xt7d7w674572 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7d7w674572/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 18931894 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Catalogue of the State College of Kentucky, Volume 3 (1893-1894) text Catalogue of the State College of Kentucky, Volume 3 (1893-1894) 1893 2012 true xt7d7w674572 section xt7d7w674572 t I `
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•

 T  A CATALOGUE M
     
W ?
   ° OF Tm; E
    STATE COLLEGE  
  ii E
    OF KENTUCKY
  FOR ’
 T A
§ _ _ 1893=1894.

 , L
 I n
I
 
PRESS OF THE
TRANSYLVANIA PRINTING COMPANY,
LEXINGTON, KY.
-
I
I
, 1  ’ ··

 Contents.
PAGE.
BoARn OF TRUSTEES .... . . A......................... . ..... T
FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION ................................. 8 `
OFFICERS OF THE EXPERIMENT STATION ................. 10
THE COLLEGE ..........................,................... 13 .
History .................................A........... . 13 `
Location .....,........................................ 14
Grounds. .............`................................ 14
Buildings .... . ......................................... 17
Traveling Expenses of Students ....................... 18
College Expenses .............i........... . .......... 19 .
Boarding ........... . ................. . ............... 20
Beneiiciaries ........................,................. 20
Appointees to the Normal (Pedagogy) Course. ......... 21 ·
Student Labor ....i,.................................. 22 .
V Gertiiicates of Character ................. . ........... 22
Departments (in alphabetical order). .... . ............ 22-46
Agriculture. Horticulture and Botany. ....... L .... 23
Anatomy and Physiology .........................i 27
Chemistry . .......................i....,.......... 27
. . Civil Engineering and Physics ..............,..... 3]
English ................ . ......... _ ................. 32
Geology and Paleontology. ...............,...   . 33
German and French ..,... . ........................ 35
_ History and Political Economy .................... 35
Latin and Greek .................................. 36
Mathematics and Astronomy ..................,... 36 ~~
Mechanical Engineering .......................... 30
Metaphysics and Moral Philosophy ................ 40
Military Science and Tactics ...................... 40
Pedagogy (The Normal School).. .................. 40
The Academy (Preparatory) ................. . . . . 41
Veterinary Science ........ . ....................... 45
Zoology and Entomology ..........l.......... . .... 45
Degrees ............................................... 46
. (   -5  —  » I.

  ' 6 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
CCLLEGIATE CCURSES OF STUDY (in alphabetical order)- ~l9—105 _
Agriculture ........ . ..................l............... 50
Biology. .............................................. 56
A Chemistry. ................. . ......................... 66 `
Civil Engineering ...... . .........................,.... 71
Classical (Ancient Languages). .,......,...,........... 7-1 Z
Mechanical Enginee1·ing ........ . .................... 76 ‘
Pedagogy (Normal School) ............................ 93
Sciencen .............................................. 98 _
Veterinary Scic-11ce.. .................................. 100 I
Special Course of Agricultural Lectures .... . .......... 105
ACADEMY (PREPARATORY) COURSES OF STUDY ............ 106 3
BUSINESS COLLEGE COURSE OF STUDY ..... . ............ 108 j
LIST OF STUDENTS FOR 1893-94 ....,.............,......... 111-126 I
. GRADUATES OF 1894 .............. . ............ . .......... 112 ·
CALENDAR FOR 1894-95 ..... . ...................,.......... 127
‘ COLLEGE DIRECTORY ...... . ........................... . .... 128
1
1

 Board of Trustees.
V Chairman Ex=0filci0.
HIs EXCELLENCY, Gov. J oHN YoUNG Buowu.
— Secretary,
L HART GIEsoN.
.JUDGE P. P. JOHNSTON., . ................... Fayette County.
l DR. R. J. SPURR .............................. Fayette County. `
4 PHILEMON BIRD, Eso ........................ Shelby County.
 V HON. R. A SPURR ............................ Fayette County.
O DAVID H. .l`AMEs, Esq ....................... Fayette County. I
I JUDGE Roma RIDDELL.. ..................... Estlll County.
GEN. D. C. BUELL ............................ Muhlenberg County.
J. C. Fr.oU1zNoY, Esq ................. l ,...... Fulton County.
HoN. J. T. GA*rHR1GH·1·. ........ . . .......... Jei’ierson County.
IsAAo WIr.soN, Esq ......................... Nelson County. V
HoN. A. P. GooDING. ............. . .......... Mason County.
HON. XV. F. PEAK ........................... Trimble County. '
DR, J. D. CLARDY. ........................... .Ch¤·istiun County. ‘
JAMES K. PATTERSON, Euqtliein.
Executive Committee. V
_ __ R. J. SPURR, Chui1·1nau.
R. A SPURR.
DAVID H. JAMES.
4 l{.·\R’l‘ GIBSON, Secretary.

