xt7cc24qnc3w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cc24qnc3w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19681030  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 30, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 30, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7cc24qnc3w section xt7cc24qnc3w Tie

EC

Wednesday Evening, Oct. 30, 1968

K

NTOCKY
UNIVERSITY

OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LX, No. 46

Charlie Bradshaw Resigns
Effective At Season's End

By JIM MILLER
Kernel Sports Editor
Charlie Bradshaw, head football coach at the University for
six years, resigned Tuesday night,
effective at the end of the 1968
season.
The announcement was made
about 10 p.m. by Bradshaw,
whose Wildcats are in the midst
of his fourth losing season.
In making the announcement,
Bradshaw said in a prepared
statement, "I always felt that
when I could best serve the UK
football program by resigning I
would do so.
Not Accomplished Purpose
"My purpose in coming to
the University was to establish
a winning football team," he
added "I have not accomplished
this, whatever the reasons may
be. We have been close many
times but close isn't good

Bradshaw, whose teams have
record as of
compiled a
Saturday, said the announcement
was made at this time in order
for the Athletics Association to
have ample time to select another
24-38-

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'

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Mr-

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coach before the recruiting season.
"It will be vital to the new
coach for recruiting the best prospects in this area."
Adversity Plagued
Adversity and criticism have

i

V
n

Meeting

Debate

in

Kernel Photo By Dave Herman

Fredrickson, Policeman Meet

Police Review Board, Laws
Center Of Forum Confrontation
said he supported "civil disobedience" even though the press
had reported that he did.
He then got on to the business
of
relations.
He referred to the police review
board as a "company store."
"You don't really have a democratic process when you bring
a complaint to them," he said.
"The company looks at it and
decides whether it's faulty or
police-communi- ty

not."

The Rev. Mr. Frederickson
stressed the need for removal of
laws (local city ordinances no.
216-6- 8
and sections
and
which place " limitations
18-1-

4)

Kernel Staff Writer

and Mike Farmer will formally resign their positions
Senior Ombudsmen at Thursday night's Student Govemmen

Bev Moore
as

DOCS

It

Hold that pose, picture perfect. Sue Willig,
A&S freshman, demonstrates statuesque posture on the balance beam, while training
for the men's and women's Gymnastic Sports
Club. Now organizing as an intramural pro- gram, the club will join in meets throughout
th4 state. Everyone is invited to join the fun.
Practices arc from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday, 4 to 0 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday and 8 a. in. to noon on Saturday. Contact
Mr. St. Peters at the Alumni Gym.

Tuesday

Frederickson, a Pralltown minister, led the confrontation of the city commissioners this fall to
.'
demand changes in the police department.

By DEBBIE TASSIE

Kernel Photo By Dick Ware

confrontation

face-to-fac- e

night, the Rev. Craig Frederick son (right) and Sgt.
Robert Duncan of the Lexington Police Force (left)
discuss the role of the law enforcer. The Rev. Mr.

Senior Ombudsmen
To Resign Thursday

,

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-1

Police-Communi- ty

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By PAT HOLCOMBE
The Rev. Craig Frederickson,
the man who led the march on
City Hall earlier this semester,
confronted Sergeant Robert Duncan, Lexington Police Force,
Relations
in a
Forum sponsored by the Circle
K Club Tuesday night at the
Student Center.
Sgt. Duncan was substituting for Police Chief E. C. Hale
as he and Frederickson spoke
before the crowd of almost 100
persons.
The Rev. Mr. Frederickson
defended the "march" on city
hall as a basic constitutional
right. He added that he never

rLdSV

V1

5--

enough."

Bradshaw, 43, said of his resignation, "It is in the best interests of my family, the coaches
and the football team."
Bradshaw added, "I have
come in contact with many fine
I have no
young gentlemen
regrets."

