xt7cnp1wdv69 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cnp1wdv69/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19200514  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 14, 1920 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 14, 1920 1920 2012 true xt7cnp1wdv69 section xt7cnp1wdv69 ft'

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON,

VOL. X.

PETITION

IS GRANTED

BY THETA SIGMA

PHI

National Chapter of Women's Journalistic Fraternity To Be Installed at Kentucky

0.

Stag ecrafters Give
Little Theatre Play

Martha Buckraan has received a
telegram from the National Convention of Theta Sigma Phi, national
honorary Journalistic fraternity for
women, which met recently, announcing that the petition of the eight
young women of the University of
Kentucky who applied in the name of
Phi Sigma, local fraternity, for a chapter of the national, was granted along
with Bimilar applications from Columbia University, New York City, and
Knox College, Qalesburg, Illinois. A
.representative of the fraternity is expected to come ito Lexington about
May 18 to formally install the chapter
at the University.
Theta Sigma Phi "was founded in
1908 at the University of Washington
grown rapidly during the last
r and has
few years, having chapters in many
of the large universities, such as Wisconsin, Ilinols, Minnesota, Missouri,
Ohio State and Oregon.
fThe local Phi Sigma was established at the University of Kentucky
during the winter by several girls of
the junior and senor classes, who are
making journalism either their major
or minor study, and who are interested
in bringing together those taking an
active part n the work of that department. Miss McLaughlin was instrumental in forming the organization
and she has rendered invaluable aid
in actually bringing the fraternity into
being.
The young women who made application for a chapter of Theta Sigma
Phi are: Martha Buckman Junior managing editor of the Kernel for next
year;' Louise Will, senior managing
editor of the Kernel this year; Elizabeth Card, member of the Kernel
staff; Elizabeth Marshall, senior member of the Kernel staff; Adele Slade,
editor of Kernel and
Junior,
f
of the 1921 Kentuckian;
Margaret McClure, senior editor of the
State Press Bulletin and Exchange
Editor of the Kernel, Bell, junior editor of the State Press Bulletin for next
year, and member of the Kernel Btaff ;
Marguerite McLaughlin, instructor in
journalism.
To be eligible for membership in
the fraternity one must bo an upper
clussman; must be on a student publication; must have a standing of 1.9
according to the point system; must
be taking work in the Department of
Journalism with no failure or conditions In such work.

The Stagecrafters of Transylvania will present a program of three
t
plays at the Little Theatre,
Monday evening, May 17, at 8
o'clock. The plays are "Maker of
Dreams," by Alfred Sutro, "Embers," by Oeorge Mlddletown, and
i comedy farce called "Room 38."

co-e-

editor-in-chie-

HEAR WEATHERFORD!

ENGINEERS

MEET WITH N. Y. CLUB

McVey and Anderson Speak

at

Long-to-b-

e

Remem-

annual dinner-danc- e
seventeenth
of the New York Club of the
University of Kentucky was held on
Saturday evening, May 1, at McAlpin
Hotel, New York City. Fifty-twwomen and men from Kentucky were
present.
The

o

Dinner was served at 8 o'clock, the
diners dancing between courses. In
Mr. J. E.
writing of the dinner-dancBoiling, who was present, says:
"After dinner M. S. Smith, president
of the club, introduced Doctor McVey,
who spoke for about half an hour on
the subject, 'Increased Monetary Appropriations for Educational Purposes,'
outlining the necessity of this in view
of the greatly Increased demand for
trained men in all walks of life.
"Dean Anderson followed. Doctor
McVey and spoke for about twenty
minutes. In his usual virile vein Dean
Anderson spoke on timely topics, Included a sightseeing tour of the University grounds, which the writer had
reason to believe he filched from the
speech of a certain senior member of
the College of (Engineering who made
such a speech at the Chicago banquet,
and closed his remarks by paying a
graceful tribute to the social developments at the University owing to the
activities of Mrs. McVey, and by according to Doctor McVey
the full
measure of credit for his work dn the
development of the University as an
institution of learning."
"Following Dean Anderson, W. H.
Grady, trustee of the University, made
a short speech in which he expressed
his pleasure and honor at being presto
ent and left the real
the hardened sinners of that profes-tlon.speech-makin-

g

"

