xt7cvd6p096k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cvd6p096k/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1963 v. : ill. ; 28 cm. Quarterly, Publication suspended 1922 and resumed with v. 1, no. 1 (May 1929); v. 5, no. 9 (May 1933) not published; issues for v. 37, no. 2-v. 40, no. 1 (spring 1966-spring 1969) incorrectly numbered as v. 38, no. 2-v. 43, no. 1; v. 40 (1969) complete in 3 no. journals  English [Lexington, Ky. : University of Kentucky Alumni Association, Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky alumnus University of Kentucky. Kentucky alumni 2002- Kentucky alumnus monthly Kentucky alumnus, vol. 03, no. 34, 1963 text Kentucky alumnus, vol. 03, no. 34, 1963 1963 2012 true xt7cvd6p096k section xt7cvd6p096k I H E Augu.s·t196.3’ ,
O Forum OI`1 Communism
O Alumni House: Dedication
195-3
i ;i. ' 
J! _
1 14 \ '
S > ·~
. »·+’
4 .4*
J- `i
e ai _ M i
»i -   K.      
" `I K ,!•‘ ?\`§:‘ I ,‘;'C}\ .
·       _
} Y , .— lis" { \       `- U ·.· ,  .
’ °‘·‘ i ‘   OS\V.#\LD
if I fi: _ A _ ii ¢§¤»¢*” ‘3,*·'   ;:>=   · , i
7* ` I " %`>’_   — `V "—i;`\ , ls`.
’/ [ ' 1   \5 ` }’ A` _   ` ‘ P`   _ ns) i ~;r§"§`§§_
V F , ‘ E‘,\~ nn — il- 'S _\_. `*‘*\' »‘ ,
ty} ‘ ,   `   _i.· _§_  ;_ §»·;`§ _
WV ‘ e"§‘$?l`**?»:»:i Y*&-%;-is:.  i T
§»{?(* ‘ », w —  ·»i%—Q§L-;; i"‘<~-1% .   · · .- -· · I-AI ·
 i;   . ; Annual REPOII   this reunion should unt; t it umm
  .l Office, Liiirersity of lxcntuclry, Lcr- r
 File.   _ h1111lll(:‘S ot Alllllldl bI€€t111g 1/ ington, Ky., inzheating if they uoulil  
 ' I ` » Y like to have a special reunion of this -.
Qi VA_` U I I . . . 9 g. , 
  I , Alllllllll H0llS€ D€(11C€ll1011 ...0 group.  ,  
  i · ‘ . Senior Associates 22
    B Emphasis 011 Scholarship 24
  ;
 a.#%’¤ : _ -*
 gz , » Football 20
 ie`? · . - · U · . . S)-
 ,,3 ,I Ma1ga1et I. Kmb L1l)I`d1y -6  _
ag;  I . _ -—
  I About the Alllllllll 2.8 ·
· Yi  `. I
. [Ei?  ‘   "
 
  EXECUTIVE COMNIITTEE I963_6_I Dri! Ra1pIi Arkgelucci, :3217 Tates Creek Pike,
    UXIIUL (lll, ~}'.
  , I D,-_ (yum U_ Dm-mh, president, 301 Clinton Robert H. Hillenmeyer, 1554 Meadowthorpe
  I . Road, LL.xi,,gt(,n_ Ky_ _Drive, Lexington, Ky. I I
·   ` james A. Sutherland, Immediate Past President, “`¤l_l¤¤·¤¤ H· TU"`“$<’“_d· Th¤'d_ Fl¤¤r. Fini Nw
 i~,‘_;;§§.,_, . · [;]0(,m§[.]d_ Ky_ tional Bank Building, Lexington, Ky. (Life
  . J. Roger Caudill, Vice President, 530 College M<"“l’€*'· H0“0l”¥“'Y) I
 3;   Blvd., Morehead, Ky. I
-`_‘  B. A._Shively,_ Treasurer, 151 Chenault Road,
    , , Lexmgton,__ky. APPOINTIVE MEMBERS
*;*.75 Helen G. King, Director of Alumni Affairs,
 gy   Room 101, Pence Hall, UK, Lexington, Ky. Mrs. Robert O. Clark, 111 Leech Court, Glas-
 'élé   , james B. Allen, Box 537, Winchester, Ky. gow, Ky.
