xt7cz8928w90 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7cz8928w90/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19590415  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 15, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 15, 1959 1959 2013 true xt7cz8928w90 section xt7cz8928w90 UK Ham Operators Transmit Internationally
By WAYNE CARTER

W4JP calling CQ Atlanta, W4JP
calling CQ Atlanta, CQ Atlanta,
this Is W4JP calling CQ Atlanta I
These phrases are often used by
students at UK's amateur radio
station W4JP In calling different
towns throughout
the United
States and countries In Europe.
Once they hate been received,
they tell each other all the Important things that happen In
their lives such aa: I bought a new

;L',,

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4

car, got me another wife, and dof -gone if she ain't as pretty as that
car!
A number of electrical engineering students and other students in
the UK Ameateur
Radio Club
have duly qualified licenses to
operate the receiver and transmitter.
For those interested In working
for a license to operate both the
transmitter and receiver, the club
has a tape machine for learning

;

V

I-

J--

Ir--i

code.

During school
hours, anyone
may listen on the receiver to
places such as Germany, Denmark,
Hawaii and anywhere in
the
United States.
Without a license, a person may
only operate the receiver. Someone with a ham radio operator's
license has to be on hand to operate the transmitter.
Army Signal Corps stations In

engineering consultant and L, K.
Adams Is the trustee In charge of
the amateur radio station.
to
Adams was demonstrating
the Inquiring reporter how the
apparatus worked when he heard
his son, who has a ham radio set
in Atlanta, Ga. talking.
He picked up the same wave
band, turned a few knobs, threw a
couple of switches, and was soon
talking to his son.

Germany are the furthermost stations that have been reached with
the radio.
The radio receives both voice
and code on a number of amateur
bands.
The equipment now Is active use
is a 500 watt BC610 transmitter
with a Heathkit variable frequency
oscillator, a speech amplifier
Conelrad unit.
Dr. II. A. Roanowitz Is the club's
BC-314- -F

Is

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Vol. L

11

15, 1939

No. 91

tars In The Night9
To Honor UK Women

itml

I

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, APRIL

un Radio

John Gex, senior electrical engineering student, practices receiv0
ing radio messages from
receiver at UK's ham radio station
NC-30-

located in Anderson Hall.

476,500 Is Low Bid
On Cumberland Center
The apparent low bid received
on the UK Southeastern Extension Center to be constructed in
Cumberland was $476,500. according to E. B. Farris, chief engineer
of Maintenance and Operations.
After the opening of the bids
yesterday in Frankfort, the mayor
and the city council of Cumberland

One hundred UK women will be
honored tonight at the "Stars in
the Night" program, according to
Sharon Hall, Women's Administration Council advisor.
The traditional program, honoring outstanding campus women,
will be held at 7:30 p. m. in Memorial Hall. The theme this year
will be centered around
the
goddess Minerva.
The program will consist of 21
different events including presen

tation of the YWCA Senior Award, lism.
the Phi Mu Cornell Award and The Phi Beta Professional
the Lexington Business and Proand the Alpha XI Delta
A-w- ard

fessional Women's Club Award.
The Future Teachers of America
will name UK's Miss FTA for the
year, and Phi Delta Kappa will
give a leadership award.
Kappa Delta Pi will honor the
outstanding senior girl in education. Theta Sigma Phi will present
a journalism award to the outstanding freshman girl in journa- -

