xt7d7w67453q https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7d7w67453q/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19220211  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 11, 1922 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 11, 1922 1922 2012 true xt7d7w67453q section xt7d7w67453q The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

i

LEXINGTON,

VOL. XII

OLD "KENTUCKY'S"

ATY

No. 16

FEBjRCARY 11, 1922

FIVE

SPEAK TO STUDENTS OF

DEFEATS WASHINGTON
AND

LEE

-

WE

21-2-

3

0

The Wildcats Will Stand
Good Chance to Win
Other Eastern Games

Evangelislic ... Lectures
on
India, China, Japan, the
Near East and Russia

LAVIN TOSES COUNTER

15

Team Receives An Invitation
To Play Series of Games
in Cuba
In one of the most spectacular games
of the present season the University of
Kentucy Basketball Team won the first
of the four games scheduled on the eastern trip when it defeated the Washington and Lee Quintet at Lexington, Va.,
last Wednesday evening by a 21 to 20
score.

This is the second defeat of the Generals this season the other lone defeat
being rolled up by the strong West Virginia Team. According to dope this
victory over Washington and Lee makes
the wearers of the Blue and White stand
in remaining
a mighty good chance
games to be played on this trip. The
pass work of the Wildcats in the Washington and Lee tilt was excellent
throughout the game. The score at the
end of the first half was 12 to 9 in Kentucky's favor-- With the score a tie and
just a half minute to play Lavin shot a
foul which gave the Wildcats the winning point. Last year at the Tournament at Atlanta the winning point that
decided the championship of the south
was made under similar conditions with
just a minute left to play. The results
of the Washington and Lee game shows
that the wearers of the Blue and White
still have the old "pep" and nerve that
led them to victory in 1921.
Wildcats Will Go to Cuba
That this sort of reputation will soon
spread was amply demonstrated last
Tuesday afternoon by the telegram received by Director S. A. Boles from the
The
Cuban Athletic Club of Havana.
telegram states that the club is anxious
to arrange a series of games with the
Kentucky Quintet and reads as follows:
"Can you arrange a basketball series
at Havana, leaving New Orleans March
11 and returning March 27. We will pay
Cuban Athletic
expenses for ten men.
Club, Havana."
Whether or not this offer is accepted
rests with the Athletic Council, but the
offer shows how the Wildcat Bnsketeers
are regarded in athletic circles everywhere.
Thursday evening the Wildcats will
Quintet also of
clash with the V. M.
Lexington, Virginia and the Cadets are
expected to put up a strong fight with
The records of both these
Kentucky.
teams for 1921 are not greatly unlike.
The Cadets played seventeen games last
season suffering only ono defeat, while
the lone blemish onthe"Kentucky"record
for 1921 was the defeat of Centre. With
these facts in mind both teams aro expected to put up a bitter struggle to determine the supremacy.
Following tho V. M. I. game the Wildcats will journey to Washington, D. C,
whero they will meet the Basketball
I- -

Tho
College.
Team' of Georgetown
Georgetown College Quitet is reputed to
bo unusually strong this season having
registered victories over Pittsburg, Ynlo,
North Carolina and V. P. I. and will
undoubtedly put up a steep struggle to ro

(Continued on page 10)

YEARS OF SERVICE

Mr. Eddy has been International Committee Secretary
of Asia 9 years.

"The new Men's Dormitory at the University of Kentucky is the finest building of its kind in the whole
State " said Mr. A. 0. Whipple, superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. forty-on- e
feet wide by one hundred
It is a four story brick building with reinforced concrete floors
The total cost of buildings
eighteen feet long. It is absolutely fire proof and has all modern conveniences.
and equipment was $155,000.
The dormitory was to have been opened Monday Feburary 6th, but due to delay in the arrival of the funiture
no definite date can be set for the opening. It has accomodation for one hundred men. This year all rooms have
men, in accordance to the law passed last year by the Genral Assembly of Kentucky.
been reserved by