 éggjig , George W. Griffin, jr., First and Main Streets, \Villiam ]. Detherage, 5404 Hempstead Road,
 _  ’ .{'y._i . ; · London, Ky. Louisville, Ky.
»   — , Mrs. ]ane Irvin Morris, 1553 Leestown Road, VVilliam M. Cant, Commonwealth Attorney,
_   , , Lexington, Ky. Masonic Building, Owensboro, Ky.
E       ` ‘ , R. G. Wells, P. O. Box 2.178, Pikeville, Ky. \Villiam K. Howard, Box 4532, \Vallins Creek,
,   I Mrs. Hampton C. Adams, Old Keen Place, Ver- Ky.
·    , - sailles Pike, Lexington, Ky. james Douglas Holiday, Route 1, Union, Ky.
  . ` L. Berkley Davis, 22 Stone Creek Park, Owens— Newton VV. Neel, City Engineers Office, Han-
Y  *{"i"a   bm'0, KY· derson, Ky.
 .  I   · R. R. Dawson, Bloomfield, Ky. James It. Pence, 815 South Fifth Street, Louis-
 ·  =; ,··—, I Mrs. Elmer Gilh, Paris Pike, Lexington, Ky. ville, Ky,
 ` `y  _ 3 I Guy Alexander Huguelet, ]r., 1469 Lakewood McKay Reed, ]r., 441 Swing Lane, Louisville 7,
=  Z, yi , » Drive, Lexington, Ky. Ky,
`   -< . Richard E. Cooper, P. O. Box 183, Somerset, Douglas Elwood Williams, 2721 Clinton Circle,
I ‘Q—    · ~ KY- Hopkinsville, Ky.
`,[  -Lg,’ Q = Dr. Harry C. Denham, 611 Forest Avenue,
I  I ,1;i` i Maysville, Ky.
  7 ‘ Robert M. Hardy, 102 Hay Avenue, Frankfort,
_   ` 2 ~ _ Ky. The UK Alumni Executive Committee meets
 A  ’}{‘ :-1;   r Dr. O. B. Murphy, 743 VVest Cooper Drive, monthly, September through july, at a time
f   I j Lexington, Ky. and place appointed for the convenience of
[  {1.,:.. rE` ]. Paul Nickell, 302 Hart Road, Lexington, Ky. the committee.
I   % I
2; 5. .343; :   I 2
i  :l`7'rl l l V
 .  %"%5¥i I
{ *    ia
*   iii
    gi I
; I -5} FI
; is
. ?  W

 . .  
l '/‘4';  Z"
.. ...»-af) rz ? z
  _·.••‘ ___ r... iX} Q • `   .
• 5 I l `    
  b ’ l 4 . . ` _
. 4 gl. ,» . —
  .   , . - l : J r   \ ,. W __\
` : I  . ‘ .
. ¤= ` `·  
I ` , :. .  w  `
ll " n ' { ·     »r···-F:  ._ as .  X" ' I `·
\•` . • ji? “` · it 74)* . - "'
! 4 · YJ • ig: ’ EZ" '___-· "
? _ * .. ¤ E
3* .4 .  · 5   '?
