xt7dbr8mdc8s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dbr8mdc8s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19170920  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 20, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 20, 1917 1917 2012 true xt7dbr8mdc8s section xt7dbr8mdc8s THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
BATTALION RESPONDS
TO FIRST RUGLF CALL

NEW

NEW PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT HEARD

IN HIS

FIRST

FIRST CHAPEL

Doctors, lawyers, merchants, chiefs,
with engineers, schoolteachers, and
farmer thrown In, In fact, every flrst
and second-yea- r
man of the University
answered Major Ellis' command "Pall
in" Tuesday afternoon and began a
year of military life with greater energy and Interest than ever before.
With the formation of the battalion
was also the organization of about
forty Juniors and Seniors who have
applied for training in the Officers'
Reserve Corp. These candidates for
commissions will each be furnished
with a uniform and thirty cents daily
for drill. They will drill five days a
week and at the end of the school
year will enter a training camp for
one month. These, men are in no
way obligated for active service, but
they will remain as "reserves" for ten
years.
Fully three hundred men alphabetically arranged In four afternoon companies, A, B, C and D, with the morning company B composed of men out
for athletics and men working, answered to their names.
Major Ellis will act as commandant
until the arrival of Major Samuel A.
Smoke, U. S. A., retired, who is expected the last of the week.
Sergeants and corporals
of last
year were seen Tuesday proudly ordering Freshmen to right face, about
face and halt. Charlie Planck, once
first sergeant, but due to the wrath of
the mighty, humbled to the position
of rearest private won back his own
a squad.
and proudly commanded
Henry Grehan, with the assistance of
Morton, or vice versa, were also cap.
Headley Shouse and
tains
pro-tem-

George Zerfoss were busily engaged
training a bunch of rookies. Hugh
uniMilton, clad in a
form, conspicuously stood out as the
man prepared.
Scattered here and
in the rank might be seen newthere
d

showed by their erect
bearing weeks of preliminary training
comers

who

at home

in the various Home Defense

Leagues.
Some

second-yea-

r

their mathematical

"Whether Democracy shall be world
wide, whether it shall encompass the
globe or whether it shall be restricted
and narrow, possibly wiped out altogether, is the vital question before
the young men and women of today,''
said Dr. Frank L. McVey, speaking
on "The Relationship of the United
States with some of the World Questions We are Now Confronting," to
the student body, when he made his
first official appearance, as president
of the University, in chapel Tuesday
noming. "Democracy is the ruling
principle that ought to apply to the
world. President Wilson said in his
immortal speech that the world must
be safe for Democracy. I second his

utterance."

men wisely used
HORACE
minds in gaining

J. A. BRITTAIN
Wildcat Captain.
NEW

GIRLS GREET OLD
AT PATTERSON

.

HALL

New Regime Brings Many
Changes To the
Hall
PATTY HALL RETURNS
Patterson Hall is again the scene
of old activities, but the participants
are new
Strange faces meet in the halls and
weep at each other across the tables.
The "old girls" explore a strange new
country. They roam through the
corridors and peer into the dining
room for a sight of old familiar
faces. Once it was the custom for
"old" girls to sit at tables together,
but rules as customs change.

No more do "intimates" greet each
pourother on the steps at
ing over grammars and chemistry
notes. No longer do they brush the
cob webs from the stairs passing to
the Y. W. C. A. room at 6:30. Now
they mount stairs on which cob webs
never grew, to ascertain the delights
of a hard wood floored recreation hall
MANN MEETS TONIGHT. free from the barks of a dog and an
overly energetic furnace.

the coveted fourth position on the
The Horace Mann Literary Society
left of the guide and immediately had will hold its first meeting Thursday
decorations on night in the Education Building. Provisions of the two-ba- r
fessor J. T. C. Noe will spoak on this
their right' arms.
The morning company will drill at occasion of the past years of the Horpresent outlook for
the fourth hour Monday, Wednesday ace Mann and the
It. Every student in the Education
and Friday and the afternoon comDepartment Is eligible to this society.
panies Tuesday, Wednesday and Fri- A musical program has been arday, which insures a busy year for ranged and a pleasant evening Is
the battalion.

MEET ON STOLL

VISIT TO UNIV.

