xt7d513ttv3v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7d513ttv3v/data/mets.xml Buchanan, Thompson, 1877-1937. 1911  books b92-213-30910706 English W.J. Watt and Co., : New York : This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Making people happy  / by Thompson Buchanan ; frontispiece by Harrison Fisher. text Making people happy  / by Thompson Buchanan ; frontispiece by Harrison Fisher. 1911 2002 true xt7d513ttv3v section xt7d513ttv3v 

















MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY

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    COPYRIGHT, 1911, BY

W. J. WATT  COMPANY




    Published September



























           PRESS OF
         BRAUNWORTH  CO.
     BOOKBNDERS AND PRINTERS
         AROOKLYN, N. Y.


 











   MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY


                  CHAPTER I

  THE bride hammered the table desperately with her
gavel. In vain! The room was in pandemonium.
  The lithe and curving form of the girl-for she
was only twenty, although already a wife- was
tense now as she stood there in her own drawing-
room, stoutly battling to bring order out of chaos.
Usually the creamy pallor of her cheeks was only
most daintily touched with rose: at this moment the
crimson of excitement burned fiercely. Usually her
eyes of amber were soft and tender: now they were
glowing with an indignation that was half-wrath.
  Still the bride beat a tattoo of outraged authority
with the gavel, wvholly without avail. The con-
fusion that reigned in the charming drawing-room
of Cicily Hamilton did hut grow momently the more
confounded. The Civitas Club was in full operation,
and would brook no restraint. Each of the twelve
                        9

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



women, who were ranged in chairs facing the presid-
ing officer, was talking loudly and swiftly and in-
cessantly. None paid the slightest heed to the fran-
tic appeal of the gavel. . . . Then, at last, the
harassed bride reached the limit of endurance. She
threw the gavel from her angrily, and cried out shrilly
above the massed clamor of the other voices:
  " If you don't stop," she declared vehemently, " I'll
never speak to one of you again! "
  That wail of protest was not without its effect.
There came a chorus of ejaculations; but the mono-
logues had been efficiently interrupted, and the atten-
tion of the garrulous twelve was finally given to
the presiding officer. For a moment, silence fell. It
was broken by Ruth Howard, a girl with large, soul-
ful brown eyes and a manner of rapt earnestness, whlo
uttered her plaint in a tone of exceeding bitter-
ness:
  "And we came together in love!"
  At that, Cicily Hamilton forgot her petulance over
the tumult, and smiled with the sweetness that was
characteristic of her.
  "Really, you know," she confessed, almost con-
tritely, " I don't like to lecture you in my own house;
                        10

 





MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



but we came together for a serious purpose, and you
are just as rude as if you'd merely comiie to tea."
  One of the women in the front row of chairs uttered
a crisp cry of approval. This was Mrs. Flynn, a
visiting militant suffragette from England. Her ag-
gressive manner and the eager expression of her nar-
row face with the gleaming black eyes declared that
this woman of forty was by nature a fighter who de-
lighted in the fray.
  " Yes; Mrs. Hamilton is right," was her caustic
comment. " We are forgetting our great work-
the emancipation of woman! "
  Cecily beamed approval on the speaker; but she
inverted the other's phrase:
  " Yes," she agreed, "our great work -the sub-
jugation of man!"
  The statement was not, however, allowed to go un-
challenged. Helen Johnson, who was well along in
the twenties at least, and still a spinster, prided her-
self on her powers of conquest, despite the fact that
she had no husband to show for it. So, now, she
spoke with an air of languid superiority:
  " Oh, we've already accomplished the subjugation
of man," she drawled, and smiled complacently.
                        11

