xt7cfx73vf03 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cfx73vf03/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19220526  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 26, 1922 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 26, 1922 1922 2012 true xt7cfx73vf03 section xt7cfx73vf03 J

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

VOL. XII

LEXINGTON, KY

MAY 26, 1922

No. 30

SCIENTISTS HOLD
CLASS IN DRAMATICS
210 STUDENTS TO BE
MEETING ON CAMPUS KENTUCKY WINS ANNUAL
IS COMPLIMENTED

75

STAFF APPOINTMENTS

FOR NEXT YEAR MADE Luclan Beckner of Winchester Elected INTERCOLLEGIATE
President of Organization

MEET;

Mr.

Powers Is Speaker at Little
Theater Performance Thursday

E14

4

Journalism Department Designates Personnel of Press
Associations and Bulletin
lias

The Department of Journalism
made the following appointments on
the staff, respectively of the State anil
conpress associations
ducted by journalism students, also for
the campus bulletin, terms of office
to begin in September and continue
.
throughout the session of
press
association:
Intra-statGeorge Taylor, chairman, Dixon Davidson, secretary, Affie Hammond, copy
reader, H. B. O'Donnell, Una Varden
and Miriam Botts, assistants;
association:
press
Extra-statMary Gorey, chairman, J. R. McClure,
secretary, Bertha Kraft, Fannie Tarl-toand Anna Louise Connor assist1922-23-

e

Lucien Beckner of Winchester,
prominent oil geologist, was elected
president of the Kentucky Academy
of Science, at tho ninth annual meet
ing of that body held Saturday in the
Physics lecture room. John F. Gunton,
of Transylvania
College, was made
vice president, while Dr. A. M. Peter
of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station, and W. S. Anderson, of
the College of Agriculture, were re
elected secretary and treasurer, re
Twenty-threspectively.
new mem
bers were elected to the acdemy, live
of these to honorary membership.
Dr. H. Gideon Wells, famous expert
on cancer,
of the University
of
Chicago, addressed the seventy-fivor
more scientists who were here for the
meeting on the subject, "The Present
Status of the Cancer Problem."
"The biggest advances toward discovering a means of controlling cancer
have been made in the past six years,"
Dr. Wells told the scientists." Among
the things which have been more or
less definitely established in connection with the disease are the facts that,
in all probability, cancer is not caused
by a specific parasite, in no reasonable
sense is "contagious, and It is not
necessarily a Hereditary disease." As
for cures, hope in this direction lies in
educating people to recognize superficial cancers and have them removed
before they become serious, he said.
Professor Glanville Terrell, head of
tho Philosophy Department, spoke on
by
tho subject, "The
Spirits," in closing the metting.

CENTRE

COMES

SECOND

Georgetown Takes Third
Place While Berea College
Comes Last
RECORDS

3

BROKEN

Warren Clair Wins Individual Honor Cup

e

"The Mouthpiece of God," written
by Prof Harvey J. Hinks of the English
Department, was the play given at the
regular performance at the Little
Theater on Thursday afternoon. Proceeding the performance of the play
Mr. Tom Powers, formerally of Louisville now an actor on Broadway, gave
an informal talk on "Dramatics," complimentary to the Strollers and the
Dramatic Production class.
"The Mouthpiece of God" was a
cleverly devised satire on the shallowpersons
ness of so many
who live precisely by the letter and
law but whose hearts are not attuned
to the divine law of the universe and
points out the real spiritual worth
of a man who was rated low by church
Each character in
conventionalities.
the production represented a specific
type of person to portray the meaning
of the story. Henry Taylor played the
part of Jed, who recognized the worth
and dross in life and lived very close
to God; but who disregarded petty
Josephine
church conventionalities.
Fithian played the part of Maria Doo- little, of the type exactly opposite to
Jed. The rest of the cast was corn- composed of, Olivia Smithe, K. C.
Tuggle and D. C. Davidson.
Immediately after the performance
the guests were served with tea in the
Woman's League room by the Dramatic Production class. Mr. Powers was
the guest of honor at the entertainment and was very much pleased with
work done of the Dramatic Production
class as shown by the play.