Old-Ti-

ten-thir-

The future of the University appears very bright in the hands of the
new president, Dr. Frank L. McVey.
Sixnfeet two, of athletic build, of commanding presence, of forceful leadership, Doctor McVey impresses one at
the very outset with the idea of bigness, of breadth of vision and ability
to handle In a big way, the problems
of real University achievement.
Doctor MoVey, in speaking of the
future of the University said: "I find
the University pleasantly situated. It,
of course, has its problems like every
other university, but they can be
of
worked out with the
all concerned. The State University
is the richest fruition and the highest
expression of democracy. The condition of a state university is, In a
measure, the best indication of progress made by the people. This war
has demonstrated clearly the value of
education and particularly the part
that state universities can play in
meeting the problems of democracy,
both industrial and otherwise.
"I look forward with a great deal of
pleasure and interest to working with
my colleagues and the people of the
Commonwealth in the great task of
of Kendeveloping the University
tucky."
Doctor MoVey's hobby Is canoeing
and he spends a part of every summer
In the wilds of Canada, completely
cut off from all civilization, following
the rivers of Canada in his canoe.
The new president, especially interested in the student publication of the
University, held a consultation with
the editor or the Kernel, Estill Woods,
conferring with him in regard to the
publication and the influence It wields
on student life.
Doctor McVey left yesterday afternoon for Washington to complete his
work of preparing for the Government
a monograph on war finances for the
Allies. He hopes to return about the
last of October to remain and will
bring his family later to reside in the
old Mulligan home which is undergoing complete remodeling for their occupancy.
"DOC" HO DBS VISITS CAMPUS.

EIELD

"Pep" Displayed
In Spite of Rays of
"Old Sol"

SEES KERNEL EDITOR PROSPECT

ADDRESS

Dr. McVey began at the formation
of the Constitution of the United
States and divided the big problems
that have confronted this nation since
then into four periods. He said that
America passed thru a critical period
at the time of the formation of the
appreWashington
constitution.
ciated the differences which were between the colonies and advocated central government. The purpose of the
great leader was the foundation of a
government
that would actually
govern.
He wanted union and a
binding government. Such things as
the Hartford Convention, the Missouri Compromise tended to hinder
the progress of the Federal Government.
"The second great period was the
period which settled the sovereignity
of the nation as a whole, over the
tate as individual units. It decided
that the nation was to rule. This was
the Civil War period.
"The third great period followed
the Civil War. It was a period of
Problems were no
new nationalism.
longer sectional. Control over railways and different commodities of
national interest was well under way
from the point of view of better government when the war came.
"The last problem which confronts
came before were confined to the
on Page Five.)

COWHIDE AND PIGSKIN

Bright Future For the
University

"Rookies"

ELLIS STUDENT MAJOR STIRRING

PAYS

Dr. McVey Anticipates

With
Last Year's Privates Take Our Relationship
Some World Problems
Command of the
Discussed

newly-cleane-

No. 2

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1917

VOL, X

CHEERING

Prospects
are growing steadily
brighter for the same old peppery variety of football team this year that
we have always had in the preceding
years.
Heat is nothing in the young lives
of the volunteers for the team and
work in all its physical aspects occupies another insignificant position in
the said young lives. Perspiration
has been recognized as the price of
glory and the coveted honor of being
a varsity man has inspired every candidate for the team. The old familiar
"atta boy" rings across the best athletic field in the South in the old familiar way, and the exhortation is
never uttered in vain.
In other iwords, the football team at
the University of Kentucky is going
to be a team up to high standards and
accomplishments
predecessors
its
have set for it. A stolid, steady coach
named "Daddy,' 'an
called
quarterback
"Jim" and a watch-charrecognized as "Jimmie" will prove the
fact that Caesar stated, namely, that
the proper triumvirate can be successful over all difficulties. Coach Boles
refuses to have any idea of what is
going to happen except that the presence of Jim Park will help mightily.
old-tim-

Just at present the toe men are presenting the most interesting considThe poor little pigskin is
eration.
trying to rival Ruth Law and all the
other aces of the air in flights for
Urged on by
height and distance.
its former companion, the cowhide, it
remains uncertain as to which aspirant is the most deserving of its best
effort. Altho nothing will be certain
until after the flrst games, it seems
now that the toe of Gay will meet the
r
ball most this season. Riddle, a
applicant for quarterback, is also
aspiring to this 'position.
One of the most cheering items
gathered on the field Is that the varsity line promises to weigh between
170 and 180 pounds. The back field
will come up close to 155 or 1G0 and
that combination should fear nothing.
Beyond this it is only necessary to
first-yea-

cist-

if

A

say that the men behind the line are
to be fast, judging from those serving
there now. Men trying for the back-fielare Baugh, Gay, Hedges, Adair,