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



  "Some of us have," Cicily retorted; and the ac-
cent on the first word pointed the allusion.
  " Oh, hush, dear! " The chiding whisper came
from Mrs. Delancy, a gray-haired woman of sixty-
five, somew hat inclined to stoutness and having a
handsome, kindly face. She was the aunt of Cicily,
and had reared the motherless girl in her New York
home. Now, on a visit to her niece, the bride of a
year, she found herself inevitably involved in the
somewhat turbulent session of the Civitas Club, with
which as yet she enjoyed no great amount of sym-
pathy. Her position in the chair nearest the presid-
ing officer gave her opportunity to voice the rebuke
without being overheard by anyone save the militant
Mrs. Flynn, who smiled covertly.
  Cicily bent forward, and spoke softly to her aunt's
ear:
  " I just had to say it, auntie," she avowed happily.
"You know, she tried her hardest to catch Charles."
  Mrs. Morton, a middle-aged society woman, who
displayed sporadic interest in the cause of woman
during the dull season, now rose from the chair im-
mediately behind Mrs. Flynn, and spoke with a tone
of great decisiveness:
                        12

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



  " Yes, ladies of the CiN itas Club, Mrs. Plynn is
perfectly right."  She indicated the identity of the
militant suffragette, who was a stranger to most of
those in the company, by a sweeping gesture. " It
is our duty to follow firmly on the path which our
sister has indicated toward the emancipation of
woman. We should get the club started at once, and
the work done immediately. Lent will be over soon,
and then there will be no time for it."
  " Yes, indeed," Cicily agreed enthusiastically, as
Mrs. Morton again subsided into her chair; " let's get
the club going right away." The presiding officer
hesitated for a moment, fumbling among the papers
on the table. " What's the name - Oh, here it
is! " she concluded, lifting a sheet from the litter be-
fore her. " Listen! It's the Civitas Society for the
Uplift of Woman and for Encouraging the Spread
of Social Equality among the Masses."
  As this gratifyingly sonorous designation was
enunciated by Cicily in her most impressive voice,
the members of the club straightened in their places
with obvious pride, and there was a burst of hand-
clapping. Ruth Howard's great eyes rolled de-
lightedly.
                        18

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



  "Oh," she gushed, " isn't it a darling duck of a
name! Let's see - the Vivitas Society for - for-
what is it for, anyhow "
  Cicily came to the rescue of the forgetful zealot.
  " It's for the purpose of bringing men and women
closer together," she explained with dignity.
  Miss Johnson gushed approval with her usual air
of coquettish superiority.
  " Oh, read it again, Cicily," she urged. " It's so
inspiring! "
  " Yes, do read it again," a number of enthusiasts
cried in chorus.
  The presiding officer was on the point of comply-
ing with the demand for a repetition of the sonorous
nomenclature:
  " The Civitas Society for -" she began, with
stately emphasis. But she broke off abruptly, under
the impulse of a change in mood. "Oh, what's the
use " she questioned flippantly. "You'll all get
copies of it in full in your mail to-morrow morning."
Mightily pleased with this labor-saving expedient,
Cicily beamed on her fellow club-members. " What
next " she inquired, amiably.
  Mrs. Carrington rose to her feet, and addressed
                        14

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



the assembly with that dignity befitting one deeply
experienced in parliamentary exercises.
  " Having voted on the name," she remarked pon-
derously, evidently undisturbed by the exceedingly
informal nature of the voting, if such it could be
called, "I think it is now time for us to start the
society." She stared condescendingly through her
lorgnette at the duly impressed company, and sank
back into her chair.
  There were many exclamations of assent to Mrs.
Carrington's timely proposal, and much nodding of
heads. Plainly, the ladies were minded to start the
society forthwith. Unhappily, however, there re-
niainied an obstacle to the accomplishment of that de-
sirable end - a somewhat general ignorance as to the
proper method of procedure. Ruth Howard turned
the gaze of her large brown eyes wistfully on MNrs.
Carrington, amid voiced the dilenmmna by a question:
  " How do we start " she asked, in a tone of gentle
wonder.
  Before Mrs. Carrington could formulate a reply
to this pertinent interrogation, the militant suffra-
gette from England began an oration.
  "The start of a great movement such as is this,"
                        15

