xt7d7w674k0k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7d7w674k0k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19430205  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  5, 1943 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  5, 1943 1943 2013 true xt7d7w674k0k section xt7d7w674k0k The Kentucky Kernel

ON PAGE TWO
Harry James

Coming-S-

ax

s The Whirlwind

UNIVERSITY

VOLUME XXXI V

I

GuiinoVsW alchOnl he Rhine
rlo Have No Students In Cast

Goosens Praises Pianist
Mr. Goosens also said of her.
"Veronica Mimoso. the highly gifted
young pianist, recently played for
me at my home. I cannot recall
ever having heard a young girl with
greater talent and artistry than she
possesses. She held me spellbound
of an
for at least
hour.
"I think she is one of. if not the
most gifted, of the younger school
of pianists in this country today.
Her facility In various styles is
astounding. She has the equipment
three-quarte-

For the first time in several years.
Guignol is producing a play without
any University students in the cast.
"Watch on the Rhine." which opens
for a week's run March 1. will be
enacted entirely by townspeople.
After two very successful light
coineuies. vjuikuui u lujiiiuic lu 111c
heavier drama with "Watch on the
Rhine." The play, written by Lillian
Hellman. author of "The Children"s
anti-Naof a mature artist, and should be Hour" and "Little Foxes." is an
epic directed at the complaconsidered as such."
cency of the American people.
Has Played Here
Play Warns Americans
previously appeared
Veronica has
It might well be called "All Quiet
in Lexington, having been presented
with a question
by the McDowell Club of Lexington on the Potomac
last winter. She has given two con- - mark at the end to emphasize the
The play opened on
certs in Richmond at the Eastern warning.
Broadway in April, 1941 and was
Stat Teachers' College.
After one concert, the New York most timely then, but since that time
Times wrote. "Her charming per- - the United States has entered the
sonality and poise, as well as her war and the American people have
supernatural interpretative powers, been Jarred out of their compla-hol- d
icency.
the audience spellbound."
The entire play takes place in the
the New
Of her performance,
York Herald Tribune said. "She living room of a home not far from
commands a tone of might and Washington, where an amiable,
with a capacity to build derly widow has lived in comfort
a real climax, and she demonstrates and security, not greatly troubled bv
musically valid phrasing."
'the world alarms.
She is harboring, not too willingly.
Was Taurht Bv Mother
wife, but
Veronica attributes her talent to a Rumanian count and his
early musical training given her she is more concerned with the.
the
rau,t"1
'
bv her mother, Mrs. Lucia Mimoso,
with her German
who is her travelling companion.!'1" is returning
children after
Mrs. Mimoso. a graduate of the h"sban and three e
years.
..... .
absence of twenty-threL)nservaiory oi musical nxi. new
Play Melodramatic
York City, has been teaching piano
for more than twenty years.
The whole plot of the play is
The German husUshers for the concert will be melodramatic.
Edith Weisenberger, Martha Kop-piu- s, band is a key man for the Nazi unMary Mason Taylor. Betty derground which for years his fought
Bohannon. Martha Adams. Marie Hitler on his own terrain. The RuLouise McComn, Patty Cliff Lane, manian count is by nature a fascist,
Martha Ringo, Esther Johnson, a gambler, a blackmailer, and a spy.
M a u r n e Koofhage. and Kitty He recognizes the German and atChurchill.
tempts to bleed the family.
All students and townspeople are
The cast for "Watch on the Rhine"
invited to attend.
has not been released as yet but
will be published in The Kernel at
a later date.