 I
Faculty of Instruction. i _
JAMES K. PATTERSON, PH. D., E. S. A., President,  
Professor of History, Political Economy and Metaphysics.
JOHN SHACKLEEORD, A. M., Vice-President. -' 
Professor of English Language and Literature.  »
(Arranged in alphabetical order.)  
F. PAUL ANDERSON, B. M. E., ·  
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. _
‘ S. E. BENNETT, D. V. M.,
i Professor of Veterinary Science.
MRS. LUCY B. BLACKBURN, ~
Assistant in the Academy. _
ROBERT L. BLANTON, M. LIT.,
Assistant in Ancient and Modern Languages.
CHARLES D. CLAY, lst LIEUTENANT, U. S. A.,
Ccmmandant, Professor of Military Science.
J. M. DAVIS, A. B., B. S.,
Assistant in the Academy.
H. GARMAN,
Professor of Zoology and Entomology.
F. M. HELVETI, A. M., ‘
Professor of German and French Languages and Literature.  
J. H. KASTLE, Pu. D.,  
Professor of General, Organic and Agricultural Chemistry. ip
J. LEWIS LOGAN, A. B.,
Assistant in the Academy.
C. W. MATHEWS, B. S.,
Professor of Agriculture. Horticulture and Botany.
ARTHUR. M. MILLER, A. M.,
W Professor of Geology and Paleontology.
n

 STATE CoLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 9 Il"
V. E. MUNCY, B. S.,
 , Assistant in the Academy.
E J. P. NELSON, C. E., M. E.,
  Professor of Civil Engineering and Physics.
' JOHN H. NEVILLE, A. M.,
Professor of Latin and Greek Languages and Literature.
  J. W. NEWMAN, B. S.,
` Assistant in the Normal Department. 4
  WALTER K. PATTERSON,
j Principal of the Academy. y l
 K M. L. PENCE, M. S.,
_  Associate Professor of Civil Engineering.
 ` ROBERT PETER, M. D.,
_ Emeritus Professor of Chemistry. `
. J. W. PRYOR, M. D.,
 V Professor of Anatomy and Physiology.
U RURIC N. ROARK, A. B.,
Principal of the Normal Department and Professor of Pedagogy.
JAMES H. XVELLS, B. M. E., _
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
JAMES G. VVHITE, A. M.,
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy.
  Other Officers.
  MISS MARY HODGES,
 é, Stenographcr.
A J. XV. PRYOR. M. D., ‘
F Surgeon of the Battalion.
RURIC N. ROARK, A. B.,
Secretary of the Faculty.
JAMES G. VVHITE, A. M.,
Business Agent.
. . .11 .  ,~

 Experiment Station of the State College.  "
Board of Control.  Q
DR. R. J. SPURR, Chairman. VQ 
R. A. SPURR. ~
` DAVID H. JAMES.  `
' J. K. PATTERSON, President. of the College. i
M. A. SCOVELL, Director, Secretary. I
Station Officers.
M. A. Scoviann, Director.
A. M. PMP * `
DIMM  Chemiats.
. H. E. CURTIS, 5
H. GARMAN. iintoinoiogiat and Botaniet.
C. VV. )L\'l‘IIE\VS. Horticuiturist.
4 J. S. TJQRRILL, Aesistant to Entoinoiogist and Botanist.
A. T. JORDAN, Assistant to Hortiouiturist. ‘
T. S. HAWKINS. Foreman of Farm.  Q
l\l1SS Amon M. S1»I1·;LBY. Stonograpiier.  
i .
i
.<· %

