xt7cnp1wdr9d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cnp1wdr9d/data/mets.xml  1878  books b92-122-28575504 English Spencer & Craig, : Cincinnati : Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Knights Templar (Masonic order) Kentucky. Biographical memoirs of the members of Covington & Newport Commanderies, K.T. text Biographical memoirs of the members of Covington & Newport Commanderies, K.T. 1878 2002 true xt7cnp1wdr9d section xt7cnp1wdr9d 











Biographical Memoirs

       OF THE MEMBERS OF



COVINGTON  NEWPORT



COMMANDERIES, K. T.

 
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Z5; thet ", mll jti



SIMON OF CYRENE,



pound;he friend of our Savior, who bore His cross, and fell a martyr to His cause,
is this Volume, in token of the CHJflI4TY he exemplified, the ROPE in
which he lived, and the FflITH in which he died, most reverently dedicated.

 










             TEMPLAR MASONRY.
     The wholesome principles inculcated by Templar
Masonry, the virtuous precepts set forth in its lectures, the
good it has done, is doing, and will continue to do, commend
it to the serious consideration of all good and thoughtful men.
If the purity of the principles it teaches were spread
throughout the world, the good of every clime and land would
be constrained to admire it and the vicious to turn from it
with loathing. To be eminent as a Templar it is necessary
that the principles and precepts taught should be practically
impressed in the heart and mind, and exemplified in the
daily walk and conversation. The Knight without spot
or reproach, is now, as in days celebrated in poesy and song,
the Knight simply of benevolent heart and intrepid soul, who
promptly meets and unshrinkingly performs each call of duty.
    Templar Masonry dates back to the days of the Crusades.
To the time when King Baldwin II., of Jerusalem, granted
to the "Poor Fellow Soldiers of Jesus Christ," a place of
habitation within the sacred inclosure of Mount Moriab.
It was founded at Jerusalem in the beginning of the twelfth
century, by Hugh de Payens, Geoffrey de St. Omer, and
seven other French Knights, for the protection of the Holy
Sepulchre, and of the pilgrims resorting thither. The habit
of the Tempars was then white, with a Red Cross of eight
points of the Maltese form worn on the left shoulder. They
were Christian soldiers. Their duties were to relieve poor
pilgrims, take care of the sick, and defend the Christian
religion. They were divided into three classes. The first
class were warriors and protected the weak. The second
class were chaplains and provided for the spiritual wants of
the community. The third class were servitors and nursed

 




PREFACE.



and waited on the sick. Eventually, many persons became
affiliated with them without taking the vows, for the sake of
the protection afforded. After the conquest of Jerusalem
by the Saracens, they spread over Europe. They had
settlements in England from an early period.  The first
was in London, on the site of Southampton Buildings,
Holborn; but from ii85, their principal seat was in Fleet
Street, still known as the Temple. The round church which
bears their name was dedicated by Heraclius, Patriarch of
the Church of the Resurrection in Jerusalem, In ii85, and
the chancel was consecrated in I 240. In 1310, they settled
in Rhodes, which country they held nearly two hundred years.
    Although there were probably many Sir Knights in this
country during the first two centuries after its settlement by
European nations, it was not until the year i8i6 that the first
Encampment was organized in the United States. But Blue
Lodge Masonry, however, dates back with us to about
1733, when first formally introduced at Boston, Massachusetts.
Kentucky got her Masonry from Virginia, and Virginia
got hers from the Grand Lodge of England, which goes back
to Ancient York Masonry; that takes us back to 962, or
the days of King Alfred and Egbert.
    Masonry is now as wide spread as the Christian religion,
and might well be styled, nay, declared an universal religion
-the very religion of mankind, in which all good men and
true, may and do, worthily and well agree. And, here, forced
to pause, we can but remark how Governments have been
formed and passed away; how nations have arisen, enjoyed
centuries of prosperity and power, and their ruined cities,
temples, and works of art alone.remain to attest their former
greatness, while Masonry, the child of Heaven, alone has
stood the test of time ! Firm as the rock-immovable as the
hills, with but one faith that all may believe, and one
language that all can speak, 0! how indescribably grand!
What volumes in her favor!



iV

 



PREFACE.