lurthy

Angle

of intensive training in
poultry, dairying, and care and use
of farm machinery is being given
men from six southeastern coun- ties of Kentucky by the staff of the
agriculture college in cooperation
with a plan set up by the Farm
Security administration and the
United States Employment bureau.
Upon completion of their course
here, these men will go to farms in
the state where they are needed to
carry on the work necessary for
production
to meet war
needs.
This is the first group to be given
such training on the University
campus.
Four similar groups of
Kentucky men have been trained
at Ohio State, one group at Pennsylvania, and a group is being formed for prospective schooling in New
Jersey. Probably other groups will
be brought here throughout the
spring and summer.
Dr. Fordyce Ely is in charge of
the dairying instruction. Dr. J. S.
Insko directs the poultry work, and
Professor J. B. Kelley is at the head
of the farm machinery division of
the course.
A personnel committee composed
of Dr. Howard Beers, head of the
rural sociology department, chair- A

week

'

man. Prof. Lawrence

Bradford,

of

the farm management department,
and Prof. N. R. Elliott, of the hor-2- 6
ticulture department, help the men
become acquainted with the cam- pus and the city. They enjoy entertainment with the men, have meals
with them, and discuss problems
with them.
These men have been chosen by
the Farm Security administration
as ones who meet certain health requirements and are willing to move
and take, up farm work. Although
there is often personal advancement for the men, many of them
have expressed the feeling that the
fact that they are contributing to
the war effort has induced them to
leave their homes. Some of them
hope to have the advantage of
better schools for their children in
their new environment.
This group arrived Saturday, January 30, from Wayne, Pulaski, Casey, Russell, Adair, and Whitley
counties and will complete their
coarse Saturday, February 6.
The federal employment bureau
contacts with farmers
makes
throughout the state who want and
need help so that these workers
will find employment as soon as
their work here is finished.

Social Service Committee
Visits 'Bovs Al Grecmlale
j

Y

Visits are made each week to
the Kentucky Houses of Reform at rious groups, Mr. Peak said. There
Greendale. about four miles north
also a need for old magazines to
of Lexington, by members of the be distributed at the school, he
social service committee, added. These might be funny books,
YMCA
and Bart N. Peak. YM secretary.
boys' books, and story books.
To entertain the boys confined Games, playing cards, and puzzles
also needed.
fhere is the purpose of these visits.
Often the Y members take games
An effort is being made to con- from the public playgrounds for tact all students who are former
he inmates to play. On other ocScouts who would be interest- casions movies are shown. Since ed in devoting one night a week to
12
the boys, whose awies range from
assisting scoutmasters or leading a
to 17. must stay indoors during the group of young boys in their scout
evening, the weekly visit has be- work in troops where there is no
come an important event in their scoutmaster.
lives, according to Mr. Peak.
All men students who are interAlthough the" students go to ested in either the reform school
or boy scout work should see Mr.
Greendale to enliven the monotonous lives of the boys, one of the Peak or Norman Chrisinan. chairmain purposes of the trips is to man of the Y social service comteach ttie inmates the advantages mittee.
of playing fairly and honestly, Mr.
Peak said. By actual contact with
people from the outside world, the
boys, perhaps unconsciously at first,
bei-'ito acquire a desire to be bet
ter citizens when they eventually
ieave the institution, he explained.
The college students, through
knowing the boys, learn t'j understand people and the various conditions under which they live.
Of the 4.0 young people at the
school. 350 are boys. They are divided into groups of 50 each. At
present more college students are
d to help entertain the va- -

I

Eu-ne-

1

Ag College Offers Course
hi Intensive harm 'training
By

purso, executive director of the
music department, will play in con- cert on the regular University Musicale program at 4 o'clock Sunday
afternoon in Memorial hall.
This organization is composed of
twenty selected instrumentalists. It
was organized by Dr. Capurso in
1940 to provide talented students of
the University an opportunity to
study the serious works of the great
masters. The aim of the Sinfonietta
is to give authentic interpretation
of works which were originally intended for the smaller symphony.
Bach Works Included
program will InThe four-pa- rt
clude "Idomenio Overture" by Mozart. "Sleepers Wake" No. 4 of
Church Cantata, and "Come Sweet
Death." by Bach.
An interesting feature of the program will be the presentation of
the "Intermezzo and Serenade from
Hassan,'" by Delius. The "Intermezzo and Serenade" are from the
incidental music which Delium wrote
for James Elroy Flecker's dramatic
fantasy. "Hassan." produced in 1923
in His Majesty's theatre.
Haydn Will Conclude
For the final number of the program, the Sinfonietta will play the
Adagio. Vivace.
five
movements.
Adagio ma non troppo. Minuet, and
Finale from Haydn's "Symphony
No. 7 in C Major."
Ushers for the Musicale are
Bias. Ann M. Gillespie, Jane
Humphrey, Kenneth Fincher, William Walter Hall, and Garland
Young.