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 The College.
  History.
  GRICULTURAL and Mechanical Colleges in the United States
  A owe their origin to an act of Congress, entitled "An act donat- 4
 f ing public lands to the several States and Territories which
  may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic,
 E arts," approved July 2, 1862. The amount of land donated was 30,000
  acres for each Representative in the National Congress. Under this
 ` allotment Kentucky received 330,000 acres. Several years elapsed
. befo1·e the Commonwealth established an Agricultural and Mechanical _
i College under the act. When established it was not placed upon an
* independent basis, but was made one of the Colleges of Kentucky Uni- _
versity, to which Institution the annual interest of the proceeds of
the Congressional land grant was to be given for the purpose of
 ‘ car1·ying on its operations. The land-scrip had meanwhile been sold
for fifty cents per acre, and the amount received—$165,000—invested »
in six per cent. Kentucky State bonds, of which the State became
custodian in trust for the College.
The connection with Kentucky Unive1·sity continued till 1878, when ‘
the act of 1805. making it one of the Colleges of said University, was -
repealed, and a Commission was appointed to recommend to the Leg-
islature of 1879-80 a plan of organization for an institution, including
an Agricultural and Mechanical College, such as the necessities of
the Commonwealth required. The city of Lexington offered to the y
Commission (which was also authorized to recommend to the General
V _ Assembly the place, which, all things considered, oliered the best
j and greatest inducements for the future and permanent location of
 [ the College) the City Park, containing iilty-two acres of land, within
 ‘ the limits of the city, and thirty thousand dollars in city bonds for
=* the erection of buildings. This offer the county of Fayette supple-
mented by twenty thousand dollars in county bonds, to be used either
for the erection of buildings or for the purchase of land. The oiiers »·
of the city of Lexington and of the county of Fayette were accepted
by the General Assembly.
By the act of incorporation, and the amendments thereto, constitut-
ing the charter of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Ken-
tucky, liberal provision is made for educating, free of tuition. the
energetic young men of the Commonwealth whose means are limited.
The Normal Department, for which provision is also made, is intended
to aid in building up the Common School system by furnishing prop-
i
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 . z
I 14 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
erly qualined teachers. This College, with the associate departments
which will, from time to time, be opened as the means placed at the
, disposal of the Trustees allow, will, it is hoped, in the no distant
future do a great work in advancing the educational interests of Ken-  ~
‘ tucky. Being entirely unlenominational in its character, it will  
appeal with contidence to the people of all creeds and of no creed, {
and will endeavor, in strict conformity with the requirements  
» of its organic law, to afford equal advantages to all_ exclusive advan-  <
tages to none. The liberality of the Commonwealth in supplement-  g
ing the inadequate annual income arising from the proceeds of the  ‘
land-scrip invested in State bonds, will, it is believed, enable the  
Trustees to begin and carry on, upon a scale commensurate with the  L
wants of our people, the operations of the institution whose manage-  T
ment and oversight have been committed to them by the General ·_
I Assembly of Kentucky. .
, Location. ,
The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky is estab- _
lished in the old Citv Park grounds of the City of Lexington, given ·
to the Commonwealth for this purpose. The site is elevated, and
commands a good view of the city and surrounding country.
Lexington is now the most important railroad center in Kentucky,
being in immediate communication with Louisville, Cincinnati,
Maysville, Chattanooga, and with more than seventy counties in the
Commonwealth. The long established reputation of the city for
A refinement and culture renders it attractive as a seat of learning,
and thc large body of fertile country adjacent, known as the "Blue
Grass Region," with its splendid stock farms, atlords unsurpassed
advantages to thc student of agriculture who desires to make himself
familiar with the best breeds of horses, cattle, shcepandswine in
America. v
Grounds.  
The campus of the College consists of 52 acres of land, located within
the corporate limits of Lexington. The South Limestone street elec-
tric car line extends along the greater part of its western border,
giving opportunity to reach in a few minutes any pa1·t of the
city. The campus is laid out in walks, drives and lawns, and is
planted with a choice variety of native and exotic trees and shrubs to
, which additions are constantly being made. A portion of the land
A has recently been reserved fo1· a botanical garden in which will be
I grown the more desirable native plants, with a view to testing their
adaptability to cultivation, and to give inci·cased facilities to students
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 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 17 I
taking agricultu1·al and biological courses. Two and a half acres
forming the north-east portion of the campus, enclosed and provided
with a grand stand, is devoted to the field spo1·ts of students.
 L About three-quarters of a mile south of the campus, on the Nicholas-
,— ville pike, an extension of South Limestone street, is the Experiment ·
¢· Station Farm, consisting of forty—eight and ahalf acres. Here the
  field experiments of the Station are conducted, and students have
``_  opportunities to witness tests of varieties of field crops, dairy tests,
 ‘ fertilizer tests, fruit spraying tests, in short all of the scientific ex-
`·  perimentation of a thoroughly equipped and organized Station. The
 ' front of the farm is pasture and orchard. The back portion is divided V ‘
“_  off into two hundred one-tenth acre plots, for convenience in making
 g crop tests.
 . Buildings.
. The main college building is a structure of stone and brick. 140 -
»»  feet long and 68 feet in width. It contains the office of the Presi-
dent and of the Business Agent, and on the third floor, counting the ·
basement floor as one, is the Chapel, in which each day the students
and Faculty meet, and in which are held public gatherings and such
other meetings as bring together the entire student body, The re-
maining space in this building is occupied by recitation rooms and by
the society rooms of the students.
The Station building is a handsome structure, well planned for the p
object for which it is made. It is seventy feet in length by fifty-four
feet in width, with a tower projection in front, and an octagonal pro- `
jection eighteen by eighteen on the north side. The building is two
stories high, and has a basement eleven feet from floor to ceiling.
The main entrance is on the nrst floor. on the west side of the build-
ing, through an archway fifteen feet wide. The basement is occupied
in part by the Station and in part by the College. The next floor
V above is devoted to ofiice and laboratory work of the Station, while
 2 the upper floor accommodates the College work in chemistry.
 ' The building devoted to Mechanical Engineering covers altogether
`  ‘¤ an area of about 10,897 square feet, is constructed of stone and pressed
l brick, and is well furnished with modern conveniences for work in
, this branch of engineering. It contains rooms as follows: Recitation
’ room, 3l’><25’; recitation room, 25’><23’; library and exhibition room, `S
25’><2Il’: office 1U’><12’; drawing room, 34’><3%5’; engine room. 20’><3l)’;
tool room, 3<<27’; wood
shop. 80’><2i4’; machine shop, —f2’><35’; blacksmith shop, 35’><335’: foun-
dry, Il5’>(3`i’.
A new brick two—story building has been erected and furnished with
modern conveniences for the work in Veterinary Medicine. `
Two large brick dormitories on the campus afford boarding con-