plagued Bradshaw since coming
to UK.
The death of Greg Page and
Cecil New's paralyzing injury
have done much to speed recent
criticism of Bradshaw's football
system. But every season, there
has been cause undue or not
for dissent.
In 1962 Bradshaw's first season at UK his "Thin Thirty"
(only 28 players finished the seawon
son after a player walk-oujust three games.
Won Only Three
The next season Bradshaw's
Wildcats featured eight sophomore starters and again won only
three. In 1964 UK looked like a
coming power, but after a blazing start finished with a 5
mark.
Nationally ranked in 1965, the
Wildcats again started fast but
after injuries to key starters, lost
their last two games and a bowl
opportunity. Bradshaw's 'Cats
the next season
slipped to
Continued on Page 7, CoL. 1

meeting.
They will propose instead that
a faculty member serve as an
ombudsman to handle academic
problems.
Famier and Miss Moore attended the National Ombudsman
Conference in Detroit last week
where they learned that there
are only four other student ombudsmen in the country.
Other schools that have ombudsmen usually employ a faculty member in either full or
part time capacity to handle primarily academic problems.
Berkeley presently has a faculty member as a part time
Michigan State has a
faculty ombudsman who handles
an average of 500 cases during
a month.
The two students will recommend that UK:
y employ a faculty member as

ombudsman to deal with academic problems.
create a position of a student
assistant to handle small problems so that there will be a direct
liaison between the student and
faculty and administration.
establish a committee of stu- Coitiinued on Page

5, Col. 1

Muskie Here
Democratic Vice Presidential
candidate Edmund Muskie will
speak at 8 p.m. tonight in Memorial Coliseum.
The Maine senator will be
addressing a presidential convocation declared to honor those
presidential candidates and their
who accept
mates
running
speaking invitations issued by the
University.

of freedom

of assembly

and

speech."
Duncan began with a rebuttal
to the minister's remarks. "The
police are the first who are going
to uphold this (the First Amendment)," he said.
Duncan then launched into
a discussion of police programs
now being offered.
"A 'sensitivity program is'
given to all recruits," he said.
They go into ghettos, work there,
referee ballgames, etc. We hope
to be able to send them to Cincinnati or some other large city
soon to live in a ghetto for a
few weeks."
A Police Youth Action Corps
(PYAC) enables young men to
see the police in action. They
ride with an officer. They share
problems with each other as a
step toward understanding.
Police Resent
"Yes, the police resent and
are against a citizens' police review board," Duncan stated.
They should be allowed to "clean
their own house" and they are
doing a good job, he said.
In reference to the ordinances
which the Rev. Mr. Frederickson
wanted to change, Duncan stated
"I can't see where we are abusing
the people because we are armed
with the law." We have only
used the disorderly conduct section once or twice.
"We have both black officers
and white officers. We even have
Italian officers. We don't segregate them. Black patrols with
white; they ride together; they
travel together."
Duncan said that the black-whit- e
ratio is not in the proper
perspective, but they are trying
to recruit more Blacks. They have
had some response, but not nearly
enough, he said.

The formal discussion was folqi ions from the audi- -

low ML v

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 19G8

Mysterious 'Phiffi Boom'
Ruled Ineligible Candidate
of

TODAY and TOMORROW

"Phiffi Boom" had the backing of all sorts

Today
The University Art Gallery would
about paintings,
like Information
decgraphic!, sculpture, or unusual memorative arts owned by faculty
bers that might be available for loan
for a Collector's Show which will feature works from private collections In
thia area for the spring exhibition,
March 9 to April 6. Telephone University ext 2597.
for
The presidential convocation
Senator Edmund Muskle has been
from Thursday at 11 a.m. to
changed
Wednesday at 8 p.m.
Tickets for the Lou Raw Is concert
may be purchased in block form today at the Central Information Desk
at the Student Center between a.m.
and S p.m. The block seating will be
open to all student organizations today only. October 31 and November
1, 2 are the days tickets will be sold
to students, faculty and staff. Tickets
are $2.00 In advance.
Advance registration for Spring Semester, 1969, will be Monday through
Friday for those personsAllwhose last
name begins with A-currently

enrolled students 'should
The Registrar will then notify students at their home address by January 3 whether their advance registration is complete or incomplete.
Members of Alpha Epsilon Delta,
and
honorary,
In cooperation with Dr. Pisacano, will
d
and
be advising
students in Room 8 of Bradley Hall
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day
during
Recent paintings of Suzuki will be
exhibited from October 13 to November 10 in the Art Gallery of the Fine
Arts Building. The gallery Is open
Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to
S p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
The Student Center Art Gallery will
Sculphave an exhibit, the
ture Invitational Show, from October
27 to November 9.
Phi Mu Alpha, the music fraternity
of the University of Kentucky, will
Music Concert
present Its American 8:15
in Memorial Hall at
p.m. The
public Is Invited to attend.
Classics series will
The International
present "The Jazz Singers" starring
Al Jolson on Wednesday and Thursday
In the Student Center Theatre at
al

al

pre-me-

pre-de-

Mid-Sta- te

7:30

p.m.

