xt7crj48s766 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7crj48s766/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660909  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September  9, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, September  9, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7crj48s766 section xt7crj48s766 Tntlnvfi Kornnl

htKifln
KUIC ftccd
changes: Page Two.
New

tditor discusses

juggcjfi

Black

..."

policy

Page

r

--

freshman tootooii team loaaea wnn
leadership and depth: Page Six.
John Breckinridge announces possible
candid ancev tor governor: Page Eight.

Power:

Four.

Joseph Kralt investigates South Africa
Killing: Page Fie.

University of Kentucky
19Gf
SEPT.

Vol. 58, No. 7

Harper Says
Hell Return

LEXINGTON, KY., FRIDAY,

0

9,

Eight Pages

H
..

.

1

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fl

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ill

fs

After Leave

University Dean of Men Kenneth Harper reported today he plans
leave of
to return to UK in February upon completing a one-yeabsence.
Presently a consultant with
Volunteers in Service to America in Washington, D. C, Harper
told the Kernel he knew nothing
of a report that he would be
appointed president of Pikeville
(Ky.) College.
In a telephone

interview,
Harper said he definitely plans
to assume his duties here when
his leve of absence is terminated
Feb. 1, 1967.
When questioned about the
lossible presidency, he said "I
haven't heard anything about it
yet. "As far as I know I'll be
back at the University as soon
as my term with VISTA is completed. I don't know where the
rumor came from," he added.
"I'm assuming he's returning
as Dean of Men," Robert L.
Johnson, Vice President of Student Affairs said. That's what
we're planning on. We've had
no indication that he's not,"
Johnson sated. The Office of
Dean of Men is a unit of the
Student Affairs Office.

Pikevillc's Acting President
Rediford Damron said today that
although the college is seeking
a new president, the selection
committee has not yet met to
consider applications.
Johnson also said no change
is planned in the structure ofthe
offices of the Deans of Men and
Women, as had been reported
earlier.

Johnson added he had no
of any change in
Harper's duties when he does
return and that any such change
would have to be initiated by
Harper.
He said that Acting Dean of
Men Jack Hall would return to
his previous position as assistant
dean. Joseph Burch, also an assistant dean, will continue in
that position.
knowledge

lj3&

V'm

Welcome Back program featured the Keeneland
Pickers, a folk singing group, and members of
Keeneland House Council, but their housemother
stole the show to the delight of cheering residents.
Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

Sen. Cooper said the United
States must not escalate the war
so much that Red China might
intervene and cause a third world
war.

Democrat Brown countered
that he wants the U.S. "to strike
the Communists where it will
bring them to the conference
table," and criticized Sen.
Cooper for urging that bombing
be stopped.
But the
Somerset
he has
Republican insisted
"never advocated withdrawal or
or any restraint
by soldiers on the battlefield."
white-haire- d

Brown, a Lexington attorney,
called his opponent
and urged him to "stop riding
a donkey and an elephant in
the same parade."
two-face-

"John has a practice of not
alienating anyone," Brown said.
"And his
opinion can
get the votes of the parents who
have boys over there(in Vietnam)
and (those of) draft card
burners."
dove-haw- k

"Your position has been deto the
system," he charged.
The debate, originating in
Louisville, showed neither candidate is happy with the way
the other is quoting him. Several
times each accused his opponent
of not having the facts straight,
straight.

structive

two-part- y

Sen. Cooper said he might
agree to the weekly debates
Brown suggested if they were
"actual debates on the facts."
the economy,
Discussing
Brown said there was no reason
to become hysterical over a few
ills in "the best level of prosperity any nation has ever had."
Sen. Cooper defended his v ote
for the Dirksen ammendment,
vote is not
saying "One man-on- e
absolute in this country. I believe we should give the states
the right to have both houses
based on population, or one on

population and the other
On Page

8

fcff

n

wouldn't let me eat dressed like this? I'm so mad!"
protested Keeneland Head Resident Katy Roberts
Wednesday night. Mrs. Roberts modeled the latest
thing in the Keeneland girls' dining apparel,
including sloppy football jersey, flop houseshoes

Vietnam, Inflation Highlight Debate

Both incumbent Sen. John
Sherman Cooper and his opponent, State Rep. John Y. Brown,
Thursday night stressed their
stands on the Southease Asia
conflict in a televised debate.