Graduate Student
Wins Book Award

Creative Arts Award will be given.
Panhellenic will present a spirit
and service award to a sorority.
Alpha Delta Pi will honor the
outstanding women's organization
on campus. Delta Delta Delta will
give a $100 scholarship award.
Chi Delta Phi will present the
new pledges. Blue Marlins will present new pledges and award the
outstanding marlin
and guppie.
Tau Sigma will recognize the
pledges and give an outstanding
pledge award.
....Pi Phi will honor a freshman
woman of non-Greaffiliation
but who has excelled in leader
ship and scholarship.
Senior awards will be given by
Mortar Board to girls excelling in
service and leadership who have
never been tapped by an organization.
Alpha Lamba Delta, freshman
honorary for women; Cwens,
sophomore honorary; Links, junior honorary; and Mortar Board,
senior honorary, will tap their new
members.
The "Stars in the Night" program has been planned and will
be sponsored by the Women's AdCouncil, which is
ministration
composed of vice presidents
of
different women's organizations.
This year Earrie Laszlo, president of the council, will act as mistress of ceremonies. Barbara Bedford1 is vice president, Wilma Bas-hasecretary;
Diana Yonkos,
treasurer; and Sharon Hall,

met with Gov. A. B. Chandler.
Chandler assured them steps would
be taken to get work under way
on the center as soon as possible,
Farris said.
An announcement
from the
State' Department of Finance is
The Wilson Book Award will be were 26 entries in the contest.
expected to award the contract in
presented to Henry J. Hubert,
Hubert's list contained approxi
Continued On Page 8
graduate student in ancient lang- mately 500 items of superior quality, according to Prof. Kuiper. It
uages at 9:15 a. m. tomorrow.
included the original writers of
Hubert will be given a $50 cash the basic classics and was excellent in general, covering many
award.
n
periods and works, Prof. Kuiper
Prof. John Kuiper, chairman of said.
By BOB ANDERSON
If the write-i- n candidate
the UK Library Committee and
The students who . will receive
clines or does not meet
A new Student Congress Conqualifications, the person receiving head of the Department of Philo- honorable mention are Julia Barn-har- t.
stitution pioviding for a new apNell Cox, Fred H. Goldbecker,
the next highest number of votes sophy, said there would be 10
pointment system and write-i- n
honorable mention awards. There Jim Hampton, Charles C. Harber,
would be seated.
candidates was presented to the
John F. Hetzel. Jackson B. Lackey,
SC as.sembly Monday.
James Y. McDonald, Glenn
B.
The proposed constitution was
Moore and Jerald H. Richards.
presented SC by Bob Manchester,
Members of the Wilson Book
chairman cf the SC Constitution
Revisions Committee.
Committee are Prof. Kuiper, chairman; Bruce Denbo, director UK
SC has tor some lime realized
Press; Dr. Shelby McCloy, History
the need for a new, more definitive
Department; and Dr. L. S. Thompticipated.
Jim Hampton. Kernel editor-in-chie- f,
constitution that would eliminate
yesterday was elected presiRoberts is chairman of the son, representative of Samuel
such controversy as ensued when a
Continued On Page 8
write-i- n
candidate received more dent of the Arts and Science College's senior class.
officially-entere- d
votes than the
The senior class selected Dick
candidate in last fall's SC election.
17-1-8
Roberts, economics major, as vice
The new appointment system
president. Jean Kuhn, a topical
would provide the colleges with
"Hallucinations," the 16th Anone representative in SC for every major,, was ejected secretary.
,
Nominating committee presented nual Troupers Show, will be prev
e
750
students enrolled in
a slate which was approved by sented at 8 p. m. April 17 and 18.
them. The new system would not
The show is divided into three
cut the present representation of the class. Candidates for the presidency were Hampton, Ann Mur- parts, totaling about 17 acts with
any college but would become effective when the enrollment in phy, Dick Roberts, Phoebe Estes approximately 50 people involved
any college became great enough and Sid Fortney. Roberts receiv- in the production. Some of the
to entitle it to another represen- ed the second highest number of acts will be Liz Eblin's comical
votes for president and was nam- pantomime; Dave Copeland, solotative.
ist; Ray Burklow's tumbling act;
Arts and Sciences currently has ed vice president.
secretary were Carolyn Duncan and Don Adams,
Candidates for
three seats in SC; Engineering,
three; Agriculture and Home Sue Judy, Jean Kuhn. Patsy May-he- w vocalists; and Bob Orndorff, magician.
and Mary Eileen McClure.
Economics, Commerce, Education
Hampton is a member of Delta
The first part of the show conand Graduate School have two
each; and Law and Pharmacy, one Tau Delta and vice 'president of sists of magicians, who in turn will
Sigma Delta Chi. He won national introduce the performers to foleach.
For Arts and Sciences to receive awards in the "Safe Holiday" cam- low. Silhouette acts will make up
another representative, its enrol- paign in which the Kernel par- - the second part of the program.
lment would have to increase' to
The third part includes several are
rangements of spirituals.
3.000
students. Manchester said the intended meaning of
A
clown act will be
"My Fair Lady".
the article Is that if A AS had
"My Fair Lady" are presented at 7:30 p. m. for children
Tickets to
2,999 students it would still receive
still available and will be on sale attending the show.
,
......
.
only three seats.
Dave Copeland. president of
Friday
today, Thursday and
The section of the proposed confrom 5 p. m. in the SUB ticket Troupers, is musical director of the
show. Ray Burklow, vice president
stitution concerning write-i- n canHallucinations9
booth.
of the organization, is scenic dididates tates "if a write-i- n canHoard SubThe Student I'nion
Rehearsing for the 16th Annual Troupers Show are left, Susan
didate leceives the laryot number topics Committee is sponsoring; rector.
Bailer; right, iV le Glashagel; top, Bonny t'helf; and bottom,
of votes for the particular office" the trip to Cincinnati to see the
Directors of the three parts of
Si Roberts. The show, "Hallucinations," will be presented at 8 p. in.
the show are Don Adams, Bob
nnd has a 23 trade standing, "he jil.iy April 2.V
April
Lc declared the winner."
Continued On Page 8
slull
ek

