xt7d251fmw5s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7d251fmw5s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680301  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  1, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  1, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7d251fmw5s section xt7d251fmw5s Tl

K MUCKY

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The South' s Outstanding College Daily

Friday Evening, March I, 1968

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By DARRELL

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Members of Les Miserables don't look very miser- e
able as they accept their
trophy after
the final round of the 1968 Quiz Bowl. Left to

right are Karen Kemper,

Les Miserables wrapped up
the fourth annual UK Quiz Bowl
championship Thursday night
with a convincing 490-15win
over the Newman Club foursome.
0

The Newman Club team
jumped out to an early lead,
but were behind
at the
half. Les Miserables dominated
the rest of the game.
165-9- 0

Les Miserables also won last
year's championship. Team captain Tom Craler, senior English
major from Cincinnati and editor of the Kentuckian,
Bob
Howell, sophomore history major
from South Fort Mitchell, and
Frenchman Jean-PaPegeron,
d
a
sopliomore, were on
both championship teams.
Karen Kemper, junior English
major from Cincinnati, joined
the team this year. All four are
members of the Honors Program.
The champions said they prepared for their competition by
spending about an hour of speed
pre-me-

Pegeron, Tom

ul

PREVIEW

LES MISERABLES RIPS
NEWMAN CLUB FOUR
IN QUIZ BOWL FINAL
By S. WAYNE SMITH

Jean-Pa-

Craler and Bob Howell,

first-plac-

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practice between games. They
asked each other questions and
concentrated on giving answers

as rapidly as possible.
The UK Quiz Bowl, modeled
after television's College Bowl,
was moderated by Dr. David
McCants, an assistant professor
of speech.
The three judges were Bonnie
Cox, Fred Christ en sen, and
Mangat.
teams entered the
Thirty-si- x
competition. JaneTieman Blair,
Quiz Bowl Committee chairman,
said pairings were determined by
drawing team names from a general pool.
The quiz questions were written by the members of the Quiz
Bowl Committee: Miss Blair, Tef
Holschlag, Deena Spikell, Virginia Houghton, Melinda Fish,
Bob Imholt, and Emily Egbert.
It was speculated that if the
UK faculty would be willing to select a team of their own, a game
between it and Les Miserables
will materialize.
De-vind- er

Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

Tau Sigma will provide the
e
entertainment at Saturday
afternoon's game between UK
and Vanderbilt. Practicing here
are sophomore Clay Nixon and
half-tim-

senior Margaret Thompson, president of Tau Sigma.

SG Debates
By JO WARREN
Student Government again proved its ability to mix
controversy and parliamentary procedure in the assembly
meeting Thursday night.
Controversy and indeed even heated discussion developed on two issues brought before the assembly.
Quite a debate concerning the merits of
and
students developed over a resolution
introduced by Joe Maguire and Beth Paulson. The
resolution called for SC to take a stand "opposed to
any policy, restricting in number and increasing tuition
of nonresident students." It was amended to strike the
te

out-of-sta-

part concerned with increased tuition.
The discussion nearly reached a point of resident
representatives against nonresident representatives. A
move to have the resolution declared out of order
was not successful.
Included in the joints against the motion was
a statement that nonresident students do not pay
taxes and therefore the parents of Kentucky students are
supporting nonresident education.
A nonresident representative said thebetterKentucky
students go out oft he state anyway so instead of limiting
students, work sltould be done to improve
"at least one state school so students would stay here."
This remark received considerable rebuff by

students.
The resolution was eventually tabled until next week
so that some one knowledgable about the nonresident
situation could come tothe assembly toanswerquestions.