i

:n

j

CIVIL SERVICE
LISTS POSITIONS

Mr. Eive By Five
To Get One Seat
In Alumni Gym

Recruiting on a
j

(..t (n

Slinriltv

"sun-ni-w-

nation-wid-

e

is now being conducted

scale
for posi

tions in the fields of transportation,
labor, commodities, and industrial
The "good ol" days" of sprawlstudies, according to a recent press
ing over two or three seats at
release by the United States Civil
basketball games are over, since
Service Commission.
students will be issued specific
Experience in other lines' is also
seals as they enter Alumni gym
and applicants with
Saturday night.
training in economy, marketing, in"We aren't particularly critternational trade, money and bankicizing the students," Bernie
ing, and housing, will be acceptable.
director, said
Shively, athletic
Those accepted will be stationed in
in making the announcement.
United States or abroad and will
"Ifs just natural for them to the work directly related to the presdo
put their feet on the row in
ent war program.
front of them."
Five years of college or university
"first
Shively added that the
education or experience in economics
come, first served" principle
or statistics, or a combination of
would be in effect; the ones
the two, are necessary for the grade
that come first will be given the
earning a $2,600 salary. Other salbest seats in the center section.
aries range as high as $6,500 yearly
The ticket will specify the
plus overtime, and the educational
section, row. and seat number.
require ments are proportionally
higher.
Interested students are asked to
apply immediately. Further information as well as application blanks
may be obtained at first- - and
d-class
postoffices. from the Civil
Service regional office, and from the
Five former University students U. S. Civil Service Commission at
have reported to the Army Air Washington, D. C.
school at Maxwell
Forces
Field. Ala., to begin the second
phose of their training as pilots.
Cadet John Wilson Bell, Paris,
was a member of Phi Delta Theta
The Westminster Fellowship will
fraternity. He served one year In
the Army Air forces before being meet from 5 till 7 p.m. Sunday at
appointed an aviation cadet for pi- the Second Presbyterian church "in
a
United
Inter - Denominational
lot training.
Cadet Rav Uouela Bunch . of worship and fellowship hour for
was a member of vouth in observance of youth week.
Wavnesburn.
Bridle, animal husband-i- s The Reverend Robert McNeill will
Block and
be the principal speaker.
ry honorary, and the Dairy club,
Representatives of the various
t a(Jet ttem sjielton Howard. Jr.. nominations will participate in de
the
.and, was a member of Alpha
Tau 0mega fraternity. Pershing program and the Youth choir of
Rjneii ant tle YMCA. He corn-ar- e the Central Christian church will
pieted his Civilian Pilot Training in present several selections.

desirable;

US's UKs

secon-

Pre-Flig- ht

Westminster Group

To Meet Sunday

t ade, pauJ K. jhiisoii. Waynes-Sta- r
bur was a stUdent here before he
entered the Army and served 18
montns before being appointed a
,.,...1

tadel

7.

Phi Beta Presents
Lunch Program

M'MUFR

:!

NAVAL AVIATION

Killed

In North Africa

Tide Is To Stage
Return Battle
Here Saturday

Mo

Liu-Lia- n

y OPEN TO BOYS 17Sees
Barbara

Rehm

This Era
Most Tragic"

Officer To Talk
To Men Interested

...

..
bffil iIiiimii fnrsiiliiit
of the M imirri's .tilministnitiiT
Lt. Peyton T. Talbott. special
Con in il.
naval aviation representative,
will
be at the University at 9 a. in. to-- !
morrow to discuss the reopening of

.

