xt7d7w674j99 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7d7w674j99/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581216  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December 16, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, December 16, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7d7w674j99 section xt7d7w674j99 UK Students Help Make Christmas Merry
"A Merry Christmas will come
early for several needy families
and groups
of underprivileged
children who perhaps would have
had at best a dismal holiday.
Many UK students will be playing Santa this week to unfortunate children or giving money,
baskets of feed, clothing and toys
to whole families.
Holmes Halt girts were planning
to give nonstnse gifts to each other
when they read of a destitute Harlan County family. The father is
out of wotk because of a mine
shutdown. The Harlan Relief Fund
was contacted and arrangements
made to send money to be used for
grocery buying.
Keeneland Hall residents are collecting clothes, money and canned
goods for a needy Lexington family. The money will be used to
buy a Christmas dinner for this
-

family. Oirls will take
gifts to the family tonight, and
the
then go caroling through the housing project.
.
Jewell Hall is sending a basket of
food, toys and clothing to a needy
family in Lexington.
Boyd Hall residents are planning
to send food and clothing to a
family which they call "The family
to be remembered at Christmas."
The; girls will go caroling afterwards.
The following sororities have had
or plan
Christmas parties this
six-memb-

Richard Vimont will play Sinta at
the 8AF. party.
Wildcat Manor I planniag a
party this evening at Shrloer
Hospital and Cardinal Hill Children's Hospital.
Kappa Sigma will entertain with,
a dinner for children Tonight at
6 p. m. and go carol singing after
wards.
Movies will be shown at the
Zeta Beta Tau party at 7 p. m.
tomorrow. Gifts and refreshment
will be given to the children.
Tomorrow at 5:30 p. m.. Kappi
Alpha will have its party for underprivileged children.
Thl Delta Theta Is planning to
entertain 30 children Thursday

Delta Delta Delta will entertain
Most of the children Invited by
tonight while Kappa the sororities are from Abraham
four children
Alpha Theta goes to the Old Ladles Lincoln School. '
Home. The women will receive
The following fraternities have
gifts and participate in group sing- already, or will hold parties for
ing.
underprivileged children:
Kappa Delta's party will also be
Tau Kappa Fpsllon's party was
tonight with about 20 child- held Sunday afternoon for 15 child
held
ren expected to attend. Te Identity ren from the George Lee Home.
of Santa's representative was not Oames. movies, food and gifts were
disclosed.
available for the children.
Alpha Gamma Rho will have
Dill Hanley will play Santa Claus
to about 22 children at the Alpha their party this afternoon. Walker
Delta Pi House tomorrow night. Thomas Is to be Santa Claus.
Alpha Tau Omega and Delta
Also tomorrow night, Chi Omegas
'
will
entertain about 14 needy Tau Delta will have their parties
tonight. The Delt's Santa is Larry
children.
The third Wednesday night party Kirchdorfer.
will be given by Delta Zeta for 25
About 20 children from Abraham
girls, ages eight to ten. Mrs. Santa Lincoln
School will attend Jhe
Claus will give presents to the Farmhouse party tonight while a
group of children from a colored
children.
Kappa Kappa Gamma expects 25 orphanaee will be entertained and
given gifts by Sigma Alpha Epsiloti.
children tomorrow night also.

er

week.

Alpha Gamma Deltas party for
20 five-yeolds was held Sunday
afternoon. Jim Decs played Santa
Claus.
Nineteen children were present
at the Alpha XI Delta party Sunday afternoon. Zeta Tau Alpha's
party was held Thursday afternoon
ar

"night.

Phi Kappa Taus will go
to
Shriner's Hospital Thursday even
ing with gifts for the children.
(Continued on Page 3)

TT

S

1U

(JNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Vol. L

k

--

1

Bouncing Uillikcn
UK students give the nations TV fans a good show of confiscating
, Saturday afternoon when they captured the head from the St. Louis
mascot. The head was worn by a St. LoiisJJ student but was
captured by UK students and displayed triumphantly.

r'

Phi Beta Kappa Initiates
15 Best Scholars Today
Fifteen seniors and recent UK
graduates will be initiated into
Phi Beta Kappa, honorary scholarship fraternity at 4 p. m. today.
Admission is based on scholastic
achievment.
All
initiates have academic
standings of 3.5 or better, according to Dr. M. A. Hatch, freshman
English head and secretary of Phi
Beta Kappa.
Elected to membership in the
fraternity at a recent meeting of
the Alpha of Kentucky chapter of
riil Beta Kappa were Richard
Roberts, Paducah, economics; Virginia Weissinger, Lexington, philosophy; Helen Wood, Campbells-bur- g,
English.