"Mr. J. I. Lyle, also a trustee of the
University, followed with a brief history of the New York Club, recalling
many of the folk and Incidents which
surrounded the foundation of the club
la 1902. Mr. Lylo attso added a word
about the present und future needs of
tho University und spoke of the
campus layout, which
hud been perfected to servo as an intelligible guide to futuro expansion.
carefully--

considered

(Continued on Page Two)

L. REED ADDRESSES

"If you can put thinking into action, you will get the highest satisfaction of life. The only way in which
a human being can be educated is by
some form of human activity. At the
adolescent period the teacher is working with the most malleable stuff that
can be worked, thus teaching should
be considered as a spiritual art," said
O. L.
Superintendent of Louisville schools, in his Inspiring talk in
chapel Tuesday, on "High School
Teaching as a Life Work."
He also said: "The great aims of
education are, first, the physical education, education for home life, and
the moral and religious education.
We all learn sooner or. later that
money is only worth what you can
exchange for it in terms of satisfaction." In speaking further of the high
school education, he said that the
high school has an unique Individuality in that it is a survival of the old
classical academy.
Superintendent Reed ended his talk
by paying tribute
to the classical
training given in the high schools, and
making a plea that more University
students take up teaching as a life
work, calling it the noblest profession
in the world.
Mr. George R. Larry, University of
Wisconsin, and of the American Red
Cross, closed the chapel exercises by
making a short talk, saying that
people in the United States are
s
continuously and seriously 111.
of the illness is unnecessary,
and could be prevented if the boys'
and girls were educated to care for
their bodies and to obey the laws of.
health and hygiene. He closed by
asking that we give our support to
the Red Cross, which is now doing its
greatest work, in the time of peace, by
teaching health and hygiene in the
schools, and in various kinds of social
work.

Rd,

bered Occasion

Two-third-

WEATHERFORD WILL
TALK SUNDAY NIGHT
president of
College at Nashville
W.
will speak at the joint Y. M.-C. A. meeting at Patterson Hall Sunday night.
Doctor Weatherford was the founder
of Blue iRidge und is an authority on
tho Negro question tin the South. He
Is n speaker of note and tho lUnlver-sltIs especially fortunate In securing hint to fill this engagement. Every
collogo student interested
In current problems should hear him.
Dr. W. D. Weatherford,

the

No. 30

X20

1

George R. Larry, of Red
Cross, Also Speaks, Urging Observation of
Health Rules

one-ac-

KENTUCKY

MAY

CHAPEL

REQUIREMENTS

RIGID

KYM

Y. M. C. A.

y

wlde-uwuk-

HEAR WEATHERFORD!

STROLLER BANQUET
TO BE NEXT MONDAY
The annual Stroller banquet will
be given Monday, May 17, in the
ballroom of the Phoenix Hotel. All
members of the cast are asked to
be at Patterson Hall at 8 o'clock,
so they can proceed to the Phoenix in a group.