DR. KENNETH HARPER

"Do you know those people in Blazer cafeteria and rollers in her 'mop'. The Keeneland Hall

Cooper, Brown Clash

By JOHN ZEH
Kernel Associate Editor
senatorial canKentucky's
didates are fighting the Vietnam
war along the campaign trail
in the Commonwealth.

tM)MflWW

Would You Believe A Housemother?

e

X'"

m

J

.J

urn -

'

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v--

-.

Houses On Campus Property To lie Demolished For
Parking Lots

The old Sigma Nu fraternity house on Euclid Avenue,
left, and a row of houses across from the Chemistry- Physics building will be demolished to make room

for temporary parking lots. The University is building
the gravel lots to help relieve the parking problem
created by delay on permanent structures planned

around campus. Both these sites will be used for
faculty and staff parking, but an additional 220 student spaces will also be provided elsewhere.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Sept.

2

NOW

i

STARTS 7:30

ONE

Adm. $1.00

L?(f

OF THE MOST HEART WARMING

ADVENTURES

LITERATURE!

J1

9, 19(G

IN

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Two Mighty Armies

Trampled Its Valley...
Fighting FamilyCCliallenged Them Both!

A

STEWARTtiHtNANUUAH

JAMES

Quick access to medical information is now available to the
of TVX teletypewriter.
The unit was organized in April 19G6, according to Mr. Omcr
Hamlin, head of the UK medical library. This makes UK the
sixth institution of seven to join the network MICKS, Medical
Interlibrary Communication Exchange Services.
Interlibrary loans of needed
Mr. Hamlin said that UK
information, requests, and gen- has the fastest TVVX teletype
eral interlibrary correspondence unit, and it operates on a 24
can, by this system, be obtained hour schedule. When the library
within two days. It is also used is closed, the unit works on
for exchanging
information on automatic answering.
cataloging problems and for findMr. Hamlin hopes a teletype
ing where material can be obsystem will be made available
tained.
to the Margaret I. King Library
The seven member institu- and all community college
tions can deposit seldom used libraries.
materials in the Center for ReThe six other medical libraries
search Libraries in Chicago.
are of Duke University, the UniThe cost of using the tele- versity of North Carolina,
School of Medicine,
typewriter is the same as long man-Gray
distance phone calls. One hun- the Medical College of Virginia,
dred words per minute are sent the University of Virginia ami
the University of Louisville.
on a three minute limit.
UK medical library by way

BiHy..
PLUS

Dr. Wall Takes
Post At Tulane

Teletype Network Will Enable
UK To Share Medical Findings

Dr. Hen net t Wall, associate
professor of history, will leave
today for Tulane University
where he will assume an associate professorship there.
Dr. Wall, who has been with
the University for 22 years has
been teaching at Tulane off and
on since 1917. Last year he taught
there on leave and also this
summer session.
During his stay at the University, Dr. Wall served as director of Men's Residence Halls
from 1945 to 1955.

CLASSIFIED

.!

Bow-

FOR SALE

Champion Mobile Home
washing ma.
chine, excellent condition. Reasonafter 5:30
ably priced. Call

FOR SALE
42x8;

254-23-

KERNEL CLASSIFIED ADS BRING RESULTS

STARTS SUNDAY

The World's Immortal Adventure!

J3 ib

Austin Healey Sprite,
1963, white. Assume $45 per month
Needs tires. Call
bank payment.
6Stf
after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE Morgan Plus Four. Purchased Nov. '63. 33,000 miles; BRG
with black leather; perfect condition
throughout. The only one like it in
central Kentucky. The car James
Bond drove before they delivered
his Aston Martin.
Asking $1,800.
Contact Prof. Campbell at ext. 2227.
FOR

SALE

252-32-

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open

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FOR SALE

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FOR
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Ext. 5418 days, 252-07-

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FOR SALE

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"BEAU

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GUY STOCKWELL

Srfc-.-

DOUG McCLURE

LESLIE NIELSEN

WALTER SELTZER

la.