Tomorrow's Student Congress
election will decide the occupants
of eight of 'the 16 college seats in
the governing body.
There will be several features of
the election which will add to the
color of things. For example, the
race in Ag will find Leroy McMul- -'
lan running against Maitland Rice.
McMuIlan is a member of Alpha
Gamma Rho, while Rice is a member of Farmhouse Fraternity. Both
fraternities are predominantly
agricultural and in past years they
have been In competition in several areas.
Not since 1955, however, have
running
they had candidates
against each other in a student
government election.
Another interesting race will be
in Commerce where Taylor Jones,
one of theNjrganizers of the Campus Party lasts$pring, will be run- -'
ning , against Terry Kuester. a
founder of the Students' Party in

Sydney Smith, Lexington, math;
Charles Cawdod. Middlesboro, pre-meWilliam Mosley, Indianapolis,
English; Nancy Quinn. Louisville,
history; Sam Woodall, Paducah,
topical; Gerald Sullivan, Lexing- 1956.
Kuester served In the otdSGA
ton, anatomy and physiology; Elfrom May, 1956 until Octobefxof
mer Schoenbachler, Louisville, pre-me- d.
last year. Jones was active in ,th
organizing of the Campus Party
John Stoeckinger, Lexington,
zoology; Susan Darnell, Lexington, last May and still serves on the
English; Phoebe Estes, Lexington, main policy making body of the
topical; Max Harris, Paducah, party.
physics, and
Stanley Huffman,
Other races will draw attention
Lexington, anatomy and physiolo- tomorrow. In Engineering, the
gy.
only college having two seats at
The initiation will be held In the stake, a heavy vote is expected.
Music Room of the Student Union The voting is usually heavy in EnBuilding.
gineering because a majority of the
d;

.

.

Hi.

lr8

No.

y

are In or
some time
around Anderson Hall

people

in the college

during the day.
Carleton Godsey and Colin Lewis
of the. Students' Party will face
Dick Watkins and John Bailey of
the Campus Party in tomorrow's
election. Lewis ran in the SC election last May and was defeated by
Tommy King (C). Rep. King goes
out of office early" next month.
The race in Arts and Sciences
finds Rose Billings, Students', running ' against Charlotte Bailey,
Campus. Miss Billings is now in
Student Congress as representative from Alpha XI Delta sorority.
The Arts and Sciences race is
one of the most interesting be- -

FOR SC ELECTION
VOTING PEACES
Aj; Aj Building
A

Journalism IMdg.
Commerce While Hall
&:

S

Educ at inn Ta lor Educa- lion Hldg.

Engineering Anderson I fall
Graduate Journalism Hldg.
Home Fx Home Fx Hldg.
Law Eaffeily Hall
Polls will Ik ojen from
9 a. in. to 1 p. iii. Voting
will he hy ID card.

(Continuerd on Page 3)

Stahr Asks For Funds
From W. Ya. Officials
Stahr Jr., the

president-elec-

t

of faculty personnel.

WestxVirginia University, pleaded
to, statexpfficials last week fcr
lnxpay and number' of
faculty members.
X
President-elec- t
Stahr, according
to a story In the Daily Athenaeum,
West Virginia University newspaper, stressed the prospects of
competl- the "greatest
in-crea-

cut-thro- at

r

OBK Initiates Author Jesse Stuart--'
g
The tag, "regional writer," makes due to "professional and domestic was a
field. He said Chambliss, Whayne Priest, Jack
author Jesse Stuart "feel like a advice," said Dr. Thompson. The special knowledge of the technique Deacon and Rich Roberts.
steer fenced In on a pasture."
author had a heart at- of shaping stories for that "groove," ODK
President Sid Fortney preGreenup County's novelist and tack recently. His recovery is is necessary.
over the Initiation and banshort story writei'made the state- described in his book, "The Year
He advised general writers in- sided
quet. He recited some of the circle's
ment during a
of My Rebirth."
terested in selling stories to netAnswering a question, Stuart works to follow regular short story projects during the past year which
session following his address at the
toOmicron Kappa Delta initiation told how difficult it was to an- form and let experts adapt the Included awarding scholarships
taling $2400 to three UK male stu-