Bid FROLIC
HALL

ON PATT

LAWN

COMING

Student Government

Asso-

ciation To Give Mardi

Gras Next Friday
Evening

BENEFIT OF REC. HALL
HIGHLANDS WINS HIGH

Have you ever been to a Mardi Gras
Kentucky on a Friday night in
May? Most likely you have not, as
there has probably never been one.
But you are going to have the rare
opportunity of attending such a cele
bration at Patterson Hall Friday evening, May 21, for the girls of the Student Government Association of the
University are going to give a unique
Mardi Gras which will rival even the
most elaborate Mardi Gras which have
brought fame to New Orleans.
A champion swimming match, a
fortune teller, a fish pond, a Japanese
tea garden where demure Japanese
maidens will serve tea and sandwiches, booths where anything which
fancy dictates can be purchased, and
various side shows, including everything from the smallest midget in the
world to a show "for men only" will
be features of the evening's entertainment.
In addition to these attractions, the
program committee of the carnival
has provided an excellent program to
be given on the platform to be erected in the center of the large circle in
the Patterson Hall yard. This program will feature a minstrel show, a
mock council meeting of the Student
Government Association in which
girls from the audience will be "called
up" before the council, and "The
.Maker of Dreams," a skit which will
be presented by some of the best
Stroller talent of the University.
The entire front yard of Patterson
Hall will be converted into a veritable
fairyland, lighted with Japanese lanBright and attractive costerns.
tumes, gaily decorated booths, harns,
and confetti will add to the festive
spirit of the occasion.
in the Patterson
The
Hall yard will continue from 8 until
10 o'clock.
Then, at 10 o'clock will
come the grand climax of the entertainment of the evening. The doors of
the Recreation Hall will be thrown
open and the jazz will start, and
dancing will be enjoyed until the
"k strikes twelve.
The proceeds of tho Mardi Gras will
be used to refurnish the parlors at
Patterson Hall. So, boys, one and all,
come with a warm heart and a full
purse, prepared to spend freely, and
you will bo rewarded next year by
having attractive parlors, artistically
furnished with comfortable furniture
and pretty floor lamps, in which to
wait for your girls. Adelo Slade is
general chairman of tho Mardi Gras.
Virginia Griffith and Fannie Heller
are assistant chairmen.
in

L TRACK

MEET

Fort Thomas Boys Easy
Victors in State
Contest

Inter-scholast- ic

The team from Highlands High
School, Fort Thomas, easily won the
Kentucky Interscholastic track meet
held on Stoll Field last Saturday, May
8.
Highlands piled up a total of 57
points to their credit; Louisville Boys'
High came second with a score of 22
points. Anderson County High was
third with 15 points.
County
Mountjoy, of Anderson
High, was the high point man of the
contest. He entered three events and
took three first places. Stegeman, of
Highlands, was second with 13 points,
and Funkhouser, of Providence High,
was third with 10 tallies to his credit.
The winners of the) tournament
were presented with the trophies immediately after the meet in the Y. M.
DocC. A. rooms of the University.
tor McVey made the presentations.
Gold medals were given to winners of
first places, silver ones for second and
bronze ones for third. A silver loving cup went to the winning team and
one was also given to the high point
man of the meet. In addition to this
the Sigma Nu fraternity gave a specially designed loving cup to the winning team.
Three high school records were
Pole
broken in the meet, namely:
vault, .Mountjoy, 10.6; broad jump,
Mountjoy, 19.9; (former record, 19.G,
held by Locke, of Louisville); Javelin, Chlnn, 140.6, (first year thrown);
discus, Scott, 101.7, (former record,
95 feet, held by Hawkins, of Anderson
County High).
Funkhouser ran the 220 yards in
23
seconds, coming within a fifth
of a second of Grabfelder's record of
23
seconds.
The various teams were the guests
of tho different fraternities of the University during their short stay in this
city. The meet was one of the most
successful ever held here and a record crowd was in attendance.
Tho officials were T. J. Beam, manager;
R. W.
Owens, referee and
starter; Parks Boone, James Wllhelm
and W. D. Thompson, clerks of
course; E. A. Bureau, George Whiting
and Julius Wolf, timers; W. D. Funkhouser, W. L. Summers and John J.
(Continued on Pago 7)

merry-makin-

g

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 2
CONCERTS DAILY, AFTERNOON AND EVENIN1

ALL AMERICAN
ORCHESTRA

THE STRAND

STRAND

Open 10 A. M. to

HOMI OF

P. M. Admission

Adults

11

"The Sett Orchestra In the South"
Everybody Says So.

Paramount, Artcraft, Metro, Rtalart,
GoMwyn and Select Pictures.
REMEMSER

Children, 18c., But 2c. War Tax, Total 20c.
27t, alus 3 War Tax, Total 30c.

displayed more "WATCH YOUR WATCH"
than novice ability. All the characGet Your Watch Cleaned and Put In
ters arc well known Lexington folk.
Order. A Watch That Will Not
Professor Carl Lampert led the
SHOWN IN PLAYS
Keep Time Is Equivalent to no
community singing between the plays
Watch at all. Careful Watch
on his
nnd gave a few selections
Guarantee
Satisfaction
Plus Promptness.
Theatre Program violin, and demonstrated tho differ
Presented By the ence between Chinese scales and ours.
In tho rolo of Mabel,