    In presenting this keepsake to the fraternity it has not
been our aim or desire to glorify individual members, but
simply to relate in a plain, matter-of-fact way, the salient
points in each one's biography, and leave to the unbiased
judgment of the Craft, the value of our contribution to
Masonic literature.
    In behalf of our reporter, Mr. C. C. Stephens, we tender
to many of the Sir Knights of both the Covington and
Newport Commanderies, our sincere thanks for favors shown
and information given. To Recorders Ramsey and Schraeder
for their kindness in furnishing dates and facts, and especially
to Bro. L. D. Croninger, Grand Recorder of the Grand
Commandery of Kentucky, for his brotherly and important
aid, we hereby acknowledge ourselves to be under deep and
lasting obligations.
    With the best wishes for the perpetuation of our noble
institution to the dim distant ages of an unfathomable
futurity, and with a fraternal and courteous regard for the
Craft universal whithersoever dispersed around the globe,
we submit this, our votive offering to the genius of
Masonry, for the candid consideration of all true and worthy
brethren.
                     SPENCER  CRAIG, Publishers.



V

 
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       MASONRY IN COVINGTON.
    The first Masonic Lodge chartered in Covington was
Temple Lodge. No. 64. The date of its charter August,
I820; this was forfeited August, i834. Thomas Buckner
was its first Master; its prosperity was never great. Masonry
then was for several years below par in Covington. In
August, I838, however, some of the Brethren got a charter
and established Covington Lodge No. i09, William WV.
Southgate being its first Worshipful Master from 1838, until
1847, the order increased rapidly and in September of the
latter year Col. Clay Lodge No. I59, was instituted with
L. E. Berry as Master, Golden Rule Lodge No. 345, received
its charter October, 1857, Samuel Reed being its first Master.
The last three named Lodges are all now existing in good
working order with a fine membership. Covington Chapter
No. 35, received its charter in the beginning of 1849 and has
had a career of great prosperity from its first inception.
Kenton Council No. 13, was instituted April io, I851,
A. H. Jameson being its first Thrice Illustrious Grand Master.
Covington Commandery No. 7, was established in i85 1, with
the following named members: Charles NV. Clayton, Rev.
Richard Deering, John C. Elstner, J. Ellis, W: W. Henderson,
A. H. Jameson, W. B. Kinkead, F. W. Major, W. C. Munger,
H. H. Mayo, C. L. Mullins, R. K. Summerwell, M. P. Smith,
J. M. Tipton, Thomas Thompson, John T. Wise, T. N. Wise
and Thomas Ware. W. B. Kinkead was appointed its first
Eminent Commander; J. R. Hallam, Generalissimo; and
W. W. Henderson, Captain General. Of the original
members there only remain Drs. Henderson, J. T. and
T. N. Wise. At the meeting of the Grand Encampment at
Frankfort on the i4th of January, i852, a charter was granted

 




MASONRY IN COVINGTON.



to Covington Commander No. 7, and W. B. Kinkead
appointed E. C.; T. N. Wise, Gen.; and J. M. Tipton, C. G.
During the years i852 and I853 the new Commandery added
to its numbers thirty-five new members, and it now is probably
third in size in the State. Its Eminent Commanders have
been as follows: T. N. Wise, i854-5-6; Samuel Reed, 1857;
William C. Munger, 1858-9; T. N. Wise, i86o to i866
inclusive; J. M. Worrall, I867-8; W. H. Gayle, I869;
Henry Bostwick, 1870 to i873 inclusive; Henry Ranshaw,
i874-5; Geo. W. Lyon, 1876; J. P. Harbick, I877 and
J. J. Nigman, i878. Their new Commandery rooms are
centrally located, commodious, and fitted up with taste and
elegance.  No. 7 has a just right to be proud of what she
has accomplished in less than a score of years. She has
proven the wisdom of her institution by the faith she has
exhibited in her works, which have been both fruitful and
righteous.