`¤ » 4 - ?   ·i ‘ x. I rj°EQi';·.:: _ -
iw ‘ : i    
e __ Y · as - »   5,   A     .. l
` .' ... ~¤ ·· I ' `T I  · _' ‘ . ‘- 1
·.·\lurnnz \ _ '   - i j?·,,;_ .   " '»"i ' Q
<·/ ~l¤~i¤- ` A } { ‘- ` -  '=?·,;" —T`4JY`—QY i{ l E
ry unilir V   ` ` if i     - PYT `;.·;_ ` i J ’;
W ' ‘ " ` ‘ · »." ·
ngrarn in   { `· » ti     ‘_ ‘~‘,·:·. ' U   y` _., {
Huy y;4_’{{ in- i _ \ * r` '   g ·. _'»:`; 'Ii.; U _ :5*     Z
. . -· ,·.‘_"*_’J"'.Q·— Q_'
·’·;;’<   _ · M   at   T .,,;,.»..·:.;    
. Hllllii _ P .,,,y~¢· ·;· T. .r -3   s _ .i·{Q.‘ "
hy. lm;} 4 • I ' *2* y   » ;_'· ’ V, `  
· * i . · · *- E' ` .' ` — `  3
[I `LlU< ` ` ·’} gg uw?  
yi nf this .. _ — ·~· ' g 6** I ,,¢" 2·· _ .i·_-I·;
l _ 1 ' ` ,._   mfg- h »` ;'.`:£‘ §‘_.’;‘~
_ _ . .·--·· I ( -,l¤ / . BF`; ,h>f·_;;;§E'T`? `·»}` _·
_. ` i N`- -4 · -—· ·’ 7 ` l._” .. ">  '  
" i - : { ;‘·— ‘ ks- -J‘¤ ' a   V
-s '     ` » , » T · ' V   ' _ '_ 'Q W »
ML f _ h ` : : 4 w   7 V é _, " ~v l ` li ·;i
  . f  i   /" sq, ., .
· Ar I i_ `__ I _ ` J   ` O - , _\- _P` ki -: `-`r~'·‘· _:·' T
gs; . · ?< · - c l ··V _ ,·*’ L ` ¤:.k,·:»"‘_` ,_`
5.;., ._ . ' , J-   x. ; X * _-Y _ .~ *  _; __·_ _ -—;_·  
’~-- . ` "’li!- »· —  “` ‘ —\,1~`.··2   e
__   :_ .1.* i . *' 'Yi•¢· ,. · V
  · ‘ ’ ' ·` ·· — — W . . .. ·~" ` .
N I "" ']   __ _._{,;,     .  €`*"· ·-»·    •  *   tm, _ _
’·· " I A .· - " · . 4, ax. Y W, uu. H TA . .`    '·. . _` .
bl _»_ __14•¢ Y_ · ·"' `   ' `V gf ,5*%, (l l _ · . » `   A `
·.   ··* ·"-‘¢  _ $‘·  Tl~•" "  P   ‘ I
• I • Q
I
UH1VBPS1tY Is A Place; It Is A Splrlt ..... XI .
Peace and happiness and enthusiastic expcetatien pervade the eanzpas of the
l`niver.sity af Kentneky as the (`niversity family anticipates the arrival 0f the  
new I’re.s·ideni and his First Lady.
Dr. ]ahn \\`. Oswald, sixth president 0f the llniversity 0f Kentuelcy. will assume
his- duties an September 1; however. same af as were privileged t0 meet him and
his lavely wife last ]nne and we eancur with his calleagues at the C`niversity af
California wha have designated them, with affection and respect, as `“grand
peuple."
As we faee a new era at the (`niversity af l(entucl _
`. _[nl1n
. . ( llc
" l_ alrnos
·.   . Califo
`_ /‘   . conw
r  ·· _; ,1 __ \ -_ 1-lun
47 nl  . some
{ Al  .].1 s { ' g_ corps
  `.X \ _ vision
{   —   ‘·‘) ’ »* xm-
_ J ' _ —   `_  <‘ Rosun
1 \ I _ »   "—` ` _ ‘ briefly
• y l ` ,` ‘ _ —·.:_j; mater.