SPIRIT

Little

Ably

FOR THE COLLEGE STUDENTS
HOME-MAD- E

"The Workhouse Ward," "The Open
Desires,"
Door," and "Suppressed
given In the Little Theatre on last
Monday night displayed both an Increase in community spirit and in tho
ability of the presentation
of tho
drama.
"Tho Workhouse Ward," by Lady
Gregory, alive with humor nnd human
interest, was successfully interpreted
by J. C. Noe, head of the Department
of Education and Dr. iC. B. Cornell,
Professor of Phychology of the University. Mrs. Pauline Wherry, of the
Red Cross Division, should also receive her share of praise in the role
of the country woman. Indeed It
would be difficult to determine the
star in this production.
Mary Elizabeth Downing, leading
lady in the Stroller play, and Grover
Creech who also had a prominent
part, were the only characters in Alfred Sutre's drama, "The Open Door."
The eternal triangle was the only
theme, but the ability and beauty of
Miss Downing, and the attractive
tones of her voice in every way desirable for the stage, together with
the polish of Creech's acting, gained
by several years' experiences as a
Stroller, made It very enjoyable to all.
"Suppressed Desires," G. C. Cook
and Susan Glaspell, was different
from anything given at yet in the
playhouse. As a burlesque on the theories of
it was an
overwhelming success and judging by
the applause which followed, it was
very popular.
iSamuel
B. Walton, as Stephen
Brewster, showed remarkable talent
in his humorous
and expressions. Both Isabel Wolfe Gemenway,
as the wife, and Gladys Goltans' chum,
s

"EVERYTHING NEW"
EVERYTHING GOOD TO EAT AT THE

PHOENIX FRUIT STORE
DELICATESSEN
PHOENIX BLOCK

133-13-

KENTUCKY ENGINEERS MEET
WITH NEW YORK CLUB.

BECKER DRY CLEANING CO.
C. R. McGraghey, Proprietor
CLEANERS THAT SATISFY.

PATTERNS
THAT APPEAL TO
COLLEGE MEN
See Them At

(Continued From Page 1)

WE ARE ALWAYS ON THE JOS WHEN YOU WANT ANYTHING
CLEANED, PRESSED OR REPAIRED.
"During the evening we discovered
that the banquet in the next room was
PHONE 821-TAILORING
being held by the class of 1920, New JUSTRIGHT
COMPANY
York University, and at Doctor
suggestion a committee was ap145 W. Main St.
pointed tq draw up our greetings and extend them to the class of
Suits made by us pressed
1920. Such greetings were prepared
for one year free of charge.
and delivered. A short time later the
class of 1920 returned their greetings
to us, expressing an unusually sincere
XBMroraU)
compliment to Doctor
and well-pu- t
W. B. GRIGGS
McVey, having used some of his text
Opposite Agriculture Building
PHONE 210
books In their work at the Univer114 N. UPPER
CIGARS,
CIGARETTES, TOBACCO
sity."
AND SOFT DRNKS
The following incomplete list of
STEP IN AND SEE ME
mWMWWlWnKWfWWWWWWWUWWWMMMMngiKmmmmm
S. N.
those present was obtained:
Courtney, J. E. Boiling, F. Paul Anderson, Jr.; E. T. Lyle, Boston; L. L.
Lewis; Carlyle Jefferson; Howard
Derrill W. Hart; Henry Hamilton; Jake H. Gaiser; J. Ray Duncan;
Homer L. Pence; M. E. Pendleton;
Lynn
A. C. Norman;
Lieutenant
Nones; E. C. McDowell, Hamilton,
Canada; Henry Marsh, Wilmington,
Delaware; J. I. Lyle; J. T. Lowe; R.
L. Weaver; Perry West; R. T. Taylor;
S. A. Smith; J. B. Shelley and J. B.
Saunders.
's

Cropper's Laundry

1

s;

Best Styles
for Young Men
At the

Mi

CANDIES AND LUNCHES

McGurk & O'Brien

South Limestone.
The writer is wondering if all tho
members of the feathered tribe of an- (Formerly with Caskey Jewelry Co.)
imals, ncluding the stuffed ones too,
who wcro forced to "turn their faces
VICTOR BOGAERT
to the wall" and keep them there ever
LEADING JEWELERS
slnco the Governor's race In KenEstablished 1883
tucky was run last fall, won't havo
"THE HALLMARK STORE"
opportunity to turn 'round' and "mako
1
W. Main St.
Lexlnaten, Ky.
a Joyful noise" after the next Presidential election.
1S7

Townfolk

psycho-analysi-

THE CLASSY PLACE

R. W. SMOCK

Strollers, Faculty and

"THE BEIT IN MOVING PICTURE-

r
i

Graves-Co- x

Store is the Place to See Them.