Iiiis

REHM

BARBARA

ELECTED TO HEAD
WOMEN'S GROUP
Breeding, Horr
Will Serve As
Other Officers
Hurhnra Rhm nriHfit nf Al- nlm Oamma npita snmritv
has
been elected to head the Women's
Council, according
Administrative
to an announcement received from
the office of the dean of women.
,1;
in....i..i..
p. ..:.J.....
vugnua
Alpha Delta Pi. will serve as secretary of the organization and Mary
Horr, head of Zeta Tau Alpha, will
act as treasurer.
The Women's Administrative
Council is made up of the presidents of all women's organizations
on the campus, social and honorary. This group annually manages
the Women's banquet, which is to
be held this year early in April.
standouts iiouured
It is at thus affair, open to all
women in the University, that out- standing students are honored for
their work during the year. Alpha
Lambda Delta, freshman scholastic
honorary. Cwens. sophomore leader- ship fraternity, and Mortar Board.
Senior women's leadership honorary, tap their pledges at the ban- quet.
Mortar Board presents a cup to
the treshman woman with the
highest
scholastic
standing and
recognizes the sophomore women
with a standing of 2.6 or above
whose names are listed on the Mor- tar Board plaque which hangs in
the Union building. Theta Sigma
Phi honors the freshman journal- km student with the highest stand- ing and Phi Beta, music honorary.
recognizes the outstanding senior
member of their own organization,
Alpha Gams (ive Cup
Alpha Gamma Delta presents a
cup to the freshman woman chosen
as most outstanding in her class.
Alpha Lambda Delta gives an
award to the senior woman with
the highest
standing and the
Women's Athletic association hon- ors the outstanding
member of their own group.
in audition, cm ueita flu. lit- erary. announces new members, as
does Phi Upsilon Omicron. Home
Economics
honorarv.
Phi Beta
Kappa, and Theta Sigma Phi.
Committee
chairmen
for thus
year's banquet are Julia Johnson,
Delta Delta Delta, tickets; Wanda
Austin. Kappa
Delta, program:
Dorothy Angle. Hamilton House,
menu; Jeannette Graves. YWCA.
decorations;
Sarah Anne Hall.
Mortar Board, invitations:
and
Betty Jane Pugh. Alpha Ai Delta,
publicity.

f

T3
D.trr-uu.-

'

.

t.-- ucil

non-coun-

"S0THE7
CAVn
Question:

Io

naval aviation to boys of 17. Dr.
W. S. Webb, head of the physics
department, has announced.
It is not known whether Lieuten- ant Talbott. will talk to interested
students at a general meeting or in
individual conferences. Anvone who
would like to talk to the lieutenant
should call Dr. Webb's office tO
learn the exact time and place of
the meeting.
Students who enlist will not be
called to active service until the end
.
..
i... ....
year aimi unui
01 ine
.....
.. ...
..... nacurrent st 11001cue cigiiirTrui 11
11 icv
c
aiiicu
birthdavs.
It is believed that a
longer p,,,.
of academic training
.in k rx.rmitt.-ras
in
Those enlistine must have reached'
their seventeenth birthdavs but not
their eighteenth for nDDointment to
the class of apprentice seaman

,

1

Brown
y

"We are in the midst of the must
tragic eras of our time, not because
n.ilTir,t.u

Kernel Sport

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Editor

iImii-Ji-i-

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IkinL

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:

