack these courses as prerequisites for any of his college work. he
will be required to take them in college without credit.
Applicants who have graduated from unaccredited high schools and
those 110t graduated from high school may be admitted as freshmen, if, in ad-
Q dition to presenting the fifteen acceptable units, they successfully pass the
j University classification examinations.
l .»\dmission to the University does not necessarily qualify a student for
l admission to a particular college. ln every case the student must meet the
  admission requirements of the college in which he is to enroll.
i To Advanced Standing. A student who applies for admission with ad-
vanced standing is expected to present evidence that he is in good standing
in every respect in the institution last attended, and in general is required
to have maintained a standing of 1.0 in all previous college work. The Uni-
versity docs not disregard at any time or under any conditions college or uni-
versity records in order to admit applicants solely on the basis of their high
school records.
As a Special Student, A graduate of another university or college may
enter the University as a special student. Other persons may be admitted as
special students provided they are fully prepared to do the work desired and
provided they are at least twenty·one years of age.
As an Auditor. By payment of the required fees any person 1nay be ad-
mitted to a class or classes as an auditor. A student regularly enrolled in any
college must apply to the l)ean of the college in which he is registered in
order to be {lll auditor. Other persons should apply to the Registrars Office
for admission. No credit can be given for a class audited. nor is the student
permitted an examination for credit.
` (lollege of Arts and Sciences. Admission to this college is governed by the
  general admission requirements of the University outlined on the preceding
j pages.
College of Agriculture and Home Economics. Admission to this College
is governed by the general admission requirements of the University outlined
on the preceding pages.
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l   College of Engineering, ln addition to meeting the general requirements E
  [or admission to the University, the applicant for admission to the freshman  
  class of the College of Engineering shall include in high school credits one  
  unit of plane geometry and one and one-half units of algebra. It is recom- l
  mended that the student offer one-half unit in solid geometry; otherwise this  
pi subject will be added to the requirements of the freshman year.  
  Students whose scores on the University classification tests are in the ( 
l   lower one—fourth, or those lacking in the requirements for algebra, may enter
  the College of Engineering. The schedules of such students will be adjusted 1
  in accordance with their placement tests, as directed by a special orientation
l   committee of the College of Engineering and the Personnel Office.  
i   College of Law. An applicant for admission to the College of Law must  
,   be at least 18 years of age and have had the standard high school course that
V g will satisfy the general requirements for admission to the University. In ads §¤
  dition, he must meet the following requirements: Effective in September,
  1952, three years of college credit (90 semester hours, at least 6 of which  
iii must he in English and not more than 9 of which may be in nontheory ~
ii courses) will constitute the normal admission requirement. However, admis-
§_ sion with only two years of college credit (60 semester hours, at least 6 of
  which must be in English and not more than 6 of which may be in non-
  theory courses) may be granted if the applicant contemplates four years of
  law work. Admission with only two years of college credit will depend upon
5 the availability of a four-year program of law study at the time admission is
  sought. Any applicant who seeks to enter must communicate well in advance
( , with the University Registrar's Office in order that the Registrar may de-
  ~' termine the law program best suited to the individuals credentials.
j College of Education. In addition to meeting the general admission re-
, quirements of the University, outlined on the preceding pages, the applicant
i for admission to the freshman class of the College of Education must rank in
  the upper three—f0urths on the University classification tests. In order to trans-
_ fer to the College of Education from another institution or from another col-
`i lege of the University, a student must have a standing of 1.0 or higher.
if College of Commerce. ln addition to meeting the general admission re-
i` quirements of the University, outlined on the preceding pages, the applicant
Y for admission to the freshman class of the College of Commerce must rank
g_ in the upper three-fourths on the University classification tests.
V
  College of Pharmacy. Admission to the pre-pharmacy program of this
  college is governed by the general admission requirements of the University
il outlined on the preceding pages. For admission to the College of Pharmacy,
  see the University Catalog. The College of Pharmacy does not offer a sum- *
  mer session program. l
  The Graduate School. A graduate ol a fully accredited institution of §
  higher learning may be admitted to the Graduate School upon evidence ol
  graduation and an official transcript of undergraduate courses. However, such
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, n admission does not obligate the University to accept all credit granted by the
i undergraduate school. When full credit is not granted, the student will be
  required to do more than the normal amount of work to complete a graduate
  degree. Applications from graduates of institutions not fully accredited will
; be individually evaluated.
  NUMBERING OF COURSES I
Courses numbered 1 to 99 inclusive, may be taken for credit only by
undergraduate students, Courses numbered 100 to 199, inclusive, may be