You want the kind of suits we have here for
you; we knew you'd want them that's why we have
them here. They're made in the smartest styles for
Men and Young Men.

TENNIS CLOTHES, too; DUCK TROUSERS,
white
SHIRTS, TENNIS SHOES, etc.
soft-collar- ed

Your choice of spring cravats is not confined to

a few patterns and colorings here, or to a few prices

either.

There are many of each, and each cravat is
the best of its kind.
Cheney Cravats the tie without a wrinkle
slips easy in the collar.
$1.25 and $2.00

United Qpifimi

Stores

Graves, Cox & Co.
Iacoraorata.

S-

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
KERNEL STAFF

1920-2- 1

Rare Robert Raible
Arranges articles artfully
In interesting index;
Blushes beautifully,
Likes learned literature,
Earnestly edites editorials.
M

Down Toum

MEMORY BOOKS $4.50.
KODAK ALBUMS 50 Cents ot $8.00.

PENNANTS $1.00 and up.

Meeting Place

Orders taken for special College and
Pennants and Banners.

anaglng Martha,

A rtleasly

PAGE

arbitrary,

R ules roost.
Tboroly, thoughtfully
Handles her helpers,
And assigns articles n la adflnitum,
'

Don dares
I nitiate
N umerous
N ovelties

for

FRATERNITY STATIONERY
If we haven't your Fraternity Paper we can
get it for you.

University Boys

COLLEGE STATIONERY,
DANCE INVITATIONS,
DANCE PROGRAMMES

In

Open Until 8 P. M. Every Evening

High Class

News.

Go it

Don!

The Feature Editor:
M odestly
E gotistically
J erkily
Refuses to write her own acrostic.
A mbitious Adele,
D etermined,

Chivalrous

College Boys Styles in Our Special Designed Clothes

DOBBS FIFTH AVENUE HATS
MANHATTAN SHIRTS

233 West Short St.

Most Complete Assortment of Silk Shirts
We Earnestly Solicit Your Patronage

jcaBasK

!'

Arthur

Haberdashery

liihersiiy Bookstore
Basement Main Building.

E nergetic,
L ikable, and
E nthusiastic editor.

Luigarts

I

M ercilessly

Mammoth Garage Co.

E ndeavors to
R ave raptuously

On
N uts for Squirrel

SENIORS, ATTENTION!
Please leave your order now for Caps and
Gowns, also engraved cards.

'

Phoenix Block

(Incorporated)

,

Food.

The Store For the Well Dressed Man.

H andsome Hodge hacks

Out
Departmental dope,
Gravely giving
E ntire efficiency

HOOF AND HORN CLUB
ORGANIED BY AG. MEN
The Hoof and Horn Club is a new
organization among the agricultural
students of the University. Such
other universities as Iowa, Illinois,
Missouri, Wisconsin and Michigan
have "Hoof and Horn" and it is a
live wire in those institutions.
It is
expected that this club will be responsible for a great deal of good resulting for both the Department of
Animal Husbandry and the University
for the motto is "More and Better
Officers are, president,
Livestock."
Garnett McKinney, Winchester;
Harry Farmer, Stanford;
secretary-treasureR. H. Ford, Winchester.
The club will present to the students of the University and the public its initial program Saturday after
noon when a livestock show will be
given in the Judging Pavilion, located
on the Experiment Station Farm, for
the Berea students who will be visiting the University then.
A number of animals of every kind
of livestock owned by the University
will be used in the Bhow. The animals will be brought in, Judged, and
the reasons given for placing them
within t venty minutes' times. The
judging will be done by the members
of the club.
L. V. Burge, member of the Senior

Clnss, Chemistry, has been heard from
in Akron, whore he is employed by
the Goodyear Company, That ho is
making progress is evinced by the
fact that he expects to "get a raise"
next month.