RICE
of the two opposing
the compulsory
groups on have been
ROTC issue
active
this week at Morehead State
University.
The university has experienced a great deal of controversy since a group of students
and faculty members rose in
opposition to the administration's plans to incorporate compulsory ROTC next fall.
Two professors, Kenneth
Vance and Richard Norman,
have received word that their
contracts will not be renewed
next year and feel their involvement in student activities is
largely responsible.
A third professor, Dr. Robert
Arends, was asked to resign. He
has refused, saying he prefers
-to stay, despite what he calls
"the dungeon atmosphere," to
work for "freedom."
The anticompulsory
ROTC
group announced their intentions last week to pass out leaflets criticizing the university and
its administrators. But when Dr.
Arends informed the students of
his having been requested to
resign, they decided it would be
"safer" to distribute the leaflets
late at night by slipping them
under dormitory doors.
Professor Replies
Dr. Norman Tant, professor
of education at Morehead, condemned the students by answering the leaflet with a statement
posted in the Student House.
He called the group cowardly
for not signing the leaflet and
disparaged the idea of asking
for protection after committing
civil disobedience.
"I challenge you, individually
or collectively, to debate whatever it is that is eating at your
insides," the statement says. "I
shall attempt to clobber you, but
I shall defend your right to
speak your mind even as I was
doing 26 years ago in the
jungles of the Southwest Pacific
while probably the eldest of the
'New Sons' (the group) was
still mewling and puking in his
mother's arms."
Both

It
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NCAA Travel Bill

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444-44-44t

Dr. Tant's statement was soon
answered by another statement
posted next to it. The second
letter was signed by Morehead
students David S. Walker and
Michael D. Embry.
"You, Dr. Tant, being a
World War II veteran and hero
have shown some violence in
your paper and we understand
the militaristic values the army
has put upon you," they say.
"You are the old generation and
therefore you have been left out
on some of the newer values
such as peace, nonviolence and
free speech."
"Thank you, Dr. Tant, for
expressing your views," the
statement ends, "but don't you
agree that a constructive criticism will better promote peace
and goodwill among all men?"

Underground Newspaper
An

"underground

news-

paper," the Student Poll, made
its first appearance at More-hea- d
Tuesday. The
six-pa-

mimeographed edition was distributed off campus to students
coming and going from the
school.
The paper presented several
of position and
statements
poetry (including some poems
by Dr. Arends).
Sue Easterling, who is on the
Student Poll's editorial staff,
said it was hoped that the paper
will come out regularly about
every 10 days and that it will
contain the views of anyone on
campus who wishes to con-

tribute.
The

group is still
circulating its petition, but some
of the students say their efforts
are being overshadowed by another petition circulating on
campus.
The second petition supports
the university administration's
stand favoring the ROTC program. It could not be learned
at this time, however, the actual number of signatures collected.
The
group says it
has about 400 signatures on its
petition.
Continued on Pare 8, Col. 1
anti-ROT- C

anti-ROT-

C

Students, Tickets

passed by SC to set up a chartered flight
to Los Angeles for the NCAA finals. Nick Carter said
that arrangements had been made for a round trip flight
for University personnel and students. The fare is $128
round trip and 89 spaces are available, Carter said.
The flight will leave March 20 and return March 24.
Information may be obtained in the SC office.
A bill was

(ft

Vol. LIX, No. 110

Activity Continues
In MSU Debate

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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

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EC EENEL

A bill jointly introduced by Allen Youngman and T.
Rankin Terry called for changing the announced procedure for obtaining tickets to the NCAA regional tournament. The bill called the distributing method "unfair
and unworkable" and the sponsors advocated that the
often used system of "first come, first serve" be used
instead of the lottery now planned.
The bill was amended "so that this won't become
just another piece of our legislation." The amendment
called for sending the bill to the University's
on tickets.
President Steve Cook said there was a big question
in his mind as to whether the system could be changed
now. He added that in all live different distribution
systems were discussed by the ticket committee and a
group of students whom Cook had asked to consider
the problem.
One of the major reasons the change was promised
was to allow those "wlo wanted to go to the games
the most the best oportunity to get tickets." In a
lottery the chances are greater that people who don't
really want to go will get tickets, one representative said.
Cooking Caused Hazard
Cook pointed out that when a "first come first serve
basis" had been used before, people began waiting at
3 p.m. the day before and stayed all night. He indicated
some troubles had been caused by the long waiting,
such as the hazard of fire from eoJe cooking supper
while waiting.
e 8, CoL t
Continued on

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, March
Opposes Johnson's War Views

Fort Lauderdale Manager
Welcomes Students, But . .
EDITOR'S NOTE: In anticipation of this spring's onslaught
of college students, the
city of
Fort Lauderdale has sent a memorandum concerning student behavior to colleges across the country. The following is a portion
of this memorandum received by
the Kernel.
To: All students planning to visit
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
during the spring holidays

Professor To Run For Congress

.