The

History of Art In Medicine"

will be the topic of Robert Emllng at
the Colloquium on Biomedical History and Philosophy in the Medical
Center Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.
There will be a meeting of all
students In Room 108 of
the Animal Pathology Building at
7:00 p.m. for the purpose of

"The Mitotic Cycle" will be the subDaniel
ject of Dr.California Mazla of the Uniat the Theoretical
versity of
Seminar on Wednesday and
Biology
200
Thursday in Room 4:00 of the
at
Funk-hous-

er

p.m.

Building

Tomorrow
Dr. Fred W. Ellis will speak at a
Pharmacology Seminar on "An Auto-

mated Fluorometric procedure for the

of
Enzymatic Determination 4:30 Ethanol
Blood" at
p.m. in
in Finger-Ti- p
Room MN502 of the Medical School.
Julian Bond, State Representative
from Georgia, will give a lecture
p.m.
Thursday at 7:30Student In the Grand
Center sponBallroom of the
sored by the Forum Committee of the
Student Center Board. There will be
no admission charge.
There will be a general meeting of
the SDS in Room 251 of the Student
Center at 7 p.m.

Coming Up
The Barrister's Ball for the Student
Bar Association members and faculty
will be Saturday.
The deadline for applying to Keys
sophomore men's honorary has been
extended to Friday, Nov. 1. Sophomores with a 3.0 grade average write
a letter to Tim Futrill, 410 Rose Lane.
"A Man for All Seasons" will be
shown in the Student Center Theatre
on Friday and Saturday at 6:30 and
9:15 p.m. and on Sunday at 3 p.m.
Admission is 50 cents.
Garvice Kincaid will answer questions on any subject at the Student
Bar's Speakers Forum on Monday,
November 4 at 12:45 in the courtroom
of the Law School. Students and facattend.
ulty are Invited to Club will have a
The Cosmopolitan
party on Friday from
masquerade 1:00 a.m. The cost Is 50
7:30 p.m. to
cents. Everyone is invited and should
wear costumes.

UK Placement Service
Register Thursday for an appoint- -

7.

ment

.n Monday
with American
Greetinps Corp.
Accounting, Bus.
Adm., Mech. E., English IBS). Locations: Cleveland. Ohio; Oseela, Arkansas; Ky., N. C. Citizenship.
Register Thursday for an appointment on Monday with Henry C. Beck
Co. Civil E. (BS). Locations: Southeast.
Register Thursday for an appointment on Monday with Chicago Pneumatic Tool Co. Civil E., Mining E.,
Elec. E., Mech. E. (BS). Locations:
Upstate N.Y., Pa., Conn., Texas, Mich.
Citizenship.
Register Thursday for an appointment on Monday with Colgate-PalmoliCo. Bus. Adm. (for Production
or Industrial ManagManagement
ement, Elec. E. (BS); Chem. E., Mech.
E. (BS, MS). Location: Jeffersonvllle,
Ind. Citizenship.
Register Thursday for an appointment on Monday with Defense Electronics Supply Center (also Defense
Bus.
Accounting,
Supply Agency)
Adm., Economics, Computer Science,
English, Geography, History, Journalism, Math, Political Science, Psychology, Social Work, Sociology, Sociology (BS); Civil E., Elec. E., Mech.
E. (BS, MS). Locations:
Dayton,
Cleveland.
Columbus,
Ohio; Battle
and NaCreek, Detroit, Michigan;
tionwide. Citizenship.
Register Thursday for an appointment on Monday with Equitable of
Bus. Adm., EcoIowa Accounting,
nomics, English, History, Math, PoPublic
litical Science, Psychology,
s,
Recreation,
Health,
Social Work, Sociology (BS);
(MS); Law. Locations: Cincinnati, Lexington, Louisville. Will interview Seniors and Graduate Students for summer employment. Citizenship.
Register Thursday for an appointment on Monday with New Jersey
Zinc Co. Civil E., Elec. E.. Mech.
E., Met. E. (BS); Chem. E. (BS, MS);
Chemistry (BS. MS), Ph.D.). Locations: Nationwide. Citizenship.
Register Thursday for an appointment on Monday with Humphrey Robinson & Co. Accounting
(BS, MS).
Localton: Louisville.
Register Thursday for an appointment on Monday with Union Carbide
Corp. Linde Division Chem. E., Elec.
E., Mech. E. (BS, MS); Engr. MechanEastern and
ics (MS). Locations:
Midwestern U.S.
Register Thursday for an appoint-&
ment on Monday with Western
Southern Life Ins. Co. Math (BS).
Location: Cincinnati. Citizenship.