SUhr told the State Board of
Public Works that the future of
West Virginia will drprnd upon the
future of the university. He added,
the University "mast be a university In fact as well as name.
UWVA asked for an operating
budget of $8,167,385 or about $l' j
million more . than the current

year's appropriation.
Stahr told the board the budget
reflected only top priority needs,
and that "all others were deleted
before the budget left Morgan-town- ."
-

high-payin-

question-and-answ-

er

banquet Sunday night.
Stuart Is called a regionalist because his writings usually deal with
eastern Kentuckians. However, his
books are more often translated
into foreign languages than those
of any other Kentucky author, except Thomas Mertons.
Stuart's books are more often
translated than Robert Penn Warren's, pointed out Dr. Lawrence
Thompson, director of UK libraries.
Stuart's formal talk was short,

Mi

Eight Races Featured
In Congress Election
rj
--

r

LEXINGTON, KV., TUESDAY, DEC.

ticipate the lasting value of particular stories. A collection of 21
of his . stories, "Plowshare in
Heaven," was selected from 2C6
that he had written. Twelve of the
stories chosen had never been sold
before publication in the anthology.
Stuart said, however, literature
which is easily understood Is the
literature which lives through the
centuries.
Asked about writing television
scripts, Stuart admitted that it

story for TV viewers.
Stuart answers 25 to 30 letters a
day, he said, adding that he has
learned to avoid committing himself in answering critical letters.'
The author was Initiated Into
ODK as an honorary member Sunday afternoon at the First Presbyterian Church. Dr. R. II. Weaver,
distinguished professor of Arts and
Sciences,
installed as an ODK
faculty member.
Student
initiates were Bob

dents, providing uniforms for the
Cosmopolitan Club soccer team,
which represents UK against other
schools and giving radios and
magazines to the infirmary.
Seventy-fou- r
student and faculty
ODK members and their wives and
bandates attended the
quet. Vice President Frank Peterson gave the invocation and Dr.
Maurice Clay. ODK faculty advisor,
gave the benediction.

The president-elec- t
said 19
per rent of the increase sought la
the general category would go for
new positions, with the othrr sev-ne- w
positions, with the other 79
prr rent to be used for pay
faculty and 10 per cent for staff

personnel

0,
DELTA SIGMA

VI

Drlta Sigma PI. Commerce
honorary, will hold a rush meeting tonight In Room 128 of the
St 11. The time will be 7 p. m.
for regular members and 7;39
p. m. for rushers.

* 10, 19"8

2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Dec.

TAYLOR TIKE CO.
Incorporated
.

.!J"t

r

"COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE"
PHONE

,.

t

4

2-71-

400

27

LtAiNvj

VINE

E.

i

un

Y

24 HOUR AAA ROAD SERVICE
m

!

GO FORMAL
COMPLETE

RENTAL SERVICE
For ALL Occasions

KENT'S

MOVIE GUIDE

UK Choral Group Gives

"Me and the Colonel"-2:3- 0,
6:04. 9:38.
"The Line UP" - 12:58, 4:32, 8:06.
CIRCLE 25 "The Big Country"
the
their traditional manner,
6:30, 10:20.
Choristers, opened and closed the KENTUCKY
"The Lone Ranger
program with Shaw's "Fanfare for
and the Lost City of Gold" -Christmas Day" and Dickinson's
1:27, 4:15, 7:03. 9:57.
"The Christmas Story," respective"The Steel Bayonet" - 12:00,
ly.
2:48, 5:36, 8:24.
Contralto Peggy Cowgill Davis STRAND "Last Hurrah" - 2:45,
was featured in Davis "What Do
6:30, 10:20.
You Bear" and a piccalo obbligato
"She Played With Fire" -- 1:00,
highlighted "Christmas Dance of
4:45, 8:35.
the Shepherds" by Kodaly. The
audience Joined the Choristers in
singing a number "of well-kno-