J l E ¤ ` ‘ "&`
H    Q . and tl
· - \ ' ·— . Y   »  prcssci
.`~•,_ •,_ J; `· I » f A men xx
Q   ~\ . ·  ,"  * " i M sity. \
"   _ _ L ‘ § _ .  7 · " altert
_  ·   `   1    L ` ` lnoxxn
· V   » x g·Y g " `  I-   •_ ) , mudv ¤
‘         ‘   ` ; _ A · His:
  I   ‘  ' `   ~ · nexvsrn
  · ` ° I "`Y ' ‘ lint l
, ’   1 X I   g “
__   __’·   · 5, _     ·T Stritlin
I"     _·   1  _ ’  I porters
· as  ` · n l2 _ f  ,. tv J brow
_   2;  “  'P v   _    "—Q Nlorr
A   ’ `F;    ;‘ __    ' llO\\'(’\’(
It l h '   w i ll  i   .··~’  4 ·· ,  _ , I   l 4 lvrinrrli
_ I *‘·T r -_`.   l '   " # Cztlilor
, °    ‘; I     Y. . - • $llU\\`€tl
Ei.;   `     · \ 3 Hill acer
      · Q. tscuper
  . »  y "$0n1
    PI. ` " ` h€‘ 0l)sr
·K »     ; ZT   __ ing if [
    _ - . luckx;"
4,}/ `  ‘  /_  h ._ > ‘· '
  vo.,    w., ‘ \ Mr
  gv - ` ‘ l¤¤¤>w
Vf ‘¤1 €‘"     V draw ju
  A ,_g$_;:.   ‘ tml cri;
ti-;      — '   a  lng mm
Pfcsiclcnf and Mrs. Oswald at a Spindlemp Hull i‘¢’¢‘<‘;>lll"l·
4

 F HE HANDLES UNIVERSITY ncwsmen. At any rate, his display 0f gr`   •.!Y/"‘··   '· "F
I problems with thc same finesse the clipping served as an effective in-   ` # rf '
displayed at his first meeting troductory bridge,   _ M; " { .__y¥ _ `
with Kentucky llCWSm0l1, he’ll do HH The temperature outside was a hu- , . ,‘_
yjght." mid 90, and it was but little cooler in g•’..¤‘_ 3 Q. - ` f
50 mnurked u veteran reporter at the conference room. But as the ques- . Z';     _ { ·*  
the Conclusion of thc initial Lexington tioning progressed, Dr. Oswald, oc- V- V   `— {9   y ji", A {
HWS conference held by thc Univer- cusionally sipping a Coke, answered $#32* .; __Z   W.; cc h·  
5j{y9fKcl1lllCi"$• E  
· 3 Although Dr. Oswald und his wife, them,   ` · V [ g
_ §‘ Bosanel, were to be in Lexington only Though it produced little copy for _‘ »»   ° A I i
` °‘ . b;jeHy-between :1 visit to his alma the newsmen that day, this frank self- ` `Qc y   V i
Q. ater, DePauw University in Indiana, appraisal 0f his qualifications sent the - · ‘ _ i · _ _ iw 4 i
H ,; d their return to Berkelcy—he ex- reporters away with the feeling that l _ ’ Q
 pegged an interest in meeting news- here is :1 man they can work with .,-.  _ `  `  »· ig i
, .gn whose beats include the Univer- amicably in future, one who gives   1 , , __  
_  ‘ry, What he thinks of the reporters straight answers when he has them     ’ ` $
’**\ ~ er the resulting news conference is und who admits it when he doesn’t   z·  - »   I
` i qown only to him. But he obviously lmve. And. as any experienced re-   2  
, , . . ade :1 hit with the reporters. porter will testify, you can draw  
Q · His successful first meeting with the worse assignments than that any day. Rosanel Oswald, UK} neu; first lady ·
 i ewsmen stemmed not so much from ,
_  ‘ what he said as the way he said it.     i
  " Striding into trhe conference mom in ]Ohn uyieland Oswald at a glance · · · I
A the relaxed gait of the ex-athlete that b
L he is, he greeted the assembled re- Age 45, ]0}1n Wieland Oswald holds a bac}2eI0r’s degree from i
porters with Z1 robust imndshuke and DePauw University and the Ph.D. degree from the University 0f
A abroad, face-crinkling smile. California, an institution he served as assistant professor, associate .