HEAR WEATHERFORD!

Studehaker
Automobiles

University Pharmacy
offers to the students of the University a complete

That Good Gulf Gasoline in
and Supreme Auto Oils

assortment of Stationery, Candies and Toilet Articles. Prescriptions filled promptly.
CIGARETTES, CIGARS and TOBACCO

Bring Your Kodak Films Here.
Opposite Campus.

Everything for the Automobile

East Main Street.

Dick Webb, President.

.WALTER S. WELSH
SUCCESSOR TO
WELSH & MURRAY CO.

GRADDY-RYA- N

COLLEGE STATIONERY

CO.

ENGRAVING

Incorporated

AND

THE COLLEGE BOYS' STORE

DIE STAMPING
FRAT and DANCE PROGRAMS

Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Shoes and Tailoring

DE LUXE
Ladies' and Gents' Tailors

Pianos
Player Pianos
Columbia Grafonolas
Aeollau-Vocnllo-

Competent Home Tailors
A

Trait Building,

2nd

Flssr

Lexington. Ky.

Phn

n

PHONE 592
Established
1899

Records
Musical Instrument
Player Rolls
Sheet Musle

The E. C. Christian Music Co.

P. ANQELUCCI

UrIm Hank

LEXINSTON, KY.

N. LIMESTONE

124-1-2

1770-205-20-

7

Everything Pertaining to Music
Moving, Tuning, Repairing and Refinishinff
Pianos a Specialty
Lexington, Ky.
Main
East

t

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
rtbllshed every Friday throughout the College year

by the student body
of the University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
alumni and faculty of the institution.
The Kentucky Kernel is the official newspaper of the University. It
la issued with a view of furnishing to Its subscribers all the college news
et Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerniag the
Universities of other States and Canada.

claim when Othello stabbed her, Mr. TWENTY-TWMoore?
FOR
Moore Ouch!
Rotundant Roscoe says, "Ain't it
funny how a little skinny girl with
gold upper teeth keep company with
four boys at the same time."

EDITORIAL STAFF.
ROBERT JULES RAIDLE
Martha Buckman
Donald Dinning
Mary Elizabeth James
Adele Slnde
ArtlTur Oameron
Arthur Hodgea

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Managing Editor.
Assistant Managing Editor.
Featuro Editor.
Associate Editor.
Squirrel Food.
Departmental Clubs.

REPORTERS.
iMary Archer Bell
Thompson Van iDeren
J. O. Segenfclter
Lucille Moore
Adeline Mann Amanda Forkner
Fred Augsburg
Robert
Mitchell, Jr. Tom D. Woodson Paul Peck
Gerald Griffin

ANIMADVERSIONS OF THE CYNIC
publication
Far be it from such a highly intellectual and
as the Kernel to descend to the level of Hortensla Knowall, author of "How
To Be Proper On All Occasions", but since the subject has been broached in
these columns it may well be finished here.
Two weeks ago, the Kernel took editorial notice of the maxim, "Don't
let your studies interfere with your education" and commended a certain
application of it to student life. But every thing has two sides, even this and
dollar. What we would now bring to your attention Is the other
the
side of this proposition.
Going to school is like trying to ride three horses at once; only a few do
it successfully and most of us poor mortals had better not try. There is
Horse No. 1, Studies, by Hard Work out of Thought. He is a longwinded
brute, not good to look at and therefore despised by some. He 'is likely to
take the bit in his mouth and run away if not carefully watched. If you are
trying to ride him, be on the job early and late and don't look at the pretty
green grass on the left or the gay crowds on the right. Though this horse is
headstrong, when carefully handled he will take you under the wire with a
safe lead over the field.
Horse No. 2 Is Activities, by Leadership out of Organization. His temper
3uits has name. Like all colts he is restive and fidgety and likely to give his
rider a disastrous fall, especially if ridden too hard. Correctly paced, he is
the ve-best of mounts but any gait faster than a walk excites him and is
likely to make him break away from the race and run the wrong way of the
track.
But Horse No. 3 is the most dangerous of all. He is Society, by Good
Times out of Youth. His greatest fault is a tendency to .jump the fence, and
only the strongest and most skillful rider should try to mount him. Many
who have attempted to do so have been thrown before they were halfway
around the track. Fatalities are especially great among young and inexperienced jockeys, who are Just entering the race. If one is in this class one
should be very cautious and be ready to pull up at the first sign of danger
When one falls, one falls hard.
"Falling in love' is, oh, so easy. Love is a natural instinct of mutual
association aroused by propinquity to persons of opposite sex. Its ultimate
end, under our present system of civilization, is marriage and the establishing of a home. (Until the aspirants are ready for this, they should not take
the thing too seriously. If they do, they make themselves miserable, irritating to their teachers, and ridiculous to heir
What emotional and social experience one gets out of these attacks of
,
will profit the fiction just as do several lessons of Greek or Calculus, but since all three are only parts of an education, why should the
allow one to get him down while he treats the other two lightly?
As a parting and final word on the subject, let us say this: Don't "fall"
Tor anybody; it hurts when one hits the ground. Don't let anyone "get you
down" if you would hold your friends. The demonstration either wearies or
amuses them. They feel vastly superior. Keep a clear head; ride your
three horses but don't stick to any one too closely; hold the reins and drive.
fellow-student-