Memorial Hall as the University
Choristers presented their annual
yule concert yesterday afternoon
and evening.
In a simulated cathedral setting,
the Choristers sang a varied program of Christmas music. The
selections included French, Czech,
and Puerto Rican carols and from
the American scene, a white spiritual and a Huron Indian carol.
Directed by Mrs. Mildred Lewis,
professor of music, the group of carols.
Prof. Arnold Blackburn was the
50 singers included four faculty
organ accompanist.
members and two townspeople. In

LAUNDRY

COIN OPERATED
DRYERS
WASHERS

9 lb., 20c

10 mini, 10c

Money
SAVE
IT YOURSELF

Time
DO

52

FABULOUS
m

m

k

m

ys

a

-

Daytona Beach,

i

Florida
During Christmas Vacation Stay

At The Beautiful

r

NEW LIDO or SILVER
SANDS MOTEL

7

Lexington Owned
Open 5:30

Margaret French bowled a 248
for the highest score ever rolled
by an Oneida. N. Y.. woman. She
became the city's third 600 club
member with scores of 191, 206
and 248 for a 645 series.

Admission 65c

$2.50 per clay

NOW OPjEN
Indoor Thearerarorium!
--

LEX's

Outdoor

Only

Up to Four Students Per Room

-l

Indoor Theatre

'

Gregory Peck - Burl Ives
Charlton Hesron - Jean Simmons
colorScope '

CLASSIFIED ADS

L.

Woolcott Mills, Phone

"THE BIG COUNTRY"

Leader route.
FOR SALE Lexington
Earn $118 peri month. Located in N.
Lime, Upper, Barr, Walnut, and Scond
Street vicinity. For details call Univ.
ext. 2332. Ask for Joseph Schwer.

WHITE
For Reservations

Contact O.

ENDS TONIGHT

2-15-

44

color featurerre

"DANCE BEAT"

FOR SALE Tuxedo with white Palm
Bench coat, 2 shirts, all studs, ties,
cumberbund. size 38 long. $45. See Mrs.
Suttsman, Phone3-111- 3
alter 5 p. m., or
Catalogue Dept., Library, during day. .

it

m

j

.

.

Open 8 A. M. to 9 P. M. Daily
Phone
877 'A E. High

"Fun Under
the Sun"

BENI ALI

Christmas Music Show

SELF SERVICE

00

holiday weekend when you are returning to your
home. Special care should be taken when driving on
icy highways.

The careful drivrr is the sane one. This picture
shows what can happen in that split second of
carelessness. Caution is urged during the coming

filled

4-65-

Dave Chadwick Campus Representative

Another Statistic

Christmas-tid- e

WEAR
TEL.

120 S. UPPER

Strains of

MEN'S

WANTED one or two college men to
Bhar furnished hous with three others.
Located within two blocks of University. Call
after 5 p. m.

s

RIDERS WANTED

3

n

riders wanted to

FORl .h Yi$tv$...THE GIFT

N. Y, area. Will
leave Fri. afternoon. Call ext. 2352
between 1 and 4 p. m. or see Phil Smith
at 826 S. B'Way after S p. m.

the

Buffalo-Rocheste-

r.

TREASURED FOR A LIFETIME

Tr-:

4 eyl. O.II.V. front engine. Seats four

-

..

,

h;'-'"- 1"

Ifffffl

'

jold-fille-

d

OMEGA.

f

washer, duotone finish and many

V

Q

if14K $79.50

to five. Large rear luggage compart

NOW! ENDS WED.

51

I

FIAT 1100 SEDAN
ment. Heater, windshield wiper

ii

1

extras standard equipment.

17-IEW-

1

WATCHES'

EL

$1,949 delivered
im

HARRY ALDRIDGE
MOTORS
133 Midland

Tel.

3-31-

t

siftMtctS

Frivolity bows to praclicality
when you choose an Omega! This

2nd. Hit

exceptional watch will not only
be trusted for its Incomparable
accuracy but treasured for its
supreme beauty. See our wide
assortment of Omega men's and
ladies' models, $75.00 up includwater-resistaing,
creations.
and diamond-se- t

"STEEL BAYONET"
Eve. 75c

Mat 50c.