Proposed SC Constitution
Clause
Includes Write-I-

Hampton Chosen Head
Of A&S Senior Class

Troupers Show To Be April

full-tim-

full-tim-

pre-sho-

.:

3--

1

17-1-

8.

m,

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April

15, 1959

WhrtFlnnkfl?

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jffivft

A&S Students To Evaluate Professors
similar program at William at'd
Mary College. Among questions
asked were what was the student's
grade average, was the instructor aware of current events in his
field f did he encourage class discussion, did he answer students'
questions, was he clear in his
speech and did he write clearly at
the blackboard?
It was emphasized by Terlman
last week that students filling out
the questionnaires would remain
anonymous. The results of the
evaluation would not be used to
intimidate professors In any way
and results would be strictly confidential, with professors receiving
onl ythe results of their personal
evaluations, Perlman added.
The purpose of the evaluation is
twher.
5C President Pete Perlman read to acquaint Instructors with any
h sample questionnaire used in a flaws in their instructional methods they are not aware of. In this
way they will be able to take steps
to correct these faults.
MOVIE GUIDE
John Williams, representative
from the men's dorms, presented a
.aSHLAND "The Hunters," 1:40, "Tradition's Committee report.
5:14. 8:48.
Williams said he had conferred
Separate Tables," 3:18, 6:52,
Arts and Sciences instructors
ill bo evaluated by students in
a study conducted by Student Congress in conjunction with A fc S
Dran M. M. White.
Dean White last week asked SC
to
with him in carrying
plan.
out an instructor-evaluatio- n
A SC committee met with Dean
White and Kitty Smith, A&S representative, and reported the
of the meeting to SC.
A vote of (he SC assembly Mon-.la- y
night showed the members in
t'avrr of the plan.
The survey would be conducted
ov .SC members who would go to
AA.-classes and have the students
fill nut questionnaires about the
orufessor and his ability as a
co-oper-

rc--ul-

with E. B. Farris, chief engineer
for Maintenance and Operations,
about the possibility of putting the
"bird sign" idea suggested by Williams into effect.
Several weeks ago Williams proposed that SC do something about
only the results of their personal
prevent students from walking on
the grass and creating new paths.