...i

 









         MASONRY IN NEWPORT.
    The Masonic Bodies of Newport are Robert Burns Lodge
No. i63, Newport Lodge No. 358, Olive Branch Chapter
No. 76, Jeffries Council No. 33, and Newport Commandery
No. 13.
    The first Masonic Lodge instituted in Newport was
called the Licking Valley Lodge. It received its charter
August, I844, and remained in existence eleven years,
surrendering its charter in I855.  Robert Burns Lodge
received its charter from the Grand Lodge of Kentucky in
August, I848, F. A. Miller being its first Master. In
October, i857, Newport Lodge No. 358, was chartered with
William M. Smith, Master thereof. Olive Branch Chapter
No. 76, was instituted Oct. i6, i86o, Rev. P. H. Jeffries, H. P.
Jeffries Council No. 33, was instituted February ioth, i86o,
Rev. P. H. Jeffries, Thrice Ill. G. M. presiding, he was
continuously elected until July, i874, when M. H. Lewis
succeeded him until October, i877, and then J. K. Rugg the
present T. I. G. M. was chosen.
    Newport Commandery No. I3, was instituted March
I6th, I869, upon petition of the following Sir Knights:
C. R. Woods, Thomas Bardsley, Geo. H. Alcoke,
M. Muggridge, Gilbert Truman, C. J. Brass, John Kline,
H. D. Helm, John H. Barlow, George Ross, James Taylor,
Jr., C. J. Jones, Charles R. Woods, Thomas Bardsley and
Geo. H. AJcoke were appointed to the offices of Eminent
Commander, Generalissimo and Captain General in the
order named, by Rev. J. M. Worrall, Grand Commander of
the Grand Commandery of Kentucky. In i870, Thomas
Bardsley was elected Eminent Commander, followed by W.
H. Gayle in 187I-2. In i873, J. H. Barlow was chosen and

 




2                MASONRY IN NEWPORT.

re-elected in i874. George E. Clingman was elected in i875,
but ceasing to be a resident of the state in May, D. G. Brumback
served in that capacity the remainder of the year. In i876,
J. H. Bromwell was elected and served until March I 7th, when
he removed from the state and James Thomas became acting
E. C. In i877, Edward S. Runnells was chosen Eminent
Commander and re-elected in i878. The membership of all
the Masonic Bodies of Newport is large and constantly
increasing. Masonry seems to be in a flourishing condition
there. The growth of Newport Commandery has been steady
and healthy.  It is probably the fifth in point of members
in Kentucky.



 















                     I N D EX.-(Covington.)
                                                                     PAGE.
Ashley, Edward H .................................................          102
Bean, John P             ................................................. 52
Bentley, Matthew H1 .................................................        63
Blades, William C .................................................. 55
Bogart, John H .................................................. 119
Bostwick, Henry ................................................. 175
Bristow, Julius L .................................................       . i6
Brooks, Levi H .................................................. 113
Brown, Arnold.................................................          77
Brown, Charles L ................................................. 93
Carpenter, William B .................................................      153
Connelly, John B .................................................. 125
Crigler, Llewllyn N .................................................        39
Croninger, Lorenzo Dow .................................................     25
Dalton, William D                   ......................... 129
Davis, Eleazer H ........................ 6o
beButts, Benjamin F.......................                             149
Dunlap, William Ramsey .......................                          99
Durant, George Benjamin.......................                         151
Drury, Asa ....................... 163
Eaton, James D ........................ 157
Eckman, Edward H ........................ 92
Ewan, John Brandon Guthrie .......................                      53
Fisk, Charles H.......................                                 141
Gedge, Julius F                   ......................... 22
Goshorn, Alborn 0                   ......................... 139
Gray, John.......................                                       20
Green, Henry ....................... 173
Greer, Alexander L                  ......................... 105
Harbeson, Robert.      ....................... 9
Harbick, John P ........................ 121
Hardin, Berry S ....................... 55
Henderson, William Wharton  .......................                     95
Hill, George W                    ......................... 123
Hill, William G ........................ 8i
Howe, Robert ......................... III
Jenkins, Thomas ..1..................... I7
Johnston, George Lorimer .......................                        69
Johnston, Nicholas M ........................ 33
Keller, Henry............                    .                          13
Kivett, George............                                              15
Lehman, John L ............ 159