'
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l1111111i
yvui "viiuti'.iv
but because we had just
...
... years ago.
f
(.him- Hint i S
.1
!
.
101.5111 a
Mr. LJU
Liang-Mnoted Chinese social
I i.l.
P. ni I I
worker and authority on United
Chinese
relief, said IVHn.... .1. kll ktvl tin- ( jis iii ..I ilu 11
..
.
.
nigm wnen ne spone at a runner iniilis.iiirl
ml,- oy tne 1
sponsored
ill I iis al'H.i. I ln- ili- "You older people here went
jihIi-- i lull
1114 11
r
thrr.nirh lh.
all. in the hope that your children MoimI.ix nielli in
lilt!
would not have to tight, but the life
; into a IiinI ..itt lie with
and blood given 25 years ago was in
l.inii;iiM Si. Hi. I I111- -. ilit- ki 11
vain." the speaker continued,
llllki.lll'. Kill ill. Ml' UIIMt' Ulllll'll
"We Have T l.rarn"
"We have got to learn something
nil Jiiti mi llir nulte.
r
0100a ana liv
of our
'Kiikiim Win Seven
boys." Mr. Liu said. "and we are
learning two lessons.
The BamaiLs added victory No. 7
The lessons that we are learning in
i'fn l'krn' fircl. rHi u ..wfe hv
are first of all. that we human beings
over Mississippi.
of thP wnrlrt r th ,.hilrir.n ..f .h.
same God. no matter what race, Five losse adorn, the debit side of
color, or creed, and we are equal. the Tide ledger, while Kentucky's
the speaker stated.
.p record now reads five and one.
His second point was "we cannot In artdifiiin ,
n.
compromise with the evil forces. n ;and
th,
Allibanla won
matter where they are."
hf
r,.' .r- - ,,,!
Vandv
-War Began In ISSl"
Georgia Tech. two from Florida
Mr. Liu went on to say that many
Bart Avery was the man behind
people consider that the war started the gun in last week's Tide suc-i- n
Europe in 1939. but that the Chi- - ce.ss. ably assisted by Jim Homer,
nese say that it began in 1931 in Charley Erwin. P. F Sharp, ai.d
Manchuria when the Japanese in- - "Red" Bell also had ma jor shares
vaded that territory, according to in triumphing over the Bluegrass
plans that had been laid down W
RHI i a mhman
or 40 vears ago for the taking of;
.erihr KM- - TaU
j
China.
is a heart breaking story to ico
"It
Southern sports scribes are
to 1931 and see what well-eding the Cats hard these days,
men who sat in comfortable ing to break their morale in
in Geneva, who held the peace seascn.
Apparently Kentucky has
and order of the world in their established itself as the class of the
hands, did about the situation." Mr.; league in appearances down in
Liu said.
Dixieland from the general trend
"They did not see the Chinese of game narratives.
Anyway the
people, so they were not moved by ' BJues have no intention of slowinn
the suffering of the Chinese people." down at this stage of the game.
pointing for the loop tourhe added.
ney three weeks hence.
"Saw Only Balanre l Pwer"
One of the major contributions
They saw only the balance of
power, the speaker continued, when to Kentucky's fir.t conierence loss
China appealed to the League, and at the 'Capstone was their inacChiang curacy at the free throw lane In
even when Generalissimo
issued orders to the young mar- - previous tilts this season Coach
,ne Adoiph Rupp's charges had been
Tllls
snalls "ot to
darn night iinbeala.Ve when it
order.
tamous
came to chanty tosses, especially
"In ordr 10 avo'rt fi,ce to
conflict with Japan they decided to when the chips were down. Agatu&i
compromise, not taking the Chinese the Tide, however, the Cats
weak in foul efforts.
consideration,
because they
'n,
thought of them only as a third or
Kaon UK's II w H.wr
fourth rate power." Mr. Liu stated.
The Baron feels that all sympBritish Did Not Listen
and cocki"At that conference, the Chinese toms of
delegate said, addressing the British ness have been ironed out of hu
hoopsters. pronounces them fit ard
in particular. If you gentlemen reready for 'Bama'S invasion.
fuse to listen to the Chinese today,
The probable starting lineups:
ten vears from today you will be
fighting for your Singapore ' And
KriiiMkr
Alabama
that was when Singapore fell." the
Tier
I
Erwin
speaker said.
Itavw
f
Sharp
way in
Mr. Liu described the
Brewer
lluno-- r
r
which the nations allowed the
A vrrv
km
gressors to take the weaker counRwlliia
y
Br
tries, and how China remained pa- g
until they
tient and
decided that they must finht if they
were to survive. In 1937. they be- gan to tight, and for five years and
six months they have fought the
Japanese. They fought with their
bare hands and with what arma- ments other nations gave them.
4'hinese Prefer Freedom
"We prefer to fight and die as
...
free men on the battleground UI Tt H LI Nt H t XI
. . members will be entertained
rather than live as slaves under
a'
Liu their weekly meeting at noon today
Japanese imperialism."
Mr.
in the Footbabll room. Union build- said nngiiigly.
After the talk was concluded, the ing. by representatives of Phi Beta
meeting was thrown open to lii - ' music honorary.
cussion.
COSMOPOLITAN 1 LI B . . .
will meet at 7:30 p.m. Moiulav
in the "Y" lounge of the Union
building. Oscar Stern, refugee from
Czechoslovakia, will discuss his ex- Drattees in the present war are periences and mode of escape from
educationally far above their coun- - a German concentration camp
terparts in the last war. recently
lo NOTES
compiled figures show. Twelve per
cent of the present crop have a col- - EKIIIAV
Phi Beta. 5 p.m.. room '.t4
letie education, as against only five
per cent who were college trained
1.
Dutch Lunch club.
during the first war. Over 55 per room.
cent o the selectees of the present
war have high school education. MONIM
;
Co&mopoiltaii club.
p in . ' Y '
only 17 per cent did during the first
lounge
war vv line during tne last ar .hi
Women s Administrative Council,
per cent of the draftees had not
room '.'W.
reached high school, during this war!' V
niily 33 per cent of drafted men
Panliellenic Council. 4 p in
04
fall into this low chissiticatlou.