puppy-dove-

Senior Stuff.
Hendrlckson Did Ruskin or Shake
spearo write "Hamlet?"
Stuhlburg Yes sir, Professor.

She
cents,
dollar
He
and a

You can get "Smiles" for fifty
"kisses" for a dollar and for a
and a half" you'd be surprised."
"Somebody lend me a dollar
half.

That Ghastly Sensation
It is a ghastly sensation for a guy,
who could not figure whether a kiss
was a delicacy, an exploit, a dare,
sauce for the goose, a satanic temptation, a pleasure, a dissipation, or balm
for his bouI, to find out that a kiss is
only a kiss after all.
Things a Patt Hall Girl Knows Sut
Won't Tell.
(Written by a Girl Who Belongs to
the "You'd Be Surprised Club.
Whose hat she has on.
Why she wants late permission.
Her age.
Why she wasn't at the hop.
How to go down the
Who moves the benches.
Why she broke a
How to camel-walWhen she is tricked.
Who took the light bulbs.
How to go to Frankfort and get
back by 10:15.
How to get an extra plate of food.
How to enter the dining room after
,
the doors are closed.
How to dine at the Phoenix and not
get caught.
How to plead ("Ignorance of the
law") before Council.
Who is a good sport.
Whom she loves.
Social and Personal.

"That was a mean thief in Louisville who stole an actress' lip stick,"
now what will she have on?
Herndon Evans has started shaving
his neck round. You can take a maa
out of the country but you know the

rest.

A newspaper of today, at least the
ads in it, would lead a foreigner to
think, well you can Imagine what with
such ads as these:
"Have you a stomach, liver, or
canal?" If so take etc.
"Is your head achy"?
"Have you pimples"?
"Does your brain seem foggy"?
"Do you sneeze and tremble when
ill the presence of ladies?"
"Are your feet flat and does your
"Turn to the.Jllght" and you will tongue hang out when you are tired"?
pass the Lexington Drug.
"Are you making enough to support
a wife and eight children"? Why?
Don't get "sore" when another fellow sends your affinity a box of
"No
Mademoiselle On Dit says:
candy; go over and help to eat it.
less than fifty boys have applied for
the position of starter for the girls'
Grove? Creech has not yet an- track meet.
nounced himself for the Presidency.

FOOD
Frances Marsh reading names on
black board in French Class:
"Segenfelter; what a name! I sure
would hate to have a name like that."
Kitty onroy: "Well I wouldn't."

Just Crazy Stuff.
Boys, don't be bashful, the girls are
just as anxious to go out and sit under the shade of the trees' and talk,
us you are. Take a hint.
Although it may not seem that way,
Dean Melcher is your friend
Burnham surely did put a quietus
on Cincinnati's would-bhome run.
e

ENLIST

DR. GILLESPIE SPEAKS
SUMMER CAMP AT JOINT "Y" MEETING

O

Students To Takt Advantai
Government Offer.

of Maxwell
Presbyterian
Church Addresses Association
Sunday Nlht.