Finished a Successful

(Continued on page 5)

Students from the University are aiding in the sanitary survey, started
Monday by the Board of Commerce, in
which every house was to be visited
and its sanitary conditions inspected.
Each inspector was furnished with
a card stating that he had been appointed deputy sanitary inspector by
the city and that he was authorized
to make a survey of the promises. The
cards wore signed by Dr. W. O. Bullock, president of the Board of Health;
C. H. Voorhtes, health officer; and B.
J. Tracy, president of the Board of
Commerce.
Dr. P. K. Holmes, who holpod ninko
plans for tho survey, declared that tho
oxporionco would be valuable to his
Ho said that tho survey
studonts.
would give them an excellent opportunity to study sanitary and social
conditions first hand and that ho was
glnd to offer his assistance to tho
Board of Commerce:
A mooting of tho district captains

The last chapel of the year for the
freshmen class was held last Tuesday
with President McVey the speaker of
the morning. His remarks wero concerning the coming vacation and about
the old custom of tho cutting of the
freshmen's hair each Fall at tho opening of school. He made several suggestions for other ways of designating
the members of that class, for instance
the wearing of the blue cap.
There are two good reasons, Dr. McVey brought out, why the freshmen
should have some means of identification: in order that they may bo able
to recognize each other readily and so
tho newcomers at the University may
bo Identified. Ho said the point in
bringing up tho discussion at that time
was bocauso tho old traditions aro carried on and perpetuated each year by
tho Sophomore class. So. that is why
ho made tho suggestions to them and
In order that they might act on his suggestion in somo definito way in a class
meoting s.omo time beforo tho close of
tho term.
Dr. McVey congratulated ovory freshman that is closing a successful year
in tho Univorslty. Ho commented on
tho difficulty of adjustment which a
froshman has to undergo and one that
doos so, creditably, dosorves to bo congratulated. Ho cautioned them about

(Continued on page 5)

(Continued on page 5)

(Continued on page 5)

(Continued on page 5)

ants;

Campus bulletin: Mary McMeekin,
Gladys Martin.
The State association which supplies county newspapers with news of
activities of students from counties in
which those papers are respectively
nublished, succeeded in having pub
lished, during the session just closing
annroximately 1600 such news itms
which have not only exploited the University but incidentally have kept the
homefolk In touch with the student
life of their sons and daughters in
the university.
association supplies
The extra-statnews of the larger activities of the
University to about forty newspapers
throughout the state that pay attention
especially to educational news. The
campus bulletin issued each Monday
forecasts events of each succeeding
week on the campus and in other
quarters into which student and other
activities extend. The campus bulletin supplies the source from which
in a large measure all student publication assignments for. further treat- e

(Continued on Page 5.)

Table-Movin-

ARBOR DAY OBSERVED

5

220-yar- d

5

440-yar- d

ON CAMPUS

FRIDAY

Lavin Presides Over Ex-

ercises; Honorary

So-

cieties Tap Pledges

d

Lawn

Congratulates Those Who

The annual Arbor Day exercises
and the pledging to Lamp and Cross
and Mortar Board, senior honorary
societies was held on the campus during the fourth and fifth hours Friday.
"Bobbie" Lavin, 'president of the
senior class, presided and after a short
talk introduced Raymond Johnson,
senior class orator who spoke of the
traditions and ideals of the senior
class following the presentation of
the spade to the class president, each
senior heaped a spade of dirt upon the
tree. Mr. Johnson then presented the
spade in behalf of the seniors to Harry
Brailsford, junior orator, who accepted
it with tho promise that the present
junior class would seek to further tho
ideals and to carry out tho plans fostered by tho seniors.
of
tho
tho reading
Followed
class prophecy by Eva Congloton who
In a very charming manner predicted
tho future of her classmates.
Tho assembled crowds then adjourned to group themsolves near tho cannon to witness tho pledging services.
Tho following young men woro chosen
for Lamp and Cross: John Burks,
Albright,
Grant,
John
Bowman
Lawronco Burnham, BIrkott Prlbblo,
Charles Mahonoy, Otis Jones, Samuel
Itldgoway, William Finn and Juiuob
Shouso.
Thoso choson for Mortar Board
woro: Eleanor Morse, Sarah Blanding,