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ex-

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of dresses, skirts and
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e
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ALTERATIONS

tu-i-

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.odTELLY SAVALAS

DOUGLAS HEYES

;

mobile-home-

FOR RENT

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2 and 3 room furnished
apartments, equipped kitchens, private bath (shower or tub), near
town, UK. Apply 260 South Lime,
stone St.
9S6t

FOR RENT

SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO
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Managers needed
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plus ffHE

AN EXPLOSIVE STORY OF TODAY!

'ZEBRA IN THE KITCHEN
EARTH DIES SCREAMING

CHILD

GRADUATE student's wife desires to
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STARTS SUNDAY
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The Kentucky Kernel
The

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five tunes weekly during
the school year except
and exam periods, and during holidays
the summer semester. weekly during
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky
the Uoard
of Student Publications, by Prof. I'au)
chairman and Linda Gassaway,
Oberst,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in lbU4. became the Record in 1900, and the Idea
in 1908. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.

KERNEL

ARTISTS
-

-

f

r ABIAN SHElliY
ftTtR BROWM ajithcnt

r ABARLS UB HUNIFRHAYES

suswt HAR

mmi FflF

. James

Ml

$8.00
$.10

TELEPHONES

Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
Editor
2320

J

com t, muii
Released IhivUNlTEO

RATES

Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files

I

enr

mmmm

SUBSCRIPTION
fn.

Dresnts
YVES M0NTANH

N

TCHUM

News Desk, Sports, Women's Editor,
Socials
2321

Advertising, Business. Circulation

2319

* .TUT KENTUCKY

UK Horse Lovers Tour Farms
By MARYJEAN WALL
Kernel Staff Writer
UK horse lovers
Twenty-thre- e
were taken on a guided tour of
Lexington horse farms Thursday
afternoon by the Student Center
Board.

The tour, one ot the many
ictivities scheduled for the fall
.emester by the Board, included
topsat several of the farms along
he Ironworks and Hoffman
Pikes.
Of special interest was the
site of the Man o' War statue
near Man o' War Farm. The

bronze replica of the immortal
"Big Red" stands guard over
the interred bodies of Man o'
War and two of his famous sons,
War Admiral and War Relic.

at Klmcndorf Farm, owned by
Max Cluck. From here the group
of cars moved on the Leslie
Combs' Spendthrift Farm, where
Nasi ma, one of the most famous
Thoroughbreds of ajl time, was
shown to the students. Spendthrift boasts a total of 38 stallions, including such famous-nam- e
Thoroughbreds as Callant
Man, Bald Eagle, Dark Star,
Fleet Nasrullah, Jaipur, Never
Bend and Raise a Native. Dark
Star was the Kentucky Derby
winner who beat Native Dancer.

Samuel D. Riddle, owner of
Man o War, bequeathed two-an- d
one-ha- lf
acres of what was then
his Faraway Farm to the Lexington Chamber of Commerce
and Fayette County, for a Man
o' War Memorial Park. It is
in this roadside park, off Hoffman
Pike, that the Man o' War statue
can be seen.

First stop on the tour was

After stopping at the Man

6T
rTrv

ry

t

.

KERNEL,

.

Sept.

lIM-

!).

resumed at Castleton Farm,

s.

d

wood-panelle-

million dollars". But horses
that valuable usually aren't tor
a

sale.

which is the home of many famous standardbreds and saddle
mous standardbreds and saddle-bredPerhaps the most impressive thing in the standard-brestallion barn here, other
than its royal equine occupants,
was the cleanliness and highly
polished look of the interior.
Beautiful
walls
and stall doors rose from clean
cement aisle-wayd

s.

Portions of the barn floor had
just been repainted, and were
still wet. Several remarks were
made that the barn looked cleaner
than most of the dorms. That
could be true, without insult to
anyone concerned, for expensive
horses have been known to live
better than ordinary humans.

On the way back to the
campus the tour drove through
Walnut Hall Farm, where a
bea-Waln-

Hall Farm, w here a beautiful stone mansion is surrounded
by stone walls and fenced
By this time the farm
had been closed to visitors, so
the group did not stop.
ias-ture-

WATCH OUT FOR
THE OTHER GUY

d

Drive Defensively!