 y i 18 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
venienees for students wl1o wish to lessen expense in this direction.,
Other buildings on the campus a1·e a brick dwelling for the Presi-
‘ de11t, and a f1·ame cottage at present occupied by one the College
` employes. g
At the Experiment Farm is a brick dwelling occupied by the Direc- '
` tor of the Station, and the usual farm buildings for the care of tools, ,
the protection of stock, and the like.  
Traveling Expenses of Students. ,
By the terms of the recent legislation upon the Agricultural and i
Mechanical College of Kentucky, a county appointee is entitled to ‘
‘ have his traveling expenses from home to the College and return paid
by the College, on the following conditions: I
lst. He must be appointed according to law, a copy of which is.
' in the hands of each County Superintendent of Schools.
2d. He must travel from home to the College by the short-  l
est, least expensive and most expeditious route, and take receipts for
all necessary expenses of travel, depositing the same upon arrival with
the President of the College.
3d. He must present himself for matriculation within one week
after the beginning of the fall term of the collegiate year.
4th. He must bring a certificate of good moral character, signed
· by two or more well known and responsible citizens of his county.
Sth. He must pass creditably the entrance examination required
for admission.
{Sth. He must remain a student of the College for ten consecutive-
months, or one collegiate year r
Tth. He must maintain during the collegiate year such class stand-
ing as will enable him to pass the final examinations at the end of `
the year.  
Sth. He must maintain a good character and maintain such class
standing as the regulations require.
ll at the end of the collegiate year the foregoing conditions have
been complied with, the President of the College shall certify the
fact to the Treasurer of the College, who, upon said certificates as
vouchers, shall pay tothe appointee the amountshown by the receipts
~ aforesaid, and in addition thereto the sum for discharging the neces-
, sary expenses to be incurred in returning home.
l
.. f &