A professor at Bcrea College,
"Our policies and ordinances
also a former minister, will speak
in cars and
prohibit sleeping
at the Law School Fonim 12:45
or sleeping in the open. Camor trailers are not permitted p.m. Monday on his candidacy
pers
for the UtS. Congress from Kento park on the beach
Sixth District.
"All the laws that govern the tucky's
J. Donald Graham, an assisconduct of the individual will
tant professor of philosophy and
be enforced. A person must be
religion at Berea, announced his
21 years of age in order to purintentions to run for office Feb.
chase or consume alcohol. (It 9
because, in his words, "some
should be noted that drinking in crucial
issues must be faced or
the open is not permitted.)
this country will be in dire
1968
"Parents and school officials straits."
From: R.H. Bubier, city manaof any and all students arrested
He has taken a position opger, Fort Lauderdale
during this period will be of- posing what he terms President
"I would like to take this ficially notified.
Johnson's and Secretary of State
opportunity to welcome you to
"It is the feeling of the City Dean Rusk's "misguided foreign
our city and sincerely hope that
your stay will be a pleasant and Commission, this office and all policies," especially in regard
to Vietnam.
of the Citydepartments involved,
memorable experience.
"In order that neither you that if your conduct while in Fort
Another major issue in his
nor the City incur any unpleas- Lauderdale follows your personal
campaign is "doing something
antness, the following suggest- guidelines while on campus, that before our cities are burned
ions and policies have been in- your vacation will indeed be a
down," referring to the racial
stituted and will be adhered to pleasant and memorable
situation in Negro ghettos.
unequivocally.
As to Mr. Craham's position

....

on Vietnam, he says it is similar
to those'of Kentucky's Senators
Thruston Morton and John Cooper.

TODAY and
TOMORROW
Annsanecments far University greaps
will be abllthed twice anee the day
befere the event end enee the after-nee- n
ef the event. The deadline Is It
a.m. the day prler te the first

VISTA Representatives of Volunteers in Service in America will be
stationed on the first floor corridor
of the Student Center to acquaint
students with available opportunities.

WBKY-F-

Today

"Pantagleiie." by Michael de
will begin at 8:30 p.m. In
Guignol Theatre. Fine Arts Bldg. Admission is $1 for students.
Phyllis Jenness, contralto, will give
her faculty recital at 8:15 p.m. in the
Agricultural Science Auditorium.
The American Institute of Mining
Engineers will meet at 4 p.m., second floor Anderson Hall.
"Lord Jim," will be shown at 6:30
p.m. and 9:15 p.m. in the Student
Center Theater. Admission is 50 cents.
Ghel-dero-

FRIDAY
5:00 BBC World Report
5:15
5:30
6:00
7:00
7:30
8:00

9:00

Tomorrow
Ghel-dero-

Coming Up
Applications may be obtained for
Complex Government sponsored train
trip to Ft. Lauderdale from 11 a.m.
to
p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in
Comp.cx Cafeteria until March 5.
Duke Eastin art exhibit will be
showing from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday until March 2 in
the Ait Ga.lery. Student Center.
Applications for male and coed
cheerleaders nre available in 2j8 Adate

may
1(,2

pre-la-

honorary,

be obtained from
Bradley Hall.