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING
UNUSUAL?
hi

1

Rare items for your rooms or for gifts:

ill

;;

PRIMITIVE

ffiLJLt zrX

the club's program.
featured,

A

"Y Coloring Book" was

4-- 1

1

r.

All students interested in trying out for the rifle teams are
required to attend an organizational meeting and clinic from
7 to 9 p.m., Monday in Boom
will
109 Barker Hall. Try-out- s
be held on the rifle range in
the basement of Buell Armory,
Members will be
Sept.
13-1-

selected for the Varsity, Freshman, BOTC, and Girls' Bifle
Teams.

216 SOUTH LIMESTONE (Two blocks from Main Street and Campus)
Always Discount lor U of K Students.

in Boom

101--

A

Miller

Hall.

University Shop

Memberships in the Central
Kentucky Concert and Lecture
Series may be purchased at

for young men
and gentle women

Shackleton's and
University students are admitted
on their I.D. Student wives may
purchase memberships for $5.00
at the office of Student Affairs,
Boom 207, Administration BuildSmith-Watkin-

I

Scholarly pursuits
are sought in
V Neck Sweaters
at the

Pi Delta Phi, National French
Honorary, will meet at 4:30 p.m.
Monday

JEWELRIES

you name it!

3..

UK Bulletin Board
An organizational meeting of
the University
Club will be
held at 6:30 p.m. Monday in
Boom 111 of the Student Cen-teAll interested students are
invited to attend.

CARVINGS
PAINTINGS,

at KOSMOPOLITA

YWCA Holds First Meeting
Mary Faraci, social director for the University
YWCA greets two coeds Thursday during the Y's
first meeting, held to acquaint new members with

ARTS

ORIENTAL

s.

ing.

The Indian Association will
hold a general meeting at 5 p.m.
Sunday in Boom 109 of the Student Center.

tilICllllllllIIUIIIIIIirt3llllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIICllllllllltlllllllllE

Pod you vmnk

S3

c

A ysup

Math

122 Book

... but

were sold a new one?
KENNEDY'S CUSTOMERS
GOT A USED ONE AND
SAVED $2.25

We know we don t have a clothing store on every campus
. . . but we're working on it.
OHIO

u.

PURDUE

FLORIDA U.

407

u.

jfIC3llllllllllll3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3lllllllllllll3llllllllini3IIIIIIIIIIIIClllllllllllllC3lllllll'H

WEST VIRGINIA

MIAMI U.

(0

)

EASTERN KY. U.

OHIO STATE U.

Kennedy Book Store

S. Limestone

U.

BOWLING GREEN U.

s.

The afternoon ended with a
drive through the University's
own Spindletop Besearch Farm,
and from there the cars headed
back to UK.

In Castleton's saddle horse
barn, the grooms were just getting
off work, but they were kind
enough to point out thechampion
saddle-bred- ,
Wing
Commander, as well as Star of
the Show and Local Talent.
Asked at how much he valued
the
Wing Commander, one groom laughed and said
he really didn't know, but guessed that i would be "well over
five-gaite-

v

-.

In Bluegrass Area

War Memorial Park to take
pictures of the statue, the tour

o

It i1.i

UNIV. KENTUCKY
UNIV. CINCINNATI

* "Can't l.v Yon Mred. (Julia Tililcn This Tourniquet

Fears Of Black Power
The mayor stood on top of the
police car and pleaded with the
crowd to listen.
Ivan Allen, Jr. wanted to avoid
rioting in Atlanta.
"Let's sit down and talk this
thing out peaceably," he yelled
to the crowd. Few listened.
"I'm going to walk up Capitol
Avenue to the stadium," the silver-haire- d
mayor said. "Follow me
and we'll talk this out." No one
moved.
Then a
Negro youth
climbed to the top of the car and,
waving his finger in the mayor's
face, yelled "black power." The
crowd joined in the chant and
began rocking the car. Bottles were
thrown, shots were fired, and
several youths were arrested by
police.
It was the nearest Atlanta had
come to serious racial trouble in
some time. The city, which has
a
reputation of dealing
intelligently with racial matters,
is troubled.
Leaders of the White Establishment, who have backed Allen in
his attempts to give justice to all
of Atlanta's citizens, are fearful
of the black power chant of SNCC,
red-shirtc-