More winning to the press corps, professor and professor before entering the administrative ranks I
however, was the easy \Vcstern in- in 1957.
formality with which he produced :1 Since then, he has held the positions of administrative assistant i
California newspaper clipping that I0 the chancellor 0f the Berkeley Campus, academic assistant 10 Ig
Showed a picture of himself alongside the president 0f the University, assistant ciee president, vice presi- ii _
V an account of a police search for an T=??·l . .
    ·`i‘   < i »
-   ti t
 Pi ill
·¢· tl
, qi `V

 ."A
we have some measure of superiority today, we do not French and American policies can he and must he re-
have supremacy. And the movement is toward parity in solved. with imagination and patience. The stakes are
quality and quantity. Even now we cannot reliably threa· too great for U.S. policy to turn hack from this goal.
ten the Soviet Union with nuclear destruction without The developing countries ot Asia, Africa and Latin
risking very grave damage to our own power and our America are likewise a main target of communist ambi-
iiiitioiial falirie. 'lhe success with which our country coii— tion. ln many countries. especially in Africa. the real
fronted the challenge of Soviet missiles in (julia will he test ot our political wisdom and staying power will come
(lillienlt to repeat in the future. Tfiat is why. in order to in the next five to ten years. By that time many ot the
keep ahead in this liasie form of national power. we need leaders of national liheration—many of them were edu-
to press forward with our research into new and even cated in Vtlestern values—will face a new challenge aris-
more com ilex systems of wea ions. \\`e need to ex ilore in Y from the next generation of voun Y and restless lead- =
V . I Ls '7 . Lv
every avenue for the development of a defense against ers. In this competition we must use o11r great resources
missiles. lf the Soviet L`nion should get an effective wisely and well. and we have. together with ()llI' allies.
.lllil·IlllS\ll<' defense first. our survival would he entlan- great capacity to help the new countries develop their
gered. ;\nd we should he laying the groundwork for a economic and human resources. This is no time to cut
system of civil defense. in order to assure the recovery of hack our assistance and leave the field open to Soviet
the nation in ease ltussia should press its offensive to the and (jhinese (jommunist influences. lt will not help our
point oi a nuclear attack. cause. or safeguard the future of tree institutions in the
II_I},IIIIv_ \\'e need to press forward with the strengthening and world. it we turn our hacks on the hopes and needs of
I |>I.],\,,,; consolidation of \\`estern fiurope. in order to create a the new and developing countries.
I ]I_,t I. second great center of political and economic power. and L`nder Krushchey or his successor the struggle to Shape
S '· iotentially of great strategic iower. within the free the world will go on. \\`e cannot t11rn back from this
l uml v [ . V
dustrv tf world. fyhrushcheys prolilems will lie enormously com- contest. \\ e must use our many advantages to make it
ind sk:l`· plieated. and his relative power will he greatly reduced. clear to the (fommunist leaders that their claim to press
ione in is on the day when \\'estern Europe has at last organized the future ot mankind into the Soviet mold is going to
- .   its great resources ellectivelv. Present conflicts lietween fail.
(l\1 llll . ~ .
is lieiizi .
l"` `°ili'V ‘ ZT .S`fI'llggf(’ (lf)Ollf HIGH, (lf)Ollf HIE llHll}€7'·S`€, about  
\`t` IIIN i. M
iches is _ _ I _
eric iii ` Bv \\'~\LTER H JUDI) Judd 1s‘pc·uk.s· in Mcdiml Center Audimmrm.
` “'lll ll l . .. .. . . .. .      
CII I. III, ‘ fflz .»\i\S\\ lxli to the vital question. ls (,ommun- e   · .=g·
. I|NvI-M i$ln al \\`J\'l‘ of the future or a wave of the pastP.’ A u
IC IIII i..V· - depends largely on what the t'nited States does. .( _ f I
ImmII_I_ ‘ The answer must depend on the kind of understanding A ` $ I _..