Sports Burt Mahone
It Happened Today Bob Cooke.
Rick Kincaid. Mark Withers
Evening Concert Liszt. "Four
Symphonic Poems"
Georgetown Forum
Legislature '68
Viewpoint Kate Reid and Pat
Hingle Give Their Interpretation
of Arthur Miller's New Play,
"The Price"
Masterworks Bob Cooke: Ives,
"Three Places in New England"
SATURDAY

"Lord Jim," will be shown at 6:30
and 9:15 p.m. in the Student
Center Theater. Admission is 50 cents.
by Michael de
will begin at 8:30 p.m. in
Guicnol Theater, Fine Arts Bldg. Admission is $1 for students.
"Spyder Turner" with the "Torques."
will perform from 8 p.m. to midnight
in the Student Center Ballroom.
Dorissa
Robertson
will give her
senior recital on the organ at 8 p.m.
at Central Christian Church.
p.m.

min, titration Uldg.
Societas Pro Lcgibus,

91.3 mc

M

undergradu-

applications

Tm Futrell.

"John Tuska: Recent Ceramics," is
showing from
p.m. to 5 p.m. daily
until March 17 in the Art Gallery
of 'he Fine Arts Bldg.
Applications for Ombudsman are
available in 102 Student Center for
sophomores and juniors until March 6.
Registration is taking place for
sorority open rush in Room 301 Administration B.dg. until April 19.
College Life will meet at 9 p.m.
Sunday in the Phi De.ta Theta house.
Male faculty and graduate students
may use the Women's Gymnasium
from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and
Sundays.
Be.ow are the Job interviews scheduled for Monday. Contact the Placement Office, second floor of the Old
Agriculture B.dg. for further information.
Dow Corning Corp.
Chemistry,
Physics IBS, MS); Acct., Bus. Adm.,
Personnel Mgt., Sales IBS); Chem.,
Met. E. iBSi; Elec, Mech. E. IBS.
MSi. Summer work also. Citizenship.
L'Anse Creuse Schools, Mich.
Elementary, Junior High Math, Elementary Librarian, Senior High Math,
Science, Biolgoy, German.
National Institutes of Health Botany, oology, Journalism, Microbiology. Public Ilea th tBSI. Summer

9:00 Music Sign on
10:00 Morning
Concert

"Symphony No.

1

Schubert,
in D Major"

12:00 Music
1:00 Manager's Desk
1:30 UK Musicale
Mozart,
2:00

"Rhondo
From Quintet" Featuring Ray
Schaeberg, and Fred Dart
Met Opera Ponchielli, "La
Gioconda"

He said he favors a negotiated
settlement preceded by an unconditional bombing halt. "But
at this point I would almost
say we could pull out. The people there don't support us."
"There is no military solution," he said. "Johnson can't
come before the American people
and say he made a very bad
mistake not with all the boys
killed."
At this point Mr. Craham is
undecided as to whether he
should run in the Democratic
primary or as an Independent.
He is circulating petitions, however, for Independent status and
says he has about half the 400
signatures necessary to put his
name on the November ballot.

favor of slum clearance and providing jobs for everyone who
wants one.
He said these programs could
be partially paid for by "diverting funds now goingforthewar."
"If you can't pacify Harlem,
you can't pacify South Vietnam.

-

And Harlem is a higher priority
because they're American citi-

zens."

Mr. Craham says one reason
he is running as an Independent
is because he cannot support
President Johnson's official policies for the Democratic party.

-

CLASSIFIED
FOB BALI

WANTED

Golf clubs, brand new,
still in plastic coven. Sell for half.
Phone
22Jtf

NEED A GARAGE for my car. Am
too late for my classes and need a
after
?lace near campus. Call
28FSt

FOR SALE

0.

ATTENTION
1958
FRATERNITIES
Cadillac ambulance.
all power, good condiUon, good tires.
2.
$400. Call
I7Ftf
SUPER

DELUXE

One ticket to
Call
rame, for high school student. lMlt

WANTED

UK-Van-

1961

Impala Convertible, 283 four barrel.
power, whitewalls. WhiU with
black top. Call
28F5t
All

1.

FOR RENT

TUTOR
TUTOR with fair command
conversational Spanish, plus interest
In teaching; to teach English to
pay.
Spanish speaking family. Good 216.
Call Dr. Drucker at 2931 ext.