d

well-earne- d

the

Atlanta-base- d

militant civil

rights group headed by Stokley
Carmichael.
And many Negro leaders, At- -

Selectivity?
Unquestionably, the establishment of a magazine stand in the
Student Center is an addition long
overdue. However, the operation is
being handled under a dubious
philosophy: sell what the majority
want and nothing else.
If this were strictly a commercial operation, the policy might be
'justified. But, hopefully, the purpose of the rack will be to expose
and make quality reading material
available to University students
and faculty.
The majority of material being
sold now is of a somewhat superficial nature. Students desiring to
read such magazines as The New
Republic, The National Review,
Harpers, Atlantic, or The New
Yorker, to mention only a few,
receive little benefit from the Student Center rack.
Members of the University community should be encouraged to
read magazines with a little more
depth than Mad.

lanta's Dr. Martin Luther King
among them, are afraid that the
chants of the young militants might
undo the work of a generation.
We share this fear.
We recognize the injustice and
frustration
that has led
the
Carmichael and his followers to
believe their strength lies in "black
power" as opposed to open cooperation with the white community.
White leaders generally have
been slow and reluctant to grant
full citizenship to Negroes. Many
of them have taken the view that
the Negro must earn his right to
citizenship rather than being born
with it as was his white brother.
The frustration of a little freedom, slowly and reluctantly granted is an exceedingly heavy load for
d
the
Negro youth
to bear.
So it is with some understanding
that we listen to the black power
call.
And yet we are troubled when
we see the finger of black power
pointed at an official who has
always done his best for the Negro
and who, at the moment of trouble,
was pleading for reason and responsible conversation.
The Civil Rights Bill is being
considered before the Senate this
week and all the signs indicate
that it will be dropped or largely
cut apart.
The Southern block of Russell
and Thurmond and the rest will
win this round, the commentators
say, because there is no real backing
for the bill from among the civil
rights groups who say it is "weak"
and "not enough."
We are as anxious as the young
activist-orientate-

militants to see

first-cla-

ss

citizen-

ship granted to all Americans, and
we long for the day when all of
the social and economic barriers
will have crumbled.
Yet we ask from these Negroes
the super-huma- n
task that they
follow the advice of Dr. King in
seeking neither "black power" nor
"white power, but "human pow-

er."
The

white

community

must

understand the frustration that is
at the heart of the cry for black
power and the young militants
must realize the harm to their
own cause this slogan can do.
For the true
problems lies in
of both groups
a goal that is still

solution to the
the cooperation
toward reaching
far from won.

Letter To The Editor

Criticism TJn warranted9
To the Editor of the Kernel:
Your editorial of Sept. 6,

that any further ref"They erences to Dr. Patterson's alleged
Took It" places unwarranted crit- overuse of our facilities are unicism on Dr. Patterson for failure warranted. He may have overto be at the presentation of the extended himself to our hospitality,
M usie Room "Back to the Stubut in this particular matter the
dents."
fault is ours, not his.
The Student Center Board
Student Center Executive Comaccepts the blame for the erroneous mittee:
idea that Dr. Patterson was to have
Robert Walker
appeared, since we were aware that
he would be out of town and,
therefore, unavailable. We further
compounded our error through a
failure in communications in finalizing our plans with him.

We feel

Bill Eigel
Becky Caton
Suzi Soames
Blithe Runsdorf
Peggy Lee Herbert

"Tt

uirfii&Tx

Post- -

The Flat Earth Society
With a lot of speculation about
government withholding or distorting news these days, you'd think
that everyone would be baffled
about what is going on. But no,
not everyone is affected. Take the
good old International Flat Earth
Society, for instance. You can't
fool them.
The New York Times reports
that a picture of a round earth
taken by the U.S. Lunar Orbiter
was shown to the society's secretary. Obviously a plot to dispel
any deviation from the popular
image of the shape of the earth,
it almost suceeded. "I confess that
it really knocked me," Samuel
Shenton, secretary, said. "It was
a terrible shock."
But, to his credit, Mr. Shenton
quickly recognized the picture to be
"probably one of the nonluminous
bodies between us and the moon."