n

e

to Be Held On

Patterson Hall

Two hundred and ten students will
from tho University of
Kentucky at the
commencement exercises Wednesday, June 14,
on the lawn of Patterson Hall. The
commencement address will bo delivered by Dr. Edwin E. Slosson, scientist
editor and publicist of New York City.
His subject will be "Looking Backward and Living Fowrard."
The academic procession will form
in front of the administration building
and march to the scene of the exercises. Following the address, degrees
and honors will be conferred by Dr.
Frank L. McVey. The baccalaureate
sermon will be preached in the University chapel Sunday afternoon, June 11,
at 3:30 but the name of the speaker
has not been given out.
Tuesday, June 14, will be alumni
day when more than 400 alumni from
all parts of the country are expected
to meet at the University . A reunion
and conference by colleges will be held
in the morning from 8 to 10 o'clock.
Alumni of the College of Arts and
Sciences will meet in White Hall,
alumni of the College of Agriculture
in Scovell Hall, alumni of the College
of Engineering in Dicker Hall, 'and
those from the College of Law in
Science Hall.
The annual business of the alumni
association will be held in the Administration Building at 10:30 o'clock.
Luncheon will be served on the campus In tents to be erected for the purpose, and afterwards tho visitors will
be taken on an automobile trip thru
the Bluegrass section.
The alumni club reception for the
girls of the senior class will be held at
4:30 o'clock and the alumni banquet

The university of Kentucky track
team won the annual intercollegiate
state track meet held here last Saturday afternoon on Stoll Field with G3
points to its credit, 15 points ahead of
Centre its nearest competltior. Three
collegiate records were broken, in this
meet, and one record tied.
The final standing of the teams was:
Kentucky 63, Centre 48, Georgetown
1!), and Berea 5.
The four colleges
mentioned were the only ones that had
teams at the meet.
Warren Clare, or tho University, was
the winner of the cup for individual
points, with
scoring. He had 17
Mountjoy and Kimble, both of Centre
second and third, with 14 U and 12
respectively.
Threo, Stnto collegiate records were
broken and one tied. Kimble, of Centre, shattered the mile record by 8
seconds; Clare, of Kentucky, broke his
own record of 25
for the
low hurdles by stepping It off in 24
Moore, of Georgetown, established another 'record for the javelin throw by
hurling it 1G6 feet 9 Ms inches the previous mark was 1G4: 7.
run, made
The mark for the
last year by Dean, of Georgetown, was
tied by Head, of the same college. The
time was 51 35 seconds Barryman, of
Centro, barely missed tho mark of 9
dash,
seconds for tho hundred-yarwhen he ran it in 10 flat.
The results of all events follow:
Dash Berryman, Centre,
first; Clare, Kentucky, Second; Head,
Georgetown, third. Time 10 seconds.
Pole Vault Mountjoy, Centro, first;
Pilphrey, Berea, and Sharon, Centre,
tied for second. Height. 10 feet 6
inches.
One Mile Run Kimble, Centre, first;
Porer, Kentucky, second; Kirk, Berea.
third. Time 4 minutes 32 seconds
(new record.)
Shot
Put Davidson, Kentucky,
first; Daughtery, Georgetown, second:
Hill, Berea third. Distance, 3S.05 feet.
Dash Berryman, Centre,
first; Clare, Kentucky, second; Nantz,
Kentucky, third. Time 22
seconds.
High Jump Mountjoy,
Running
Contra, first; Wilhelm, Kentucky, and
Morman, Berea, tied for second.
Height, 5 feet G inches.
Discus Throw Davidson, Kentucky,
first; Boyd, Kentucky second; Daugh-orty- ,
Georgetown, third. Distance, 112
feet.
High Hurdles Claro, Kentucky, first; Mountjoy, Centro, second;
Dowhorst, Kentucky, third. Time,
1G
soconds.
Run Hend, Georgetown,
first; Robortson, Contro, socond; Snysecder, Kontucky, third. Time, 51
onds (tios record).
Run Brown, Kentucky,
first; Portor, Kentucky, socond; Swan-go- ,
Berea, third. Tltno, 10 minutos 35
seconds.

e

Exercises

T
LAST FRESHMANVCHAPEL

Year

be graduated

fifty-fift-

h

d

0.