63

. TOffTO

self-windin-

Home of the College Folks
V1

683

S. Broadway

Phone

4-43-

5fS

g,

1111

nt

QitmoMdVmrvrtert

I

ft

73

127 W. Main
MR. AND MRS. JOHN INNES,

Reasonable Prices
Private Rooms for Parties
High Fidelity Music for Your Dining Pleasure"

Phone
1

Proprietors

Store Hours: 9 to 5 Daily
OWfGA

$ THE

CfCfAl

WATCH

Of 1h

QumHC CAMf J

...

HOlDtt Of

HlGHCST

ACCUHaCT

AWA03

1

* THE KLNTI'(

Four of the seven known surContinurd From VRt 1
vivors of the first sraduatiiig class
After the party the group will idnjj of UK Law College returned last
week to find the sapling planted in
oroln.
Sigma Phi Epsilon is also hav- 1910 n towering black oak. The
ing a party for Thursday nittht tree was a farewell gift given by
with Charles Schimpler as Santa their graduating class.
Clans. A p if t - filled jjrap bag and
Reed Wilson, firover
Thomprt her presents are planned for the son, Unzy (). ThompsonCand (Urn
children.
F. Kelly expect to visit I'K acaln
, Phi Sigma Kappa and Pi Kappa
next spring when the law college
Alpha will also have parties be- will hold ceremonies commemorafore the weekend.
ting its 50th anniversary.
The majority of the children
invited to the fraternity parties 'They were among 2G students
pre from Abraham Lincoln School. who began their law study in 1903
under the direction r f Jud,;c W. T.
Laffcrty and two partime
inAlthough Jockey Bill Hartack
structors. Since then 1.291 students
had one losing
streak of 19
ftraight Hialeah mounts the na- have graduated from the University's second oldest college.
tive of Colver, Pa..
scored 49
victories to lead the riders for
Graduates of the school have
the third straight season
last Included five U. S. congressmen.
42 members of the state legislature,
winter.
The 1959 PGA
championship two U. S. judges, four members of
will be held July
2
at the Kentucky Court of Appeals,
three state attorney generals, 14
Minneapolis.
.

g.

a.ii.!tit attorney c nei ,1, a governor, two l.eutiniint governors,
and more than 2?.0 other elective
or appointive oflieials.
In Kentucky's
last gubernatorial race, all of the three leading 'candidates Democrats A. H.
( handler and Iter t T. Comhs and
Republican l.dwin S. Drnnv wire
graduates of the I K I. aw College. '
Enrollment has iiureased from
the original 2G to the pte.-.cX.
e
The faculty has pnwii to ID
members.
The law library,
originally composed of the personal
collections of Jud-- e I,iife:ty and
nta;ns more
his assi.- taut.;, -- now
lhan GO.OOO olumes and is troAing
at the rate of about 1,800 each
year.
The school has been represented
in national moot court competition
final.-- live times in nine years. Tins
record is surpassed by only three
other schools.
Only two of the school's five
former deans are still living. Charles J. Turk, dean from 1911-2is now executive secretary of the
Japan International I'niversity
Foundation in New York, l.'lvis J.
Stahr Jr. will soon take office as
president of West Virginia University. The present dean is
William L. Matthews Jr.

For

..ts th uv ,.cluol has
ben member of the A.'scUMon
uf American
Iiw Schools, and
J2."t has Imcii
since
ppioed by
the Atneilc.in liar A.stvlatlon. Its
4(

the co.ir.'iy.

-

c

YOUR PERSONAL APPEARANCE
Is

IMPORTANT
"t

I

Try our excellent Laundry's Dry Cleaning Service.
The "Best Dressed" on the campus do!

i

E C EC E

E5
CLEANING CO.

Claude McGaughey

Grad. UK '48, manager

UK Club To Hold
Arl Open House
The Art Club Is sponsoring .an
open house from 7:30 - 9:30 p. m.
tomorrow in the Art Gallery of the
Fine Arts Building.
All drawings and prints which
have been in reserve in the Graphics '58 exhibit
will be shown.
Freeman and Frederic
Richard
Thursz will discuss the paintings.
Refreshments will be served. The
program is open to the public.

Continued
i

NOMINATIONS
All nominalloiM

tor auitst.ind
ing man
and wmn.m of tlu
.l.iniiiry niuvt e
month for
turnt-In to Kooin 111 of the
SI' II hy Jan. 5 at 5 p. m.

V""

.tr

i;

rum I'me I
rir

of rh

f--

In L.iw.