AT

EIGHTY SEVEN NEW
LEGISLATURE STUDENTS ENROLLED

toward the
converting of one of the Patterson Hall
parlors into a reading room for the girls.
During the war a fund was started, by
the girls, to be used for making some
permanent improvement of Patterson
Hall. This has been added to until the
sum has reached two hundred dollars and
sometime in the near future the dream
of the girls will be brought to a delightful realization.
French doors, built in book cases, a
long window seat with cushions, a library table, comfortable chairs and floor
lamps will make of one of the bare formal parlors a cheerful, homelike reading

Eighty seven new students enrolled at
the University of Kentucky during the
first part of the week, for the second
semester and the old students that
COMMERCEJUESDAY
classified brought the total enrollment
up to 1559. Many of the old students
Depart- took advantage of the matriculation last
week and avoided the rush of Monday.
Unique and
Studies were resumed Tuesday morning and classes were attended as though
there had been no break between the
WE WELCOME
first and second semesters. Lessons were
assigned as usual.
"Between-U- s
Day"
Cinderella" An The semi-annu"A
was observed Tuesday at the regular
Will
Allezarical
chapel hour and President McVey spoke
Be Given
to the students and faculty on UniverAn invitation has been extended the sity problems.
Kentucky Legislature to be the guest of
the Lexington Board of Commerce for a
Valentine party to be given at the La- INTERESTING
fayette Hotel on Tuesday, February 14 at
6:30 o'clock. A committee of students
OF PLAYLETS TO BE
and faculty from the University of Kentucky will cooperate in arranging an
entertainment whichwill follow the ban- GIVEN IN LITTLE THEATRE
quet.
A unique program and elaborate decor-

READING
ROOM
PATT. HALL
Work

will

soon begin

room.

WILDCATS ADD SCALP
OF TIGERS

TO THEIR

BELT OF VICTORIES

Fastest and Most Sensational Game Ever Played on
Georgetown's Floor
SCORE

IS 26 TO 17

Aspirants to State Championship are Shown New
Style of Play.
Last Monday evening the Wildcat
Basketball Squad defeated the Tiger
Quintet on tho Tigers' homo floor by
exactly the same score that tho wearers
of the Gold and Black were able to run
up on Kentucky in tho first gnmo of the
In ono of tho strongest conseason.
tested battles ever fought in tho
tho Wildcats
Georgetown gymnasium,
amply demonstrated that they were far
below par in tho first tilt with George
town and incidentally lulled to a quiet
sleep the high hopes that had been held
by Georgetown to cop tho stuto chain
piouship this season.
Tho Tigers started tho game with a
(Continued on page

10)

GUESTS

OF

BOARD

OF

14

Journalism and Art
ment Plan
Pleasing Program

YOU

Kentucky

Playlet

PROGRAM

sell

ations are being planned under the Professor
and
of the Journalism and Art DeKnight to be Directors
partments. Some members of the University faculty have written an unusual
STUDENTS TAKE PART
and most entertaining allegorical plaplet
which will be produced by the students.
This feature, "A Kentucky Cinderella" This Year's Program to Surpass The One of Last Year.
will have a selected cast of marked abilMiller
Mamie
ity, including Misses
The Little Theatre of The University
Woods, Sue Chenault, Elizabeth
t, of Kentucky
Adelaide Longest, Jeanette
is planning a
for 1921-2- 2
Myrtyo Clare, Allene Lemons, Ida most interesting program. New features
Kenny Risk, Nell Hanks, Lucile Hutchin- of tho littlo Theatre Movement which
son, Ruth Gorman, Carlyle Chenault and have heretofore not been attempted by
Mrs. Cecil Heavrin. Many other bewitch- tho Universities' Playhouse will be given
will also have a part in enter- this year. More difficult and heavier
ing
taining the visitors. Another novel pre- roles will be presented, and n different
sentation will be a Marionette perform- style of dramatic material will bo emance. The stage, settings, and plays have ployed. A full electric equipment has
been constructed by Mrs. Thomas Young. been installed and new scenery hns been
Other features of entertainment will be provided.
The first principal bill for the year will
an address by somo eminent educator,
music by tho University orchestra, num- be tho dramatization of tho best modern
bers by tho Glee Club, skits, songs and stories by Dean Frances Jewell's class in
play writing. This promises to be a
tableaux'
Very effective decorations will adorn rare treat to Theatre goers and lovers
Tho motif to bo carriud of tho art of tho drama. Tho students
tho
out is a combination of tho Kentucky have dramatized these best stories with
great skill and elYiciency and have re
Stato shield and Valentine hearts.

