xt7crj48s82d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7crj48s82d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670228  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 28, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 28, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7crj48s82d section xt7crj48s82d Inside Today's Kernel
Married students will live in Coopers-towagain, beginning in the tall:
Poge Two.

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of the graduate faculty
nominated tor the Sang Award: Poge
Three.
One-thir-

of Kentucky
University TUESDAY, FEB.
LEXINGTON, KY.,

Vol. 58, No. 107

28, 1967

Eight Pages

UK will host the 1967 Southeastern
Conference swimming meet this week:

Page Six.

d

Editor discusses
9U""'"--

the hurley tobacco

The Baptist Student Union will hold
a basketball tournament here this
weekend: Poge Si.

r- -

tadent Rifltas Bill Approved;
Trustees Could Act March 17
J

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Amended Code Requires
Noliee Of Picket Plans

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By

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Dr. Garrett Flickenger, chairman of the Student
Affairs Committee of The Senate directs an aside
comment in an earlier Senate meeting to members
William F. Axton, Lewis Donohew, Douglas

Lri

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(nr

Schwartz, James Kemp, Eugene Bradley, Judith
Kemp, and Maurice Clay. Not shown are student
members Mary Virginia Dean, Marsha Fields,
Winston Miller, and Sheryl Snyder.

House Draft Gommission
Differs With President's
By JOHN HERBERS

inducted first into the armed

New York Times News Service

forces.

-

A special
WASHINGTON
study panel on the draft appointed by the House Armed
Services Committee recommended Monday that the youngest
men, rather than the oldest, be

UK Moving

Footballers
Into Dorms
By LEE BECKER
Although it is not certain
now who will be living in Wildcat Manor and Kitten Lodge next
year, the football team is one
group that definitely will not
be there.
Starting next Fall the football players will be living in
the dormitories as other athletes
do now.
According to Robert L. Johnson, vice president for student
affairs, the move has been in
the works since plans for the
new complex were first drawn
up. It was originally scheduled
for this past Fall, but, due to
the lack of adequate dining fa-

cilities, was postponed.
"It is a part of the move
throughout the University to
bring athletes closer to the rest
of campus," Mr. Johnson said.
The trend among universities
has been either to keep athletes
entirely separate from the rest
of campus, he said, or move
them together.
The decision to bring them
into the mainstream of campus
life represents the recognition
of the need to "pull together
so many facets of the student
affairs area, and bring them into
something that makes sense,"
he said.
The university has not decided completely what is to 1m?
Continued On Page

2

TERENCE HUNT

Kernel Managing Editor

,

The panel, headed by Gen.
Mark W. Clark (U.S. Army retired), also called for continued
college deferments except for
graduate students in noncritical
fields. And it rejected outright
the idea of using a random selection process for selecting draftees.
commission
A presidential
that has been studying the draft
since last summer also is expected to recommend drafting
younger men first.
But the presidential commission, headed by Burke Marshall,
will call for random selection of
or fit for
those classified
and that strong considservice,
eration be given to student deferments, according to informed
sources.

congressional fight in the months
ahead on just what kind of draft
law Congress will enact and send
to President Johnson. The present law expires July 1.
President Johnson appointed
his
commission last
July and designed Marshall, a
former assistant attorney general, to head it. The commission's
study was due for completion by
Jan. 1, but the members were
Continued On Page

APPLY NOW!
Wednesday is the deadline to
submit applications for the 17-fKernel staff. All positions are
open, including editor and summer editor. Applications are
available in Rooms 111 and 110
of the Journalism Building and
should be returned to the editor.

