xt7cnp1wfs1s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cnp1wfs1s/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1960 journals 096 English Lexington : Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.96 text Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.96 1960 2014 true xt7cnp1wfs1s section xt7cnp1wfs1s Results of the
KENTUCKY GRAIN SORGHUM R
PERFORMANCE TESTS
y 1960
Y By J.F. Shane , H.R.Richords
and Leo A.Link
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Z F.
$/865*
Progress Report 96
(Filing Code: l-l)
University of Kentucky
Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station
Lexington

 LOCATION OF THE 1960 GRAIN
SORGHUM PERFORMANCE TESTS
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Fertilizer Row Date Date
Location applied Spacing Planted Harvested
l. Owensboro Test not harvested
Cooperator: Beverly Gregory
2. Princeton 400 lb superphos- AO" June l7 Sept. 27
phate
AO lb N
Cooperator: Western Ky.
Substation
3. Franklin Test not harvested
Cooperator: Paul T. Garrett
4. Lexington QOO lb 6-6-l8 A0" May 24 Sept. l3
Cooperator: Ky. Agr. Exp. Sta.
<2>

 RESULTS QF THE KENTUCKY GRAIN SORGHUM
PERFORMANCE TESTS - 1960
J. F. Shane, H. R. Richards and Leo A. Link
The objective of the Kentucky Crain Sorghum Performance
Test is to provide an estimate of the relative performance
of grain sorghum hybrids and varieties.
This report presents yield and other agronomic data
. obtained from grain sorghum plantings made at various lo-
cations in the state. The grain sorghum tests consisted
of l7 hybrids and 9 varieties. Each hybrid or variety
was planted in 2-row plots l0 feet long in each of b rep-
lications.
When tests are grown near highly populated areas, which
serve as roosting places for birds, they are more subject
to attack by birds than they are in open fields. The test
at Lexington was harvested early to avoid damage by birds
and eliminate the necessity of bagging or standing guard
with a shotgun.
The test at Owensboro was completely destroyed by birds.
The test at Franklin was not harvested because of damage by
water and weeds early in the season.
Average yields for the tests at Princeton and Lexington
were 66.2 and 89.5 bushels per acre, respectively. The av-
erage yield for both locations was 77.9 bushels per acre.
The following tables present one-year summaries for
Princeton and Lexington, a two-year su ary for Princeton
and a three—year summary for Lexington. Data for results
at Franklin, Ky. are available in previous reports.
(3)

 EXPLANATION OF TERMS USED IN THIS REPORT
l. Yield. Yields of grain sorghum are reported as bushels
per acre of threshed grain at l3.0 percent moisture and
56 pounds per bushel. Adjustments were made for bird
damage and for significant variations in stand.
2. Moisture. Samples for moisture determinations were
taken from the bulked grain of all replications.
3. Height. The distance from the base of the plant to the
top of the plant is reported in inches.
4. Head Exsertion. The distance between the top leaf and 4
the base of the head. This characteristic is reported
as G - good, F - fair, and P - poor. Varieties with
good head exsertion are more easily combined because
less plant material will be passed through the combine.
5. Lodging. Plants leaning at an angle of more than 30 de-
grees from the vertical are considered lodged.
6. Broken Peduncles. Plants that are broken between the
leaf and the head.
7. Test Weight. Test weight or weight per bushel is one oi
the quality factors used in determining the grade that
is assigned in commercial marketing of grain. The high
er the test weight, the higher the market value unless
the grain is down-graded by another factor.
8. Date Flowered. The number of days after July l when
50 percent of the heads have flowered.
9. L.S.D. The abbreviation "L.s.d." means least signifi-
cant difference. Two varieties differing in yield by
less than the L.s.d. cannot be said to differ in yield
in that particular test if one wishes to be correct at
least 95 percent of the time.
l0. Head Type. Heads are classed as O-open, I-intermediate
or C-compact. Open type heads are more desirable since
they are less likely to mold and harbor insects.
(4)

 VARIETIES AND HYBRIDS TESTED
Varieties
Martin Combine Shallu
Texas 7b Caprock
Redbine 58 Westland
Plainsman Combine Kafir 60
Midland
_ Hybrids Source of Hybrids
P.A.G. 4255 Pfister Associated Growers, Inc.,
P.A.G. 5153 Auroura, Ill. and Huntsville,
P.A.G. 605S Ala.
P.A.G. 3153S
Texas 601 Texas Agricultural Exp. Substation
Texas 611 Lubbock
Texas 620
RS 501 Nebraska Agricultural Experiment
RS 590 Station, Lincoln.
RS 608
RS 610
RS 650
Lindsey 74Q Lindsey Seed Company
Lindsey 788 Lubbock, Texas
NK 140 Northrup, King Co.
NK 210 Minneapolis 13, Minn.
NK 310
(5)

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