Mike

auspices

Lam-per-

co-e-

ball-roo-

(Continued on pago

10)

(Continued on pago

10)

Sherwood Eddy, one of the greatest
student 'speakers connected with the
Y. M. C. A. is coming to the University
of Kentucky March 3, 4 and 5 to give a
series of Evangelistic lectures. This
is one of the greatest opportunities that
the University has had along this line
for Mr. Eddy brings a message for everybody and is well worth hearing.
Sherwood Eddy, now a world figure in

Christinn leadership, was graduated at
Yale in 1891. He went to India in 1896
at his own expense- After fifteen years
of work among the students of the Indian
Empire, he was called to be Secretary for
Asia for the International Committee of
the Young Men's Christian Association.
Nine years of service in this capacity
among the students and officials of India,
China, Japan, the Near East and Russia
have been characterized by the brilliance,
energy, judgment and devotion so
singularly combined in this man.
-

In
with

1912-191- 3

Mr. Eddy was engaged

Dr. John R. Mott

in conducting
meetings for students throughout Asia.
In June, 1914, Mr. Eddy returned to
China for an extended campaign among
the students and official classes there.
Notwithstanding the war, the audiences
that year averaged 3,000 a night. In
Hongkong, for instance, 4,000 students
and business men attended, and it was
necessary to hold three meetings in three
successive hours in one of the largest
theaters in the city to accomodate the
crowd. The officials of China from the
President and
down to the
governors and local officials received Mr.
Eddy, many of whom sent out officinl
proclamations of the meetings. During
the early years of the war, Mr. Eddy was
with tho British army in France, and
during the closing years on the American,
British and French front. Since the
signing of the armistice his regular work
hns taken him across Asia, including
Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Mesopotamia and
Turkey, through tho stricken countries of
Europe, and round tho world- - His twenty-four
years of service in lands abroad
have fitted him to deal in truer perspective with the present world situation as a moral challenge to America.
In years filled with untiring activity,
time has been found for useful authorship; beginning with his "Supreme Incision" there followod his books on "The
Awakening of India," "Tho New Era in
Asia," "The Students of Asia," "With Our
Soldiers in France," "Tho
Right to
Fight," and his latest book "Everybody's
World," interpreting present conditions
in Japan, China, India, the Near East and
Russia, showing America's relation to
present world problems.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
You'W Find The College Girl

The College Boy At The

Ben Ah Theatre

Strand Theatre
"The Bett in Moving Picture"

"High-Cl-

an

"Voduii" of 6 Big Acte"

Dr and Mrs. E. C. Elliot entertained
Wednesday

CAMPUS
CHATTER

evening at

the

Lafayette

with a delightful dinner party honoring
Dr. E. G. Ireland who is to leave soon for