Jdlalq

I

ALL ACADEMY AWARD SHOW!
First Downtown Showing

1

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10:26.
EN A LI "I Want To Live," 12:00.
3:52, 7:44.
'Tht- - Defiant Ones," 2:00, 5:52,

J:44
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Now Playing!

"Lonelyhearts," 7:30,

):45.

nieav

FAMILY "These Thousand Hills,"
7:30. 10:55.

"The Man Who Died Twice." 9:35
KENTUCKY "Rio Bravo," 12:47.
in the

Bi-

. writer!

kini," 7:32, 10:36.
Girl In the Woods," 9:13.
STRAND
"The Shaggy Dog."

iwq brig noma

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12:30. 2:25, 4:20, 6:15, 8:10. 10:00.

Just

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Hayworth-Debora-

David

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"The Hunters"

Wagner
Britt

Robert Mitchum-Robe- rt
Richard Eqan-Ma- y

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ACROSS

Enraptured

8.

9. Combo
0. Khan a ad

othprs

ii.

mixKl-u- p

doan

Isn't it time you

a Kool ?
13. For the
discriminating
beer drinker
14. An almost
famous ft How
16. The t'me there
will be in the
old town tonight
15. Mysterious
non-Av- a

Gardner
Hand a line
21. IVrformed an
elbow operation
19.

New

2:1.

Haven-it- e

24. Kind word
for a prof
25. break to follow
up with a Kool
28. In

32.
34.

jo.
16.
?8.

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a.
4.
5.

by oneself
Irish expletive
(var.)
Which was to be
demonstrated
(L. abbr.)
LitllM Kdith
How Miami
got iturted
2 doz. sheets
of paper
French one(fem.)
Famous novel
about Willie's
kin folk
Take it off
vous?
(ue
our one and
only. F.asy now!
Vegetable that
sounds like'an
oorn

pah-mak- er

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No. 23
4

ARE YOU KODL ENOUGH
TO KRACK THIS?"

6

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First Area Showing

7

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11

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PATRICIA

TTtrt-

DON

RICHARD

LEE

MURRAY

(abbr.)

4.

12.

31.

DOWN
1. Cuba ha a
new 1
2. Author of
39 Acr.ws
3. Small units
of w hiskey

Brand New Film From the Pen of Former
Lexington Author-Editor- !

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KROSSWORD
i. Blow takon
by Brapcgoats
i. doa AW OL

EGAII

REMICK

114

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OWENS

It

had a tip,
but no filler

6. Your invdegreo

days

6. What icy fint'ers

make you do
7. Put on an act
8. Thir green stuff
15. Wonder drug
16. She's
companion
17. Smal' ti. n
18. Roman official
.who's mostly
idle (var.)
20. What you
must never ay
22. California
university
25. You may bo
Tiere.now
26.

It's

no

Occident
27. This should
make things
even
28. Alone, no place

to

go

29. Why can't
you behave?
30. Plant 'em now,
dig 'em later
33. One German
36. Square at some
Colleges

just wuntod
pottage

37. He

40. Portuguese

India

14
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LAST 2 NITES! . .
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STARTS FRIDAY!
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SWITCH FROM

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"LONELY HEARTS"
Morily Cm
"GREAT ST. LOUIS BAND ROBBERY"
Plus

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As cool and clean as a kreatli of fresh air.
Finest leaf tobacco. . .mild refreshing menthol
and the world's most thoroughly tested filter !
With every puff your mouth feela clean,
your throat refreshed!

frAr ttf
f"

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Jet

JUUt

JOHN DREW

utitt timin
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75c

Price

OPENS TONITE!
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Kerr
Lancaster

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Niven-Bu- rt

fSJlgTT

rviore iNignrs

mmm

"Sepearafe Tables"

BELTLINE

- lie or

TO SEE

SHOWING

Open 6:15 p.m

A Short Drive

1

NOW

mm
ii

ON THE

"Great St. Louis Bank Robbery,"

i:37. 6:27, 9:17.
LEXINGTON "Girl

ARTISTS

UNITED

11:25.
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NOW

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ALSO REGULAR S:2E KOOL WITHOUT FIITLR!

