xt7cvd6p2g0v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cvd6p2g0v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690224  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 24, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 24, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7cvd6p2g0v section xt7cvd6p2g0v TME ICffiMTOCEiY
Monday Evening, Feb. 24, 19G9

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

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Vol. LX, No. 102

University Wins
Acquittal Verdict
On Maine Chance

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JIM MILLER
Associate Editor
The University was acquitted Friday of charges of conspiring
to prevent the sale of Maine Chance Farm to Arnold C. Pessin
and Rex Ellsworth, thus ending a period of anxiety for persons
connected with the University's agricultural research program.
A jury of nine women and
three men returned the verdict here. After the UK foundation
for the defendants the UK was awarded Maine Chance for
foundation, the Bank of New a price approaching the $2 milYork and the Keeneland Asslion mark, plans to develop the
ociationafter deliberating for six farm were immediately put into
hours Friday.
action.
The $30 million anti-trucase
Land Was Needed
had yielded testimony for the
The farm was divided into
past month.
three experimental departments
A year and a half ago, Lexanimal science, agronomy and
ington veterinarian Arnold G.
Pessin and California horseman veterinary science and land was
allotted to each.
Rex Ellsworth filed suit conWith the additional land, the
a conspiracy had pretending
Animal Science Department was
vented them from buying the
farm as a base for competition enabled to implement a program
light horse nutrition that had
with Keeneland's thoroughbred
previously been ignored. If UK
auction-sale- s
business.
had lost the case, it probably
May Appeal
would have caused cancellation
Saturday, the plaintiffs said of the program.
In agronomy, Dr. John L.
they may appeal the U.S. Dishad said an adverse decision
trict Court decision. F. Selby
Hurst, counsel for Pessin and would "slow down research on
economic field crops and staffEllsworth, said he would carethe transcript and the ing."
fully study
pertinent law before making a
Can Leave Rentals
decision.
Dr. Charles E. Bamhart, diHurst has 10 days to move
for a new trial on the basis of rector of the Agricultural Experiment Station, pointed out in an
possible error in the proceedings.
earlier interview how the purOnly after a ruling on that mo- chase of Maine Chance would
tion, which can come at any allow
some of the departments
time, can he move for an apto move experimentation from
limit for appeal
peal. A
rented lands and onto Maine
is imposed only after the ruling
Chance.
of a new trial is issued.
If the case had been lost, it
Despite the fact that Univerwould probably have necessiA. D. Kirwan
sity president
the leases of the
said, "We never expected (the tated renewing
rented farms while the fate of
verdict) to come out any other
Maine Chance lay with the
way," there were some anxious, courts.
people in the UK Agriculture
Asked what would be the efCollege.
fects of a verdict against UK,
A verdict for the plaintiffs
would have dealt a severe blow Dr. Bamhart said, "It would be
to agriculture experimentation
Continued on Page 7, Col. 3
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of spectators watch as an engineering student demonstrates one of the many devices which were on display in Anderson
Hall Saturday. The occasion was National Engineering Week. Exhibits here included oscilloscopes, a wind tunnel and a plasticity
lab. Infrared Radiation is the subject of the display shown in this
Kernel Photo by Russell King
picture.

A group

Engineering
Demonstration

YD's National President Plans
Inspection Of Kentucky Groups
By FRANCES DYE

Kernel Staff Writer

Spencer Oliver, national

Young Democrats president, will
visit Kentucky next month to
study the group's statewide organization, it was revealed at a
YD meeting here last night.
Oliver has received inquiries
and requests for such a visit
from several campus YD clubs,
UK club president McKinnley
Morgan said.
Last month the UK club
passed a resolution petitioning
Oliver to call a statewide con

would be a study of the statewide organization.
In addition, the UK club last
night proposed a statewide meeting of the campus executive committees. This meeting, proposed
operation."
Smith at a meeting of the for March, would be held to
YD's state executive committee elect officers of the campus counSaturday, denied the allegations cil of Young Democrats.
and cited accomplishments since
Morgan said that John R.
1966 state YD convention at Lovill of Berea College now is
the
chairman of the campus council.
Owensboro.
elections Lovill, Morgan said, was apThe
were not mentioned at last night's pointed by state chairman Smith.
UK club meeting. Morgan said
the main point of Oliver's visit

vention for the purpose of holding elections. At that time, the
UK group also criticized state
YD president Clifford Smith Jr.
for "inactivity and lack of co--