Hartford, Conncticut, where he is to beof Physical
The Faculty Good Time Club will en- come State Commissioner
tertain with n valentine dnnce in Dicker Education and Health. For the yast
Hnll, Saturday evening at 8:30
year and n half, Doctor Ireland has been
Miss Lowe is chairman of the commit-teiissistnnt professor of Hygiene and physiOther members of the committee
cian at the University.
arc, Misses Virginia Anderson and Ruth
Those present were: Dr. and Mrs. P.
Elliot, Professor Harvey Hincks and
K. Holmes, Doctor Ireland, Misses PaulGrant C. Knight.
ine Wherry, Tillio Grcathouse, Vivian
Invitations have been sent out in the
MofTctt and Dr. and rs. C. E. Elliot.
form of little red hearts on which a
beautiful little verse by Mrs. Stoughton
Pansy Myers, senior in the college of
A. Fletcher is given:
Arts and Ssiences, was elected president
Will You come to our party
of the Philosophian Literary Society for
We've a welcome most hearty
the present semester, at a meeting of the
With the love of St. Valentine's Day.
society Wednesday evening at Patterson
You will find hearts galore
Hall.
When you open the door,
Other officers elected were: Bable Ruth
So be ready to dance or to play.
Katherirfe Hanly,
Coates,
The date you will see
secretary; Mary Stallings, treasurer;
Eleventh of February,
Eliabeth Snapp, literary critic; and
At 8:80 in Old Dicker Hall
Lucile Bush sergeant at arms.
Come prepared to stay late
At St. Valentine's fete,
Hot What kind of a girl is she?
In whose honor we're giving this ballDog I can't quite figure. When I arWe're the Club of the Faculty
rived she was reading Squirrel Food,
Good Times
but when I left she wouldn't even kiss
Who invite you with all these gay
me good night.
rhymes.
c.

-

The above is a reproduction of the dia-

The Lafayette

mond studded gold key to be awarded
to the honor student of the economics

department. The winner of the key is
named by the faculty, and the key is
awarded by the International Fraternity
of Delta Sigma Pi. The award is given
in favor of the student holding the high
est general average grade for the entire
course, and no especial weight is given
for work in economics. The key is open
to both women and men, and does not
carry with it membership in the fraternity awarding it. It is the only award
made exclusively to seniors
in the
Economics Department, and bids fair to
become one of the most coveted prizes
of the University. Mr. Paul P. Cooper,
Assistant in the Department of Economics and headmaster of Eta Chapter
of Delta Sigma Pi won the key last year.
Soph. "Where is the clutch in a car?"
Frosh. "On the back seat."
d
Where does Sir Oliver Lodge?
Bright Student The same place where
Ouija Boards Panther.
Co-e-

y

"Where The Student is Always Welcome"
L. B. SHOUSE Pres. and Gen. Mgr.
L. B. Shouse, Jr.

Wm. Beasley
ASST. MGR.

The big or little
company which?

BECKER'S

TK7HEX the talk turns to where should a
'

t

J

start work, a question arises on
which college men naturally take sides.
"You'll be buried in the big company," say
some. ' 'Everything is red tape and departments working against each other."
"Your little company never gets you anywhere," others assert. "The bigger the
company the bigger your opportunity."
And that seems true but in a different
sense. Not physical size but bigness of purpose
should be our standard for judging an industrial organization just as it is forjudging a man.
with
AY here will you find this company
a vision?
Whether its plant covers a hundred acres
or is only a dingy shop up three flights is on
the face of it no indication of what you want
to know is such and such a company more
concerned with developing men and ideas than
boosting profits at the expense of service?
You must look deeper. What is the organization's standing in the industry ? What do
its customers say? What do its competitors say?
There are industries and there are companies
which offer you every opportunity to grow.
Spiritually they are as big and broad as the
earnest man hopes to build himself. If you
are that kind of man you will be satisfied with,
a company of no lower standards.
Conversely, it you are working lor sucn a
company, the very fact will argue
you yourself are a man worth while. For
that
in business as in social life a man is known by
the company he picks.

CLEANERS THAT SATISFY

V V fellow

PHONE

621-- Y

Boys:
DON'T FAIL TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR

Clearance Sale

Semi-Annu- al

NOW IN PROGRESS
SOCIETY BRAND AND STYLEPLUS CLOTHES
GREATLY REDUCED
BIG REDUCTIONS IN ALL OTHER

DEPARTMENTS

big-soul-

Published in
the interest ofEteC'
trical Development by
an Institution that will
be helped by what-evhelps the
Industry.

ASST. MGR.

'

The electrical industry needs men who can
see far and think straight.