NEED

29F5t

TWO newly decorated

apartments. Northside. No
26F5t
children or pets.
FOR RENT One bedroom apartment,
laundermat;
pool,
26F5t
utilities paid. Call

LOST and FOUND

7.

1.

GARAGE APARTMENT FURNISHED.
AYLESFORD; ONE BEDROOM, $85,
INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES.
ALSO
ROOM FOR MEN, WITH KITCHEN.
CALL
27F5t

LISTED is the property on hand in
our lost and found department not
listed before. Items may be claimed
in Room 3. Klnkead Hall from 8:00
a.m. till 5:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday 1 man's Timex Watch; 1
Man's Suede Jacket; 4 Pair of Men's
Gloves; 2 Ladles' Scarfs; 1 Ladies'
Glasses; 3 Men's Scarfs; 1 Man's Hat;
1
4 Ladies' Gloves;
Ladies' Knit
Hat; 1 Man's Cap; 1 Pair Ladies'

Green Mittens;

EMPLOYMENT

1

Ladies' Umbrella.
lMlt

OPPORTUNITY
MISCELLANEOUS

STUDENT

EMPLOYMENT

in Yellow-

stone and all U.S. National Parks.
Booklet tells where and how to apply. Send $1.00 to Arnold Agency,
206 East Main. Rexburg. Idaho, 83440.
27F5t
Money back guarantee.

THE FABULOUS BERKSHIRE Seven,
soul recording group, have open
dates now through June for Spring
formals, dances, jam sessions. Call
lM-m254-83for Information.

mm

As for the situation in the
cities, Mr. Graham cited the results of a Harris Poll saying that
64 percent of the people are in

V7U
1

CROLIEY CLEANERS
116 W. Maxwell

255-431-

TUESDAY

Any Plain SKIRTS, TROUSERS, SLACKS,
or SWEATERS. Single item, regular price.

&

2

WEDNESDAY

3

for

VUP

Gold Cup

Shag

for $1.49

3

U

lift n
jii

uM SJttdDITD

3

CLEANING VALUES
MONDAY

1, 19G8- -3

1

work also. Citizenship.
New England Mutual Life Ins. Co.
Bus. Adm., Sales (US); Economics
MS. MS); MBA.
Philip Morris, Inc. Bus. Mgt., Ind.
Adm. ifiSl; Mech. E. iMach. Design)
at BS level.
US'. Dept. of Agriculture Office of
Inspector General Citizenship. Schedule I: Auditors Acct., Bus. Adm.
with a minimum of 15 hrs. in acct.
i
US). Schedule II: Special Agents-L- aw
ILL. H.I.
American Tel. tt
Hell Companies
Te! : Elec. Civil.. Mech. E. (BS);
Math, Physics USi; MBA, Bell TeleElec. Mech.,
phone E.
Civil
(US, MSi ; Math (with 13
hrs. physics or computer programming
i
xpenenee). Cincinnati & Suburban
Hell: Engineering. Liberal Arts. Bus.
Adm. IBS). Southern Hell: EngineerAdm..
ing. Liberal Arts. Bus. Western Acct..c:
Elec-trUSi.
Physical Science
Flee. Mech.. Chem.. Met. E.
Math 'BS.
E.
BS MSi: Ind.
HS;
Bus. Adm.. Acct.
MS : I.ibir.l Ar..

Any plain Men or Ladies' COATS smartly
Single coats, regular price.

cleaned.

SHIRTS,plain (28c c a.)

5

$3.45

for $1.35

APPLICATIONS

Now! a sock every bit

as

colorful and craggy as
your favorite sweater
and sportcoat.

Student Government Office

Heathery soft, Gold Cup Shag has the Shetland
that everybody wants today. What's more
come In all the tweedy colors, compliment
they
everything that's happening in your wardrobe
from sportswear to jeans.
And Gold Cup Shag are long wearing wonders
too. They're fashioned in a cool 2 x 2 rib of
blended 85 Orion acrylic and 15 stretch
nylon. Takes to machine washing and drying
with ease. Get several pair in all your favorite
colors. One size fits 10 to 13.

SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS

$150

for

look,

OMBUDSMAN
Arc in the

ARE INVITED TO APPLY

Deadline: March

6

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, March

18

1,

...

i

1

TONIGHT!
1st

I

!

SHOWING!

DRIVE-I-

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frank

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(A Sinatra
sVOIll
rome

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Pantagleize (Bryan Harrison) In Action

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Kernel Photos by Dick Ware

DAVIDQSELZNICKSpN.,n.c:oNorMAK(;AKLf

Mir.

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Drama Review

Pantagleize Is Powerful
of power seekers always antici-

By LYNN CARLOUCH

common thing happened
on the way to Pantagleize's desinnocence and
tiny. His child-lik- e
honesty crushed him in a world
A

's

STARTING WEDNESDAY
CLRK

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Li-

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"ONE OF THE YEAR'S

10 BEST!

1

A PICTURE YOU'LL HAVE TO
AND MAYBE SEE TWICE TO

VMLXLKIGII
LESLIE IIOWAKl) OmiVdcILttlLIANI)
A

SEIZMCK

SAVOR ALL ITS SHARP SATIRIC
WIT AND CINEMATIC TREATS"

l;Ttr.iTt;'.AL FiCT'E

-- NfWYORK TfMES

THE FRESHEST, FUNNIEST AND
MOST TOUCHING FILM OF THE YEAR!"

RESERVED SEAT TICKETS NOW AT BOX OFFICE OR BY MAIL

Lexington Premiere
WED., March 6

STRAND

p:

SEE

AT 8:00 P.M.

SATURDAY REVIEW
JOSEPH

E

LEVINE

.

MIKE NICHOLS
LAWRENCE TURMAN

The Department of Theater Arts Presents
PANTAGLEIZE
A

force To Make You Sad

By MICHEL

DE GHELDERODE

Guignol Theater

Feb.

8:30 p.m.

28-Marc-

3

h

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 2929
$1.00 with Student ID

TICKETS $2.00

morons story of a
man in search of his. "raison
d'etre.'' The dialogue is quick
and witty, but the play is really
not funny for Pantagleize is killed
by a society that has no room
for the impeccability of the naive.
Pantagleize awakes on" his; fortieth birthday to unassumingly
start a revolution with theartless
phrase, "What a lovely day!".
By his contemporaries, Pantagleize is declared a fool, a clown,
and an imbecile. But he is none
of these. Bryan Harrison asPanta-gleiz- e
never lets us think that he
is anything but an innocent unknowingly stumbling into the
hands of fate.
With an athletic prowess attributed only to the young, Mr.
Harrison captured his role superbly for we forget that Pantagleize is really forty. He is presented to us like the child he
really is.
Very precise, very' businesslike, very Jewish is Susan Card-we- ll
as Hachel Silberschatz, the
only female lead in the production. With just a hint of Russian
accent, Miss Cardwell comes
across as she is meant to, cold,
calculating, and heartless.
Also naive, but possibly out
of ignorance, is Bamlxola, Panta-gleizeNegro servant, played
by Danny Howell. What Bam-!x)l- a
has to say is timely and
funny, but somehow Mr. Howell
does not let the audience forget
that he is playing a part.
De Chelderode's satire on the
military is amusing in the character of General MacBoom played
by David Hurt. Mr. Hurt played
the fool intended in the role of
MacBoom excellently.
The set was extremely versatile, but more important realistic. It lent itself well to a cafe,
a bedroom, or a courtroom.
The lighting and sound effects commanded a tour de force
which brought the reality of de
forty-year-o-

pating the lie.
Opening Wednesday night at
the Guignol, Michel de Ghelde-rode"Pantagleize," is the hu- -

's

1st OUTDOOR SHOWING!
ELECTRIC

This is Benjamin.
He's a little worried about his future.