Thus the stage is set for a

Anti-Wa- r

2

With strong amendments, the University Senate Monday aj
proved the last section of the student rights and discipline report
and recommended its adoption hy the Board of Trustees.
Action by the Trustees is exCommunity of Scholars, were appected at the March 17 meeting.
proved in earlier Senate meetings
If approved by the Trustees, imwith minor amendments.
plementation of the report should
The first two portions outbegin by the fall semester.
line disciplinary procedures and
The unanimous voice vote of
jurisdictions in housing units,
the Senate at 4:55 p.m. climaxed ' and prescribe a list of 10 dis11 months of work by the Senate
ciplinary and two academic ofAdvisory Committee on Student
fenses. Avenues of appeal and
Affairs, the body which drafted
punishments which can be imthe
report, and four
posed are delineated by the reSenate sessions in which the report.
port was considered.
Amendments to the third
Taken as a whole, the report
section Monday are considered by
defines a new University-studen- t
Advisory Committee Chairman
relationship in the areas of a W. Garrett Flickinger to be the
resident in housing, an employer, most drastic changes made to the
a consumer, a scholar, the subreport.
ject of discipline, and a member
The amendments change the
of organizations. Drafted under
intentions of the committee. Prof.
a philosophy that the University
Flickinger said. "They weaken
is not responsible for imposing
Continued on Page 3
punishment for state or local
law violations, the report is considered by many a major step
toward the elimination of the "in
loco parentis"
(in place of
parents) responsibility of the Uni27-pa-

1,1

Jljml'

versity.

defined by the report, the
University's sole concern is "to
provide protection of, and facilities for, those who seek knowledge." Today's student is an
adult and "is at the University
as a member of a community of
and so long as his
scholars
conduct in and out of the classrooms does not impringe on the
rights of other such scholars,
the University should not use its
powers to either condone or condemn."
Sections one and two of the
report, the University as a Landlord, and the University as a

1

As

W;-;t-

J

...

W. GARRETT

FLICKINGER

At Last!

Factions Plan United Program

By JOHN O'BRIEN

Students, faculty members, and local citizens who have expressed dissatisfaction with
the "immorality" of the Vietnam war in
the past decided to unite into one organiza-

tion Sunday for the purpose of "educating"
the campus about the war.
will be inThe fact that
volved in the organization raises the question
of
involvement in campus
politics.
Robert L. Johnson, vice president for
student affairs, was out of town and unavailable for comment on the issue of persons participating in campus political affairs who are not affiliated with the Uninon-studen- ts

non-stude-

versity.
He is expected to return late Thursday
and a statement of policy on the issue should
be forthcoming, his office said. However,
if previous experience is any indication the
vice president may approve of Lexingtonians
not affiliated with UK participating in this
phase of campus politics.
Representatives from local Democratic
and Republican campaign committees have

solicited aid from students in past Fayette
County races.
The Citizens For Peace in Vietnam, the
newly formed group, has set forth a
program for the remainder of the
semester. The organization will provide for
a "Vietnam Peace Research Center" which
will be housed at the Presbyterian Center
on Rose Street.
Don Pratt, a member of the University
Christian Movement, said the research center
will contain books, articles, govemmentdoc-umentand a film catalogue on national
foreign policy and the general subject of
peace in Vietnam.
Pratt said the center will be open to
any interested persons.
The organization also plans to hold a
weekley peace vigil in front of the Administration building or "some other central
place on campus" according to Mrs. Lawrence
X. Tarpey, chairwoman of the peace vigil
committee. Mrs. Tarpey said she consulted
Mrs. Charles Hubble, original creator of
the technique and instructor of Sociology
at the Santa Baibara Campus of the University of California.
four-poi-

nt

s,

She said Mr. Hubble sent her some literature on the one year history of the peace
vigil technique. Mrs. Tarpey said peace
vigils are being conducted in 67 American
cities at present, including Louisville and
Cincinnati.
She said her committee would meet Wednesday at noon to decide on a time, place,
and a day to start the weekly event. Pratt
said the organization will "disseminate an
article entitled "Clergymen's Dilema" to
every Lexington minister for his comment
and criticism.
Pratt stated that the organization "will
demand equal time on WKYT-Tto respond
to the station's recent
Vietnam editorials."
V

He also stated that the group is constructing a questionnaire to be distributed
to the student body to "determine the views
of the students on Vietnam and their educational background on the matter."
The organization will meet again Sunday.
Pratt said it was an open meeting at the
Presbyterian Center at 2 p.m.