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COGCAN

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SOON! "SOME LIKE IT HOT"
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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL., Wtiinrvlav.j Anril
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Five new members were appoint- ed to the Student Union Board
Monday to Join the five members
la.st week.
They were Marietta Booth, Dave"
Kr.lzicr, Marion Jokl. Sarah Jean
Hilly and Myra
Leigh Tobin.

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photographer Gordon Baer. From left are Dr. Army Vandenbosch, the principle
speaker, Cadet Col. Don Harmon, who received one of 11 distinguished military student awards, and Col. William Grubbs, who presented the awards.

I

Apnes

Mc Alpine

Sandefur,

NOW OPEN

..

Play Day or

Smith will discuss
variations in the polypoid sunflower at a Genetics Seminar
meeting at 11:30 a. m. today in
Donovan Hall.

Night

18 Hole Miniature Course

Genetics Seminar

15 Tec Driving Range

Dr. Dale

pianist, will present a senior rental fat eight tonight in the Laboratory Theater in the Fine Arts
Building.
The recital will be presented by
the Uil Music Department in parti, il fulfillment of Miss Sandelur's
B iche'or of Music degree in
music. It will be open to the

C

18 Hole Par 3 Course
14

Dr. Hollis Summers' lecture,
given last Tuesday in Guignol
Theater, will be rebroadeast by
WBKY at 8 o'clock tonight.

ed

Mason Headly Road

Three principles at the Scabbard and Made initiation banquet Friday night pose for

Summers9 Lecture

CLUBS FOR RENT

J

1

rrP7
0 UULa

ap-pl- .d

public.
Miss Sandrfur is a member of
riii Bta, Women's National Music
Fratcr.iity, secretary of Chi Omega,
M;rij fraternity, has sun with the
I'niversity Chorus for four years,
is a nvmber of Women's Glee Club,
and
member of SuKy, stupep organization.
dent

ui

English: CAMPUS TOUGH GUY
Thinklish translation: This character belongs to the beat generation,
as any
freshman can testify. When he cracks a book,
it ends up in two pieces. His favorite subject: fistory. Favorite sport:
throwing his weight around. Favorite cigarette? Luckies, what else?
Puffing on the honest taste of fine tobacco, he's pleased as Punch. If
you call this muscle bounder a schooligan, bully for you!

"Heat Generation"
To He Panel Topic

black-and-bl-

SUB topics will sponsor a panel
"The Beat Generate n." The program will be held in
tiii S icial Room of the SUB at
4 r. m. on April 20.
Members of the panel will be
Fuel Waddell. Raymond Sweika,
Dr. Albert Lott and Dr. Robert
Hazel.
licii!- - ion on

ue

English: UNHAPPY
MARRIAGE

About Time

ACHING
Polish: SCR
a

One of
TUCSON. Ariz. (AP
Mrs. O. R. Fishback's poems has
jmt been published in an indus-

Eng ish:

SPG

DOG

trial arts magazine. She submitted
nine years ago.

ft

Blakeman Jewelry
Thin Wish:

WATCH AND CLOCK
REPAIRING

Thinklish: FLEAGLE

-r
rimvui d J jcwciri
viinu

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HOIIRTO

BRI

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SPM'MNY
,RIHin COLLI"

Thinkhish:

fwcm

WISCONSIN STATE COLL.

TloN

strikf'

Gifts For All Occasions

cohn

English: ILL TYRANT

Located At
501

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EUCLID, PHONE

W

17

"5)

lSTRIEfil:7
Thinklish: SICKTATOR

Get the genuine article

Getf
a.

r c.