K. STUDENT HELP IN

LEX. SANITARY SURVEY

Work in Charge of Captains
Server, Galbraith, Henry,
Wilhelm and Cooper

d

5

d

4440-Yar- d

Two-Mil-

SLOMER

ENDS CAREER

WITH WIN

OVER

VOLS

Captain

Bud's Masterful
Hurling: Subjects Tennessee In First Game

Aided by the masterful pitching of
Captain "Bud" Slomer, the Wildcat
nine defeated the University of Tennessee 10-- in the first of a two game
series, last Thursday afternoon on
Stoll Field.
Captain Slomer, pitching his last
game for Kentucky turned in a wonderful game, holding tho enemy to five
hits until tho ninth and then easing
up. "Dutch" Burnham, Oakley Brown,
and Pribblo led tho locals with tho
hickory, tho trio garnering over half
of tho Wildcat total safeties.
Kontucky opened tho attack in the
first inning when she put four runs
across the platter. Tennessee was tho
next to score, making two runs in tho
second on two hits, nn out and two
walks. In tho sixth the Wildcats,
thinking that It was tho "lucky seventh
added, by mistako, six mora runs to
tho total, on six clean hits, one a
doublo by Slomer, and a trlplo by King.
In tho ninth inning Tennessee opon-eup a dangerous attack, and with tho
7

d

(9 oSud no ponunuoo)

* THE KENTUCKY KERNE

Alumni Notes

i

nlverslty of
of Alumni Association,
Kentucky, Lexington. Ky., for your
meptlm?
Lebanon, iWny
1922-2class dues, (dot that, please,
in honor of President McVcy
it's next years duos, now too late to
tmd IiIrIi school prndunteg.
tnlk about tills year's.) If you send
Detroit, Mny 27 (Last Saturday
your check now you are going to
Regular) dinner, Dixieland Inn.
The Kernel all the remainder
Denver, Juno 1 (First Thursday
of this collegiate voar, as a bonus, and
Regular) luncheon 12:30, Uniall next year. If you haven't soon
versity Club.
The Kernel lately, let me toll you that
Lexington, June 10 (Second Saturpaper alone is worth the $2.
day Regular) luncheon 12:.10,
"(Jraham writes mc that there are
Lafayette Hotel. To complete
Gl living members of the graduating
arrangemontfi
for
clnss of 'Ofi and that only 22 of them,
June 13.
or 3G per cent, were In good standing
Cnrrollton, June 13 (Second Tuesin the Alumni Association, Mnrch 15.
day Regular) luncheon.
1922. I think that is poor for '0G.
Don't you?
X
X
"Second, I want you to write me a
Something interesting every minute
or a note, or a telegram but
13, from S a. m. until midnight, letter,
.June
write, please and tell me you have
has been arranged by the
and thou tell me all
Committee. The program in brief fol- sent the
about yourself. In that way we can
lows :
CALENDAR

I

3

n

two-spo-

"
"circular
by Col- start that
Conference and
wo talked about in '0G. I'll not
a. m.
leges
let It stop. Just eacli one of you give
Business Meeting,
on Campus by Classes me the "dope" about yourself and your
Luncheon
family, and I'll see that Its passed
p. m.
12:30-I believe you are going to get
Motor Trip through Blue Grass around.
another $2 worth out of that.
p. m.
"(1) A little check to Graham.
Alumnae Reception for Senior Girls
"(2) A good letter to Brown.
p. m.
"Then watch our smoke. I'm an
p. m.
Open House Fraternities
Dinner-DancLafayette Hotel 6:30 xlously awaiting your reply.
"Do it this very soon, please.
p. m.
"Yours for Old Kentucky
Other plans for making the day re-- ,
CHAUNCEY BROWN."
plete with fun and good fellowship
X
X
have been made by the committee com
posed of Headley Shouse, chairman;
BOWLING GREEN HAS CLUB
Misses Lulie Logan and Marguerite
McLaughlin, Wayland Rhodes and
Widened Influence of University in
Louis Hillenmeyer.
Southern Kentucky is Aim
r
Classes to hold their regular
let-tor-

d

0

10:30-12:3-

4

6

4-- 6

five-yea-

are

'77, '82, 'S7, '92, '97,
'02, '07, '12, and '17. The class of '19
n

this being
will hold Its first
the .third year since graduation. Under the Dix plan contemporaneous
will
classes to the regular
hold informal meetings with each of
them in groups of three as follows:
78, 79, and 80; S3, 84, and S5; SS, S9
and 90; 93, 94 and 95; 9S, 99 and 00;
03. 04 and 05; OS, 09 and 10; 13, 14
and 15; 18 and 20.
X