* J -- TIIU KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday,

I

cl.

28,

l!7.

House's Draft Panel
Submits Its Report
Continurd From Page
split over the issue of student
deferments and did not reach a
final decision until the end of
January.
The commission's report is
now in the White House.
On Nov. 1, the Armed Services Committee, headed byRep.
1

L. Mendel Rivers,
appointed its own study commission
composed of Clark and seven
other members.
This move was interpreted
by some congressmen as a means
of exerting congressional independence by providing the comD-S.-

mittee with the basis for reporting a draft bill substantially different from that recommended by
the White House.
A summary of the panel's recommendations was released Monday and Mr. Rivers said the full
text would be made public in
a few days. It is expected to provide the basis for hearings the
committee will hold on the draft
in the near future.
Although the panel recommended some basic changes, the
report was essentially an endorsement of the "generally philosophy of the present Selective
Service Act," according to the
committee summary.
Under the current system,
youths below the age of 26 who
are in
have been classified
principle drafted in the order of
their birth date, with the oldest
A

first.

The panel recommended that
instead of selecting the oldest
men first, local draft boards would
first attempt to satisfy monthly
draft quotas by ordering for induction
registrants who are
in the 19 to 20 age group.
"Older
registrants would
continue to be liable for induction until age 26 but at a considerably reduced priority," the
A

reports said.
All bona-fid- e
students of institutions of higher learning would
continue to be deferred as long
as they remained in good standing
"until either receipt of their undergraduate degree or the attainment of age 24, whichever occurs
earlier. Deferred students would
then revert to the
pool for
induction on the same basis as
their younger contemporaries
then in the 0
age group."
In other words, the graduating
college students would be subject to the "same hazards of
exposure to induction as their
younger contemporaries."
Furthermore, once deferred as
a student, the registrant would
forfeit any chance, except extreme hardship, for further deferments on other grounds, such as
A

19-2-

marriage and fatherhood. This
provision, the panel said, would
keep young men from parlaying
college deferments into a lifetime
exemption from military service.
Student deferments, the panel
said, would not be continued for
students except for
those training for occupations
judged to be "critical to the national security."
The panel rejected the idea of
a national service system that
would equate work in humanitarian organizations with military
duty.
post-gradua- te

Dispensing Opticians
SPECIALIZING in CONTACT LENSES
JOHN G. KRAUSS III

Phone

254-808-

183 N. Upper St.

3

Lexington,

Ky.

University Plans To Move
Football Players To Dorms
Continued From rage
done with Wildcat Manor and
Kitten Lodge, which house varsity and freshman players respectively, but Mr. Johnson is
hoping that they will be kept
1

for housing.

"Several fraternities who are
living in older houses have expressed interest in moving into
one of the buildings if they become available," he said.
"Everybody will be considered and judged on the merits
of the case."
"VVc really haven't discussed
it yet," Mr. Johnson said, "but
a decision will be made in the
next few weeks."
According to Kenneth
assistant dean of men,
between four and six fraternities
will be seeking consideration
when the decision is made.
When contacted, the eight
fraternities not now living in
close proximity to campus were
restrained in their response to

the matter.
Except in the case of Delta
Tau Delta, all said that they
knew of the opening, but most
felt unqualified to make a definite statement about their position.
Charlie Ben Ashby, president
of Delta Tau Delta, said that
his fraternity would definitely
not be interested in the two
houses since they possess enough
land to expand if needed in the
future.
Mr. Brandenburgh said that
it would be unlikely that Zeta
Beta Tau, living in the leased
Sigma Nu house, would be interested in the houses since they
have recently extended their lease
for another year.