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



Mrs. Flynn declaimed, " is like unto the start of a
great race, or the start of a noble sport; it is like -"
  Cicily was so enthusiastic over this explanation that
she interrupted the speaker in order to demonstrate
the fact that she understood the matter perfectly.
  "You mean," she exclaimed joyously, "that you
blow a whistle, or shoot a pistol! "
  This appalling ignorance of parliamentary tactics
induced some of the more learned to ill-concealed tit-
ters; Miss Johnson permitted herself to laugh in a
gurgling note that she affected. But it was Mrs.
Carrington who took it on herself to utter a veiled
rebuke.
  " I fear Mrs. Hamilton has not been a member of
many clubs," she remarked, icily.
  At Miss Johnson's open flouting, Cicily had flushed
painfully.  Now, however, she was ready with a re-
tort to Mrs. Carrington's implied criticism:
  " Oh, on the contrary! " she exclaimed. "Why,
I was chief rooter of the Pi Iota Gammas, when I went
to boarding-school at Briarcliff."
  Miss Johnson spoke with dangerous suavity of
manner:
  "Then, my dear, since you were one of the Pigs-
                        16

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



pardon my using the English of it, but I never could
pronounce those Greek letters -"
  " Of course not," Cicily interrupted, with her sweet-
est smile. " I remember, Helen, dear: you had no
chance to practise, not having belonged at Briar-
cliff."
  Kindly Mrs. Delaney was on nettles during the
passage of the gently spoken, but none the less
acrimonious, remarks between her niece and Miss
Johnson. She was well aware of Cicily's deep-seated
aversion for the coquettish older woman, who had not
icrupled to employ all her arts to win away another's
lover. That she had failed utterly in her efforts to
make an impression on the heart of Charles Hamilton
did not mitigate the offense in the estimation of the
bride. So strong was Cicily's feeling, indeed, and so
impulsive her temperament, that the aunt was. really
alarmed for fear of an open rupture between the two
young women, for Helen Johnson had a venomous
tongue, and a liking for its employment. So, now,
Mrs. Delaney hastened to break off a conversation
that threatened disaster.
  " Let us select the officers, the first thing," she sug-
gested, rising for the sake of effectiveness in securing
                        17

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



attention to herself.  " It is, I believe, usual in clubs
to have officers, and, for that reason, it seems to me
that it would be well to select officers for this club,
here and now." 'Mrs. Delaney reseated herself, well
satisfied with her effort, for there was a general buzz
of interest among her auditors.
  Cicily, with the lively change of moods that was
distinctive of her, was instantly smiling again, but
now with sincerity. Without a moment of hesita-
tion, she accepted the suggestion, and acted upon it.
She turned toward Mrs. Carrington, and addressed
her words to that dignified person:
  " Yes, indeed," she declared gladly, " I accept the
suggestion.  . . . Won't you be president, Mrs.
Carrington "
  The important lady was obviously delighted by this
suggestion. She smiled radiantly, and she fairly
preened herself so that the spangles on her black
gown shone proudly.
  " Thank you, my dear Mrs. Hamilton," she replied
tenderly, with a pretense of humility that failed com-
pletely.  " But I believe there are certain formalities
that are ordinarily observed - I believe that it is a
matter of selection by the club as a whole. Of course,
                         18

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



if -" She paused expectantly, and regarded those
about her with a smile that was weighted with sug-
gestion.
  Cicily was somewhat perturbed by the error into
which she had fallen.  It occurred to her that Helen
Johnson might here find another opportunity for the
gratification of malice. A glance showed that this
detestable young woman was in fact exchanging pity-
ing glances with 'Mrs. Flynn. Cicily was flushed with
chagrin, as she spoke falteringly, with an apologetic
inflection:
  " Oh, the president has to be elected I beg your
pardon! I thought it was like the army, and
went by age."
  At this unfortunate explanation, the simper of
gratified vanity on Mrs. Carrington's features van-
ished as if by magic. She stiffened visibly, as she
acridly ejaculated a single word:
  " Really! " The inflection was scathing.
  Mrs. Flynn, who was smiling complacently over the
evident confusion of Cicily, now stood up to instruct
that unhappy presiding officer:
  " No, indeed, Mrs. Hamilton," she announced with
great earnestness, " for the most part, it is the young
                         19

 




MIAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



women, even young wives no older than yourself
oftentimes, who are at the front, fighting gloriously
the battle of all women in this great movement.
 . . At least, that is the way in England."  She
paused and bridled as she surveyed the attentive com-
pany, her manner full of self-content. " There, I
may say, the youngest and the most beautiful women
have been the leaders in the fray. Ahem!
  Cicily did not hesitate to remove all ambiguity
from the utterance of the militant suffragette with
the sallow, narrow face.
  " And you were a great leader, were you not, 'Mrs.
Flynn e " she demanded, bluntly.
  There were covert smiles from the other women;
but the Englishwoman was frankly gratified by the
implication. She was smiling with pleasure as she
answered:
  "I may say truthfully that I know the inside of
almost every police-station in London."
  At this startling announcement, uttered with every
appearance of pride, the suffragette's hearers dis-
played their amazement by exclamations and gestures.
Mrs. Carrington especially made manifest the fact
that she had scant patience with this manner of
                        20

 





MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



martyrdom in the cause of woman's emancipation.
   " My dear Mrs. Flynn," she said, with a hint of
contempt in her voice, " here in America, we do not
think that getting into jail is necessarily a cause for
pride." There were murmurs of assent from most of
the others; but Mrs. Flynn herself was in no wise
daunted.
  "Well, then, it should be," she retorted, briskly.
"Zeal is the watchword! "
  " I think that Mrs. Flynn should be president,"
Miss Johnson cried with sudden enthusiasm. " She
has suffered in the cause! "
  " Oh, for that uatter," interjected Mrs. Morton
flippantly, " most of us are married." It was known
to all those whom she addressed, save perhaps the
Englishwoman, that at the age of forty Mrs. Mor-
ton had undergone two divorces, and that she was now
living wretchedly with a third husband, so she spoke
with the authority of one having had sufficient ex-
perience.
  But Mrs. Flynn was too much interested in her own
harrowing experiences to be diverted by cynical rail-
lery.
  "The last time I went to jail," she related, " I had
                        21

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



chained myself to the gallery in the House of Com-
mons, and, when they tried to release me, I bit a po-
liceman - hard! "
  "Oh, you man-eater! " It was Cicily who ut-
tered the exclamation, half-reproachfully, half-ban-
teringly.
  " I fail to see why, if one should prefer even Chi-
cago roast beef to an Irish policeman, that should be
held against one." This was Mrs. Carrington's in-
dignant comment on the narrative of the mordant
martyr.
  The remark affected Mrs. Flynn, however, in a
fashion totally unexpected. She cried out in genuine
horror and disgust over the suggested idea.
  "Good heavens! Do you imagine I would ever
bite an Irish policeman "
  " If not," Mlrs. Carrington rejoined slyly, " you
will have very small opportunity in New York for the
exercise of your very peculiar talents."
  Cicily interposed a remark concerning the appe-
tizing charms of some of the mounted policemen. It
seemed to her that the conversation between the two
older women had reached a point where interruption
were the course of prudence. " I think we had better
                        22

 





MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



do sonie more business, nows," she added hastily, with
an appealing glance toward her aunt.
  Mrs. Delancy rose to the emergency on the in-
stant.
  " By all means," she urged. " Let us get on with
the business. We haven't been going ahead v ery fast,
it seems to me. Why not elect the officers right
away"
  Once again, the entire company became agog with
interest over the project of securing duly authorized
officials. There were murmured conversations, con-
fidential whisperings. As Ruth Howard earnestly de-
clared, it was so exciting - a real election. A
stealthy canvas of candidates was in full swing. The
names of Mrs. Flynn and of Mrs. Carrington were
heard oftenest. Incidentally, certain sentences threw
light on individual methods of determining executive
merit. A prim spinster shook her head violently over
some suggestion from the woman beside her. " No,
my dear," she replied aggressively, " I certainly shall
not vote for her -vote for a woman who wears a
transformation  No, indeed!"   . . . Cicily im-
proved the interval of general bustle to inquire se-
cretly of her aunt as to the possible shininess of her
                        23