Take a word celebration, for example
With it, you can have a football rally
(yelkbration), a gossipy bridge party
(telle-bration)-

CIGARETTES

faitWMttwetiDiaiigiiitMnniiitiiriiWhiriiTmwa

the horaesf taste

of a

c& jmtuem

,

or a clambake (shellebrction)
That's Thinklish and its that easy'
We're paying $25
ho Thinklish word.;
judged be&t your ciierk is itc hing to go
Send your words to Luckv Strike, Bo:
(7A, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Enclose you
name, address, university and class
i

LOCCCY STRDECE
Product cf

--

Those elected last week in n earnpus election were Philip Cox, Kaj
Evans, Judy Schrim, Kathy Soup-electster and Warren Wheat.
The new mebcrs were appointee'
by the outgoing board and
.verve for the .school year 1959-6-

PAR 3 GOLF CLUB

Scabbard And Blade Initiation

Piano Recital
Set Tonight

Ifivi

Lexington's Newest,
Most Modern Golf

--

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FORE!

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Named As Members
Of Student Union Board

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is

our middle uamr

* How Good Is UK?
When the University's seniors
take the Graduate Record Examinations next month, they will forge the
first link of a chain of
which will take several years to complete.
The results of the UK tests will be
compared with those of schools
throughout the country and related
to a national norm. Thus we will see
just where the University's graduates
rank in comparison with other schools
and, more important, we will know
some of the weak and strong points in
UK's educational system.
self-evaluati-

The Kernel commends the University officials for their farsightedness
and initiative in originating this proOnly through
gram of
a sincere introspective examination of
our curricula, our students and our
faculty, will be able to find our
faults and eliminate them. That the
University is cognizant of its need for
and, moreover, is turning cognizance into concrete action is
a meritorious effort to which the
Kernel pledges its wholehearted
self-evaluatio-

n.

self-evaluati-

Pop's Not Too Important
A couple of interesting statements

about that sacrosanct creature whose
name sailors have tattooed on their
chests alongside Old Glory and the
words "Long May It Wave" cropped
up in the news recently, and we
thought we'd pass them along for the
benefit of our misogynous readers.
We allude, of course, to the American mother,
One expert said mothers ahead of
fathers by leagues determine how a
family's gifted child will turn out as
a student. Mothers, , the expert declared, are the ones "who go to the
encyclopedia to help look up the answers to tough questions, who take
the children to the museum, who encourage them to read more books."
After he has performed his initial
mating duties, .the father's relations
with the child apparently include only
teaching backyard sports and handing
Junior. his weekly dole.
This picture of the emasculated
male in an expanding matriarchy is
hideous enough, but yet another expert has added some comments (not
connected with those of Expert No.
1 ) that have an ominous ring.
This expert says American women
are tired. Not tired because of raising

children, baking bread or sweeping
carpets the maid evidently does that,
these days but tired from running
hither, thither and yon to a plethora
of meetings, rallies, bazaars, showers,
bridge clubs, fund drives, lectures,
parties, teas, sundry soirees, quilting
bees, ad nuseam, that she comes home
plumb tuckered.
Thus we are faced with future
generations of children able only to
play baseball and fish, simply because
mother is too pooped to open the encyclopedia, suggest books to read or
answer questions with anything but
"Don't bug me, kid!"

where grandpa had it secured, and
chain the other hand to a cradle.
If the women object, perhaps husbands can be lured out of their
long enough to perform
that neglected duty that Oscar Wilde
once suggested so sagely with these
words:
"Women should be beaten regupip-squeake-

ry

larly, like gongs."

Barely

involved in this decision.

might inThe economy-minde- d
sist that we not replace the old tatflag, but that we should
tered
jobs to come
wait for the new
off the assembly lines. Certainly there
is some merit in this frugal thought.
We think that is is at all possible to get a new
flag (at a
resonable price) it might be better to
replace the
present campus Old
Glory. The UK American flag is in
bad shape. It looks somewhat like the
original flag Francis Scott Key was
writing about. It is faded; it is tattered; it is rustic; it is patriotic.
At any rate, the flag is something
that should be taken care of without
delay. Things have been a little drab
the last few days and that decrepit
looking flag doesn't help.
Buy war bonds!
48-st-

ar

50-st-

ar

48-st-

ar

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

Entered at the Pot Office at Lexington, Kentucky a second class matter under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Published four times a wwk during the regular nchool year except holidays ami exams.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-CIii-

ef

Bill

Neikirk, Chief News Editor
Lahhv Van IIoose, Chief Sports Editor
I'erry Ashley, Business Muuager
Nohman McMullin, Advertising Manager
BaLlE Rose Paxton, Society Editor
Cordon Baer, Ffwtographer
Hank Chapman, Lew Kinc, Skip Taylor And Bob Hehnuon, Cartoonists
WEDNESDAY'S