earlier-propose- d

Reductions Proposed
In Air ROTC Credit
By TERRY DUNHAM

Campus Bus Service Bolstered
By DANCOSSETT

Kernel Staff Writer
Two new buses known as
"Complex Expresses" will be
added to the fleet of four vehicles
that provides students free
intra-camp-

ur

30-d-ay

SG Adds 'Complex Expresses9

Assistant Managing Editor
Credits will be reduced .by one half next year for freshmen and
sophomore Air Force ROTC courses if changes proposed to the
College of Arts and Sciences are approved.
The changes were proposed
transportation.
several months ago by Col. John the courses meets twice weekly
The expresses will run daily
between 7:40 a.m. and 9:10 a.m..
Sutton, chairman of the Aero- for an hour of classroom instrucspace Studies Department, to tion, and once weekly for an The service was scheduled
nla
bring the program here into line hour of "corps training," usualbegin Monday and is desig
wishes of the ly military drill.
to eliminate the glut of student
with, he says, "the
The "corps training" also inAir Force."
travelling to and from the Com"This is the normal thing now cludes other studies, however, plex on other buses.
in most of the schools in the including, according to Col. SutMoney for the additional
vehicles will come out of SC
country," Col. Sutton says. "We ton, "military courtesy, tradition,
are manned to teach a course practices" and other topics.
President Wally Bryan's continThe academic work, which gency fund since the service is
of one academic hour a week,
and the additional classes create is to be reduced from two hours a Student Government project.
a week to one hour, often is
an overload."
Bob Lawless, director of stuThe courses which would be taught by members of the classes. dent services in Bryan's cabinet,
affected Aerospace Studies 111, Col. Sutton says they learn lead- said, "The largest rush for classes
now
112, 211 and 212-- are
ership and gain "the ability to seems to be for the eight and ninet
courses, but will be stand up in front of a group of o'clock classes, and in the past,
credits if men, command attention and dereduced to
Complex students would fill the
the changes are approved, as velop
buses, making it impossible for
Other lessons consist of lecCol. Sutton assumes they will
other students to get on."
tures and films. Col. Sutton left
be.
The route for the express buses
a classroom viewing a film on begins at the Sigma Chi House
Retained
Corps Training
Continued on Page 3, CoL 1 at Hilltop and Woodland Av
At the present time each of
one-ho-

Rag-lan- d

us

enues, proceeds down Hilltop to
University Drive, then to Rose
Street via Huguelet Drive.
From Rose Street, the buses
follow the regular route through
the campus except that the stop
at the Commerce Building will
be excluded.

After a stop at the Student
Center, the Express goes directly
down Euclid Avenue to Woodland Avenue, then back to the
Sigma Chi House.
Express service is scheduled
definitely to continue for five
weeks.

American Legion Questions
'Activities' Of Di Sedler
A local American Legion post has asked for an official investigation into the "activities" of Robert Sedler, a UK law professor.
Asked by Man o' War Post No. 8 to Investigate Sedler were
Cov. Louie B. Nunn, Attomery Ceneral John B. Breckinridge,
Law College Dean William Matthews Jr., UK Trustee A. B. Chandler and State Treasurer Mrs. Thelma Stovall.
The Legionaires questioned whether Prof. Sedler is "fulfilling
his obligations to the Commonwealth" because of his representation of various clients in court.
Prof. Sedler's clients, the American Legion post said, were
involved in action against the Selective Service System or had
activities.
been involved in Inquiries about
Prof. Sedler has represented draft tesisters Don Pratt and Joseph
Mulloy, an antipoverty worker accused of subversion by Pike
County authorities last year.
"pro-Communis-t"