'estetn Electric C0mpany
An organization which holds for its
ideal the hope that it may measure up
to the aspirations of those who work
in it.

R. S. THORPE & SON
Incorporated

West Main St. at Mill

Lexington, Ky

ADA MEADE THEATRE
Superior Photoplays Properly Presented
Home of First National Attractions
Continuous From 1 to 11 P. M.
Correct Musical Settings on the New $10,000
Roberts Norton Organ

* 1

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

ORPHEUM THEATRE

Continuous Performance, 10 a. m., to 11 p. m. THREE PICTURES (Changed
Every Day) Personally Selected, so that the variety is sure to please everyone.
Courteous Attention; (Best of Order. "Go Where The Go's Go.")

MEET ME AT THE

7?iS:
mem;

Laiaseile Millard nail, For Gennenen

t?H2,fHTS!feL

xreing me umy muies ujl una iaic uusigu
in the City. A Game of "Billards", or "Pocket-Billiardswill be Enjoyed, as we permit nothing
",

but perfect order.

4AAAAAAAAAAA4AA44AAA4AAAAAAAAAAAA4AAAAAA4
AAAAA AAAAAA AAA Thursday afternoons

at

3:30.

Society

According to plans which have been
mndc recently each one of the sororities
will have charge of the Sunday night
program for the Y. W. C- - A. at Patterson
AAAAAAAAAAAA((AAAAAAAAAAii
LITTLE FLOWER GARDEN
Hall. The dates for theso programs arc
The Botany Department under the as follows:
February 12 Alphn Gramma Delta.
direction of Professor F. T. McFarland,
is planning a dnhlia garden in the power
February 19 Kappa Kappa Gamma
plant court. There will be a variety of
March 5 Kappa Delta.
flowers, with dahlias as the prominent
March 12 Alpha XI Delta.
March 2G Chi Omega.
feature of the garden. The entire space
of the court will be used.
The old power plant will probably be
Miss Annette Martin, daughter of Mr.
shaded with the tropical castor bean and Mrs E. L. Martin, Lexington, and a
plant, which grows to be about fifteen graduate in Home Economics, class of '14
feet high, and has gigantic leaves four of the University died at St. Joseph's
or five feet across. These plants are of Hospital. Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock,
various colors, black stem, red and pur- while undergoing a slight throat opera
ple stem, leaves mostly green or red.
tion. Death came as a result of heart
of the
Also, in connection with the work of attack caused by the effect
the Botany Department, there is an anaesthetic, physicians in charge said.
Miss Martin is an alumna of Kappa
acre of ground south of the new Chemistry building, which has been plowed and Delta fraternity at the University, where
about a hundred different kinds of she was popular with the faculty and
grasses have been planted- - The hope student body. Her death is a great shock
is to make a large grass garden out of it to the members of her family and her
and the object of the garden is to afford many friends. She was also a graduate
opportunity to carry on innoculation ex- of Hamilton College and took a masters
periments to determine the relationship degree at Columbia University, New
York. She taught domestic science for
of the various ergots.
It is quite likely that the swamp be a year in the Lexington public schools
tween White Hall and the football
and held a similar position in Louisville
field will be converted into a botanical
Besides her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E
garden in the near future.
L. Martin, she is survived by two brothers and two sisters, Dr. Curry Martin of
Books which have been in demand Baltimore and Allen Martin of Lexinglately in the University library are: ton, Miss Grace Martin and Mrs. H. R.
"Woodrow Wilson as I Know Him" by Douglas of Lexington.
Joseph R. Tumulty, Burns, Mantle's
"A Biography of
During the past week seven graduates
Best plays of 1020-21,- "
Richard Mansfield," "An Autobiograyhy and a former student of the College of
'"of E. H. Southern."
Law visited Judge Lafferty and other
Amone other new books are: "The friends In the department Of the group
Three Soldiers," a novel by Dos Pasos two are County attornies and one is aswhich was recently criticized in the sistant librarian at the Law Library of
Literary Digest. It is a war story which Cincinnati.
paints a very gloomy picture between the
Miss Rebecca Parritz of the class of
officers and private soldiers. "A Story 19 who is now assistant librarian at the
of Mankind" by Van Loon, designed for Law Library of Cincinnati recently took
the upper grades, begins with the forma an examination for admission to the bar
tion of the sun, moon, metals and uni in the State of Ohio before the State
verse. The book is very closely com Commission. The class which took this
pared with Well's "Outline of History." examination was composed of 184 appli"In A New entury," a book of popular cants which numbered among its memessays on social subjects by Edwards S. bers students of the leading colleges and
Martin, "The East and the West," which universities of the country. Out of this
tells of India, China,and Japan, by Price class of 184 applicants 90 passed and 94
Collier, and a book of travel in Scotland, failed. Miss Parritz's standing was 84.3
beautifully illustrated, entitled "Over the per cent which was considerable above
Border" by William Winter, are book the 75 percent necessary to pass. In
which will be catalogued in a few days this list of failures were representatives
and be ready for circulation.
of the biggest schools In the country.
Among those who visited the departTwo new books on evolution which
the library has recently receives are: ment were: Will C. Hoskins, '17, Hayden,
"The Theory of Evolution" by Scott, and Ky. who is now practicing law at Hayden
"Man and His Ancestor" by Morris.
and is County Attorney. W. C. Benton,
Other books which have been in do 21, Winchester, Ky. who is practicing
mand recently on the same subject are: law at Winchester with his father Judge
"Theology of an Evolutionist" by Lyman Benton. E. C. Purycar, '19, Paducah, Ky.
Abbott, "The Evolution of Christianity
by Lyman Abbott, Draper's "Conflict Be
White's
tween Reigion alnd Science,"
"History of Warfare of Science With
"History of Fredom of
Theology,"
Thought" by Bury, "The Bible of Nature"
by J. Arthur Thompson, "World Power
and Evolution" by Huntington and
,
"Social Evolution" by Chapin.