and other
Respiratory Diseases

9 out of 10

By PRISCILLA DREHER
Kernel Staff Writer
Cooperstown will be given back to married couples and graduate students this fall when the new dormitory complex is com-

plete.
That is, if strikes, and other acts of God do not interfere with
the completion of the two towers.
Definite plans have also been made to refurbish all the departments in Cooperstown, even if the complex is not completed in
time.
New occupants in Cooperstown in the fall can look forward
to newly painted rooms with new furniture. New stoves and refrigerators will also be installed to replace the ones that have
been there ever since Cooperstown was built.
The cost of redecorating Cooperstown is set at around $441,000,
which will come from the auxiliary service fund, and not increased rent rates.
At the present time Cooperstown C houses 45 couples, and
Building A, 40 couples. Single students occupy the rest of the
project.
The new complex's two 22 story towers will house over 600
students apiece.
Some interesting rumors have been going around concerning
the complex but officials are quick to refute them. The top floors
of the towers will not contain faculty penthouses, nor will one
tower house all the athletes. The entire complex will consist of
double rooms and only single students will be housed there.
Students desiring to live with a "view from the top" can
indicate il when they apply for campus housing, said Mrs. Jean
Lindley of the housing office.

CLASSIFIED ADS
Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113, Journalism Bldg.
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed in The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not include,
as a qualifying consideration in deciding whether or not to rent to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.

HELP

WANTED

MALE

&

FEMALE

APPLY NOW
For A Position
On The

Kernel Staff
available in Room 111
Applications
or 116 of the Journalism Building
and are due March 1.
1967-6- 8

ladies' Benrus

Yellow

gold,
watch. Reward. Call

27F3t

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Lighter, in or near downtown
cafeteria. Of sentimental value. Generous reward offered. Call ext. 1051.

LOST

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WANTED
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valid Ky. driver's license. Must be
over 21. have mornings or afternoons free. Apply Wallace's Book
7Ftf
Store.
WALLACE'S
BOOK
STORE
needs
your used textbooks. Bring them in
anytime. We pay top prices. We buy

all used textbooks.

ROOMMATE
Editor-in-Chi-

LOST

10

not be as complete.

Cooperstown Will House
Married Students In Fall

LOST

Hey,

"We were mostly concerned
with food training tables and
meeting rooms. We're real pleased
with the accommodations,
lions."
Another plus factor in the
move, according to the coach,
is that there will only be two
men in a room in the complex,
while there are four in a room
in the houses, and the change
will aid good study habits.
Although the men will be
spread out in the dorms, as is
done with other athletes, due
to the large number of men,
the distribution will probably

Bran-denburg- h,

FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS

farmers
never think
of joining
The Peace Corps

According to Mr. Brandenburgh, it would be possible for
Sigma Nu to return to campus
"tomorrow" as far as the University was concerned, since they
were disciplined by their national, and not the campus.
It seems unlikely that this
will occur, however, in the light
of the lease.
Coach Charlie Bradshaw,
when questioned, said that he
did not think the players living
in the dorms would cause disciplinary problems.
"The only kind of discipline
that is worth anything, is
he said.

2nd
Week!
IRRESISTIBLE!- '-

Summer Editor
Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor
Assistant Managing: Editor
Sports Editor
Arts Editor
Women's Page Editor
Itusiness Advertising Manager
Circulation Manager
Advertising Salesman
Office Manager
Itrporteri
Pick up applications In Koom 113
Journalism liuilding. All applications
must be turned in by March 1.
THE

KENTUCKY
KERNEL
WANTS YOU!

9Ftf

WANTED
Female;
near UK. Call university,

apartment
ask for Kathleen Gastarpich, ext.
5501 before 4:30 p.m.
23F4t
Good looking, liberal
minded female companion for Florida trip during spring break. All
expenses paid. Travel via Vette.
Call Jeff
28F4t

WANTED

HELP

WANTED

HELP WANTED Student's wife
Good typist, some shorthand; 5 day
8:30-4:3-

week.
transportation.