X

PRIZE CIRCULAR IS OUT
Chauncey Brown goes after Class of
'06 for Higher standing
The best class letter and plan for
received at the Alumni
Office has originated with Secretary
L. Chauncey Brown '0G. St. Petersburg, Fla. Mr. Brown is a published
and had his circular prepared in his
own office in the "Sunshine City."
Other secretaries are turning letters
out by hand, multigraph and mimeoand
graph in an effort to
strengthen the old Kentucky spirit.
Active membership in the Alumni
Association has gained 300 percent in
the last two years, the renewed interest and greater membership having
been made possible by the class secretaries and by the alumni clubs. The
only
classes hold regular
once in five years but the clubs are
meeting monthly.
Mr. Brown's letter follows:
"Remember, back in 190G, how we
said we would stick together after
those
Remember
we graduated?
"circular letters" wo planned so that
we would keep In touch with each
other?
"I haven't been any better than the
rest of you. I, also, have had plenty
of good intentions.
"But, follows, the joke is on me
now. Here I am way down In Florida,
pretty well out of touch with Kentucky and the states farther north
where most of you are, and all of a
sudden I am convinced, much against
my will, that I am the class secretary.
They won't tell me why. But since
I am class secretary, Its just naturally
up to mo to do what I can for the
class and our Alma Mater.
"Of course, I am going to ask you to
do something; class secretaries have
to do that or lose their Jobs.
"First, I want you to mail a check
for $2 to Herbert Graham, Secretary

Bowling green alumni, organizing
the thirtieth club of the University of
Kentucky, the seventeenth in the state
of Kentucky, have launched a movement for extending the influence of
the University in the Southern part
of the State. Through organized effort these alumni are planning also
to take an active part in local educational and civic enterprises. The club
is expected to lend material aid also to
"Western Normal School where several
Kentucky men now hold important
positions. President H. H. Cherry,
of "Western" is one of the pioneers in
the
movement among the
normal schools, colleges and the University,
J. V. Pritchett 'IS, attorney, was
elected president of the club and C. A.
secretary-treasureLaudermilk
A dozen former Kentucky students attended the dinner and business meeting of the club. Professors E. S. Good,
R. C. Miller and W. S. Anderson, of
the University, also attended the meeting and made short talks. They had
gone to Warren county for a breeders
field meet.
"There is no doubt that we shall
have here in a short time one of the
largest and most enthusiastic alumni
clubs in the State," in the words of
George V. Page '17, head of tiie Department of Physics at "Western."
ex-'2-

X

ANNOUNCE

X

LOST

LIST

Alumni Secretary Requests Information to Complete Records of
Office

Alexander, .Tosie Mc Coun '07; Allen,
John Griffen '07; Grunwell, Paul Clifton '07; Maddocks, Florence May '70;
Paulln, Frank Chester '07; Schorffius,
Bonjamin F. '70; Stiles, Mildred '07:
Summer, Gordon '07; Towery, Beverly
Todd '07; Bell, Benjamin Duncan '08;
Dean, Willis Johnson 'OS; Rands, Mrs.
Robt. Carfleld 'OS (minnle c. Frost);
Galloway, Clinton d. 'OS; Lewis,
Jumes A. C. 'OS; Schultz, Oscar Lewis
'OS;

Browning, George F. '09; Hudgins,
Thomas F. '09; Stackhouso, William
O. '09; Wallace, Leonard Dolong '09;
Grafton, Milton C '10; Fleming, Ruby
Ringo '10; McCarroll, Charles '10; Nelson, Harry Androw '10; Pope, George
Riley '10; Salyers, Squire W. '10;
Smith, Hal
Sims, Robert Leo '10;
Walker 10;
Boyd,
James
Aullck Oliver '11;