Good eye there, blimey. You've
restored our faith in stickto-it-ivenesWe have to admit, we
probably would have been fooled
ourselves.
s.

Keep proclaiming your theory,

that the earth is flat and motionless at the bottom of a huge pit,
at the top of which the sun, and
the moon each about 32 miles
across are whizzing about. While
we may not exactly hold with this
theory, we certainly encourage you
to question the earth's shape or
anything else bugging society.
In fact, we are compelled to
admit that we admire your convictions. You and your 24 other
members are displaying a courage
of convictions rare in today's
world flat or round, whichever it
be.
Keep a stiff upper lip.

The Kernel welcomes letters from readers wishing to comment on any topic. Because of space
limitations, letters should be limited to 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters received.
Longer manuscripts will be accepted at the editor's discretion.
The letters submitted should be signed as follows: for students,
and class and
local telephone number; for faculty members, name, department and name, college
academic
for alumni,
name, hometown and class; for University staff members, name, department rank; position; for
and
other readers, name, hometown and hometown telephone number. Unsigned letters cannot be considered for publications. All letters should be typewritten and double spaced.
Letters should be addressed to: the Editor, the Keptucky Kernel. Journalism Building. University
of Kentucky, or they may be left in the editor's office, Room 113-of the Journalism Building.
A

The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

ESTABLISHED 1894

University of Kentucky
FRIDAY, SEPT. 0, 1906

Walter

M.

Chant,

Editor-in-Chi-

Terence Hunt, Executive Editor

Gene Clabes. Managing Editor
Judy Chisiiam, Associate Editor
John Zeh, Associate Editor
Frank Browning, Associate Editor
Phil Straw, Stxirts Editor
Fox. Daily News Editor
Larry
UoN ntHKONf Daily NeiVS Ediu
Barry Cobb, Cartoonist

William Knapp,

Business Manager

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Cami-uell- ,

Circulation Managi

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Washington Insight

Ve rwoerd Killing Shows Deep Inner Logic

By JOSEPH KRAFT
WASHINGTON
Superficially the assassination of Prime
Minister Hcndrik F. Verwoerd
of South Africa looks to be a
random act, senseless in genesis
and without general significance.
In fact, the killing has a deep
inner logic.

-

It underlines, as does, by no
coincidence, the current meeting
of commonwealth countries in
London, the desperate choices
now shaping up in the matter
of African race relations. And it
is against that background that
the United States should be
thinking about the African role,
so much avoided in the last
few years, which it must begin
to play again.
Crudely stated, the race problem in Africa is the problem of
relations between a majority of
poor and backward blacks and
a minority of dynamic whites.
Two different approaches to the
problem present themselves.

First, there

is

the approach

of the territories south of the
Zambesi River Portuguese Africa, Southern Rhodesia and the
Union of South Africa. Here the
whites have fortified their economic advantages by authoritarian regimes that have as their
chief purpose the exclusion of
the black majority from even a
gradual approach to political
power.
Secondly, there is the approach of the East African cou-

ntriesZambia, Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya. These countries
comare examples of multi-racimunities in action. The whites
have retained their economic advantages while political power
has passed slowly, and in democratic fashion, to black regimes.
As between these two patterns, there is, if only on practical grounds, no real choice. The
maintenance of w hite supremacy
generates manifest inhumanities,
patterns of rigid constraint, ac- -

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

cretion of power to irresponsible
police types, and tension among
racial groups.

Not
regimes
surprisingly,
based on racial supremacy however tough they may appear from
the outside, have no organic
strength. They arc so stiff and
tense that they can be toppled
by a single crazy act. And the
lesson of the Verwocrd assassi-

the vulnerability of
based on racial princiregimes
ples. The killing traces on the
wall handwriting that says:
"sooner or later . . ."
nation

is

Outsiders, in these circumstances, can only seek to promote a smooth transition from
racial to multi-racicommunities. To that end, the chief outsider, Britain, has through the
commonwealth sought to act as
a bridge between the countries
south of the Zambesi and the
East Africans. The United States,
by moving to foster better economic conditions in both areas,
has backed up Britain.
But it is now apparent that
policy has
failed. The commonwealth is
splitting apart because it has
done nothing to arrest the effort

this

even-hande-

d

of the whites of Southern Hho-desi-a
to establish their political
supremacy in perpetuity. As to
prosperity fed by American investment, it has yielded in the
Union of South Africa not an
easing of tension but a tightening
of racial restrictions.