R

HEATERS

THE GRADUATE
ANNE BANCROFT

DUSTIN HOFFMAN

CALDER WILLINGHAM--

.

KATHARINE ROSS

BUCK HENRY

PAUL SIMON
SIMON.. GARFUNKEL LAWRENCE TURMAN
MIKE NICHOLS technicolor- - panavision-

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FORMERLY THE
ASHLAND...
LEXINOTON'S
SMART THEATRE!

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young...

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HEY WILDCATS

in love

"PROMISE HIR ANYTHING

and they kill people.

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StVCN ARTS

VJ

LPj
wbtth Me

266 2174

(helderode's

...

...BUT

TAKE HER TO PERKINS"

BUTTERMILK PANCAKES (famous)
APPLE GLAZED ROLL-UP- S
BLUEBERRY PANCAKES
FRENCH TOAST
FENCH ROLL-UP- S
POTATO PANCAKES with Bacon

75c
$1.10
$1.10
85c

$1.10
$1.10

"WHENEVER

YOUR APPETITE CRAVES A TREAT" . . .
YOU ARE IN "WILDCAT COUNTRY" or

Perkins Pancake House
920 South Lime, across from UK Med Center

timeless theme

closer home. Is man a puppet
on the string of fate?

The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, Univerkity of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second clan
pobUiite paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed live times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
scbsion.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK t'ost Office llox 4U6.
lietiun as the Cadet in 1UU4 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 115.
Advertising published herein Is
to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCKIITION RATFS
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Per copy, from files
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KENTUCKY

KERNEL,

Friday, March

1, 19G8- -5

Kernel Forum: the readers write

To the Editor of llic Kernel:
Why don't you change the name of
your publication from The Kentucky Kernel to The Hanoi Daily. While you're
at it, you might persuade Ho Chi Minh
to join your editorial staff.
The best advice I can offer is a reiteration of a statement made by L.B.J.:
"Don't spit in the soup. We've all Rot

to eat."

Bill Corlinc
A & S Sophomore
To the Editor of the Kernel:
I would like to take issue with a
statement made by a Mr. Cerny in Kernel
Forum. (Feb. 22) He says "I'm not saying for sure but I think maybe the Greeks
have something to do with this vandalism." This sounds to me like a person
w ho doesn't really know but would like
to point his finger at an outsider and
say "You did it."
Mr. Cerny, we are not overly concerned alxnit the Complex competition.
If the Creek system is destroyed (God help
us) then we will be destroyed internally
and not by outside competition.
You say, Mr. Cerny, that 15 of this
campus runs.it. But you go on to say
that the only gimmik this 15 has is the
ability to drink in their respective residence units.
Now these two statements do not
seem to be complementary. Neither do
the ends which they accomplish. If you
will explain this to me I will be eternally
grateful. Surely they have something else
going for them. Now I will be more than
happy to explain this to you but I suggest
you try fraternity rush. You might be
surprised.
Another point, Mr. Cerny, if this 15
didn't do anything as far as the campus
is concerned then w ho would. The answer
is simple. Nobody. Consider this a challenge, a repudiation, or whatever, it has
been substantiated as cold, hard fact.
So, Mr. Cerny, before you think maybe again, I suggest you come up with
some facts.
Nick Carter
Agriculture
Senior

Forum article on automation and the
guaranteed income, we felt that his comments deserved the time, study, and effort
involved in writing this response.
Robert A. Valentine
A fit S Senior

Rodney F, Page
A fir S Senior

the woman and her physician. The
suffering in the form of needless
mental anguish can be extreme for the
unmarried pregnant, or lor the woman who
pio-longc- d

desperately wants to avoid having another
child. Unjust laws prevent the physician
from doing his duty to relieve this suffering. The suffering is often greater than
nx)st physical pain ev er endured by people
in civilized nations. Surely physicians
want to be free to help these unfortunate iHople.