Must

have

PERSONAL

FOR SALE

The Peace Corps
Washington, D.C. 20525

TOUR
SALE
Electric motors, used,
'a & i horsepower, $3.00 each. Bulk
discount; all makes. Call Dennis,
after 6 p.m.
22F19t

FOR

INDIA

Center. Room
11

3,

a.m.

at no "cost. Student
115. Monday
7 p.m.
28Flt
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Please send me information.
Please send me an application.

Address
City

State.

!JO 0 R" M AT

U

Rl

AU0

HTM

Zip Code

Published as a public service by The Kentucky Kernel
in cooperation with The Advertising Council and the
International Newspaper Advertising Executives.

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40500. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published live times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4SKJ6.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
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Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
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SALE 19ti0 Porsche Super 90
roadster;
radio, radial
ply tiers, competition roll bar. Car
needs new valves and or rings, $li,r)(l.
John Frelinger. 219 N. Broadwav,
2HF2t
apt. 1. Phone

FOR

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The Kentucky Kernel

Name

own

23F5t

2321
2320
2447
2319

FOR SALE 1959 Rambler American.
Good tues and battery. Phone
23F3t

THE
MEW

2nd FUN WEEK!
A

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"A FUNNVTHING
HAPPENED
ONTHEWAYTO
THE FORUM"

FLCC
TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 8 p.m.

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I'M.- 7-

Third Of Graduate Faculty
Nominated For Sang A ward

of the more than 200 members of the University
Over one-thirof Kentucky Graduate Faculty have been nominated for the Sang
Award for 1967. The award, worth $3,000, is given to the jhtsoii
judged "to have made the most outstanding contributions to the
graduate program."
Stuart Forth, director of bbrar- Dr. Lewis V. Cochran, act- - jcs
ingdean ot the Graduate School,
The same year he gave L'K
said nominations for the award a collection of books on Italian
e
are made by individual
literature.
d

full-tim-

Dr. Waslcy Krogdahl, left, and Dr. Michael Adlestein differed at Monday's University Senate
meeting over whether an organization could lose its registration because of a single incident of
breaking campus rides.

Flickinger Critical Of Final
Amendments To Rights Code
Continued From Page

our recommendations

...

1

do not

put the responsibility on the organizations that is necessary."
One of the major changes in
the reixirt, which deals with organizations, is the addition of
"lesser punishments." As suggested by the committee theonly
punishment would have been loss
of organization registration a
prerequisite for an organization's
existence on campus.

Actually, the amendment providing lesser punishments, proposed by committee member Dr.
Michael Adelstein, came in response to an earlier amendment
which would have caused organizations to lose registration for a
first instance of "disorderly conduct" or "poor academic performance of an organization."
As originally proposed by the
committee, the offenses were
"prolonged disorderly conduct"
and "prolonged poor academic
performance," but an amendment of Dr. VV. E. Krogdahl,
professor of mathematics and astronomy, eliminated the word
"prolonged."
Arguing against the term "prolonged," Dr. Krogdahl said, "an
ordinary citizen is not made liable
when offenses are prolonged."
Neither should organization's offenses need be prolonged before
action is taken, he said.
amendment therefore
The
makes one act of disorderly conduct of poor academic performance cause for discipline.
Arguing that loss of registrationin effect termination or an
organization's campus life is too
drastic for one single occasion
of misconduct, Dr. Adelstein
championed the amendment for
lesser punishments.

However, lesser punishments
for organizations are not spelled
out in the report seemingly incongruous with the rest of the
report which delineates all crimes

and punishments.
Another amendment proposed
by Dr. Krogdahl will require any
organization intending to picket
or demonstrate to inform the vice
president for student affairs of
the time, place, and purpose of
the demonstration within 24
hours prior to its happening.
The amendment changed a
parenthetical suggestion that
asked any organization intending
to picket to inform the University
authorities of the time and place.
As enacted by the Senate, the
report now requires notification
of time and place, plus the purpose of the demonstration.
Explained by Dr. Krogdahl,
the amendment is intended to
prepare the Administration of
possible volatile reactions . to

demonstrations

depending

and thus allowing the Administration better to
plan protection.
Mr. Flickinger questioned the
of requiring
constitutionality
notification of intent, but the
measure passed.
Interviewed after the Senate
session, Prof. Flickinger continued to question the amendment and said, "I don't think
the University can require notification."
Noting that he is not a constitutional law authority, Mr.
Flickinger said, "I doubt the
University could take action for
failure to comply with tliese regulations . . surely the University
could not prevent a demonstration or pickets if they did not
comply."

on the purpose

.