(h.utir.ui

I)'.(

VwTii'iit,

X

f

ttr'f--

r.ut.

:e.
r.ir- -

iU luxl
imnorrow
ami Phil Co ronlrlinr
Ji .Mirr
in ! ritual inn and Tom
one
C.rrrnl.md and Jerry .MrVrton
held br Ted
eekin? the rat m
Power in the (ir.idualr School.
Vi"ii;u
take pl.icr fomoiro'V
f.om I) n m t 4 p.m. witli
clan's vofifv; in. their ic. K . t:c

Ot'trr

.ian)

-

M

(Hy the A uthor of "Holly Hound the Ffog. Iioy$!
"Bartjiwl Hoy u ith Chrrk.")

"ard.

ADVENTURES IN SOCIAL SCIENCE: NO.
''The roxr study of mankind is in.ui.".s;ii,I
immortal Cos, At
f,,, ;tM, I
tlioe taimled times it is particularly prox r t
in hi

;

;

..IlK y

( li

I

nn r

autre n,op In
tmly tii in lnw
I)'' livr and works. Aceordinply, tliis column, normally
doot. d
to sla'.dali wiiKrry, will from time to tine, turn a" rriou- - vc
on the
.scicne.
,

MK-i.-

In making tliese ocijoional tlrfvtrt urc . I liae tlir liearty
proval of the makers of Philip MorrU Ciirrttcs, wl.os,. ii,t,., t
is not only in providing yoiitiii Amerieaiis with line rig.in tN
st
matchlessly Mended of intai:e tohaccps, grown with loi;,g
care and harvested with
mercy, then cun-with
patience and rolled into firm tasty cylinder f.nd
hrou'ght to you in long size or regular, in soft puck or
p
lox, at prices which wreak no havoc on the most stringent of
Midgets, hut who are equally concerned with broadening l"He
minds and extending the intellectual vistas of eery college
man and woman !

""

--

d

eoin-passinn-

Hi-to-

I

".,--

this; great hen rtcdnc, and
though I know it is considered chic tlieV" days to disparajn- one's
employers, I shall not. Indeed, I shall cry "lluzzah!" lor the
makers of Philip Morris. 1 shall crv "Uuzzah! " and " iva!"
and "Olc;!" and "Ochichoonva!"
--

-

jack.)

Economics breaks down into two broad general claifien-tions- :
1) coins; 2) folding iikuicV. Hut
taking up then,
technical peels',' let us survey briefly tbc Jiistoryof ecuuoiniei.
e

,

U

.

ir

iftnii.iw.iMi(rnmiii

LEROY McMULLAN

ROSE M. BILLINGS

TERRY KUESTER

CANDIDATE
FOR

CANDIDATE
FOR

CANDIDATE
FOR

REPRESENTATIVE
AG & HOME EC

REPRESENTATIVE
ARTS AND SCIENCES

REPRESENTATIVE
COMMERCE

1

Economics was diseoered by the Englishman, Adam Smith,
lie published his findings in 17N', but cvitvImmIv giiiicUl so
hard that Smith, blushThg hotly, gave up the whole thing and
went into the cough drop business with his brother.

A

1

All

JO MOYER

CARLETON GODSEY

CANDIDATE
FOR

CANDIDATE
FOR

CANDIDATE

REPRESENTATIVE
EDUCATION

REPRESENTATIVE
ENGINEERING

REPRESENTATIVE
ENGINEERING

COLIN LEWIS
FOR

Pol For Prowess
Vote Stedeof s' Party

r

..1.

Cu.-- t it u?

V"

W

T-

the
t
ion
V
ui:i Ih- mnr.irm
Man in ter for the one eat ui!t!:0
of

Hut I digress. Tor our first leson in social science, leMis
turn to economics, often called the quern of the !ocial
(Sociology is the king of the yual fccicncf . Advertising is the

C
f

I

the v

I, for one, am not unmoved hy

"MERIT RATHER THAN AFFILIATION

-- J

1G.

It k:e

..'.!

nt

full-tim-

1

law JiMrnal, publihed continuously iiiiLC 1312, i.s ihe tenth l.lest in

Dec.

Elect ion

a

7,

LAUNDRY

KtKM'.l, Tuvm!.i.