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



  nose. " It always gets shiny when I get excited,"
  she explained, ruefully. As a matter of fact, there
  was nothing whatever the matter with that dainty
  feature, which had a fascination all its own by reason
  of the fact that one was forever wondering whether
  it was classically straight or up-tilted just the least
  infinitesimal fraction.
    It was Mrs. Morton who first took energetic action
  toward an election. She stood up, and spoke with a
  tone of finality:
    " I think that dear Mrs. Carrington would make a
  splendid officer. I nominate dear Mrs. Carrington
  for our president."
    " Did you hear that, Mrs. Carrington  " Cicily in-
  quired, with a pleased smile for the one thus hon-
  ored. " You're nominated."
    "Oh, it's so thrilling!" Ruth Howard exclaimed,
  with irrepressible enthusiasm.
    But Miss Johnson, to whom Ruth particularly ad-
  dressed herself, had on occasion been unmercifully
  snubbed by Mrs. Carrington. In consequence, now,
  she showed no sign of sympathy with her compan-
 ion's emotion. On the contrary, she sniffed indig-
                          24

 





MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



nantly, and muttered something about " that
woman ! "
  Meantime, Mrs. Morton was waxing restless over
the fact that things remained at a standstill, despite
the nomination she had made. She rose to her feet,
and surveyed the company with a glance eloquent of
haughty surprise.
  " I am waiting for a second to my motion," she
remarked, icily. Then, as there was no audible re-
sponse to this information, she added with rising in-
dignation: " Well, really! " There was a wealth of
contemptuous reproach in the tone.
  The effect on the susceptible Cicily was instantane-
ous. With her customary impulsiveness, and her
eagerness to do the right thing for any and all per-
sons, she felt that she herself had been woefully
remiss in not having hurried to Mrs. Morton's sup-
port at once. So, to make amends, she spoke with
vivacity:
  " Oh, I second it! . . . Mrs. Carrington," she
continued, turning to the gratified candidate, " you're
seconded." She was rewarded for her conduct by a
stately bow of thanks from Mrs. Morton. Half a
                       25

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



dozen others, taking their cue from the presiding of-
ficer, noisily cried out in seconding the candidacy of
Mrs. Carrington, whereat Mrs. Morton grew flushed
with pleasure, and was moved to consummate the af-
fair without a moment's delay.
  " I move that the election of Mlrs. Carrington as
president be now made, and also that the election be
made unanimous," she demanded, with much unction
in her voice.  She smiled persuasively on the presid-
ing officer as she concluded: " Won't you put that
motion, my dear"
  Cicily rose to the occasion with an access of be-
coming dignity.
  " It is moved and seconded," she announced loudly,
  that Mrs. Carrington be elected president of this
club. All in favor of this motion -"
  " One moment, please," M\,Iiss Johnson interrupted,
excitedly. " Madam  Chairman, I move that Mrs.
Flynn, the great, the tried, the proven, the trusted
crusader in the cause of woman, from England, be
elected president, and that her election be made unan-
imous." She paused to turn to Ruth, whom she ad-
dressed in a fierce whisper: " If you don't second me,
I'll never speak to you again."
                        26

 





MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



  " Oh, I second you," Ruth cried, anxiously. " Of
course, I second you."
  But, by this time, Cicily had come to a realization
of the fact that the other women present were every
whit as ignorant of parliamentary law as was she
herself. So, in this emergency, she did not scruple
to make audacious retort. She answered with ex-
ceeding blandness:
  " But, you see, Miss Johnson, there's already a
motion before the house."
  Thereupon, Mrs. Morton hastened valiantly to her
own support.
  " Yes, indeed," she declared, haughtily; " my mo-
tion was first. I must insist that it be voted upon.
If Miss Johnson wished to have an imported English
president for our American society, she should have
nominated Mrs. Flynn first."  She made direct ap-
peal to the presiding officer. "Am I not right,
dear"
  Cicily beamed on Mrs. Morton, and was about to
reply, when a sudden thought came to her that did
greater credit to her ingenuity than to her executive
knowledge. Forthwith, she beamed, somewhat hypo-
critically, on Miss Johnson in turn.
                        27