'"deed
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kitl
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"

V-- 5.

Cale Young Rice

""g

i

Bequeaths Library
To University

j

50-4- 0.

'

,,

The library of Cale Young Rice.
Louisville poet and husband of Alice
Hegan Rice, author of "Mrs. Wiggs
of the Cabbage Patch," has been
ieft to the University,
when his will was probated early
this week, it was learned that he
left an estate valued at $84,311 In
cash and securities,
A . qoo bequest in the memory of
his wffe was left to the Cabbage
Patch settlement in Louisville.
All of his war bonds, the amount
was not specified, were left to the
United States government for "prosecution of the war."

'

--

j

rid-ba-

u-

hop-cat-

ed

nud-chai- rs

Annual King Award
U IV
lilV'en 10 ...r Men
C,.:pnf.
v Olicuic firm
UUp
rp

j

Tne anllual King award for the
Kentucky Academy of Science has
eil awarded to Dr. Martin E
Weeks, assistant professor of soi'.s
and Jack Todd, analyst, at the Ex
periment station.
Dr. Weeks and Todd collaborated
on the article. "Semimicro Deter- mination of Magnesium and the
Hydroxyquinolate Using the Colori- metric Ferric Chloride Method." It
as nuhlUhed Anril 11
This award, which amounts to
$50, js presented annually for arti- cies concerning newlv discovered
scientific developments and other
scientific research.

fa-'-

ss

Refugee To Speak
Stern, refugee from Czechoslovakia, will speak at a meeting
of the Cosmopolitan club at 7:30
p. m.. Monday in the "Y" lounge
of the Union building.
Mr. Stern will talk about his experiences in a German concentration camp. He will also describe
the manner in which he effected
his escape from the prison.
O.-c-

Xavier. one of Kentucky's biggest basketball rivals, makes its
annual visit to Alumni gym
Monday night. The Musketeers
were
early
last month in Cincinnati, but.
as in previous years, are improving as the season wears on.
Monday night the Muskit-8
held mighty Tennessee to a
margin. Xavier has an unbecoming habit of pushing Kentucky to the limit in all their
meetings, and quite a cage feud
has developed between the two
schools.
Ense. Muskie center, is one of
the top Xavier scorers, was a
jmwer to reckon with in last
month's contest. Mulligan and
Hey wood, both guards, are out-- ,
standing contradictions to the
adage that guards don't score
much, as both manage to pick
up several markers in each start
Bairy and Tetens al forwards
round out the first string.
d.