who is practicing law with his father at
Paducah. E. A. Cole, '21, Lexington, Ky.
F. L. Elchelberger, '16, Covington, Ky.
who Is practicing law at Covington. Miss
Rebecca Parritz, '19, Cincinnati, Ohio

who is now assistant librarian at the
Law Library of Cincinnati. Raymond
Connel, '21, Paris, Ky. who is practicing
law with Judge Dundon, at Paris, and
L. C Flournoy, Jr. Morganfield, Ky. who
Attorney at Morganfield.
"Miss Caroline Sharpe, Sgcretary of the is County
University Y. W. C. A., was called to her
Pennsylvania, An interesting feature of the week was
home at Wilkes-BarrSunday by the death of her mother.
the lecture given in Chapel, Tuesday,
The faculty and students of the Uni- February 7, at 3:45 by Mrs. B. Frank
versity wish to extend to Miss Sharpe Mebane, on the "Balkans and France."
their deepest sympathy
Mrs. Mebane, a native North Carolinian,
volunteered just after the armlstlco to
go into relief work In Serbia. Her talk
Band Practice changed to Wednesday
Orchestra Prac which was a narration of the events that
afternoons
tice Monday and Friday evenings 7:30. took place from the time when she left
The Glee Club Boys are getting down New York until Bhe had again landed In
to real honest work for their tour of America was both interesting and inpart of the State. Professor Carl A. structive.
In prefacing her remarks Mrs. Mebane
Xampert earnestly desires every member
to be out for practice on Tuesday and stated that Bhe did not wish to make a
e,

3:30-5:3-

war talk but merely to tell of the wonderful work of the little country of
Serbia and of the Queen of Roumnnin,
whom she had the pleasure of meeting.
"Serbia" said Mrs. Mebane, "stands like
a gateway between the East and the
West. It is tho guardian of civilization.
Hcnco in 1914 when tho angry hordes of
warriors swept across the little country,!
they laid bare all the fields and raided
all the houses for miles around. It was
Serbia that dealt tho first blow against
tho Central Powers and at Christmas of
1914 there were 70,000 Austrian prisoners

of Queen Mario and showed a number of
pictures which she had collected on her
trip. Tho lecture was preceded by a
violin selection by Jcancttc Lamport,
accompanied by Mrs. Lampcrt.
Following tho program tea was served
in the office of President McVcy. Mrs.
Farquhar and Mrs. Lampert presided at
the ten table and were assisted by