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



  " Yes, certainly," she affirmed; " I'm sure you're
both quite right."
  " Thank you, Madam Chairman, for agreeing with
me," Miss Johnson replied, placated by Cicily's un-
expected amiability toward her. " My motion also is
before the house, and I insist that it be voted on.
Mrs. Flynn has been seconded."
  There was a spirit of hostility in the manner with
which Miss Johnson and Mrs. Morton faced each
other that boded ill for peace. The rival candidates
sat in rigid erectness, disdainfully aloof while their
supporters wrangled. The whisperings of the others
suggested a growing acrimoniousness of debate. That
earnest maiden, Ruth, was alarmed by the tension of
strife.
  " I think I'd rather go," she faltered. " I'm afraid
you're going to quarrel, Helen."
  But the resources of Cicily's inspiration were by
no means ended. She waved a conciliatory hand to-
ward the adversaries, and spoke with an air of finality
that produced an instantaneous effect as of oil on
troubled waters.
  " I'll tell you: I'll put one motion, and the other
can be an amendment." At this profound sugges-
                        28

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



tion, the whole company breathed a sigh of relief.
Only Ruth appeared somewhat puzzled.
  " What's an amendment " she questioned frankly,
while the others regarded her with evident scorn for
such ignorance.
  " An amendment, Ruth," the presiding officer ex-
plained patiently, is - is - oh, just listen, and don't
interrupt the proceedings, and you'll know all about
it in a few minutes." She beamed once again, first
on Mrs. Morton and then on Miss Johnson. " Which
of you would rather be the amendment" she in-
quired.
  Mrs. Morton, as became her years, was first to make
reply.
  " It's entirely immaterial to me, just so my motion
is put."
  Miss Johnson adopted a manner that was not with-
out signs of heroic self-sacrifice.
  " I'll be the amendment," were her words. With
that, she bowed very formally to Mrs. Morton, who
returned the salute with a fine dignity, after which the
two at last subsided into their chairs.
  Cicily was elated with the subtle manner in which
she had evolved order out of chaos. Her eyes glowed
                        29

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



with pride, and the flush in her cheeks deepened.
There was an added music in her voice, as she once
more addressed the company.
  " Splendid! " she ejaculated. " Now, all in favor
of Mrs. Motion's morton - I mean Mrs. Morton's
motion, please say ay! "
  In a clear, ringing voice she led the chorus in the
affirmative. Yes, every woman present, including the
presiding officer, voted an enthusiastic ay, whereupon
Cicily declared the motion carried; and Mrs. Morton
rose and said: " Thank you, ladies." Next, Mrs.
Carrington stood up, placed a hand on her heart, and
expressed her appreciation of the honor done her:
" I deeply thank you, ladies." The incident was fit-
tingly concluded by an outburst of applause in which
all the club joined, although Ruth beat her palms in
rather a bewildered manner. . . . Cicily immedi-
ately entered on the new phase of the situation.
  " Now, all in favor of 'Miss Johnson's amendment,
please say ay," she directed. Again, she led the
chorus in the affirmative, and the entire company
joined in the vote without a dissenting voice.
" Amendment carried," the presiding officer an-
nounced, gleefully. It was now the turn of Miss
                        30

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



.Johnson to rise and offer her thanks, and Mrs. Flynn
followed, saying, very neatly: " From over the sea,
I thank you." The usual applause was of the hearti-
est. . . . But Cicily was still energetic.
  " Now, all in favor of the motion and of the
amendment, please say ay," she requested. For the
third tinie, she led the chorus, and the vote was un-
opposedly affirmative. " The motion and the amend-
ment are carried unanimously," Cicily announced, and
the hand clapping sounded a happy content on the
part of the Civitas Club.
  Afterward, came a little intermission of conversa-
tion in which was expressed much appreciation of the
efficiency of the club in carrying on its session. " It
all goes to show how businesslike women can be," Mrs.
Carrington remarked, triumphantly. Mrs. Flynn
was even more emphatic. " I've never seen a meet-
ing more gloriously typical of our great cause." The
tribute was welcomed with a buzz of assent.
But, finally, there came a lull in the talking. It was
broken by Mrs. Delancy, who spoke thoughtlessly
out of a confused mind, with no suspicion as to the
sinister effect to be wrought by her words:
  "Who's elected " was her simple question.
                        31

 




MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



  There was a moment of amazed silence, in which
the members of the club stared at one another with
widened eyes. It was broken very speedily, however,
by Mrs. Carrington, who rose to her feet with more
activity of movement than was customary to her dig-
nified bearing.
  " I have the honor," she stated, sharply.
  Instantly, Mrs. Flynn, the militant suffragette, was
up, her face belligerent.
  " Pardon me, but the honor belongs to me," she
snapped, regarding the first claimant with a fierce in-
dignation that was returned in kind. Most of the
others were too confounded for speech, but Mrs. Mor-
ton rose to support her candidate's claims.
  " Pray pardon me," she began placatingly, " but
probably Mrs. Flynn does not understand. The in-
terpretation of parliamentary law in England may
be quite different. Probably, it is. The customs
of that country vary widely from ours in many re-
spects. So, they probably do in the matter of elec-
tions in clubs. Now, I belong to ten clubs - Amer-
ican clubs - and I assure you that, according to the
parliamentary law in every one of those ten clubs,
Mrs. Carrington is certainly elected."
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  This advocacy was, naturally, a challenge to Miss
Johnson, who promptly rose up to champion her own
candidate.
  " Mrs. Carrington, I am sure, has no desire to take
advantage of a distinguished stranger within our
gates - and one who has served as gloriously in the
cause as Mrs. Flynn -but, even if someone-" she
regarded Mrs. Morton with great significance -" I
say, even if someone should wish to take unfair ad-
vantage of a technicality, it would be altogether im-
possible, for my amendment to the original motion
was carried - unanimously! Mrs. Flynn is the
president of the club, duly elected."
  Some hazy notion of parliamentary procedure
moved Mrs. Flynn to a suggestion.
  " J think the matter might best be settled by the
chair," she said, doubtfully. " The chair put the
motion. Let us then leave the decision to Madam
Chairman." Mrs. Carrington nodded a stately agree-
ment to the proposal, and the company as a whole
appeared vastly relieved, with the exceptions of Miss
Johnson, who sniffed defiantly, and of Ruth, who ap-
peared more than ever bewildered by the succession
of events.
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TMAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



  Now, at last, Cicily felt herself baffled by the crisis
of her own making.   She looked from one to another
with reproach in her amber eyes.
  "But -but you cannot expect me to decide be-
tween my guests," she espostulated. There was ap-
peal for relief in the pathetic droop of the scarlet
lips of the bride, but it was of no avail. The coin-
pany asserted with vehemence that she must render
the decision in this unfortunate dilemma.    ...
And, again, the angel of inspiration whispered a so-
lution of the difficulty.  Impulsive as ever, a radiant
smile cutr-ed lier mouth, and her eyes shone happily.
  " Very well," she yielded. " Since you insist on
putting your hostess in such an unfortunate position,
I decide that it is up to the ladies themselves. Which
one w islhes to take the office, to force herself forward
againlsi the wishles of the other "  She cast a seem-
ingly guileless glance of inquiry first on Mrs. Car-
rington, then on Mrs. Flynn, who simultaneously ut-
tered exclamations of indignation at the imputation
thus laid upc n them.
  Mrs. Carrington was quick to make explicit an-
swer.
  "If the ladies of the club do not desire me to be


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MAKING PEOPLE HAPPY



president, I must decline to accept the office, in spite
of a unanimous vote. If, however-" She broke
off to stare accusingly at her rival, then about
the room in search of encouragement for her
claims.
  Mrs. Flynn took advantage of the opportunity for
speech in her own behalf.
  " Naturally, as a stranger, I hesitate to force my-
self forward, even though my record is such that it is
hard1 to see how any opposition could possibly develop
against me. However-"
  " Of course, Mrs. Carrington is elected," Mrs. Mor-
ton interrupted.
  At the same time, Miss Johnson urged aggressive-
ness on her candidate.
  " Don't back down," she implored. " Remember
the policeman!
  Mrs. Carrington muttered maliciously, as she
caught the words.
  " In view of Mrs. Flynn's record," she began, " I
scarcely feel justificd -" Her mock humility was
copied by Mrs. Flynn on the instant.
  " As a stranger, I cannot force myself
  The presiding officer decided that this was in truth
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MAliKlNG PEOPLE HAPPY



the psychological moment in which to dominate the
situation.
  " Indeed, the chair appreciates the rare quality of
your self-denial," she announced in an authoritative
voice that commanded the respectful attention of all.
" Now, ladies," she co