Alfred '11; Dunlap, George Oreon '11;
Easton, Harry Draper '11; llendrlck-son- ,
George M. '1.1 ; Horronkohl, Mrs.
Otta '11 (Jesse Flthlan Hlblor); Hudson, William Edwnrd '11; Mills, Grover
C. '11; Paynter, Walker B. '11; Sloan,
Jesse Ncnl '11; Strong, Robert duthrlo
'11; Worthlngton, Elmer Frnncls '11;
Faulkner, Francos Alma '12; Gill,
Jonas Otha '12; Johnson, Mrs. S. King
'12; (Elolse E. dlnn); Hughes, Mary
Irene '12; Johnston, Wllllnm B. '12
Korphage, Harry G. '12; Perkins, Wal
ton '12; Tomkles, Frnnk II. '12; Utloy,
Newton Wlllnrd '12; Watson, John R.
12; Whitacro, Philip A. '12; White,
William Blackburn '12.
X

X

;..j.j..;..j..;...j..;. ;;;- - j. j.

Betwixt Us

I

"It wns a great pleasure to all of
McVcy
and
us to have President
Arthur Shanklin with us May 2. We
couldn't help being impressed with
the President's great interest in us
and our University. Shanklin made a
wonderful impression on our crowd
and certainly gave us an interesting
account of current University activities.
at this
"The custom Inaugurated
party of having a senior with us each
year certainly should be carried on
and should promote a closer tie between the New Club and the Univer
sity. We believe the entire senior
class should get some benefit from
Shanklin's visit with us, stimulating
them to become better alumni after
they have gone out into their various
walks of life.
"Please feel free to call on me at
any time for anything I can do, and
also give us the benefit of any suggestions that will tend to make our
Club more servicable to the University." Carroll G. Taylor '10, Secretary,
New York Alumni Club. Address 27
William Street, New York City.

I,

University," writes Jus. R. Robinson.
Mr. Robinson received his A. B. degree in '09 and hns been engaged In
teaching over Blnce leaving college.
For n fow years ho was connected
with tho Richmond high school, first
as a teacher then as principal. He Is
now Supervisor of Correspondence at
tho Western Kentucky State Normal
School at Richmond.

x

x

Is manager of the
C. W. Nunn
engineering and construction department of tho Swanson Electric Company at 104 Main Street, Evansvlllo,
Indinnn.
ox-'0-

X

X

Henry Clay Wilson, who received
his A. B. In '9S, A. M. '11, hns returned
to Lexington for tho summer vacation
and is at homo, 334 Spring Street. Mr.
Wilson has been in educational work
in various high schools of the State
since leaving the University. Ho was
superintendent of schools at West
Liberty from 1914 to 1919. For two
years bo served as principal of the
high school at Union City, Tennessee,
returning to Kentucky last Juno. He
hns just closed a successful session as
principal of tho high school at Hardlns-burg- ,

"I am just in receipt of your courteous
invitation to visit the U. of K. grounds
in June and meet some of my old
acquaintances of thirty years ago. I
appreciate the invitation and wish my
health would permit my being present
but under the Doctor's instructions I
could not, in justice to myself, go into
any assembly for months to come."
A.

M.

Cox

'92

Attorney-at-Law-

,

X

X

X

Monogram and

Initial
Buckles and
Belts
New Spring Designs

HEINTZ JEWELER
East Main St. Opposite Phoenix
Lexington, Kentucky
Headquarters

for "Frat" Jewelry

X

for two years was assistant chemist
at the Experiment Stntion. He was
a member of the Barrow Unit, U. S.
B. II.
40, during the World War.
Since his return to civilian life he has
been connected with the National
Carbon Company of Cleveland, Ohio,
as chemical engineer. He returned to
Cleveland after his visit to Lexington
but will go to California about July 1
on a business trip for his company.
His address is Box 400, Cleveland, O.
X

X

A lumni Directory
The F. D. Lawrence
Electric Co.
Fourth St.

CORRECT ENGLISH
How To Use It
JOSEPHINE

TUCK BAKER, Editor

A Monthly Magazine
$2.50 THE YEAR

Send 10c for Sample Copy

Correct English Pub. Co.
EVANSTON, ILLINOIS

BARNES & HALL
DRUGGISTS

East Main St.
Prescriptions a Specialty
Fine Assortment
of
NUNNALLY'S

,THIN

lead:
Par

Electrical Supplies
General

CANDLES

Ven

Cincinnati, Ohio

Wholesale
Distributors for the
Electric Co.

Cynthlana, Ky.