 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 19 VI
Q College Expenses.
J   The necessary expenses of a student while at College need not ex-
_   seed the following estimates. As a rule the less pocket money _ V
 ` allowed by parents or guardians, the better it is for the pupil. When
’ ,  supplies of pocket money are kept short, the opportunity for con-
5  tracting vicious habits is correspondingly diminished. Students
i should not be allowed by their parents to create any debts. All
j moneys intended for the use of the students should be deposited with
ci  the Commandant. {
  For county appointees occupying a room in the dormitory and
» boarding in the common mess, the necessary expenses are as follows: V
,_   Tuition free .............,........................ $000.00 `
  Matriculation free ........................ . ....., 000.00
Room rent free .................................. . 000.00
3  Use of furniture in room. .......... . .............. 2.50 ’
‘ Washing, about ............,..................... 10 00
Uniform .. ............ . .......... .... ..... 19.00 `
Board, 38 weeks, at $2.25 per week ..............., 85.00
Books, about ...............................,..... 8.00
Total ....................................., $125.00 1
Each room must be provided by each occupant thereof, at his Owl?.
expense, with a good mattress, three comforts or blankels, one pillow, -
three pillow-slips, four sheets, looking-glass, blacking-brush, hair- _
brush, clothes-broom o1· brush; some of these articles may be brought
from home by the student.
For students who are not supplied with appointments from the
Legislative Representative Districts of the Commonwealth. and who
board in private families, the necessary expenses will be as follows:
c M Tuition fee ..............,...   .........,.....,,. $15.00
; Matriculation fee. ........,...................... . . 5.00
  Board and lodging, 38 weeks, at $3.50 to $4 per week. 133 00 to $152.00
 1, Washing . .............................,............ 10.00
`_ Books and stationery .............................. .. l0.00
Total. ,....................................... $173.00 to $182.00 ,_
Those who occupy rooms in the dormitory pay $0.50 each (yearly)-
for the use of a room and its furniture. A standing deposit of $5 is
required from each student, which deposit is refunded when his (5011-
nection with the College is terminated, less the amount which may
be assessed against him for the damages done to the buildings, furni-
ture or premises. All damages, injuries. defacements, ete.. which
rooms and furniture in the dormitory sustain during occupancy will
.7 K · I .

 E. 20 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
be charged to the occupants thereof. All injuries, damages, deface-
ments, etc., which the halls and dining-room sustain will, unless spe- ·
vciiically traced, be charged to theoccupants of the respective _sections ,
— collectively.  
l Boarding.  
For the accomodation of students sent as beneficiaries of Legis-  
lative Representative Districts of the State, rooms for one hundred  ;
and forty students are provided in the dormitories. To these good  i
substantial board is furnished at $2.25 per week, payable weekly in  —
advance; but no student under seventeen years of age will be per- V
mitted to 1·o0m in the dormitories, unless all of his classes shall be in
the regular collegiate courses. Good boarding, with fuel, lights and —
furnished room, can be obtained in private families at rates varying s
° from $3.50 to $4 per week.  ;
, The students who board in the dormitories are, for business pur-
poses, organized at the beginning of the collegiate year under a ·
l Chairman and Secretary of their own choice, whose successors are ’
elected on the first Tuesday of each term, and who serve for one term.
At the business meeting held on Tuesday night of each week, the
weekly dues, $2.25, are paid. The boarding department is managed
by a Board cinsisting of the President of the College, the Command-
ant, a Treasurer, who is a member of the Faculty, and into whose
hands all the weekly dues are placed when collected, aSteward,
.a Chairman and a Secretary selected by the students. It will thus
be seen that the boarding department has no official connection with
A the College authorities. The College, as such, does not board the
students, and is in no sense responsible for any debts created by the
boarding department. Two members of the Faculty, in their indi-
vidual capacity, assist in the management of its funds.
No dormitory facilities are provided for women. ,.
Beneficiaries
Each Legislative Representative Dist1·ict is allowed to send, on
competitive examination, one properly prepared student each year, to
this College, free of tuition charge.
Beneficiaries are appointed on competitive examination. A Board
of Examiners is appointed for this purpose by the County Superinten-
dent of common schools. The results of examination are reported to
the Superintendent, who, from the data thus furnished. selects the ap-
i pointcc. Examinations are made upon subjects transmitted to the
. County Superintendent by the Faculty of the College. One appoint-
{ ment is made each year.
- eq &