HUM I. Y- of the issues prevailing in this country and the dcdica- I b   l._ ' '   V _-
mI\Im-I · . tion .`il](lV skill xy ith which wt puisia tht things that nt hi t \£_,“_“ \;7_:r_`LV I_=V_ I  {
Ir I.I\.II_,_\ _- _ lielieve in. ,,&_Q;_,%   . V .! _ _  .-
I , .... »- Sometimes in intellectual circles you hear talk ahout · V *‘ ’ KV   __=·  
ntie ~··— V _ _ .   . V. Eq V ,_`¤V
II\I_ I,,I» ·   liiiman rights (they re awtully noble) and property } ___;•` ·   _ . ( .'
I I.(.m...- — E· n‘1fltS. \\ ell. youre kind of einharrassed ahout them. I • _ [V , -
l A · lint ·1 i· i ·l t- lk· ' tl * i·1in~ ll‘lSll`t thought ` ~· ` A  · "' iT T" ·
V. (_\.(.Y\-   _; . lcrson xs io .1 s in ns n. 1 tr t D `\ { V ,•—- _ __
I··IIII. UI;   \`<‘r}’ deeply; even the (ionununists know hetter. There ily \  " ’ '
IIII.,II.\" M Nlit Ll wav you can defend your human rights if you ` _ · V IIV5
ilont have something with which to teed your own fain- I i`· . I
no Ima {ii  \l}` while you resist the tyrant, Tlns rs why the Aclnlles I
" .   lleel of the (`ommunists everywhere is the m·1n whos |
'“"'°·‘" 1 * - ‘ ( ._ . Moselu Iectzircs in the Oak Room at Spmdlerop Hall.
IIN. [Im;-·-F. **11 the farm. They can control the man who gets a pa)- ~
{NN II-I. \·.· I  ¤'l1<’Cl< every Saturday night. V V) V   *};-$£;5_;g'i‘;»·‘ ·—- Q? .."   ·,` F
.-\ll right, why dont we give up 0llI' property. Is lt   &;;E{`;   -·_,. . ix *`__(·p,_ j
. · :   _ ,, .--·· K- ` ~·—‘>’ » , -1- r 
I .]II I; l\1$t hecause were greedy, acquisitive and selfish. 218 thi`} ".-~=-   W §'    #3;  an iw ,. = · M`- .- ¤·•·*’2
oonia _ __) __ · - _ _ Y - .  ,·.- P-. `..¤.._v ., . _,_  
.. Iarziit $¥l)'· No. its heeause we have some insights, too. “ <‘ ·- *j__;-> -»  _  ;¤‘ -— _ .  
"“·‘“ I . . . s ` .I-. . i #·‘¤¢4a  -——·f.A¤¥:? -· :· #1l* l"·r
(_tI,I.n.III-I~ li.  l)(`I`C(‘l\'(‘ that man rs endoyvetl l)v his (.reator—not ll} llb  I  ,"   _     , I; F ·. Ig, I V
. , ' . - · ·  ->- ;·<~ "~.- —— ··· ` ··  "  ‘ "
qw WIN ill?  !**\’<‘l`ninent_ but hy his (.reator—with certain iiinlieiieihlc — _ ;?$,,_§-~";é__~ ,. _ V   I  
"‘ · · · ' · · .. , `· ` ` ’ · `¤.@·-,;·"e·r
ll!l\tS: late. liberty and the pursuit of happiness. He   . `\ ` ` kx;-_y`___l;.g";:__-, .
.:`l i   Tl ·‘ T
  v v
7· **1.:.. rz 4*-
V` i V `L— T     ¢LT‘ .
fl .;.IJI.I 5*   E rl . { V
I  ..· el 5\‘.g_;. .V .'   _, _ "   r » i
uv" p 4** FT's;··&. gl   IZ"- A it ‘ y
\ .   -···e$ " U ·`  
{ ? j   "`     ·- ·

 cant live without them, and he will always find a way The great British historian, Arnold Toynbee, sair
to bring down tvrants who deprive him of them. few vcars ago that whenever in history the lronticr `
J This brings us to the basic nature of the struggle. This tween two civilizations stands still, time always oper ·
_ is a struggle about man, about the universe, about Cod, ou the side ol the barbarian. The (ionnnnnists have _
f really. Communists understand this. and please don`t drive. they know what they want, they`re hungry pi
Q_ try to simplify it to a matter of somebody with his glands ing. The story ol much ol history, in lact, is the tlitslj
  out of order trying to seize someone else`s territory. tion of the superior civilization by the inferior one
\Ve`re confronted today with perhaps the greatest cause the superior civilization became sell-satislied 5
. “ crisis our civilization has ever faced. \Ve`re faced with suing ileasnre, comfort, ihvsieal ease and en`ovni.