 






4                       INDEX.-(COVINGTON.)

                                                                    PAGE.
 Lyle, John Stuart .............................................. 13
 Lyon, George William   ............................................. 1'45
 Maybery, William H      .............................................      37
 Mayo, Henry H .............................................. 177
 McDannold, Francis Marion ..........        ...................................  50
 McDannold, George Washington .............   ................... . ........... 87
 McDonald, Robert G ..............................................           8
 Metcalfe, John Green .............................................         62
 Montgomery, Alexander ................... ;                            85
 Morgan, James...................                                      136
 Mullins, Alfred R...................                                  75
 Munger, William C...................                                   23
 Nash, Albert C ................... I03
 Nigman, John J .................... 17
 Nigman, Florentine S .................... 67
 Nixon, Tames ................... 97
 Noterman, Joseph...................                                   127
 Perry, Fcuntain...................                                     41
 Ramsay, Richard Henry ...................                              32
 Ranshaw, Henry ............................ ......................................................... 133
 Ranshaw, Thomas C ........................... j6
 Reed, Samuel ..........................                                     9
 Richardson, Isaiah W. ........................................................................ .... I79
 Ringgold, William F ........................... 135
 Runyon, Thomas M ........................... I6i
 Shadley, William H.                 .......................... 117
 Simrall, Charles Barrington...   .......................               57
 Spilman, Robert T ........................... 83
 Stephens, Napoleon B . .......................... 89
 Taylor, Joseph B ........................... 65
 Thomas, Charles F ........................... 71
 Trisler, George K ........................... 148
 Ware, Theodore ......................6........................... I7
 Westfall, Thomas C ........................... 35
 Wiles, Peter Blacketone .......................... .69
 Wise, John T .......................... log
 Wise, Theodore Nathaniel .......................... 137
 Wood, Frank .......................... 143
 Wooliscroft, John N.     ................                             i68
Yates, George Arthur ................ 73



 
















                      INDEX.-(Newport.)
                                                                    PAGK.
Ackley, Irving A ................... 2I5
Air, Robert ................... 253
Air, William ................... 267
Ashbaugh, Joseph Hill.........         ........          '.................241
Band, William H. ...............6.................................. ..................;  269
Bardslev, Thomas.................                                     293
Barlow, John Higham...................    .     .     .................211
Barnes, Charles E.................                                    205
Behrman, Henry William .................                              225
Boden, William...........                                        ...... 233
Bossard, Louis F.................                                     257
Brumback, Daniel G ...................                                   223
Cassell, John Albert .309
Cole, Albert H .273
Connor, James .275
Constans, Louis .229
Cummings, Theodore S .195
Dixon, Thomas...............                    ;                     209
Ducker, John S .189
Fagin, Theodore .249
Gayle, William Hare...............                   .               I85
Gideon, Thomas William ................................................................ 251
Gilmore, Henry B.                                                     311
Goshorn, Seth C .199
Gugle, John.                                                          300
Hawthorne, Leroy R .30I
Hawkins, Edmund W .....................                        ;      231
Hayman, Perry D .277
Hollis, Auguistus Frederick .291
Holzhauer, Gustave .285
Horner, Charles H.                                                    307
Hugle, John R .247
Imeson, Francis .193
Jeffries, Peter H .297
Kinney, Joel F .255
Klein, John .217
Ladenburger, Christopher..........................................................................22
Lang, Albert .305
Lewis, Mathew H .I87
Lock, David Richard .295
Lock, John B., Jr.............. t  .                 .     .    ,    20Q