CUFF LINKS

R. B. Taylor visited the campus for
n short while this week, renewing old
friendships. He graduated in '15 and

3

X

TIE PINS

Ky.

"Please see that the Kernel is addressed to me at Box 137 Y. M. C. A.,
Dayton, Ohio. I am now located as
XX
research engineer with General Motors
"I am very pleased to attach my Research Corporation of this city."
check for two dollars to cover my Fred Luker '21.
X
X
The issues of
alumni dues for 1922-2W. E. Baker,
is secretary of
the Kernel which were sent to me
during the past year brought mo con- the Chamber of Commerce at Hazard,
Ky.
siderable pleasure.
X
X
"I expect to be in Lexington the
"Please find enclosed, check for two
first'part of July and hope to have the
and parpleasure of seeing my class associates dollars for dues for 1922-2there. Best wishes for the success of don my tardiness," writes George G.
Association." Felix Scearce '07. Mr. Scearce graduated
Alumni
the
Shouse '195544 Pursuing Avenue, St. from the University In 1907 and taught
(Continued on next page.)
Louis, Mo.
X

SPRING
SPECIALS

t

ENUS EVERP0INTED
and other Metal Pencila

TTHE name VENUS is your
JL guarantee of perfection.

"I am the only alumna here. There
Absolutely crumble-prooWARNER P. SAYERS.
are several Kentuckians though and
smooth ana perfectly graded.
Sec'y, Sales Mgr.
wo are planning to organize a Ken7 DEGREES
V
t
tucky Club.
frfr.fr.fr fr.fr .).X$H,4HSMH' 't 'I' 'I' ! t '! t if
2B soft ec black H med. hard
B soft
2H hard
"The Kernel has been fine this year. frfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfr4
F firm
fH extra hard
I am sure I never appreciated it quite
HB medium for general use
Dues and the Kernel
as much before. Best wishes for 'Ken15c per tube of 12 leads;
tucky.'" (Mrs. Guy W.) Linda Pur-ne$1.50 per dozen tube
$2 a Year
If yourdealercannot supply you writ tu.
Smith '17,-1- 428
Tennessee Street,
For all Former Students
American Lead Pencil Co.
Lawrence, Kansas.
Alumni Secretary, University of m
, New York
215 Fifth Ave., Dept.
X
X
Ask us about the new
Kentucky, Lexington.
X
"Wo had a very nice meeting May 4
VENUS EVERPOINTED PENCILS
4, and talked of many things which fr fr frfrfrfrfrfrfrfr.fr fr fr fr fr ,, ,, 4, .t.
fr
had taken place In Kentucky during
the last month. It was quite a pleasure for us to have Doctor Tigort
here in Colorado for a few days. Ho
is the same 'Doctor Tigo' and wo are
for him strong in his new position.
''
750 Frelinghuysen Avenue,
"Another thing we wish to do at this
Newark, N.
time is to pledge ourselves to give
you every proper help In the matter
Boston Buffalo Chicago New York Philadelphia
of the Kentucky Memorial. Wo have
not as yet hnd a chance to get together
MANUFACTURERS OF WEATHER
and approximate whut can bo done
but wo will not delay this matter
ff
long." Denver Alumni Association
with the help of the following Kentuckiana
by J. A.Brittaln 'IS, COG Mining ExJ. I. Lylc, '96
J. E. Boiling, '15
change, Denver, Col.
f,

ll

'Carrier Engineering corporation
J.

to make "Every day a good day

X

"I appreciate having received the
Kernel this year, and am, therefore,
enclosing check for $4 as payment for
dues this yeur und next. I am always
interested In whatever pertains to tho

E. T.
L. L.
M. S.
R. L.
R. R.

Lyle, '00
Lewis, '07
Smith, '08
Jones, '12

Taliaferro, 'IS

H. Woraham, '16
It. Waterfill, '26
J. H. Bailey, '20
W. B. Thornton, '21
G. E. Zerfosa, '21

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
ALUMNI

'BOB"

REPENTANT

for sovornl years. Ho has boon con- A pen was found
nected with U. S. Government EngiNot wondering 'round
neers' work, moro particularly In tho But on n desk it lay,
lock and dam construction branch,
So I picked it up
recently. Ills address la coro of U. And In my pocket stuck,
Ky.
S. Engineer Office, Louisville,
All on a nice Spring day.
X