._ l . I .
" a missionary competitor, an outfit thats out to win the and lorgot its ideas, its cause. Nobody wins auto;
world and one that believes in its own dogma to the cally.
point where it works at it a little harder than we do. The (Zommnnists reject the gods of .·\braham. It__
Sometimes I wonder if the outcome doesn`t depend jacob and jesus. lint they do have a (Ind. lts naw
not on the ideas but on the dedication ot the people. \\`ill history. lt is bound to win, so why do we keep the  
the zeal of the Communists for their system run down in turmoil and in danger ol war?
faster than the dedication of the free people for theirs? .-\ll these postwar years we`ve hoped and prayr Y
Or will we be able to get a rebirth of enthusiasm for the some change in the (Zommnnist movement that  
system that made us—and this University—possible be- permit us to live and let live, live and help livi
fore the Communists can get some steam up for their there`s no evidence ol- any slightest change in th.
system? The odds are on our side if we will only under- nounced objective of the (Yommunists to lttipnse ·
stand the issues and the forces that are at work. will upon the rest ot the world.
i An .·\lghanistan leader said to me a lew \t·.iI\ _
D,·_ P]lj[jp gjospfll "l doult understand you people. You iall lor the six.; ·
tricks of the (Iounuunists. They have a world don
{   ' ‘ V .‘€`* ` . lt demands world control." I,
" TV ‘ i   ' T * Thi` (;UlIllll\llll$t$ llal\'t‘ ll) L‘(>It<]t|t·|‘ (lie vvtrrlrl lj.
" .» . ~"·~ . . V s h - - ·
. 1* — _ · . *- ' . they want ieace. lou ierhais heard Xlr. lxliri;s·
O g 1* ~ `.E_ ,.   · I l I
  V _\     " _ ,9% at say that, and thought he was a hypocrite. Xot 1
E _·—  E"     'VQ · ·• sarily. lrle wants us snnply to recognize that their ~. M
’* { `+·-·r#‘    ` {.»\\~._ , x    T ‘ is inevitable, so whv not give in and have peatr ·
#1  gi ,   ,. . .,, The Lonnnuiusts say that lxarl Xlarx discoverei. .. _
  "£" ‘ *¥ .  he didnt invent a theory. The law is this; That
yi - ·’> [  ‘ ¢~ . war is inevitable; it will be here as long as somr :·- »
» Y? A ,2 .__   ‘ V ··‘;_"’ · _ E . - own property and others sell their labor lor wages. l A
V ; l iQ  ·.·/' p   ·=~$.,__ I fore, if you want peace, yon`ve got to abolish tht · ‘·
 ` { }’?;*?‘;· ,&’  if  -.  I " system of private property and the right ol indzv . Q
7 . _ f ·` __  -   _ to hold and control land.  
_ _   J Now there are some holes iu that argument  
‘ \ i .·,· . ` * .· · · .
’•     ·s%¥_t,.. . ; · _  _ . ,   plausible. lt appeals particularly to the intellettin. .
 . . ‘ rr ti '.‘,;·r..-··:¢ i ; · · I · . - l
 if Zi T?~$*%§,     - the DOOY. Their prunarv target is alxvavs the si ·
r " , . REQ ·,   'Zg;  V  · · · '· i I , . .