 






6                       INDEX.-(COVINGTON.)

                                                                     PAGE.
Pendleton, WilliamA           ............................................. 279
Phillips, John ................................................. 289
Raipe, John J.                          ................................................ 227
Ross, George ................................................ 239
Rugg, Joseph K ................................................. 265
Runnells, Edward S .................................................              213
Russell, Charles Butler ................................................. 263
Schrader, Henry Frederick         ....................................... 259
Schreiver, Henry A ................................................. 281
Searing, Jonas ................................................ 245
Shaler, Richard................................. .        ............. 283
Shepard, Samuel Dolen ................................................            204
Smith, WilliamD ................................................       207
Spence, Philip B ................................................. 195
Taylor, John Barry ................................................. 27
Taylor, James, Jr ................................... .............. 303
Thornton, Robert Hamilton         ..'....................................... 97
Thomas, James..................                ........................... 219
Townsend, Robert..........                                             201
Truman, Gilbert            ..                   .......                243
Wadsworth, Henry A            .........                                287
Wendt, Charles            ..                  ................ ;.......... 222
Wendt, Frederick J           ......... 238
Wood, Edmund E                            .             .              261
Wolff, Charles J          .........                                   284
Wright, William L                          ..                          271


 









  C O V I N G T O N

COMMA N DERY,

   KNIGHTS TEMPLAR.

 
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COVINGTON COMMANDERY, K. T.



                      SAMUEL REED.


              EED, SAMUEL, was born in Penn Yan, New York, Septem-
              ber 19, 1797, and at his death, which occurred December 27,
              1870, was upwards of seventy three years of age. In boy-
              hood his parents moved to Olean, a tQwn on the Alleghany
              river, near the head of navigation, and where the tide of
              emigration, westward and southwestward, first struck that
              long reach of waters that so conveniently carried them to
              their distant and new destinations. Here amid the forma-
              tive influence of active and rough frontier life; in con-
              tact with the energetic and quick-witted people who laid
the foundations of our western civilization, he received his early impressions
and formed his youthful habits. His wit, his kindly disposition and his skill
in music made him a favorite with the pioneers, who were often compelled to
spend weeks at his father's house before they could get fairly off on their distant
journey. When about eighteen he joined the westward bound stream of
travel, and in the spring of 1819 we find him at Columbia, a place just above
Cincinnati which was then expected to be the great city of this region. But
in a little while, the same month of his arrival there, he accepted the invi-
tation of a former friend of his father's, and came to Cincinnati to engage in
the service of this gentleman, at such wages as he might choose to pay him.
Soon he became master of business for himself; first selling groceries and
plying a ferry boat across the Ohio, to Covington or Newport as the scatter-
ing travel might require.
    About one year after his arrival in Cincinnati he was married to Miss
Jane Miles, a native of Virginia, then residing in Cincinnati. She bore him
eight children, five of whom named Eliza, Edwin 0., Erastus R., George,
and Caroline, lived to attain their majority. His wife was well suited to
make him happy, and to help him in his rising fortunes. For thirty years
this union remained unbroken and was then severed by death's relentless
hand, her demise occurring July 11, 1855. After quitting the grocery and
ferry business, he became engaged in the framing and gilding of looking-
glasses, and was also in the lumber trade. His business capacity and hon-
esty were unquestioned. In 1851 he removed to Covington, and spent the
remainder of his life either in that city or vicinity.
    Immediately on his coming into this city he gave his earnest attention
to what was always dear to his heart, the progress of the interests of Free



2



9

 





BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS



Masonry. His connection with that order dating from the 14th of August,
1824, when he became a member of Miami Lodge, No. 46, located in Cin-
cinnati. He was present at the time of the reception of General Lafayette by
this lodge, when DeWitt Clinton of New York and other very distinguished
Masons were there to do honor to the occasion. He was untiring in his
efforts to stimulate each and every member to attend the meetings.  He
visited and united with the various bodies, and by his zeal and intelligence
in all parts of its rituals, and its sublffhe lessons he gave a new life to its
forms and a new force to its precepts. He instructed the young novitiate and
the ignorant Master; he strove to give form and regularity to all their
efforts for good, and through years of untiring and hopeful effrt did more
to build up the order in the city where he lived than any other one. He was
one of the charter members of Golden Rule Lodge, No. 345, of which he
remained an active member as long as he lived, and at the time of his death
was its efficient secretary. He was secretary of several bodies for many
years, and though past three score and ten he was a model secretary. WVell
versed in all the forms, he could write at once what the action of the
body meant, whether well expressed or not by those propounding the action.
Even at his time of life, a penman that for neatness might be a pattern for
the most fastidious, and for cleanliness and distinctness, accuracy and order,
one' that could not well be equalled or surpassed. Withal there was a
taste, painstaking in his work that made the record books illuminated vol-
umes, while his memorials of departed brothers, are pictorial monuments of
beauty alud nffection. He was frequently singled out and commended by
name by the various grand bodies before iScholn his annual reports were pre-
sented, as a model of neatness, exactness and order. In whatever position
in the Lodge, Chapter, Council or Commandery he was placed, he filled it
to the satisfaction of all. As an instructor he had but few peers. He was
elected during his long Masonic career to almost every position in the various
bodies of which he was a member.
    In 1838 he united with the Methodist Protestant Church of Cincinnati;
and the scene witnessed that day in the church was an illustration of his
peculiar character and directness of acting. He had doubtless been reflect-
ing on the subject of religion, and his mind was fully convinced. That day,
as he sat in church with his family, the communion of the Lord's Supper
was being celebrated. Deeply impressed, no doubt, with the solemnity of
the service, his heart being filled with the fullness of the great truths which
his mind had already received, he rose at the close of the service, and stand-
ing erect in his place in the congregation, said to the minister of God, " I
have long believed in the truth of the Christian religion, I believe in the
great work of our Lord and Savior in offering himself for us on the cross,
which you have just now been commemorating. I now want to come forward



IO

 




COVINGTON COMMANDERY, K. T.



and openly profess this faith in this solemn service, if you will allow
me, may I do it ' This unexpected address from the center of the congre-
gation by the tall and impressive form of " Father Reed" in the days of his
manliest vigor, may well be imagined to have produced a deep impression on
all present. An eye witness says the effect could better be felt than described.
     Mentally he was a man of far more than ordinary ability; in speaking
and composition, remarkable for one with only a limited education. But in
his powers of judgment and capacity of discerning the real point of a ques-
tion, or the broad deep meaning of a lesson or a truth he was really wonder-
ful, far in advance of many that have held the name of scholar or philosopher.
But his great name is as a distinguished Mason. He often spoke of the
early days of Masonry in Cincinnati, when his instructors were Calvin
Washburn, Father Punshon and Elam P. Langdon, and his compeers W.
H. Ragan, Jonas Jones, Joseph B. Covert, Jacob Ernest, Hanselman, J. D.
Caldwell, Arva Wilson, etc. He was so much esteemed for his knowledge
and understanding of the ritual and the principles of the order, that the
Grand Lodge of Ohio regularly commissioned him as the Grand Lecturer for
the instruction of the subordinate lodges throughout. the State. The Grand
Lodges of Indiana and Arkansas issued approvals of this appointment, and
invited him to go through their jurisdictions in the same service. In this
work it is astonishing how much he performed. His travels were thousands
of miles; his addresses were unnumb2red, and his initiations and degrees
conferred, two or three hundred a year, for fifteen or twenty years. The
letters of commendation, and resolutions of approval sent him for this work,
from Grand Masters, Grand Lodges, Subordinate Lodges, conventions and
distinguished individuals are numerous enough to fill a volume alone.
    They give testimony to his great accuracy, his very earnest manner and
his wonderful skill as an instructor. His power of illustration, and his action
in teaching fascinated and fixed the lesson. His end was befitting his val-
uable and impressive life. The day that he loved best of all the marked
ones of the year, was the 27th of December, the anniversary of St. John the
Evangelist. This patron Saint marked the transition of the religion of God's
people from the old Jewish system to the full and open dispensation of
grace under the reign of the Spirit after the coming, suffering and resurrec-
tion of our Messiah Lord. So there is a point in our mystic order where its
beautiful teachings come out of the shadows of the Temple, and expands in
the full light of Gospel truth. Brother Reed had passed through these
degrees and lights, and came to rejoice in all the completeness of the lesson.
So like John the Baptist, he pointed not to a coming Savior, but with John
the Evangelist, he leaned upon his bosom or bowed at his cross, or pro-
claimed his revealed love and works. Hence to him the day that recalled
the memory of that Saint was peculiarly dear. He wished that he might