A number of the students of the
university have made known their

MWe

are not creatures of

circum-stanc-

e,

but we create circumstances
intention to take advantage of the
opportunity offered to college men by and out of that which we create comes
life," said Dr. R. T. Gillespie, pastor
the government this summer, to at
of the Maxwell Presbyterian Church,
tend Camp Custer, at Oklahoma. The
following list 'is incomplete but con in his talk to the members of the Y.
W. and Y. M. C. A. at their Joint meettains the names of some that will at
ing Sunday night.
tend the camp:
"The world has gone wild over posBrittingham, Vola D., Lexington,
sessing," he continued. "This (a the
Ky.
day when the danger of the egb,' the
Carr, John Goodwin, Somerset, Ky.
overmastering spirit of self, is apt to
(Davidson, Thomas Clyde, Jackson,
sweep us out into an irresistible cur
Ky.
rent. Do we, today, take God and our
Doty, John Gordon, Lancaster, Ky.
fellowman into our counsel, or do we
Erd, Bruner Clarkson, Lexington,
rather reason with ourselves alone?
Ky.
The man who disposes of his life and
Finn, William Goeble, Burlington,
his labor without taking God into con
Ky.
sideration is following a false concep
Field, Marshall, Owensboro, Ky.
tion of life through which he will fall
Grant, William Bowman, Lancaster,
into Inevitable and fatal error. Covet- - .
Ky.
ousness and materialism
are the
Little, Douglas F Owensboro, Ky.
great, consuming evils of today and
Hall, James O., Clay, Ky.
the Bible warns us against them."
Patterson, Guy Mose, Pineville, Ky.
The meeting was led by Edna Snapp.
Pechan, Albert Ray, Ford Olty,
A social hour followed the regular exPenn.
ercises at which refreshments were
Prewltt, John Burton, Mt. Sterling,
served.

Ky.

Price, William Robert, Louisville,
Ky.
Richerson, Edmund Irvin, Elizabeth-towKy.
Roach, John Frank, Pembroke, Ky.
Shouse, James, Lexington, Ky.
Shrove, Elbert Steele, Bradfordville,
Ky.
Smith, Charles M., Dixon, Ky.
Smith, Gilbert King, Lexington, Ky.
Warren, Charles Thompson, Science
Hill, Ky.
"Williams, John Everett, Ashland,
,
Ky.

ADDRESSED
BY DOCTOR HOLLOWAY
PRE-MED-

S

Dr. Thomas C. Holloway addressed
Club Monday night in
the
the Science building. The subject of
Doctor Holloway's talk was the im
portance of the decision to study med- iicine. iHe said that in the legitimate
practice of medicine there are not
many gradations. You must be profi
cient to be worth anything as a physician, and that means years of study
and expense spent in preparation.
After the talk refreshments were
served and the members enjoyed a so
cial time. This was the last meeting
of the year, and the last of a series of
addresses given by notable local and
visiting doctors.

HOME EC. STUDENTS
HOLD OPEN HOUSE

The girlB of the Practise House en4 to 6 o'clock
last
Thursday in honor of the faculty and
friends of the Department of Home
Economics. The list of those invited
included 191 names.
The house was beautifully decorat
ed with rose geraneums and other
flowering plants which, because of the
artistic arrangement tastefully blend
ed with the rose color scheme of the
dining room.
Those who received the guests wer?
He stood on the bridge at midnight,
Life, At It Ain't.
Miss Sweeney, bead of the depart
Interrupting my sweet repose;
"Why did you name your oil well For he was a tall mosquito,
meat; Mrs. Thomas Cooper, and
Sweet Sixteen?
And the bridge was the bridge of my Misses Eichelberger, Coffin and Cor"It's a gusher."
nose.
nell of the faculty. The girds responEx.
sible for the success of the event are
Take Him Out.
Mary Turner, Bertha Depew, Dorothy
Farquhar What did Desdemona ex
Middteton and Louise Mayer.
HEAR

WEATHERFORD!

Paster

ef

tertained from

THE LIGHT THAT LIES
'Tis often said of a woman'