By BAXTER MILTON

Noted Chinese
Says War Began
In Manchuria In '31

,

1

j

peace-lovin-

Kampus
Kernels

'Cats Meet Xavier
In Alumni (Jym
Monday Night

,

By Eugenia

:ll

'Cats Eye League Top
With Revenge In Mind
In Alabama Game Here

you think that
students should have as
Dutch Lunch club members will
many parts in (iuiuiiol plays as
oe eiuenainea at uieir weeKiy meet
ing today by representatives of Phi townspeople?
Beta, music honorary. The program,
Jiue tvi,,,,,,,,,,, A&s lrt.slll,um;
arranged by Virginia Lipscomb, will It would create lmire Ue..est Uulll
include Bettie Harris Russell, solo if it were an outside production.
ist, accompanied by Juanita Creedle;
Bradford Garrison, Commerce,
Betty Jean May, pianist; and Hettie
senior: Yes. because it's part of the
Knight, who will give a reading.
University and should give some
Parts to students.
nt
Eleanor Kaih. Commerce, sophomore: It gives must students their
one and only chance to wear grease
Sgt. Joseph Raymond Wallace, 24, paint.
Dick Eulianks. A.VS. .junior: It
of Lexington, has been killed in action in North Africa, according to stimulates the interest of University
stua notice from the War Department. students when they see fellow
During the two years that he was dents in some of the parts
A&S junior:
Florida Garrison.
a student al the University, Sergeant Wallace was a member of Definitely, because the students only
go to see other students in the playt
Phi Delta Theta fraternity.
Having entered the army in Au
Ed Karnes. A&S. junior: Not as
gust, 1941. ne lell tor overseas duty long as townspeople can s;ive fur
one year later
superior pei lorniam 's
Ex-Stude-

s

!

1941.

Riley Mcintosh..
Jciinimr
Hargett. was a student in 136t-3IX William M. Taylor, student at
has
the University from 1938-4been graduated from the bombardier school at San Angelo, Tex.
1.1. Kenneth A. Fugett. Stamping
Ground, has been graduated from
the bombardier school at Midland.
Lieutenant Fugett was
Texas.
graduated in 1942. and while a stu- dent was a member of Alpha Zeta,
Approximately 350 Princeton stu- honorary agriculture fraternity.
Ellis E. Survant. Owensburo. has
dents have been giving up their Sundays to the task of keeping sup- been promoted to the rank of capplies moving through the Belle Mead tain at a North Atluntic Wing
Quartermaster Depot. 10 miles,lrom Base oi the Air Transport comThey have been mand.
the University.
loading and unloading freight cars
Cecil Smilli, Canada, has been
and storing Army supplies in ware- promoted to the rank of corporal
houses. The Depot's commanding in Camp Lee's Quartermaster Rei.
oflicer describes their spirit as
placement Training center.
ply splendid."

Students Help

I'M

The University Sinfonietta. under
the direction of Dr. Alexander Ca-

"

rs

.

't

CONCERT SUNDAY
Capurso To Lead
Twenty Flayers
At Next Musicale

zi

Veronica Mimoso. a New York
pianist of sixteen, who at the age
of three was given musical training
by her mother and who was presented last month in a concert at
Town Hall. New York City, will be
.sponsored by the Lambda Alpha
chapter of Chi Omega sorority In
a recital at 8 p. m , February 21. in
Memorial hall.
A pupil of Harold Bauer, a graduate of the Manhattan School of
Music and the New York
tory. Veronica was presented at
Nazareth College. Nazareth, at the
behest of Eugene Goose ns, conductor
of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, who stated, "She is not a
prodigy, but a mature artist."