UK Bulletin Board
The third meetingof the Marxism Seminar, jointly sponsored by

the Philosophy Club, Students
for a Democratic Society and the
Young Americans for Freedom,

will be Wednesday. Dr. Alviri
.Magid, assistant professor of Political Science, will speak on

"Marxism and Communism in
SubSahara Africa". The seminar
will meet in the Commerce Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.

on golf scholar
ships and other interested golfers
are requested to meet at 4 p.m.
Wednesday in the Coliseum projection room. Eligibility forms
for participation this Spring will
be signed.
All persons

day, Room 206 of the Student
Center, at 4:30 p.m.

Attention Students

meeting for Honors Program
students is scheduled for Wednes

UK

significant amendment established a due process
procedure for any organization
which might lose its registration.
Proposed by the committee, the
amendment allows an organization to appeal to the University
president through the University
Another

Appeals Board.
Another amendment

of the

committee requires that faculty
representatives of, and consultants to student organizations be
tenured members of the faculty.
Other offenses for which organizations may be liable are
hazing; interference with activities of the University, of any
other registered organization, or
of an individual except that
peaceful picketing will be permitted so long as it does not
directly inhibit the carrying out
of an activity on University
property.
Another regulation prohibits
any organization to discriminate
"against any person due to race,
color, sex, or religious affiliation
or belief except when the express and legitimate purposes of
the organization require limitation as to sex or religion."
Mr. Flickinger assured the
Senate that the Advisory Committee will serve as a watchdog
committee of the effects of implementation of the committee's
recommendations.

Dry

a collection

of Henry Clay

letters, which added to Clay's
papers already there and which
currently are being edited and
published by the UK Press.

In
lionth

the library's "milvolume," donated by
"
Sang, was the Galileo
a first edition of Galileo's
defense of the Copernican system, published in Florence in
1963,

"Dia-logo,-

1632.

The following year, along
with the (May letters, came a
large collection of art books and
prints. He also has given several old paintings, some drawings by old masters and other
art objects.

Since 1939, Sang has been a
member of the University Library Associates, a private group
whose members are interested
in helping build the library's
book collections through gifts
of money, books and manuscripts. He also has contributed
to Hrandeis, Rutgers and Southern Illinois Universities, plus
other institutions.

TYPEWRITERS
FOR RENT

He has given whole collec-

tions of books and manuscripts
to the library, beginning in 1959
with 300 volumes of French literature. In 1961, he contributed
a small "but valuable" Bible
collection, according to Dr.

DIXIE CASH REGISTER
Inc.

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effect a delicious box of chocolates has on the feminine
world. Try a box and see.

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DOUGHNUTS
VISIT THE NEW, DIFFERENT

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earning

speoa

University Students and Faculty Only!
THURSDAY of Each Week
O MEN'S & LADIES'
Suits 79c each
2-pi- ccc

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OVEN

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UNDERWOOD ELECTRIC, IBM,
ALL MAKES
MANUALS
Ph. 255-012- 9
124 N. Broadway

and SWEATERS

O TROUSERS & SPORT COATS

(Neit to Coliseum)
A

doctoral students. The Graduate
Faculty consists of the dean and
persons appointed by President
John W. Oswald who meet certain qualifications.
When Philip D. Sang of Chicago established the award late
last year, the $3,000 yearly grant
(for five years) to graduate education was only one of a long
series of contributions he and
his wife had made since 1939 to
the Lexington institution.
An ice cream manufacturer
whose only connection to Kentucky is the fact that his father
was a resident of Louisville from
1888 to 1900, and whose contributions of scholarly and historical documents have benefitted
several universities, in 1964 gave

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* The Kentucky Kernel
The South' s Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

1894

Editorial

TUESDAY, FEB.

represent the ojrinions of the Editors, not of the University.
WALTErt

M.