CINEMA

PlfC

FOOTBALL
CONTEST

TODAY and THURSDAY
3 PERFORMANCES

At 2:00, 5

rWOrttWCfTV'

'AN ACTUAL
NAnONALTHEATRE

Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will win Saturday,
Nov. 2. Corresponding teams in each column are opponents. The
estimate of total yardage gained by UK will be the tie breaker.

ALABAMA

KENT STATE

MINNESOTA

MICH. STATE

KENTUCKY

W. VIRGINIA

its homecoming
"to
queen elections."
Other supporters of the derailed candidacy, according to
Steckel, were Students for a
Democratic Society, the law
school, faculty members and
some Haggin Hall residents who
publicized the campaign by
strapping, on skis .and being
pulled across Haggin Field behind wind-fille- d
surplus parachutes.
Steckel had described Phiffi's
candidacy as one of " spontaneous

support."
"We just might win," he had

added in brighter days.

ROTC Brigade Fights
In Simulated Battle
The UK Sixth ROTC Brigade held a field training exercise
Sunday, under simulated combat conditions. Sophomore, junior,
and senior cadets participated in the exercise held at the Bluegrass
Army Depot, outside of Richmond, Ky.
The field exercise, directed by
groups used real M-- l rifles with
the 8830 Military Police Traindummy ammunition.
ing Battalion, serves as preparaThe seniors, who are all oftion for the regular summer camp
each cadet must attend be- ficers, served as company comthat
manders and as advisors.
fore his senior year in ROTC
Kamikaze 1, as this exercise
This program is unique in that
few other ROTC units give the was called, is a preliminary to
cadet any tactical training before Snake Strike, the main field exercise of the year. In tliis exhe reaches summer camp.
ercise, all of the cadets will
The sophomores were given launch a massive simulated attactical combat and reconnaistack on a strong enemy position.
sance training and then given a Snake Strike
is scheduled for'
field problem in which they must Nov. 24.
Most
capture an enemy position.
of the "enemy aggressors" were
ROTC graduates still attending
1 1?

STRAND

UK.

The juniors' field problem was
similar to that of the sophomores
with more emphasis placed on the
of troops. Both
deployment

IOWA

OHIO STATE

SIS

HOUSTON

LOUISVILLE

LDWD

Homecoming Steering Com
mittee Chairman Darby Turner
has ruled that the mysterious
candidate is not eligible for the
competition for this reason.
Phiffi, who was sponsored by
POPE (Phiffi Over Positively
Everybody), is not a registered
student; in fact, no one seems to
know exactly who or w hat she is.
Turner said, "She just doesn't
comply with the rules."
Second year law student Ed
Steckel, one of the founders of
POPE, could not be reached for
comment Tuesday night.
Steckel had described the purpose of Phiffi's candidacy as an
attempt to get the University

EVENINGS AT 8:15

Matinees: WED., SAT., SUN.
at 2:15 p.m.

AUBURN

GEORGIA

OF GREAT BRITAIN'

1A0KENCE

MISS. STATE

FLORIDA

DAILY

8:15

TENNESSEE

Admission

a

$2.00
SPECIAL STUDENT
DISCOUNT PRICE
$1.00
For any performance!

ARMY

KENTUCKY

yards will be gained by UK in the
West Virginia game

UK

conceived cosmic
adventure." Cu
MGM

Peter Sellers

Wl LnuEVau.
nucEU.Tni:iasM

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gTSSUGGtSTtO
TECXXICOIOI'FMM

row

MATURE AUD'CNCES

KMJIU

BROl-SEV-

SHOP by Nov.

I,

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fj

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fl
PANAVISI0N.

METR0C0L0R

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Entries must be in the

mi

UTS

10 entries per person each week.

PRIZE:

1

ii

At

SUPER

Limit

STANLEY KUBRICK PRODUCTION

MMon

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SOUTHERN CAL

OREGON

"A brilliantly

I

NOW SHOWING!