F.I'.Rl 'ARY

WILL PRESENT

Talented Girl Pianist
Will Give Recital Here
On Sunday, February 21
Veronica Mimoso
Will Be Sponsored
By Chi Omegas

F

UK SINFONIETTA

By l.ois Ogden

ISehind Seene View
Of 'Cat Mrnadi-stst-

OF KENTUCKY

l.t.XIM. ON. KtM l'CKV. FRIDAY.

Z246

-

on page four-

.

43-3- 8.

...

Present Draftees

48-3-

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...Sports Editor

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Manager
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Art

He Is Surpassing Joe Smith
I he youth
and the civilians
the Chinese nation have plaved and arc playing in their live and a half veais of war against
the Japanese, that impressed us most in I. in
Liang Mo's siee-- h at Pitkin club Wednesday.
For it was thc'eollege students l China that
awoke that peat nation from its long sleep.
When we stop to think that for general ions on
generations, the voting people of China never
had anything to say ahout the affairs of the nation, even about their own lives, it is a wonderful thought to realize that they were the ones
of
that helped so much to bring to the
China the knowledge that if thev did not hand
together, thev would lie onpiered bv the

Ii is tin- part ili.ii

Japanese--

.

hev were the ones that gladlv gave up their
,
holidavs. and varations at home in
older to go out into the country to tell the'
of the Japanese invasion of Manchuria
in I'.J.'il. When thev found that the eople were
not interested in seeehes by a biinrh of young
"upstarts." thev anie baek with things that
would hold their interest.
Dtamas. pi lines, and songs the items which
e
even Chinese loxes were used to show the
the invasion and what was hapening to the
Chinese, in those countries.
With SO per cm of the people illiterate,
thev could not relv on ncwspaiers, and radios
So
were exircmclv rare, almost
the students went forth, like the disciples ol
old. to eairv the message to all the nation.
Another thing to notice alxiul the Chinese
fight is that the civilians, once they were
amused, came to the
suport of the
aimed forces. Thev learned first aid. not just
to use when their cities were reduced to ruins
bv apancse bomber, but they used it on the
front lines. The c ivilians braved the gunfire" of
the enciuv to aid the wounded soldiers at I lie
front, and to rarrv them to the rear where thev
could gel more efficient medicail care.
I he war there has made a difference in the
status of the soldier: formerly ii was liclicvcd
a soldier. Now they
that no good l
have a saving. "Onlv good iron will le good
nails: onlv good bos will fie good soldiers."
One division of tlie army is known as the
army, which is used to raise the morale
of the coplc. Thev are the ones that go around
the eountrv to tell the people. "What are we
fighting forVas .Mr. I.iu put il.
Manv of the students go to what is known as
Resist Japan universities, where they learn all
thetechniques of how to resist the Japanese,
such as how to mobilize- the cople and organize
I

week-ends-

K'o-pl-

full-hearte-

-

gueiilla

wailare--

.

months or a year, then
itadv lor work on the front lines.
aie
1 here
is one- thing that we wonder if the
I

hev go to school for

H

WE QUOTE
"During the most critical period in our history, national unity is of extreme inqmrunce.
For the purpose of winning the war and protecting our national interests, it is inqieraiive
that congress receive the respect and enjoy the
confidence of the public to whic h it is justlv entitled, and of which it is proving itself worthy."
(Dr. George S .Benson, president, Harding college, calls for a lessening of public criticism of
i'j ingress.)

a

"Prov ided our production reac hes the desired
volume, the coming spring and early summer,
r
if not sooner, will witness a gigantic Axis
a4pwrn"Htf tftawwiiid
by siniiritaireous
bv revolution of the subjugated nations in
from within. The actual establishment ol
a second front on F.uroiean soil inav well lie
the signal of Nai Germany's internal collapse
and of the outbreak of European revolt of the
nations against the Nazis." (War analysis of
Dr. Robert J. Kerner, professor of history.
of California.)
F.u-roj- e

I'ni-vcrs