* 19

2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Feb. 21,

'Tie Closed Corporation

Author Describes Schools' Big Business

One of the acts which students at
Dy TERRY DUNHAM
s
Assistant Managing Editor
Columbia protested in the
The Closed Corporation, American Uniturmoil at that school was the Univerversities in Crisis, by James Ridgeway. sity's expansion into nearby neighbor257 pp. $3.95, Random House, Inc.
hoods and the resulting displacement
e
families. Two of
of many
James Ridgeway and his research assistants scrutinized the finances of many of the school's trustees had personal inthe nation's largest schools and found terests in the land transactions.
evidence of
The reforms Ridgeway proposes are
political
manipulation, and secretive investments. common-sens- e
guidelines which would
"The idea that the university is a com- prevent such conflicts of interest and
restore the original function of American
munity of scholars is a myth," he concludes.
higher education the public function of
"Professors," he says, "are less in- educating with a responsibility not to
terested in teaching students than in yankprivate interests, but to the public.
"Since these institutions bear public
ing the levers of their new combines so
that these machines will grow bigger and responsibilities and receive much of their
he says,
go faster. The university has in large part money from government,"
been reduced to serving as banker-broke-r
"trustees should be elected
by the
for the professors' outside interests . . .
and other memstudents, alumni, faculty
meanwhile the undergraduate students bers of the immediate university comwhile graduate munity.
lie in campus holding-penread them stories."
Trustee Selection
apprentices
Serious Ramifications
"Trustees should not be selected beSuch charges are not applicable to cause their private business interests may
every school, and Ridgeway makes no be useful to the college but rather besuch claim, but the evidence clearly supcause of their views toward education.
his thesis that such situations are One way to move in this direction,"
ports
far too common.
he suggests, "would be to prohibit mem
now-famou-

low-incom-

conflicts-of-interest- s,

...

s,

public interest," writes Ridgeway. Awareness is the first step to disclosure, and
thus to the protection of the public interest, a sensitive awareness may be
achieved by careful reading of Ridge-way-'s
work. It is not written for accountants but for students of American
higher education, be they pupils, faculty
members, or administrators.
Can Happen Here
This month and last Lexington has
heard an attorney charge that the UK
Research Foundation bought Maine
Chance Farm to protect the auction-sale- s
business of Keen eland Association, a
firm he said has made "substantial gifts"
to the Research Foundation.
It has also looked on, amazed and
confused, as 26 men, including a former
state governor, the publisher of the city's
only newspapers, and several school officials, including former president John
W. Oswald, have faced charges of conspiring in the sale of the farm.
In a year of such events, a year of
closed executive sessions of the Board
of Trustees, The Closed Corporation,
American Universities in Crisis, should
be of particular interest.

bers of the board of trustees from transacting any business with the university."
The simple wisdom of such a procedure seems so evident it should be
unnecessary to state it, but The Dosed
Corporation indicates otherwise. Equally
logical is another of his recommendations:
"Meetings of the governing boards of
a rea university should be public
all of
porter should be present during
these gatherings, to make verbatim records, which can then be transcribed and
published. In dealing with especially delicate matters, which would entail the
trustees' holding executive sessions, (a
procedure now commonly practiced by
UK trustees) the transcript of these sessions should receive timely publication"
(a procedure not now practiced at UK).
Report Finances
recommends that "the federal
Also, he
government should require all universities
to issue publicly each quarter a detailed
financial report" and "each year the
trustees and officers of universities should
be required to furnish additional public
statements that show their business affiliations, stock and property holdings."
"Disclosure is one way to protect the

...

.And Life Provides An Example
BERKELEY,
of California students have
charged that the University Regents have mismanaged the University's $660 million investment
portfolio.
Charles Palmer, Berkeley student body president, told the
Regents that until they answer
charges of mismanagement "it
is unjust to ask the people of
California to assume the added
burden of higher taxes on students" in the form of tuition or
increased fees, which Gov.
Ronald Reagan says he will propose again this year.
Palmer made these specific
criticism:
"No part of the $660 million
investment portfolio involves inner city urban renewal projects.
This strongly runs against the Regents' statement supporting such
(CPS)-Univer- sity

1. Pipe broken?

No, I'm trying to find
where I stashed some dough.

programs, statements of interest
in helping minority groups. "The
University president later said the
University has no plans to make
such investments.
"There are heavy investments in war and
industries." These include $7.6
million in Dow Chemical Company, which makes napalm; $2.8
million in Lockheed Aircraft
Company; $1.5 million in Boeing
Aircraft Company; and $2.6 million in Ling-Ter-n
a
conglomerate corporation high on
the list of Defense Department
contractors.
"There are no clear cases of
conflict of interest" but five Regents are officers of corporations
in which the University has invested substantial amounts. Four
of these Regents are presently or
have been members of the in- war-relate-

d

The Department- of Theatre Arts Presents
-

1

2. That's where you keep

your money?

3. What's wrong with the bank?

I'd only take it right

Sometimes I put it in
the flower pot.

out again.

B a irk of tike Rfioo
Directed by Charles Dickens

GUIGNOL THEATRE

February 21, 22, 28; March 1, 2
Admission: $2.00; Students (with I.D.) $1.00
Box Office opens

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Call Ext. 2929

JUNIOR MEN'S HONORARY
4. But that's what you're

doing now.