The appropriate reaction to
this failure is to move toward
a policy that oenly discriminates in favor of the
l
communities in East Africa. As
a first step in that direction,
this country should begin to disengage south of the Zambesi.
Private investment there should
multi-racia-

worked

out jointly with other
interested nations, notably Britain and Canada.

The Central African Fact, in
sum, is that extending the hand
of friendship totl le w hite regimes
docs not improve racial conditions. Concentrating on the
multi-racia-

now be discouraged. If only to
get the message across even more
strongly, no opportunity should
be lost to vote against the regimes of South Africa, Southern
Rhodesia and Portuguese Africa
at the United Nations.
More important, the United
States should now move activelymuch more actively than
it has to date to give economic
resupport to the multi-racigimes in Zambia, Tanzania,
Uganda, and Kenya. This assistance should concentrate on projects that promote regional coh-

esionnotably

And,

of course,

l

communities,

V

ttmn 44.

PHOTOGRAPHIC
EQUIPMENT
AND SUPPLIES

1

and
COMPLETE PROCESSING
SERVICE

in

?

Lcunera

Zandale Shopping
Phone

transportation.
it should

mak-

ing them work, offers the only
hope for progress. Even then,
it is not clear that progress can
come fast enough to avoid a
terrible racial massacre.

m

Otop
Center Arcade

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278-237- 3

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"THAT KIDT1JN0 IN SOME KATHEK INTERESTING

BROWN CROSS
since

SKETCHES.-

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1963

C

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SERVICES FREE
in Kankakee

C

Third year (1965) REPORT. Like the first two years. No one made
inquiry for methods of approach for the solution or analysis of a case
of alley rubbish or filth.
Sent a letter to 20 lay treasurers of churches in an effort to form
an organization to collect public records on a continuous basis. RECEIVED no replies.
Had a business phone installed in my home but could not buy, paid
adv. in Yellow pages of phone book.
Set two signs on our city's terrace of my taxed property to match
the contempt of others already doing it. My signs were removed by the
street and alley dept. on orders of the police dept. There is no record
of the acts in either dept. Only verbal assurances. My signs were remade and reset (with more public information) in my yards. Received
a letter from City Attorney Frank Curran on his action if sign was not
changed. Later Frank Curran resigned as City Attorney. Sent a letter
to attorney Frank Curran asking information on who ordered or comAsplained for his letter. Received no reply. Sent a letter to County
sociation for the Advancement of Colored People (after sevreal misof the body NAACP) asking
leading guesses of addresses by
if Alderman Jesse Franks discussed his warning to me and the problem
with them. RECEIVED no reply. Before and ofter my signs were removed

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HOW WILL YOU VOTE IN NOVEMBER?

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Beginning Monday, Sept 12, 1966
Follow the detailed analysis of proposed

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are located at 392 N. Indiana Ave.

&

Progress-Reporte-

Editor-in-Chi- ef

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Read it first, in

...

IL

The South's Outstanding College Daily

395 N. Harrison.

Dec. 23, 1965 as
Report published by Momence
a paid adv. Report rejected by Kankakee Daily Journal, Jan. 3, 1966
as a paid adv.

Ke rnel

series by
Walter Grant
10-pa-

KIE HKPTCE

FREE.

NoteSigns

constitutional changes in a

THIS SERIES WILL APPEAR IN
NEWSPAPERS ACROSS THE STATE

presence
as there is no recording group to pass your intelligence to.
Attest Cecil Krvft 385 N. Chicago Ave. Kankakte, Illinois.
Present Guidance (self appointed) of BROWN CROSS. REMEMBER the

are

NO

M
M
M

from our city's terrace, real estote dealers (Washer, Gregor, Martin &
Spivey, etc.) and Lang Buick used our city's te