Grant,

Editor-in-Chi-

William Knatp,

Stkvk Rocc.o, Editorial fagc Editor

Bttsincss Manager

The Burley Question

Last autumn a farmer in Hancock County looked out over his
mellowing tobacco crop keeping an
eye on the weather as he complained about his difficulty in finding help at cutting time. An
aluminum
plant had recently
in the area, and the burley
opened
grower could not meet the wages
his former help was receiving at
the factory.
So it is that each year Kentucky minimum - acerage burley
growers (those with a half acre or
less allotment) face additional problems in making ends meet each
year. These burley growers are facing still another crisis this week in
their decision to adopt or reject
e
a referendum advocating
controls instead of the
present acreage controls.
It appears that, in many respects, the choice has already been
made for these farmers, for as Kentucky Senators John Sherman Cooper and Thruston Morton have
warned, Congress may soon abolish
which would spell
doom to many farmers in the minimum-acreage
category.
As Sen. Cooper stated last week
in Louisville, increased yields have
jumped from 1,640 pounds an acre
in 1960 to nearly 2,300 pounds an
acre for the crop just sold. In other
words, under the present system,
the market is being flooded with
burley, thus lowering prices, and
what will likely result is that the
federal government will cut back on
acreage.
Another problem which develops under the current system is
that farmers in parts of the Commonwealth which have terrain and
climate more suitable for growing
burley than those in other parts
of the state now receive much
greater yields per acre than those
in the poorer growing areas.
If Kentucky minimum-acreag- e
growers continue with the present
acreage system and
are discontinued by the federal government, the burley market will
be wide open, and this will result in the big farmer devouring
the small farmer, and perhaps in
other states stealing Kentucky
"Hurley Capital" production.
As Sen. Cooper stated" . . . acreage controls alone no longer provide
the production control which is
essential to the tobacco price support program. As acreage controls
can no longer meet this situation,
we are in danger of losing our tobacco price support program unless
acreage-poundag-

If the

price-suppor- ts

is

adopted."
Apparently the only significant
argument opponents to the referendum advocate is that the
e

price-suppo- rt

program is not in danger.
that Sens. Cooper
and Morton have the best interests
of the Commonwealth in mind, and
would not tell of the jeopardy of
the
program unless it
were factual.

We feel, however,

price-suppo- rt

acreage-poundag-

referen-

e

dum is defeated, the proposal cannot be offered again until 1969.
In 1968, burley growers will vote
referendum
in a regular three-yea- r
on whether they want to continue
marketing quotas for the 1968-7- 0
period. In 196-1- burley growers overwhelmingly voted "yes" for this.
But another cut in acreage is certain should growers, in 1967, produce another burley crop the same
size as that of last year, provided
they are still under the present
acreage system. And 1966 was not
even .a good growing season.
This referendum is crucial for
many Kentucky burley growers; it is
our hope that they will adopt the
acreage-poundag- e
system so as to
effect the survival of the small tobacco farmers in our state and to
retain tobacco as one of the Commonwealth's chief money-maker,

'
--

WlO BLUE

Hw4

s.

Letters To The Editor:

Poor Planning Contributed To

price-support- s,

acreage-poundag-

28, 19G7

the Editor of the Kernel:
The Kernel was correct in stating that the Feb. 18 Wilson Pickett concert was something of a
To

concert was nobody's fault; it was
just one of those nights.
Diana Waist ad
A & S Senior

hell-raise- r.

Admittedly, the students did
get out of hand, but could student disappointment over the fact
that it was impossible to hear
Pickett and that the ballroom was
overcrowded and hot have contributed to the general confusion?
If so, could poor planning for the
concert possibly have been at the
bottom of the trouble?
But then why blame the Student Center Board or the Greek
Week Steering Com