L

I think you'd be a lot better
putting some of your

off
1

Not quite. The beauty
of my system s that
I usually can t find
where I put it.

.

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V

iL.rLwS lnura"ce
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ives

ft"

g

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f

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nf nrntprtmn
it also builds cash values
you can use for emergencies,
opportunities, or even
retirement.

I wonder if it could be
with the french fries?

For information about Living Insurance, see The Man from
Equitable.
For career opportunities at Equitable, see your Placement Officer, oi
write: Lionel M. Stevens, Manager, College Employment.

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vestment committees.
Until a student senator managed to get a copy, persons asking for the portfolio were told
it was not available.
The Regents made no official
response to Palmer's charges. Edwin Pauley, chairman of the investments committee
(investments in his companies: almost
$1.3 million) said, "I don't agree
with the charges," but he also
gave notice that his committee
will propose some changes in
policy, including investing up to
10 percent of the University's
funds in more speculative stocks,
a recommendation made by a
special committee of investment
experts who studied the university's policies.
Palmer said students will continue to push the issue if Reagan continues to insist on raising fees and that some graduate
business students will be taking
a closer look at the investments.
The Regents also continue to
be concerned that some students
might get credit for listening
to radical lecturers.
The latest issue was a series
of nine lectures being given by
Tom Hayden, one of the founders
of Students for a Democratic
Society. Several faculty members
said they would give credit to
approximately 100 students for
independent study of revolution
in which the lectures will serve
as one of several resources.
Several Regents were worried
that the lectures are in violation
of their ban on credit for any
courses in which an outside lecturer appears more than once.
Chancellor Heyns said that so
far only one professor has
offered credit for a course
involving the lectures and that
in that case they are optional.
He said the registrar's office
would refuse to allow credit for
any course in which the lectures
were the entire substance of the
course.
offi-ical- ly

The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 405O6. Second ciass
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4tM6.
Begun as the Cadet in lttW and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 191S.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising shouid
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
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Yearly, by mail
f.10
Per copy, from files
KERNEL TELEPHONES
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Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
2320
Associate Editors, Sports
244
News Desk
Advertising, Business, Circulation 2J19

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Teh. 21, 19-- S

Class Instruction Reduced, Drill Retained

Credit To Be Halved For Four Air ROTC Courses
Continued from Page One
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to answer questions from
this reporter.
The upcoming reduction, he

said, will be phased so that
in the next few years some ROTC
graduates will have received eight
hours' credit for courses involved
and others will have been credited

with four hours.
The change probably will be
effected by next fall, he said, and
may be facilitated by offering only
the sophomore courses during the

and only the freshman
courses duringthe year following.

first year,

Must Take Twelve More
He said the courses may be

Pentagon Confident ROTC Program's Safe
Despite Recent Rash Of Campus Opposition
WASHINGTON

(AP)-RO-

TC,

civilian training ground
for future military officers, is
under fire at colleges across the
country. But at the Pentagon
command post the word is: Casualties are light and the enemy
can't win.
Nevertheless, officers directing the Reserve Officers Training Corps are uneasy.
What worries them is "Project Volunteer," a study billed
as a first step toward an
military service. It's
prompted by the Nixon administration's desire to end the draft,
and the draft is the best thing
ROTC has going for it.
A Lehigh University student,
asked his opinion of ROTC,
summed up the prevailing attitude on most campuses: I may
as well go in as an officer."
Thousands of students, faced
with what they see as an inevitable draft call, have opted for
ROTC despite periodic protests
by the Students for a Democratic Society and other militants
against the military presence on
campus.
The program seemed to be

weathering such demonstrations
until first Yale and then four
other schools Harvard, Stanford, Dartmouth, Bowdoin decided to stop giving academic
credit for ROTC courses. Since
then several other schools have
followed suit.
In the Pentagon, Lt. Col. Morgan Cronin, chief of policy and
programs for ROTC, said the
action of a few schools doesn't
worry him.
Asked what effect abolition of
the draft would have on ROTC,
Cronin said he'd rather not guess.
But another Pentagon spokesman
said the effect would be devas-

tating.