J0HNBRA30URNE

U. C. L. A.

PENN STATE

I
AJHtPROOUCTON

groups ranging

from the Black Student Union to the Young Americans for Freedom
in her homecoming queen candidacy, but she apparently met her
downfall for lack of official sponsorship by any dorm unit.

1968

I

CONTEST OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS

GETWIIXS,

I

Name

DO

Address

I

Phone
LAST WEEK'S

CONTEST WINNER:

The Kentucky Kjsiinel

mm
gf

Unlurrattij
up

Miami U.
Ohio State U.
U. of Cincinnati
Tuiane U.
U.
Wt Va. Ky. U.
Eastern
U. of Georgia

407
LIMESTONE

Bowling Green U.
Purdue U.
Ohio U.
U. of Kentucky
Eastern Michigan U.
U. of Alabama

Take a Piedmont Pacemaker a new Boeing 737
fanjet or other fine aircraft and leave fast
and easy. Leave campus for home, for holidays,
for
You'll like the way
service has grown to make the going easier.

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40A0O. bowij cltse
Ken rues y.
postage paid at Isln-toMUwl five time weekly during the
school year except holiday and exam
periods, and once during the summer
subllhed by the Board of Student
Publications. UK Poet UXXlce Box ewto.
Begun as the Cadet In ltd and
published continuously M the Kernel
since
Advertising published herein la In
tended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading ad ver using should
be reported to Toe Editors.
n

m.

SUBSCRIPTION

ft) PIEDMONT AIRLINES
y
growing service for going people

BATES

feMf
Yearly, b snail
Per copy, from alee
KXUNsX TCJEPttONXS
13X1
Xdltor. Managing Editor
aUtuffial Paje iLllW.
tttO
Associate Idl tut, ports
.77.
Kewe Ltoafc
t Advertising; Business, Circulation tiii
$--

M

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday; Oct. 30,

Open To

'Anti-Kcrnclitc-

s'

Board Of Publications Extends Invitation
Dr. Clfford Blyton, chairman
of the Board of Student Publications, has invited students circulating
petitions to
attend the next board meeting.
The meeting is scheduled for
4
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 6, in
anti-Kern-

the Administration

Building

Board Boom.
Dr. Blyton called attention to
three errors contained in the petitions in a letter inviting the
petitioners to attend the board

meeting. The letter reads as follows:
"It is my understanding that
a large number of students have
signed a petition opposing certain practices of the Kernel. I
have a copy of this document.
It is strange that the originators
of the petition fail to make themselves known.
"It is stranger still that students who are apparently concerned about the truth would

sign a statement containing three
significant errors: 1. The Kernel
is paid for out of student fees;
2. The Kernel is published without supervision; and 3. The Kernel is an adjunct of the Department of Journalism.
In order to prevent perpetuation of error, and in order
to clarify apparent misunderstandings, I hereby extend a special invitation to those circulating the petition to attend the

"...

(next board) meeting. In fact,
everyone is free to attend. I know
you will be warmly received.
Some of the board members may
even sign the petition if and
when it becomes truthful."
At least three different parties
are involved in the
petitioning. Two of them are
the Young Americans for Freedom and a group known only
as OZIQ.

Joarnalism Bldf.
Rates are $1.25 for 20 words, 13.00
for three consecutive Insertions of the
samo ad of 20 words, and 3.79 per
week, 20 words.
The deadline Is 11 a.m. the day
prior to publication. No advertisement
may cite race, reliflon or national
or fin as a qualification for renting
rooms or for employment.

convertFOR SALE 1961 MGA-160- 0
ible; new paint job; all equipment
in above average condition. If Interested call
after 6 p.m. 30O5t

111,

SCB Forum Committee Presents

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

I

FOR SALE

cylinder; new muffler, tail pipe nnd voltage regulator.
Good tires.
B&G Electric
for $525.
28 05t

62 GALAXIE,

6

FOR SALE 1959 Austin Healey. 1006
series. New paint job. Good condition. 3 tops, $405. Call
2905t
RCA Stereo Tape Cartridge Player
(must use amplifier) and 22 eight-trac- k
cartridge tapes. All 0 less than
after
year old, $150. Phone
6:30 p.m.
30O5t

LOST and FOUND
LISTED is the property on hand In
our lost and found department not
listed before. Items may be claimed
in Room 3, Kinkead Hall from 8 a.m.
till 5 p.m. Monday through Friday:
1 Man's
Watch; 1 Man's ID Watch;
1 Man's
2 Lady's Watches;
Wedding
1
9 Lady's Umbrellas;
Band;
pair
1
Car Key; 1 pair
Blue Shorts;
Lady's Glasses; 1 Key Case; 1 Suit
Case with Lady's Clothes.
30O2t

JUUAN BOND
State
Representative from Georgia
7:30 p.m.