NEWS STAFF

Joanie Wejssincer, Editor
Box

Bulks-man-

,

Associate Editor

Larry Van IIoose,

Sports Editor

lata

TayUr

" Must Be Immortal."

In desperation (and with tongue
firmly implanted in cheek) we suggest
the only possible solution: remove
mama's hand from the steering wheel
and chain it to the kitchen stove,

The Flag Is Waving
In newspaper circles we often hear
that discussions and prose on such
subjects as motherhood, the U. S.
Marines, matrimony, Girl Scout cookies and the flag are subject matter
not deserving of print on the editorial
page.
Perhaps this is true but the Kernel
has already discussed Girl Scout cookies this year (along with , a few
other things) so we feel its high time
to consider the flag.
More specifically, the flag in front
of the Administration Building.
We notice with pleasure tliat SC
passed a resolution Monday asking
"the proper authorities" to take action in regard to the flag. Indeed,
this was a progressive step by the
governing body.
Now the problem arises as to tvhat
"kind of flag we should have flying
here. There is most certainly an issue

Kernel CarUaa Mj

Just Plain Anti
Or, Don't Like Anything
By HAP CAWOOD

The trouble with me

that I don't appreciate the good things around here.
No, I'm not talking about the birds
that sing or the flower's heaven and the
MfcO grow, but like higher opportunities,
higher sophistication, higher prices.
Or take, for instance, suntans. Down
the path, bulldoed through the snowbank, walks a girl, and although the
is

sun is only presumed existent since someone saw it months ago, she has a tan on
her face that makes her tongue look like
an albino oyster.
Granted that I would enjoy watching
the roasting process, but unless you can
pole-vaul- t
Holmes'Hall or you're visiting someone in Good Sam Hospital, you
might as well get out and build a tower
with tinker-toybecause the girls ami
housemothers
make ultimately - vffrile
fighters.
Still you must admit it's bad when
New York is
and you call to
your sunoplated chameleon girlfriend,
"Hey, Little Roxiel Russia's attacking!
Ike's finishing the eighteenth hole! Come
on!" To which she replies, as she throws
peelings at you, "Well hold them off a
while, you fat eyed lily! Can't you see
I'm sunning with fresh butter?" I should
appreciate their efforts.
s

Another thing I don't appreciate

is

downtown movies. Why not? look what
they offer: Indian weaved carpets, atomic
marquee signs, running water, sterile
ushers, and even a thin screen to do
its deed after each main feature so as to
assure you, "Yes, you fool, of course that's
the end of the story."
I ask the ticket girl, "How much does
it cost?"
Also virile, she asks if I'm being carried
in mother's arms. I say no, so she tells me,
"Five dollars down. That includes social
fees, union dues, gives you access to
candy bars lor 7 cents eath, and
curbs inflation by being uneducational."
And 1 still don't recognize the value.
To top it all, I have no civic pride.
I throw things on sidewalks, write fox-anhounds arrows on' walls, everything.
But UK built the Coliseum so tjie tall and
short happy Lexington people could be
d