I I

 





1 2



BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS



(lie on that day, and so it was about one o'clock, just past the beauty and
glory of day on the 27th of December, that he was " called from labor to
refreshment" Eternal and Perfect. The members of the various Lodges,
Chapters, Councils and Commanderies, of Covington, Newport and Citicin-
nati, together with many visiting brethren from neighboring cities in Ohio,
Indiana and Kentucky, turned out in procession to pay a last tribute to the
memory of their departed chief, for chief he was among the members of the
mystic tie in the west.
    The services were held in the Methodist Episcopal Church on Greenup
street. They were of a two-fold character, Rev. J. C. Harrison, Presiding
Elder of the Covington District, conducting the religious part, and Rev. J.
M. Worrall the Masonic ceremonies. Notwithstanding the unfavorable con-
ditions of the weather, the funeral pageant was one of the largest and most
impressive that ever took place in Covington, and was a fitting tribute to
the mortal remains of one who is now a member of the Grand Commandery
above.

 





COVINGTON CONIMANDERY, K. T.



                   HENRY KELLER.


              i ELLER, HENRY, Tailor, Covington, Kentucky, was born
 /           1  C 4in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, August 22, 1820, and is a
               son of Jacob Keller, and Kittie (Rust) Keller. His par-
 9      I Dents were born, reared, and married, in the same place,
              and also died there. Their death occurred while Henry
              was quite young, which caused his care and custody to
              devolve upon an elder brother, who, in conformity with
       4  had  the laws of Germany, sent him to school from the time he
   6    ,      was six years old, until he was thirteen. The schools of
        9     that country were then in a very flourishing condition, and
consequently, lie received a fair education.  Immediately upon leaving
school he was apprenticed to a tailor in Hesse Darmstadt, with whom
he served two years. In 1836, being desirous of improving his worldly
condition, he emigrated to the United States, crossing the Atlantic in a
sailing vessel. He landed at Baltimore, w hence, with companions, he
travelled in wagons over the Alleghany mountains to Steubenville, Ohio,
where he entered the employ of a Mir. Thomas Brashears, a tailor. Serv-
ing with hiwn two years, and finishing the acquirement of his trade, he
went to Little Rock, Arkansas, where he found employment as a journey-
man, and worked about six months. In 1839 he left that city, and came
up the river to St. Louis, but failing to get work there, he returned to
Steubenville, Ohio, and re-engaged with his former employer. In 1844,
he commenced business in that city, on his own account, and carried it on
until 1849, when he moved to Covington, Kentucky, where he has since
resided, and pursued his avocati