BABT SITTING
WILL BABYSIT In your home evenings except weekends. Reliable, dependable, experienced. Call after 9,
1.
30Olt

shoe salesman,
WANTED Part-tim- e
hours open. Apply Jeff Kessler,
Wenneker's Men's Store, 153 East
2505t
Main.

Thursday, Oct.

VOTE FOR KATHERINE PEDEN for
U.S. Senator. A candidate who proposes, not criticizes; a true worker
2308t
for all 120 counties.

1077 NEW CIRCLE ROAD

CHARLIE WILEY'S

KEYS Sophomore Men's Honorary is
now accepting
of all
applications
sophomore men with a 3.0 grade
average. Apply by letter to Tim
Futrell, 410 Rose Lane. Deadline ex2407t
tended to Friday, Nov. 1.
OSWALD loved Phlffl Boom.

31, 1968

STUDENT CENTER GRAND BALLROOM
No admission charge

MISCELLANEOUS

NEW PALMS
THE MAG 7
Oct. 30: 7:30 pm-- 1 om
Wed.,

30Olt

THE MARAUDERS
Wed., Nov. 6: 7:30 pm-- om

Pfejenfj

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TUTORING

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TUTORING Chemistry. Calculus, Biology, Biochemistry. Mr. Pete Guzy,
299-69or
ext. 5643. 2902t

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to THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Boom

The Kernel only recently
learned that the first petition
was originated by Philip Bor-riea senior journalism major
and a member of Kappa Sigma
fraternity.
Borries said Tuesday evening
that he was not ready to disclose yet how many people have
signed his petitions nor what he
eventually intends to do with
them.

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* The Kentucky
ESTABLISHED 1894

Kernel

University of Kentucky

WEDNESDAY,

OCT. 30, 1968

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Lee B. Becker,

Editor-in-Chi- ef

Encouraging Debate

Nowhere on campus, has conservative thought been more institutionalized than in dorms and
Greek houses, where opinions contrary to the majority's are seldom
welcomed and even more rarely
generated. It is encouraging therefore to see the flourishing speaker
programs of Sigma Phi Epsilon
Hall.
and Haggin
fraternity
Through them, students are exposed 'to a variety of ideas and
encouraged to their consideration
and debate. They can only benefit
from the experience.
The Sig Eps have already hosted
and
candidates Russ Mobley
Katherine Peden; philosophy professor Thomas Olshewsky; Democratic National Convention delegate Jack Reeves; Rev. Elmer Moore
of the Newman Center and Dr.
Stuart Forth. Last night their guest,
Julius Berry prominent member of
the city's and University's black
community discussed civil rights
and the "Dixie" issue with the
fraternity men. Future speakers include Rev. Craig Frederickson, Sen.
John Watts and Don Pratt.
The Haggin Hall Contemporary
Issues Forum last week brought
to the dorm a four-wa- y
debate
between students representing the

presidential candidates on the state
ballot. The earliest and most successful program was a dialogue
between the dorm residents and
SDS representatives on student
power. The chaplain from the local
discussed
Narcotics
Hospital
And The College Student."
"Drugs
A jazz mass and a meeting with
members of the Black Student
Union are scheduled for later in
the semester.
In each case, the discussion has
d
been intelligent,
and
A freshman cannot easily
vigorous.
participate in such discussions one
week and consider himself merely
an immature newcomer, whose primary aim is to develop a greater
drinking capacity, the next. A fraternity pledge cannot see the men
who rushed him debate with a
senatorial candidate and then view
the organization as one whose major concern is partying. The effects
of the programs will be even greater
when the underclassmen involved
are upperclassmen, responsible for
guiding student affairs and the
course of at least one campus Greek
We
congratulate
organization.
these groups for what they are
doing, and can only wish others
were doing the same.
open-minde-

