xt7cfx73wb8n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cfx73wb8n/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1965 journals 158 English Lexington : Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.158 text Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.158 1965 2014 true xt7cfx73wb8n section xt7cfx73wb8n   Results of the
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.   UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
 ,, ·` `IIIQHMIIIII AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
’{ I DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY
QA PROGRESS REPORT I58 Lexmgmn
JANUARY I966
41

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TESTING LOCATIONS OF 2*
THE KENTUCKY HYBRID CORN PERFORMANCE TEST g
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Area Location Cooperator ·
Non—Virus l. Princeton West Ky. Sub. Sta. L,
2. Lexington Ky. Agr. Exp. Sta. '
Virus 3. Augusta George and Paul Gearhart
4. Vanceburg Alex Waters, Jr. g
Acknowledgment is made to Gary Hicks, Department of
Agronomy, and to the University of Kentucky Computing
Center for assistance in summarizing the results A
reported in this pI'OgI‘€SS report. ·
Y
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<2> 4

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RESULTS OF THE KENTUCKY HYBRID CORN
‘ PERFORMANCE TEST IN 1965
fs
C. R. Tutt, F. A. Loeffel and D. E. Thorndale
s
*4
_ The objective of the Kentucky Hybrid Corn Per-
4 formance Test is to provide an unbiased estimate of
Qithe relative performance of corn hybrids being sold
in Kentucky. This information may be used by farmers,
n` seedsmen, and research and extension personnel to de-
-» termine which hybrid most nearly possesses the character-
istics which are desired or required for a specific
situation. The need for the University of Kentucky
. g Agricultural Experiment Station to obtain this information
` is indicated by the continuing shift to hybrids by
A;Kentucky farmers. In recent years, much more seed
» of single-cross hybrids is being planted in Kentucky.
This is a part of a continuing search by corn pro-
\* ducers in the state to improve their efficiency of
» production.
`° Kentucky established a new efficiency record
-~ for corn production in 1965. The average yield
for the state was 69 bushels per acre. This is
I; 3 bushels per acre above the previous record set
~ in 1963 and 12 bushels above the 1964 yield. Produc-
tion this year exceeded that of 1964 by 13,875,000
U‘bushe1s. This represents an increase of 22 percent
- over last year. This year's crop also exceeded the
average annual production for the five-year period
B 1959-63 by 6,199,000 bushels or almost 9 percent.
. Much of this increase in production can be attri-
buted to a good growing season, but much credit
ligmust be given to the increasing use of superior
g hybrids, fertilizer, herbicides and improved prac-
tices used by Kentucky farmers.
¤
~ An excellent corn crop was produced this year
despite the drought during the month of August.
*Rainfall was adequate over most of the state for
‘ <:~»>

 * .
most of the growing season, with the exception of b
August. However, the bluegrass area was short on
moisture for most of the season. Early planted Q
corn received enough rain the first part of July .
to mature a good crop, although late corn was severely .
damaged by the high temperatures and moisture shortage 2
during August. An important factor in the good corn
crop produced this year was the rapid planting made
possible by modern machinery when conditions were `
favorable. Above—average temperatures during April
and May were favorable for rapid germination and M
growth of corn.
Precipitation during April was near or above
average and was accompanied by several unseasonably ,·
warm periods. Toward the last half of May, scat-
tered localities were needing rain, but early June r.
showers provided adequate moisture for most of the
state. Rainfall during July broke records in many
areas, with some areas receiving an excess of 7 P'
or 8 inches, but by the first of August additional
moisture was needed. The hot, dry weather during ·
much of August reduced corn prospects some, but s
the actual reduction was not so great as anticipated.
The dry weather hastened the maturity of early corn.
{ .
Corn planting at the end of April was behind
the progress of any year since 1961, owing to an l ~
extremely wet March and frequent rains during much *~
of April. This resulted in most of the acreage being
planted during the month of May. By the end of the
first week of May, 40 percent of the corn acreage *
had been planted, compared with less than 10 percent
a week earlier. Sixty-nine percent of the crop
had been planted by May 18 and 91 percent by June 1. *
This was higher than for any of the last five years. *
By July 20, progress of this year's corn crop was
ahead of all recent years except 1962, with 60 percent r
of the crop tasselling or in a more mature stage.
Nearly 50 percent of the corn crop was matured by
September 14, with the remainder being in the dent *
A
(4) `