 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 21 I
B_ Appointments are made by the County Superintendent between.
3- the first day of June and the first day of August of each year.
is Appointments when made should be immediately certified to the
{ President of the College.
' Appointments for the College proper, viz: the Agricultural, Me- ‘
 . chanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Scientific, Classical and
T Veterinary courses are all valid for the term of years necessary to
,_  I complete the course of study in which the appointee matriculates.
E1   This includes the course in the Academy.
d TZ  It follows from the above that a county which makes its appoint-
D   ments regularly according to law will have for the session of 1893-4
,_  ‘ one appointee in the College, for the session of 1894-5 two appointees,
1   for the session of 1895-6 three appointees, for the session of 1896-7 four
1 _  appointees. When the first appointee completes his course, or `
r   ceases to be a student, another appointee takes his place. Vtfhen the
’  · quota of a county is full it will have at least four appointees in regu-
_  if lar attendance. ‘
L ‘ Each appointee is required to pass an entrance examination at the _
_ i College on the subjects comprising all that is embraced in Arithmetic,
J ` English Grammar, Geography and United States? History, in the Com-
T mon School Cou1·se.
i All persons are eligible between the ages of fourteen and twenty- ,
i four who have completed the Common School Courseeprcference be-
ing given to young men or women whose means are 1imited,¤to aid
whom the provision is specially intended. ,
Any person not an appointee may enter the College on payment of _
fees, but no one who is not an appointee receives traveling expenses
or is exempt from payment of fees.
Appointees to the Normal Course.
The law makes provision for the appointment of four teachers, or
V * persons preparing to teach, each year Appointments may be made
and certified to the President of the College between the first day of
  July and the thirty-first of December of each year.
j., Appointments to the Normal School are tenable for one year.
{ Applicants for appointment are examined by a Board of Examiners
appointed by the County Superintendent on subjects transmitted by ,_
- the Faculty, viz: upon Arithmetic, English Grammar, United States’
History and Geogrzqihy. They should not be less than seventeen
years of age. They are also required to pass an entrance examination
at the College. They must likewise bring certificates of good moral
character.
Matriculates in the Normal Department will be required to sign an
obligation to teach in the common schools of Kentucky for as many
months as they receive free tuition.
. 7 @1 I . I I

  ‘_ 22 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
, Student Labor.
· The work necessary for carrying on the agricultural and horticul- 1
tural operations of the College is done by the students, and is paid
’ for at rates varying from six to ten cents per hour. Its design is two- V
` fold: to put in practice the instruction received in the class-room, .
and to assist students who are in need of money. The experience of `
this College is that of Agricultural Colleges generally—that com-  ,
pensated labor is not remunerative to the College
Zhe College holds itself under no obligation to fllrhish compensaled labor  
to students.  —
Students are paid monthly for the services rendered, and apply the l
money as they see proper.  ,
No slzulent, however, should come to this College ea;peet»ing to maintain  -
himseU‘ e.rclusiz·elg by eonzpensutcel labor. Al lens! seventy-jive dollars per ·
‘ cmuum, errluslve of his eurhings uvlzile here, should be at the comnulud of Q
_ every sludenl »u·h0 wishes lo avail himself of the cldrunlclges of the c0mpen— T
suled lubor system. °
1
Certificates of Character. ·
All applicants for admission into any class in the College or Acad— l
emy must bring satisfactory testimonials of good moral character.
Departments.
_ (Arranged in alphabetical order).
The instruction work of the College is prosecuted in departments,
each in charge of a responsible head, who is a member of the Faculty
proper. The seventeen departments at present organized are as
follows: ’
1. Agriculture, Horticulture and Botany.—Prof. Math