To the Editor of the Kernel:
A bill in Frankfort to legalize alxrtion
for rape victims and certain other unfortunates was beaten alter opixmcnts
women to arise and
Someday I
objected that it gave no consideration to demand their expect to determine their
rights
It is nice that
the rights of the unlxrn.
own destiny with regard to producing
some of our legislators have such a huchildren. Perhaps it would be justice
concern for the unlxrn, but
manitarian
.
should be made aware that they if they were able to force men to
they
But they could send enough women
to touch uixni this
are only beginning
to the legislature to repeal the alxrtion
problem. Our voting women reproduce
laws.
a month, but nearly all
regularly once
I have heard 3 objections to alxntion;
of their children aie destined to perish.
I think
none an adequate reason for
lack of leitiliation they are deFor
prohibitive laws. Some say that fertiliprived of their rights to be lxrn. Tragization is an act of Cod and that man
cally, very few people besides myself
seem to be concerned alxmt the rights should not interfere with His will. This
and fate of these children. Perhaps our is nonsense; fertilization is an act of man.
Spokesmen for the Catholic Church
fight
legislators who led the
will want to consider recommending that say that induced alxntiou is murder.
the Church teaches that the
girls be raped to protect the rights of individual
comes into Ining at conception.
their uiiIxmii. I do not advocate this I
do not agree with this interpretation.
course. I think it best that we allow
these children to perish, but I do want Let Catholics follow their teachings, but
should not by enforced upon others
people to Ik aware of their late. I think they
we should all oiler a daily prayer in by law.
their behalf.
conFinally, many
Now let's consider the rights of the sider the laws a just punishment for
sperm, which are produced by the mil- moral transgressions. These are the type
lions by each mature male. They are of people wlio are pleased when a crimindividuals; they are alive, and they are inal gets sliot, because they realize that
human. Therefore they are entitled to a
jury would have administered lesser
the same rights as everyone else. Let punishment. But forcing a girl by law
no one ridicule this idea who has not to endure pregnancy and bear a child
seen these living fellows through a micro- constitutes cruel and unusual punishment,
scope. Certainly our legislators should which follows a public conviction withbe as concerned alxut the rights of an out hearing or trial. And what of the
embryo. But if they really cared alxnit married woman who finds herself accithe rights of the unlxmi generation they dentally pregnant by her husband with
would outlaw strip mining in Kentucky.
another desperately unwanted child? I
With regard to alxnlion, I think the suspect a vestige of the
puritanical equarights of women should transcend tliose tion of pleasure and sin, where some
of egg, sperm, or embryo. To force a are pleased with the legally enforced
girl by law to produce a child is an sufferings of others as the devil gets
extreme injustice and infringement UX)ii his due.
her basic rights and liberties. A decision
These represent personal views, not
to terminate a pregnancy is as much a views of the University.
private matter as a decision to initiate
Wayne H. Davis
one, and should concern no one except
Dept. of Zoology
give-birth-

anti-alxrtio- n

To The Editor Of The Kernel:
Having read the reply of Jolm Junot
to our February 9 analysis of his Kernel

To the Editor of the Kernel:
If there are any Americans oblivious
to the plethora of increasing detail and
modification which tumbles into our lives,
then they are few. For the many, who are
acquainted, if not engulfed by the situations at large, to recklessly imbibe
more than a few sentences of new tlata
invites violent choking for, whatever it
was, it was probably ludicrous.
Mental choking is harshest, and what
especially rams the sanctity of our balance is the polemic of consent, or dissent, of the governed to those that govern.
Such a current bipolarization of interests
enables one to view a substantial range,
on the spectrum of disparity, which is
not a particularly unhealthy position.
However, and it is significant to notice,
that though either side (for instance,
"Hawks and Doves", as is fashionable)
pursues the interest that they think best,
it is a const met of insufficient communication lounging beside an overabundance
of antipathy.
There is a need, indeed a craving,
for a new and transitional element in this
society, an element with the scope and
capacity to comprehend and synthesize
the opposing factions, acting always as
leaders toward a new consensus: this
would be a modicum of progress.
This would also be nice to see. This
is necessary, for already our lives and
sacred honor