By BOB BROWN

EDITOR'S NOTE: The opinions
in the column titled Middle Man,
Cynic View and Scott Free do not necessarily represent the opinions of the editors
but rather represent the opinions of the
authors.
The question of just how one goes
about affecting change on this status-quoe- st
of all campuses has long been
a matter of intrigue to restless activists.
New light has been shed on the matter
by Colonel Dimples of the Maintenance
of Oscillations department who classifies
the problem as follows: (1) clarification
of problem, (2) organized minority concern,
(3) arousal of public concern, (4) experimental action, (5) implementation, and
(6) student involvement.
A case study serves to illustrate this
point. The problem of student traffic on
campus was clarified at UK by the Kernel
in the spring of 1968. Construction of over-walat Limestone and the consideration
of rerouting Hose Street were urged at
that time.
But as Col. Dimples points out, the
distance between the clarification step
and the arousal of public concern is of
mammoth dimensions on this campus. It
wasn't until the spring of 19G9 that concern
began to develop. A fraternity mascot,
"Dam it," was killed by a city bus as he
scampered across Hose Street. This incident was nearly enough to upset the
equilibrium of campus apathy, but it
was soon forgotten. Minority concern had
begun to formulate, however, and everyone
concerned realized that it was only a
matter of
again.
With the advent of 3,500 freshmen in
the fall of 19G9, general opinion began to
grow. Student traffic lights had to be
installed for pedestrians on campus. At
the comer of King Library Street and
tle North-Sout- h
Expressway a number
of crashes were reported. Exit ramps
had to be installed for the Chemistry-Thysic- s
Building and tunnels were intro--Wfor tne Engineering building which
ks

time-and-ti-

H

Mm

by this time had sunk considerably. Rest
areas were eventually installed in the
Botanical Gardens for wounded travelers
and candles were lit for illumination
of the Haggin Field walkway.
d
These
campus improvements solved the issue there, but, when
the entire Alpha Gamma Delta pledge
class was massacred by rush hour traffic
on Rose Street, public opinion began to
move toward definite action.
Early spring of 1970 brought a flood
which couldn't have come at a more
opportune time. A graduate student in
History was killed by a speeding tobacco
truck as he crossed Limestone from the
Taylor Education Building. Thanks to
the genius who designed that part of
the campus, the student was partially
submerged as he crossed the street and
the truck driver mistook the parcel of blue
books he held aloft for a floating box.
This aroused public opinion to the
extent that the M. of O. department
was pressured into posting four men at
the fork of Limestone and one on each
side of Hose at the Bradley Hall cross-wa- y
and at the Fine Arts junction to
count pedestrian and vehicle traffic. The
purpose of this study was, of course, to
determine whether the University could
afford to construct crossovers.
By the fall of 1971 this action was
confirmed and Col. Dimples made his
(Jans public. A grand controversy erupted
when it was noticed that the ramps
would encourleading to the cross-over- s
who couldn't
age their use by
ride tlteir bicycles straight. After some
weeks this was solved by the use of
stairs instead of ramps, and actual construction began immediately.
It was only a matter of months until
the walks were completed and in 1972,
reflecting the interests of the students
it represents, the Student Covemment
passed a resolution commending the
Maintenance of Oscillations department
for its decisive action.
long-neede-

red-nec-

"Youah Untlah Arrest"

Kernel Forum: the readers write
To the Editor of the Kernel
As a former UK student and editorial
writer for the Kernel during the early
19G0's it is with great sorrow that I look
upon the decline of the student newspaper as a spokesman for the UK student
body and its subversion to viewpoints
of a minority political group. It is, indeed, a sad end for what was once a
proud publication known for its impartiality and concern for student affairs.
On its present course the Kernel may
soon reach the irrelevance and ludicrous-nes- s
of the Berkeley Barb, an admitted
exponent of anarchy with the stated purpose of "declaring war on the establishment." The Barb's definition of the establishment seems remarkably like that
of the Kernel, i.e., anyone who doesn't
agree with your philosophy. Since this
is the supreme error of which you accuse
your opponents and is so obvious a contradiction, your relevance is lost and
you become just another of those loudg
mouthed,
bigots you profess to abhor.
finger-pointin-

News management and censorship are
said to be the supreme crime against
honest, professional journalism. I am sure
the Kernel's editors would be the first
and loudest to protest any suppression
or tampering with the