R. W. SMOCK
Formerly With Caskcy Jewelry Co.

Careful Watch Repairing
SATISFACTION

GUARANTEED

"WATCH YOUR WATCH"

PHONE 2682
Daisy Lee Tinslcy, Anne
LEXINGTON, KY.
Alma Hutchcn, Catherine Hcn-dri157 SOUTH LIME
Buchignani,
Mabel
Theresa
ReDaugherty and Eva Congleton.
ceiving with the guest of honor were
A Serbian knows how to Mrs. McVey, Miss Louise Webb, Miss
in Serbia.
& BROMLEY
fight and how to die but he does not Frances Jewell, Miss Frances Marsh,
know how to retreat."
Professor and Mrs. Zembrod. About one
Mrs. Mebane also told of her presentaCleaning and
hundred guests were present.
tion to Queen Marie and King Ferdinand
who is
Marie
Queen
of Roumania
The radio room In the Civil and
throughout Europe for her
known
152 S. LIMESTONE STREET
beauty is gracious, charming and ex- Physics Building Is being repaired, and
tremely popular with all her subjects. painted and a new receiving set installed.
PHONE 1550-- Y
King Ferdinand, a linguist of seven Workers have been installing this set
September.
Several new
since early in
tongues, is also a universal favorite.
QUALITY AND SERVICE
Mrs. Mebane was attractively gowned pieces have arrived and the work will
in a Romanian peasant costume, the gift soon be completed.
Misses

PARRISH

Pressing

Dry

From A Faint Blue Glow
To Modern Miracles
FDISON saw it first a mere shadow of blue light streaking across the
terminals inside an imperfect electric lamp. This "leak" of electric current, an obstacle to lamp perfection, was soon banished by
removing more air from the bulbs.
But the ghostly light, and its mysterious disappearance in a high
vacuum remained unexplained for years.
Then J. J. Thomson established the electron theory on the transmission of electricity in a partial vacuum and the blue light was
understood.
In a very high vacuum, however, the light and apparently the currents that caused it disappeared.
One day, however, a scientist in the Research Laboratories of the
General Electric Company proved that a current could be made to pass
through the highest possible vacuum, and could be varied according to
fixed laws. But the phantom light had vanished.

Here was a new and definite phenomenon

a basis for further

re-

search.
Immediately, scientists began a series of experiments with far reachtube, known as the Coolidge
ing practical results. A new type of y
tube, soon gave a great impetus to the art of surgery. The Kenotron
and Pliotron, followed in quick succession by the Dynatron and Magnetron, made possible long distance radio telephony and revolutionized
radio telegraphy. And the usefulness of the "tron" family has only
X-ra-

begun.

The troublesome little blue glow was banished nearly forty years
ago. But for scientific research, it would have been forgotten. Yet
there is hardly a man, woman or child in the country today whose
life has not been benefited, directly or indirectly, by the results of
the scientific investigations that followed.
Thus it is that persistent organized research gives man new tools,
makes available forces that otherwise might remain unknown for
centuries.