'*, s .i"Y,°:§»§:_;{S逧¤{#"·"i r mimi. A \lIll\'t‘I‘Slt}‘, by its very nature, deals xvi, r .
i'    ·=*"" two most important things in the world. ()ue is ¤
A 4 » fr) .. i 2; ._ . and the other is persons. 'I hese are also the most V ·
 ·. -‘ ‘  _  ,_ ` xi  o f tant areas in the problem ol (.onnnniusm.
Q A V M ii  `il     TOO much of our \\'estcrn world hasn`t worked a— Y
l a·· , »  ~  ... .
,   at the ideas and student minds as some others ~‘ —
\.\ _ T  ‘   "( Communist side have. lu this respect we have l.nl·
V it T    . So niuch about the Connuunist doctrine. \\`h.it s Z
‘ `  - \\ their tactics?
’* _ _ Q . These are completely fluid. The tactics are the i '* ,
` A, iv `r_   as those of football; Power and deception. ll yoii   .‘
`   ‘ `V enough power, you go through. It you can`t get lla il
‘*\ the line, you pull your tricks, not because you`r<‘ » -l
' boy but because you`re a good quarterback. \\`l¤¤`· yl
· sec a football quarterback faking a haudoll to tlir fl
and running to the left, you dou`t get mad and sn di
so disappointed in that nice, clean-looking boy. l li“*"
8 5
. :
F
l
t
li
. _r ti
., _ i

 . {   \ .   ·"
_   v. l 1.
 I  li it i'   i i  
ylllivii §¤ii·l [ _i ' `· i / him. I gave him the benefit of the doubt.,) You know
ie lroutier V jj _ » that the objective out there isn’t improved relations be-
ways op¢·r..· V; tween the two teams.
HMS l'*“"` — __   _·’;/ Take Cuba as an example of their tactics. They always
hungry. pi:   g start with a maximum objective and a minimum one,
is the desli Z * A the same way that a football player hopes for a touch-
¢‘¥"*”' """· ` ‘ down. but will try for at least a first down.
-satisli<·d. g tr   In (juba. they tried to get in enough missiles before
id enjoyrwi _ »_   { 3 __ they were discovered. missiles to blaI1l
iraliaun. lis. jr] V ’ g { a the first down." So now they have a base in Cuba that
l. lts n.ui.— i ji ' ,,. we are protecting.
geep the ii · i I I / Over and over again they demand things they have
_ A   { V / ` _ no right to demand to get us to make concessions we
ml }>f41}¤‘i¥ ‘ , V "‘ . have no business making to get them to stop doing what
Nl llm “ i they had no business trying to do.
lelp li~~~ J ,/ This brings us to the way Communism can fail, or col-
iiL¢‘ iii {lh ‘ lapse. or ex en how we can. for that matter. There are
» impose ‘ · three ways that governments. or systems, go down. One
· is by violent revolution. I dont think the Soviet Union
ew )<·.u’~ . `   I-_ or (.hina can be overthrown by revolution. They have
_;r the suny · 2: ’=· JJ utterly perfected the police State.
.·orld dow H   ` K ~ ‘ j The other extreme is gradual transformation. I am
I i l, j l sure this will happen because of manls nature which not
world l><`· q ‘\ r all the conditioning or Pavloyian <:Il\`iI’OIUT1€Ilt Carl
r. l\hru~f. g   i change. In the end Communism will fade away. but it
e. Not L ` [jj / may take two. or three or four hundred years. and OUT
it their x; ·· • · V own country will have been destroyed in the process.
<‘ l“’=*°“   The third course is internal disruption. Cangsters tend
covered .. / to quarrel when they are losing. This is why we must
iis; Tlml » _ ‘ X j _ keep the Communists losing. Confront them with
is some   - ___ ` ‘   strength and they canit achieve victory.
waties. It · V . . _ `· . This. in short. is our adversary. \\`e must study him.
ilish the fi _ `·   - we must match his zeal with our dedication. We should
of indiyi - ·         _'*'i never forget that the things we may fear—Seier1Ce, ma-
•__ *S U I chines. the atom—are neutral. \\`hether any of these
uinent lt" T [ ~ — things are used for good or ill