Cronin said in an interview
that 268 colleges offer military
training and he detects no widetrend on camspread
It's not even certain what
puses.
the effect of dropping academic
credit will be, he said.
He cited five colleges St.
Peter's, Fordham, Carnegie-Mellon- ,
Canisius and Boston Universitythat have never given
credit for ROTC
academic
courses.
At some universities, a stu-anti-ROT- C

LPC Plans Study Of War
By REBECCA WEST ERFI ELD

Kernel Staff Writer
The Lexington Peace Council last night announced its sponsorship of a panel discussion on the "Social Conditions Leading To
War," and its support of a local expansion of the grape boycott.
The panel discussion will be
held at 7 p.m. Thursday at the action against Student Center
Koinonia House. The panel will Food Services.
The expansion of the local
comprise Dr. John Drysdale of
the Sociology Department, Dr. boycott-r-par- t
of a nationwide
movement to aid striking migrant
Lloyd Jensen of the Political Science Department and Dr. Louis workers on the West Coast will
Karmel of the Educational Psy- call for an economic boycott of the
Student Center Grill as long as
chology Department.
Dr. Drysdale. will speak of it continues to serve grapes.
There are tentative plans for
"sociological factors" leading to
war and focus on "vested-interea "mass picnic" in the grill on
groups" like big business. Wednesday. Students reportedly
Dr. Jensen will take into acwill bring their own lunches and
roles eat them in the grill as an act
count the
of the political and legal systems, of protest against the serving
and the psychological aspects of of grapes. Definite plans concernthe problem will be covered by ing the "picnic" will be made
Dr. Karmel, who will emphasize Tuesday night in the Student
Center.
the role of educational instituThe Council also plans to set
tions.
The Peace Council voiced its up an information table on Sesupport of a planned expansion lective Service in the Student
of the grape boycott to include Center.

dent's field of study can determine whether he gets credit for
ROTC. The biological sciences
department at one university refuses to grant its majors anyi
credit for ROTC while the physical sciences department accepts
12 ROTC credits toward degree
requirements.
Cronin also had at hand charts
to show that the number of credits given isn't always a barometer of the number of students who
will stay in ROTC and earn a
commission.
For example, St Peter's located in Jersey City, N.J., gives
no credit for T
no credit for ROTC but is rated
a high producer of officers. Last
year, 133 St. Peter's graduates
completed ROTC, although participation is required only for
second-yea- r
d
students.
For years, the nation's land
grant colleges which include
most state universities thought
they were required by federal
law to provide military training
as a compulsory course for freshmen and sophomores.
Rulings Changed ROTC
In the 1930s the Supreme
Court ruled that while land grant
colleges were required to offer
courses in military science, participation didn't have to be mandatory.
Then, in 1964, Congress rewrote the law and made it clear
that ROTC could be voluntary.
Enrollment in ROTC promptly declined, but soon levelled off.
Rising college enrollments have
enabled ROTC to maintain a
first-an-

show of growth the past few
years.
Cornell University at Ithaca,
N.Y., is one of the schools where
the credit given depends upon a
student's area of study. The College of Arts and Sciences voted
to stop giving academic credit
for ROTC, which is voluntary,
starting next fall.
And student opinion varies
widely.
"Beats The Draft"
"It's the best way to beat
the draft," said John Elligers,
a junior enrolled in advanced
ROTC. "I'm going to have to
serve my two years and I'd like
to serve it as an officer."
Stanley Chess,
of the Cornell Daily Sun, observed that "Sadly, ROTC has
its place here.
"The alternative is to build 20
more West Points," said Chess.
"ROTC enables the largest possible civilian influence on future
officers."
editor-in-chi-

ef

Peter Agree, amemberof SDS,

taught in any order, and are without prerequisites. All students
could get the four courses by the
end of their sophomore year, he
explained.
Students who begin Air ROTC
in their freshman year must take
the four courses to be reduced
in credit and an additional 12
hours in their junior and senior
years. Students on a "two-yea- r
plan" must take only the 12
hours for upperclassmen.
The changes would be four of
1,500 to 2,000 changes made each
year in course offerings at the
University. They are described
on a descriptive resume which
was sent to the A & S faculty
earlier this month.
Army ROTC Similar
Army ROTC at the University has about 300 students enrolled. It also requires eight hours
of freshman and sophomore classes and 12 more in the junior
and senior years, but there are
no plans to reduce the lower
level requirements, according to
the head of the Military Science
Department, Col. Howard Parker.

Col. Parker explained that an
Air ROTC student must remain
in the service for four years after
graduation, while Army ROTC
graduates are required to serve
only two years. He said the Army
ROTC program must therefore be
more extensive so that graduates
will be able to more fully utilize
their shorter duty period.

said, "If thereis going to be
ROTC anywhere, I'd rather have,
it here on campus where I can'
watch it."