X

Howell Spears '07, Is on an extended
vacation In tho west, spending the
greater part of the time In California.
Mr. Spears Is chief chemist, feed division, at the Experiment Station and Is
known not only for his good work
there, but also for his ability to get
new members for the Alumni Association. Delinquent Lexington alumni, as
well ns others, will miss his genial
smile. His address until August 1 will
be Rixera, California.
X

I havo tho thing
Tho nice fountain thing,
And carry It day by dny.
But if the owner will come to mo
y
and sny
A description of this pen,
I'll give it up there and then.
BOB MITCHELL.
LOST Somewhere on or near tho
campus, a pair of shell rim glasses.
Finder please return to the Kernel
office. Reward.

X

A WARM NIGHT
H. D. Osborn, B. M. E. 13, E. E.
'16, has been with the Western Electric They sny tho sight of nn nnciont knight
Was n pretty one to see;
Company, Hawthorne Station, Chicago,
ever since leaving the University. He As he risked his neck for a feminine
wreck
Is now production engineer for the
They called it chivalry.
company, which makes most of the
His
world's supply of telephones.
residence address Is 241 South Catherine Avenue, La Grange, 111.
C.

X

BOOKS BORROWED
Now dresses dnmcs wore in the dnys of
Farmers
yore
Tho hen stood on the gnrden lot,
The following books wore borrowed
Hung down to their slze-1- 0
feet;
Whence nil hut her hnd lied,
from Prof. Mlkesoll last year will those
And didn't leave a planted spot
Unbobbod wns their hnir, but the knights
who borrowed them or have them now
didn't enre
In tho arly onion bed.
"Our girls," they thought, "enn't be
With vlm she worked both feet plonso return them nt once.
bent."
nnd legs.
"Women's Reading's No. 9."
And tho gnrdoner said, he bets,
"Vlngents Height." (Vngabond play)
If knights went nuts over antique mutts,
She wns trying to find the kind or
"Rise up Jenney Smith."
Think, if n m"dcrn miss,
eggs
"Tho Monkey's Paw."
With her dress to her knee, on n cozy
On which onion sots.
sotee,
"Tho Romancers."
Would pnss him n pnsslonntc kiss.
The Chase
"Tho Follower of Yeddo."
Punch Bowl.
A hundred years ago today1.
"The shodow of the Elm."
A wilderness wns here
"A marriage proposal."
A man with powder In his gun
Only This And Nothing More
"17 Wools shop ploya 2nd slvns"

"A yard of silk; a yard of lace;
A wisp of tulle to give it grace;
A flower placed where flowers go,
,
the back waist
Tho skirt
low;
One shoulder strap, no sign of sleeve;
If she should sneeze, Good Morning,
Evo!"

Went forth to hunt a deer,
But now the times, have changed
And run along a different plan,
A Dear with powder on her nose
Goes forth to hunt n man.

knee-high-

"ThndorJr."
"Satro (5 little plays)"
"The hour glass by Yates."
One
"The 50 contemporary
Plnys." (Shay)
"Lady Oregovles Comedies."

GOLD DIGGER
Of Coursel
Pell "They call my girl 'Spear"I'd like to try on that suit
mint,' "
in the window."
Mell "Why? Is she Wrlgley?"
Clerk: "Sorry, but you will have to
Pell "No, but she's always after change your clothes in tho dressing
meals."
roow."

X

A. L. Hicks '97, Special Examiner,

Donartment of Justice, Washington,
C Is traveling most of the time on
investigating work for that Department He is at present in Jacksonville, Florida. His permanent address
is care of Department of Justice, Washington. All mail will be forwarded to
him from that office.
D.

X

X

The marriage of Miss Margaret
Planck, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.
A. Planck of Lexington, took place
Saturday at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
C. L. Berryman, 228 Rose Street, Rev.
Clarence Walker officiating.
inMr. Ricci is just recovering from
juries received while in service in the
World War and had been in the hospital at Paris. Frartce for 11 months
before coming home.
X

X

'15 is now at
433 Newton Place N. W., Washington,
and
D. C. He is an

"Henry Lewis Poole

Nikola Tesla

until recently has been employed in
Detoit, Mich.
X

X

William Crowder Mitchell '16, is now
connected with the Farm E