First Law Class Returns To UK

Xmas Parlies

29-Au-

KY

For long years after that economics !ay iieclccte while th
World busied itself with other things, like the birth of i tor
Hugo, the la.--t days of PomjK'ii, and the. Huuny Hug.
s
Then (Mieday while Hying a kite during a thunderstonn.
Henry (leorge (also called TlMrtein N'eblent,
the law of diminishing n turn. and then, loy, the f.tt
was in the fire! Heforc you could say "knife" the Industrial
Revolution was on! Mechanization and steam owcr resulted
in prodigies of production. For evuuple, hrforc the Indti'tri.J
devolution, a Welsh artisan, naimil Ihltn Sigafoos, uel to
by hand at the rate of four a day. After the
make horse-sho- s
Industrial Revolution, with the aid of a steam engine, Sigafoos
was able to make entire hordes!
And so it went factories g
from the plains, cities burgeoning around the factories, trah-jo- t
and commerce keeping
pice until today, thank to economics, we luxe Miiog, recessions, and economies tctlooks at 7.oU kt copy,

The maker of I'liilin .Wona uie no uo(iun'li, but tli y Ut
ih tmunl ftlttr
muh rutand supiilu and (U umiid. oa'
i iyartt ten, so titt y mpitly thv fiiuitMartbjro, of course.
(ireat flacvr, improved hlttr a lot to like!

;toc

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The Kentucky Kernel
it4

University of Kentucky

Art of Marcb 3, 1870.
Fort Oitic at Lttlnfton, Krotixkr
immd rlas mntltv wndi
Pbliahd lour titan a wrek during th rrfuUr tt rionl year eictpt bolidayt and eiamt.
tlx"

tVS

MX DOLLARS A SCHOOL TEAR

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chie- f

iiof
Lafht Van I loose, Clilcf Sport Editot
Ann Roberts, Society Editor
Norman McMuixw, Advertising Manager
Pekat Ashlet, Business Manager
Hank Chapman, CarfoonM
Gordon Barb, Sfa Fhotographer
Marilyn Lyvcw and Judy rer.nebaker, Troojreadert
Antt Etpkbson,

CW

Vein

TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Dan Millott, Editor
Aucx RroorNC, Associatt Editor

Paul Scott,

Sports Editor

Televised Enthusiasm
Saturday's exhibition of UK student cheering gave millions of people
the impression, via television, that
we. are indeed an enthusiastic school.
In fact, the amount of enthusiasm
to be directly proportional to
the number of television cameras
present, and this oddity presents one
possible solution to the University's
doldrums in some areas.
Students harp about professors
being incptIcc Hirers who maunder
theirway through boring material.
Pjofessors retort with the statement
.
-.
.
..
.
-- untortunaieiy
many
true in mo ... ....
cases that their students are merely
so many vacuous bodies occupying so

many chairs, not trying or caring to

learn anything.
If being on television can cause a
usually indolent group of spectators
to explode, !n lusty hurrahs at a basketball game, why shouldn't the same

thing work in the classroom?
If millions were watching, no professor would dare read his lecture
from the text. No student would dare
come to class unprepared. Hands
would claw the air, begging to be
recognized to ask or answer questions.
Coeds would be ravishingly beautiful every day (television makeup and
eye shadow notwithstanding), hoping
to be seen by a netwoik beauty scout.
Professors would exude tweedy dignity and erudition, hoping to be seen
(and pet haps hired) by a Harvard
dean..
Since both taxpayers and parents
would be watching, we'd soon be rid
of undergraduate and professional incompetence. The University would
soar to undreamed of academic

In tomorrow's Student Congress
elections, students will elect eight
representatives to the UK student
governing body.
For the past two years the Kernel
has announced its suport for one of
the contending parties, but this year
we have decided not to enter into

heights.
All we have to do is get a sponsor.

the campaign. Instead, we are presenting, on today's editorial page,

.

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'

c's as fast as you,

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9

Tomorrow's SC Election
some of the objectives of each of the
parties as seen by their respective

chairmen.
While this is an "oil" election,
with no major seats at stake, the candidates chosen, tomorrow may still
determine the efficacy of student gov
ernment here. We urge everyone to
vote.

Students And Campus Parties Present Their Aims
By

DAN iMILLOTT

Tomorrow UK students will elect eight
new representatives to Student Congress.
chairman of the Students Party I have
been asked to place my party's case before
As

you.