entertained and get money from the
tourists we attract. Of course it's insignificant that the downtown banks won't
touch a student's check, that we hae to
pay them outrageous prices for mass retirement (don't worry about inflation
though; Lexington is going to vote in a
bill against motherhood). Orange juice is
cheaper on the Sahara Dcscit. But who
am 1? Hap Cawood, a fat happy person
full of the big sound. I suppose, your
stomach growls too sometimes.
Frankly, I'm getting so I don't even
appreciate Lile After Death anymore. I
was talking to an SC hand after he telephoned a cherub in heaven to ask what
the ruling would be if Albeit Schweitzer
(organist) and Grace Mctalious (author of
Peyton Plate, a Greek organization manual) were to reach heaven at the same
time but only one tould be allowed to
enter. Who would you pick?
Legally, neither could enter because
their angels have been wiiting about
goodie pciiods in the
their after-dancBook of Lile instead of blue books and,
furthermore, kit out some commas.
Nevertheless, in a mock trial, St. Peter
said, "Sorry Al, but Grace here turned
in a longer paper. We'd like to let you in
but, well, that's the curve system, you
know. Nasty break, Al."
However, I do appreciate the Kernel,
to which I am dedicated beyond repair.
Yesterday a home ec major killed 17 professors, a student sold his book lor purchase price, and Eisenhower beat Djii
Millott in a hopscotch match in front of
the Law Club. 1 thought it only appropriate that the next edition therefore blast
the AFROTC for not letting Christine
Jorgenson sign up.
At least 1 appreciate something.
e

Kernels
A freshman, being polled last week
by a student in the Political Science

Department's public opinion class,
was asked to "identify Henry Cabot
Dxlge" and promptly replied: "A New
England winter resort."

* m

Um0

U

11

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April

Are Americans .Dubs?
Are We Smart Cookies?
By W. C. ROGERS, AP Arts Editor

Head Dr. Daniel J. Boorstin's new book about America, but read It by alternate pages.
That way you won't get to arguing with yourself.
On one set of pages, you find the author a ravening chauvinist Nothing Is wrong with America, In

fact we're about the smartest cookies in history.
On the other set, we're flops:
We can't paint, sculpt, think,
poetize, theorize, philosophize.
This exaggerates a little. And
in truth there is no real contradiction in his book. Instead, he gives
corollary, interdependent views of
two basic aspects of American life,
and he says that in order to be
Kood in one field, we've sacrificed
in the other.
The book's title Is "The Americans: The Colonial Experience"
A
(Random House) and In time there

i

will be two more volumes.
You should be warned, Dr.

r

'

--

'-

-'

X

'I

h

"

'

V---

Boor-sti- n

is an alert talker, this author'
from the University of Chicago
faculty.
He's trying to say something very
complicated in words the average
reader can understand.
The historian's function, according to this former Rhodes scholar,
ence practicing lawyer and now
historian himself, is
"to speak not to his fellow his- -.
torians, but to his age."
Heretofore, American historians
had American eyes but had a
European cast in them; what they
aw was colored by the European
notion of what they should expect
to see.
They brought nothing to the
ftudy of their native land not
already brought to it by Dickens,
the Trollopes and de Tocqueville.
To Boorstin this was useless bag- gage. America needed to be looked
at by an exclusively American
full-fledg-

b

'

Boorstin himself has held up to
mir- America
made-in-Ameri- ca

ror- -

.

'

Boorstin, Author
whether even Ralph Waldo Emer- SOn wasn't Just the Norman Vin- cent Peale of his day.
ne is not the first to accuse
us of not doing our share of or- iginal thinking, but he's about the
first to add, so what?
He believes we came to our pres- ent advanced material success
without the need to resort to or- iginal thinking, and what counts
is the result.
To our credit he puts the facts
that our society Is peaceful, we
have never for instance fought a
religious war, our public lot is
better than that of any other

Thus he ha come up with the
proud patriotic conclusion that we
are fine at doing; but with the
tlunt, even savage criticism that
we are bad. or at least mediocre,
in abstracting, in creating, and in
giving birth to original ideas.
iiis dook in mis laiier respect national people.
is one of the most derogatory
Isn't it dangerous In this day
views of American high culture-cul- ture
depend on other people for our
sense-a- ny
In the
say, in science?
American has written.
Ideas, he answere