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_ In 1963 two moisture samples were taken at each
location for each hybrid by taking a composite sample
•£rom replications l and 2 and from replications
,_3 and 4. The moisture content in the grain was
determined at harvest by removing 2 rows of kernels ‘
ufrom each of 10 ears selected at random from each
, of 2 replications. The grain from the 20 ears was
thoroughly mixed, and the moisture content of a 100
l 4`jf3m sample was determined with a Steinlite Moisture
__Meter. Moisture samples were taken on an individual
plot basis and moisture individually determined at
‘each location in 1964 and 1965.
Erect Plants.
'* The percentage of erect plants is considered Q
_ to be an estimate of the resistance of a hybrid
To the total insect and disease complex affecting
standing ability. This value is obtained by counting
__plants with stalks broken between the ear-bearing
·’node and the ground level and those which lean from
-the base at an angle of more than 30 degrees from
·_ the vertical. This sum is subtracted from the plants
`present and the difference divided by the total plants
~—present to give the percentage of erect plants.
i;Ear Height.
· Ear height, the distance from the base of the
plant to the point of attachment of the upper ear,
`uwas measured visually using a scale with one-foot
.~intervals. Visual ratings were taken on each plot
vcof each hybrid at each location.
;Disease,
. _ Visual ratings of hybrid reaction to corn virus
fwere taken at Augusta and Vanceburg. Present indi-
cations are that the only virus present in Kentucky
»_is Maize Dwarf Mosaic. All plots of each hybrid
4"were rated shortly after silking on a l-9 scale,
'with l being resistant and 9 being extremely susceptible.
=a
_,,_ (7)

 e.
INTERPRETATION `
The performance of hybrids varies with weather I
conditions which change from season to season and from
testing location to testing location in the same season.·· A
Since the weather conditions cannot be predicted at $
the time of planting, a farmer should plant a hybrid
which has been a good performer in an "average" season. t
The best estimate of hybrid performance for an average
season is obtained by combining the results obtained
from a large number of experiments grown in different
years at a number of locations.
The information presented in Table 4 is the i'
average of l2 individual experiments conducted in l963, .
l96A and l965. In Table 5 are summarized the results
obtained from seven experiments in l964 and l965. *"·
Table 6 contains information obtained in l965 from
two locations where corn virus was not present.
Data obtained in 1965 from two locations where corn ’:
virus was present are presented in Table 7. For .
this reason, the information contained in Table 4
is the best estimate available for comparing the *
performance of corn hybrids for average growing con- p ·
ditions in Kentucky. I
ff
MAKE YOUR CHOICE BASED ON YOUR OWN NEEDS _
Improvements in corn hybrids are constantly being ‘
made. An efficient corn producer will want to keep
informed on these improvements and to determine if
they will produce well on his farm. For this reason, * I
it is suggested that new hybrids be grown frequently , °
on a trial basis in comparison with the hybrid or hybrids
presently grown. If this suggestion is followed, '
a commonly made error can be avoided. Frequently _
a farmer changes his entire corn acreage to a different
hybrid and then compares the performance of the new V
hybrid with the old hybrid. This is not a valid com-
parison since the hybrids were not grown under similar q
conditions. Hybrids being compared should be grown ’
 
(8) I
f

 A in the same field, using identical management practices.
"A good way to do this is to plant seed of the new
-»hybrid beside currently used hybrids in a field, being
sure to mark them at planting time. It is important
Jito observe the hybrids frequently during the growing
,season. At harvest, yield should be determined and
other observational notes recorded. Consult your
county extension agent for procedure. If this suggestion .
A`is followed, a corn grower will be able to select hybrids
,_which more nearly fit his production practices and per-
sonal preferences.
` *5
The number of corn plants per acre in Kentucky
is generally too low for top production. It would
"\be well worth the time and effort to change the setting
_ on the drill and compare yields at different rates
M%f planting. It should be kept in mind, however, that
‘·plant population and fertility level must be kept in ·
__balance for efficient production. Consideration should
· also be given to the use of chemical weed killers,
~ soil insecticides and some method of minimum tillage
_mfor preparation of land.
T;
_ DO YOUR PART TO CONTRIBUTE TOWARD
r` A 70—BUSHEL AVERAGE CORN YIELD IN
KENTUCKY IN l966
Q.
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(9)