Last week the Students Party adopted a
platform which was written with one central theme in mind. The only things that
should go into the platform are those pro
posals which affect the vast majority of
UK students.
Our fall platform has just seven planks,
but we have set these seven idas aside as
our program for the coming months.
First, we feel the activities portion of
your registration fee"is open to serious
question. Over $1 1 of your registration fee
is involved here. We feel that items such
as 50 cents a semester for a post olfice
box (a majority of students don't use them
after the first year) and 50 cents to the
Alumni Association are quite questionable.
Our party has gone on record as strongly advocating a complete investigation of
these and "other appropriations from the

registration fee.

We

also favor a thorough study of the
good and bad points of the National Student Association..' We feel that objectivity
is the keynote here and you,. the students,

have a light to know everything about
this organization.
The party also favors the establishment
of a group insurance plan for UK students. We specif ically pledge Ourselves to
,
working lor a voluntary plan.

The Students Party also endorses a
plan whereby UK students could obtain
dates in the student
seating for non-Usection at all athletic events. We endorse
the creation of an SC agency to deal with
all contests where judges are used. This
group will serve as arbitrators in case of
,
disputes.
We also favor the creation of a Southeastern student government confeience to
deal with the mutual pioblems of the
legion and lastly, we are very much in
Ltvor of nudent action in regard to the

By BOB CIIAMBLISS
improvement and renovation of Memorial
Hall.
I
Concerning the coming election,
are
All of these questions we feel
proposed these articles by the two parties
vital.
to bring our . respective viewpoints to
I have often heard students ask "what
Also I felt the Campus
the students.
is the difference between the two parties?"
The platforms of the two parties are Party suffers a strong disadvantage, due
to the fact that all political news (facts,
certainly one example of this difference.
l
The Students Party in the past has stood statistics, viewpoints of the
Kernel, etc.) have been written by the
for direct primary nomination of candichairman of the Students Party.
dates. This procedure was inaugurated by
the SP hist year and both parties followed
First, what is the Campus Party and
the procedure this year.
what does it stand for?
Other things the Students Party has
The Campus Party was organized last
stood for since its founding in 1956 and
year before the spring election by a
which have become reality are later hours
for women (a project begun by Terry group of students who strongly kit .the
system on campus.
Kuester in March, 1957. It is now a nec'4 of a
At that time allrcpresentativcs in the
reality), a campus Homecoming dance
its kind was held this year)
Student Congress (then SGA) were mem(the first of
bers of the Students Party and 90 per
and Sunday night hours in the library.
emI mention these things oidy to
cent of them came from six Greek organia record of
zations. Wc kit that student government
phasize that the party has
service to the student body. We feel that
should be a representative group which
the. past achievements have been good
voiced the opinion of all the students.
ones, but we stand firm in the contention
Originated on these principles, we
that tberp is still more to be done.
have strived to carry forth this effort. We.
The party's record of getting things took into consideration that the Students
done is well exemplified by the action
Party was founded on the same principle,
taken by SP members in student governso wc have taken steps to insure the
ment last year when they took it upon perpetuation of these ideas.
themselves to reorganie the old SGA in
This lull we adopted a constitution
order to obtain more communication with
which we fed will permanently establish
the. students.
these principles.
To prevent a small
This they did when our party was the
group of large Greek organizations from
only one in student government.
dominating the patty, the constitution
The dilfeiencc, then, lies in the apgives equal
voting power to each
proach to campus .problems. We have
organization.
stood for reform when rclorm was needed,
It also limits each group to one ofi.e., reorganization. And, through a phificer within the party. To insure equal
losophy of progresive student government,
the party in SC has been able to build oppoi (unities lor both Greek and Independents . the
constitution provides
a sound record since it was founded over
equal voting power for each. Each In-- ,
two years ago.
dependent 'lias cme-ft- dl
vote as long as
I leave you with one thought. In a
the total Independent vote does not
letter to the Kernel last May the Campus
Patty opened its letter of introduction exceed the Greek vote.
to the campus by saying the party Had
In case there are more Independents
adopted a 10oint program "to opjose
in the party than affiliated groups, their
whatever the Students' Patty comes up votes will be worth the fraction which
with." In this matter we ask UK stuin total will equal