GeneralElectric
Company
General Ottce

Schenectady, N. Y.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
his letter in basketball, track, and bnsi-bal- l.
mcndntlons heard throughout the semester of Improved moral conditions on the
It has been rumored nbout the campus
tlir campus and in vnrious student organil'u Million tvcry I'rIJ.xy UiioukIioui
Col rue ycnr liy the Militant lioily of
zations. Not withstanding the fact thnt thnt George has received offers from
t lie Dnlverolly
of Kentucky,
quite n number of students have failed other institutions but It Is hoped he will
The KHilUcky Kernel Is tliu oltllclnl tiown-)in- ir of ndequate standing, reports come from remain here.
nl tlio aluilfiila nml alumni of the
UnlverMty of Kentucky.
mnny sources that class work upon the
9iilifirrlition, One Dolliir uml I'lfty IVnt
SENIORS NOTICE
whole has been admtrnblc.
it Yrur.
I'lu Ontn Hie Copy
Let us enter the new semester with
..There is ntill nbout fifteen percent
at I.exliiRton 1'ontolllco as ccon'l-clnnKntercil
courage nml determination and mnkc it
of the senior clnss who arc deliniiuill mutter
quent In the payment of their clnss
the best In our University life.
Kdltorln-chle- f
dues. Unless they mnkc payment to
GERALD GRIFFIN, '22
BUCHHE1T A WIZARD
the trensurer by the 18th of February,
Phone 4085-2- 1 17-their names will be turned into the
George Buchhelt, tho n bulwnrk of
Managing Editor
Student council, published in the
strength to the foot bnll advisory staff,
subsequently ejected
Kernel, nnd
IRENE MCNAMARA '23
has been In his clement since the herald2117-Phones 24
from school.
The engineering coling in of the bnskctball season.
Since
lege Is nenrly lOO, the Ag. college
the advent of this smiling mentor athAsst. Managing Editor
the Arts nnd Scicnsc College
letics have been given a newer and a
John A. Whltnkcr
75r , nnd the Law College nbout
cleaner impetus.
2117-JOS. J. SLOMER, Trcas.
Phones 2255-Buchhelt came to Lexington two years

ThL Kt MUCKY KERNtL

90,

ASSOCIATE EDl'i'UKS
Keen Johnson '22
II. A. Taylor '23
SPOUT EDITORS
EMM ITT BRADLEY

News dditor
KAT1IKIUNK

rONKOY

'23

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
William Williams '23
BUSINESS

MANAGER

Burton Pfewitt '22
ADVERTISING MANAGER
L. B. Hall '23
CIRCULATION MANAGER"
Gleen Tinsley "22

Reporters
iohn AlbrlKht '2S
AfTle Hammnml '23

Cixon Davidson '24
MHTKaret Ounn '24
Kuth ituuhson '23
Georple I.ee Murphy
AiU.llne .Vnnn '22
Eiiftene Moore '2fl

Mary Royster
Elizabeth Ellis''
Hawsle Knox
Anmmlii Forkner '
Elfcle Hache
Marparet I.avln '
.1. It. McClure
Emmett Bradley '

FEBRUARY 11, 1922
LOOKING

FORWARD

The second semester of the University
opens
of Kentucky session of 1921-2- 2
under happy auspices notwithstanding a
number of untoward incidents that, for
the last several months, have tended to
bring the institution into the limelight
in a very critical way.
With figures incomplete the Kernel
understands that the student body for
the current semester will be numerically
as large virtually as it was the preceed-in- g
semester with a substantial number
of students entering
As we stand upon the threshold of the
new semester it might not be inappropriate to take a brief retrospective glance
at the period just closed and a perspective of the one we are entering. The
Kernel wishes to congratulate the faculty
and student body upon the excellent
and mutal underspirit of
standing that seems to exist at this time
with more emphasis than the University
has hitherto experienced.
Notwithstanding the fact that the University has been under fire of severe
criticism by persons assuming to believe
that it is giving instruction with the
purpose of confusing the student mind in
matters of faith and religion, the Uni
versity of Kentucky has borne itself
with becoming dignity and has, we believe attracted friends it may not have
had otherwise. Although economic conditions in the state are not such as to
guarantee possibility of adequate Unis
it
versity appropriation,
is apparent that the Legislature desires
to supply every dollar of funds for its
use that it can possibly properly devote
to it. In the meantime the institution
mid-yea- r.

ago last fall and has gntceously worked
himself to the highest pinnncle of success
through his
in his coaching capacity
personality and his ability to show how
things should be done.
Two years ago