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* Credibility Gulch
week to hear the views of ordinary
people there. He is to meet with
these groups in sessions to gain an
insight into how European private

Apparently President Nixon and
Gov. Nunn, unlike the other bored
delegates surrounded by Miami's
glittering superficialities at last
summer's equally superficial ReNational Convention,
publican
learned something at least to help
them in their political careers: the
fine art of successfully staging a
first-rat-

e

citizens regard the United States.
These citizens arc to be chosen
on the basis of how well they ren
of the counpresent a
try in question. Nixon is concerned
to such a degree that these people
be representative, in fact, that he
is having the American ambassador to each country pick them.
And that is the catch. There
will probably be a few token unfavorable comments, but Nixon
need not worry about any untoward things happening. He surely
already knows how the people of
Europe regard many of this country's recent actions, both abroad
and at home.
With this sort of thing goingon,
great doubt certainly must arise
about Nixon's recommendations for
doing away with the draft, lowering
the voting age and reforming the
electoral college. Could he be sincere on these progressive matters,
or are they merely more publicity
devices?
cross-sectio-

sham.

In Nunn's case, the most
vious example of this is his

it dSii

!

obrec-

Governor's Student
Advisory Commission. The commisd
sion has the
purpose
of allowing young people a greater
opportunity for participation in
matters concerning them.
But who is serving on this commission? None other than the presidents of the different student governing bodies (and only if they are
Kentucky resgood old down-hom- e
idents at that). Nunn realizes he is
not going to get many challenges
from this group, but yet he is
pushing the commission for all
the free publicity it's worth.
Nixon's sham involves plans announced for his European tour this
ently-formed

high-minde-

ami

Thbuiw

QjWufMMMlMf, ttteSJ

SyiidKM

'And Now, Ladies And Gentlemen,
Mr. Garrison, With His Bare Hands

Bus Boom
Student Government President Wally Bryan and his cabinet are
to be commended for the work they have done to provide better intra-camptransportation. Hopefully, the two new express buses now
from the Complex to main campus each morning will help
running
alleviate the problems that have plagued the original system so far
this year.
To state that an efficient intra-camptransportation system is
needed on a campus the size of this one is certainly to state the obvious, but some people here have been slow in facing the fact. The
only reliable means in the past of moving oneself from one end of
campus to another has been one's feet, and it is only this year that
buses have been found to be more efficient, or at least potentially so.
Hopefully, the new express buses will help that system operate at
maximum efficiency.

...

us

us

The Kentucky Kernel
of
University

ESTABLISHED

Kentucky

1894

MONDAY, FEB. 24, 1969

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
.

Lee B. Becker,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

Darrell Rice, Editorial Page
Guy M. Mendes III, Managing Editor
Tom Derr, Business Manager
Jim Miller, Associate
Howard Mason, Photography Editor
Chip Hutcheson, Sports
Jack Lyne and Larry Kelley, Arts Editors
Frank Coots,
Dana Ewell,
Janice
Terry Dunham,
Larry Dale Keeling,
Assistant Managing Editors

Editor
Editor
Editor
Barber

Kernel Forum: the readers write
EDITOR'S NOTE: All letters to the edi-and not
tor must be typed, double-spacemore than 200 words in length. The
writer must sign the letter and give classification, address and phone number. Send
or deliver all letters to Room 113-of
the Journalism Building. The Kernel reserves the right to edit letters without
changing meaning.

1

d

Digression Answer
To the Editor of the Kernel:
I feel that I must answer Marguerite
Ogden's letter of Tuesday, Feb. 4. Her
emotional digression is so full of flaws
that I hardly know where to start, but
let us begin.
She says that "Recent events have
finally aroused me enough to say a few
words in defense of 'our' side (white)."
This story beginning in itself shows a
complete lack of any real understanding
so sorely needed today that we need to
see not "our side" and "their side" but
one side, i.e., man as man, black or white
or yellow or red or brown, simply man
as man. She fears "that the Negro movement has caused a lot of people to jump
on the bandwagon, not knowing exactly
where it's going." What bandwagon? It's
still no great privilege for a black baby
to be born into this white society. The
sting of prejudice is still all around, and
it hurts. If she means to speak of those
radicals who say "burn, baby, bum," she
should say so. But labeling a whole m