 •
Table 1. Hybrids Tested in 1965 ·
  {
Hybrid Color Cross Source of Hybrids A
gc
AES 809 Y ax Agricultural Experiment
Station (North Central) ’*=
Burgdorf B-92-W W 4X Burgdorf's Hybrids A
B—846 ax 5101 W. Broadway
Evansville, Ind.
Crib Filler 66 Y 2X Mitchell Farms
78 Y 3X Windfall, Ind. ,
116 Y ax ik
123 Y ax _
183W W ax .
Dekalb 805 Y 2X Dekalb Agricultural
82i+ Y ax Association, Dekalb,
999 W ax Ill. `
1006 Y Ax V
XL-45 Y 2X
XL-65 Y 3X ‘
XL-362 Y 3X ·
XL—385 Y 3X "
Dixie's 99Y Y ax Dixie Stock Farm
Sonora, Ky. '
Hagan H-2 W ax R.M. Hagan, Route 4 N
H-9 Y ax Owensboro, Ky. *
Kamp 9lOK W Ax Kamp's Farm Seed, Route 2 {S
913BRK W ax Evansville, Ind.
Ky 105 Y ax University of Kentucky
Ky 5921W W ax Agricultural Experiment 1
Station, Lexington
Meacham. M-5 W ax Meacham's Hybrids
M-33YB Y ax Route 3, Morganfield, Ky. F`
MX-30Y Y 2X A
MX-50W W 2X
Oliver BB—25 Y 3X Dearmont Oliver & Son *
210 Williams Street
East Prairie, Mo.
P.A.G. SX19 Y 2X Pfister Associated Growers, 1 A
SX29 Y 2X Inc., Aurora, lll. and
SX59 Y 2X Franklin, Ky. .
SX63 Y 2x
(10) *.

 ' R
*3
- Table 1. Continued
 
Y"; Hybrid Color Cross Source of Hybrids
‘x   ,
Pioneer 309A Y AX Pioneer Corn Company, Inc.
-0 310 Y Ax Tipton, Ind.
A 321 Y ax
509 W AX .
511 W AX
"°— 3306 Y 2x
_, XlOO1 Y 2X
3369 Y 2X
"i Princeton 8-A Y Ax Princeton Farms
81-A Y ax Princeton, Ind.
790-AA W ax
890-AA Y ax
`* 920-A W ax
990-A W ax
"*$ SX-80A Y ZX
SX—806 Y 3X ,
Iv
Schenk S-73A Y AX Charles H. Schenk
`T S-96W W AX and Son, Inc., Route A
55-88 Y 2X Vincennes, Ind.
N Southern States Southern States Coop.,
gu; 755 Y AX Inc., Division of Seed
820S Y 2X and Farm Supply, Richmond
~· 860 Y Ax 20, Va.
909E Y ax
·‘~ 979 Y ax
Catawba Y ax
’ Matoaka Y Ax
Munsee Y AX
s';
Stokes 200 Y ax S.J. Stokes & Son, Military
»· Pike, Route 2, Lexington, Ky.
,4; Stull lO0YB Y ax Stull Brothers, Inc.
lO1YB Y Ax Sebree, Ky. I
K AAAW W 2X
800W W 2X
I s 807Y Y 2X
3 T-E Cropmaster Y 3X Golden Acres Hybrids,
T-E EZOYB Y ax Tulia, Texas and
ni T-E 6A16 Y Ax Ken—Bred Hybrids Marion
Ken—Bred SX2OY Y 2X and Danville, Ky.
·= Ken-Bred E2OYA Y ax Distributors, Louisville
Ken-Bred M20w W ax Seed Company, Louisville, Ky.
A'; US 523W W AX Experiment Station (U.S.D.A.)
(U)

 ’¥.
Q
  ·
Table 2. Pedigrees of Experiment Station and ,
U. S. Hybrids Tested in 1965 ` ’
  Q V
Hybrid Pedigree "
Q
AES 809 (WF9 x P8) (Oh 43 x C103) `
V Ky 105 (T8 x CI21E) (38-11 x Oh7B) V1
Ky 5921W (CI64 x 33-16) (CI66 x Ky201) g
US 523W (K55 x K64) (Ky27 x Ky49) V
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