d

"Doc" Kodcs, star football player,
athlete, and one of the best Riddle, Walker, Pullen.
statuette bearing the inscription
Special mention is inadequate for
"Patty Hall graces the down stairs known men on the campus last year,
hall. This well known personage visited the University Monday, liodes any of the squad, for every man te
A

herself arrived Monday evening to be received a second lieutenant's

com-

working as though the safety of the
upon him. The
nation depended
hopes of the football fans, nay, friends

at Patterson Hull the remainder of mission at the first training camp at
the school year. Her coming was Fort Harrison. Since that time he
hailed with delight by those who has been at Cambridge, Mass., taking
have already received boxes from special training in trench warfare.
home, and prefer to risk the curse of This winter "Doc" will be statin .
a black cat, to the small gray visitors at Camp Zachary Taylor in

that inhabit the campus are bright
and shining, and the vistas of future
night-shir- t
"peorades" are clearly de-

who might appear.

fined and promising.

I

L

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Two.

5TRAND

5c, 10c. and 15c.

Admission

Ilrookc is a graduate of the class of
1915 and last year was instructor in
the College of Mechanical and Eloe
C. C. Harp, of
trical Engineering.
the class of 1914, has accepted the
position made vacant by Mr. Brooke's
resignation.

MECHANICAL NOTES

A recent alumni visitng at Mechan-ca- l
Hall was A. L. Eimcr, class of '17,
who stopped off on his way to New
Jersey where he is going to take up
work in a munitions plant.
Mr.
Eimcr, since graduation, has been
with the East St. Louis Foundries
Company at East St. Louis, Illinois.

Information has reached here that
Fred Whitcly, class of 1916, has accepted a position with the Eastern
Wisconsin Electric Company as As
sistant Manager, at Fond du Lac
Wisconsin. This is one of several
utilities companies, which compose
the American Utilities Company, and
Professor John T. Faig, Pro- Mr. Whitely is to be congratulated
fessor of Mechanic! Engineering, on his connection with this progrcs
University of Cincinnati, was a visit- sive western industry. Mr. Whitely
or at Mechanical Hall Saturday. since graduation has been with the
Professor Faig is a member of the Westinghouse Electric and Manufac
class of 1894.
turing Company at East Pittsburgh
Wallace Hoeing, class of '02, called Pennsylvania.
Saturday at Mechanical Hall. Mr.
H. P. Parrigan, class of '16, is
Hoeing is manager of the Louisville enthusiastic about his work with The
office of C. A. Durham Company. Texas Company at West Tulsa reMr. Hoeing states that his brother finery, Tulsa, Oklahoma'. Mr.
n
H. A. Hoeing, also of the class of
has been with this company
1902, has received a commission, since July and his work as mechanical
Captain of Engineers in the United engineer consists of mechanical, civil,
States Army.
structural and efficiency engineering,
Par-rigi-

H. B. Shoemaker, class of '12, was which he states that he finds ex
in the city a few days last week. tremely interesting. The Middle West
Mr. Shoemaker resigned his position is one of the best fields for the young
as Assistant Superintendent of the mechanical and electrical engineer.
Experimental Department of the
it
Steel Products Company to ac
"BELIEVE ME, XANTIPPE."
cept the position of engineer in the
Detroit Sales Office of the Trussed
A most exceptional cast .will be seen
Concrete Steel Company of Youngs-towin the support of America's most popOhio.
Mr. Shoemaker has
ular young star, iRlohard Buhler, who
been with the latter firm since last will appear
at the Lexington Opera
March and is well pleased with his iHouse on
Thursday and Friday, Sep
work.
tember 20 and 21, in the Harvard prize
Minott Brooke, who has been in the play, "Believe iMe, Xantlppe."
employment
of the Westinghouse
iMiss Margaret Knight, whose beauComElectric and Manufacturing
ty and talent have won an enviable
pany at East Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- place for her in the dramatic profesvania, since last June, has entered the sion, will 'be seen in the leading femiW. S. nine role. Others in the cast are
Merchant Marine Service.
Moore, of the class of '17, has also Charles Oanfleld, Max Von Mitzel,
entered the Merchant Marine Service. Jack Prescott, iM. Tello Webb, ThomA letter from Mr. Moore states that as iHolden, Carl Norman and Louise
both expect to be called into active Orendorff. Seat sale Tuesday at
service in a very short while. Mr. Ben All. (Advt.
De-tor-

n,

Lexington Opera House Thursday
Two flights Commencing

Sept. 20

A. G. Dclamater Announces

Richard Buhler
(HIMSELF)

The Former Star in Ben Hur
IN THE HARVARD PRIZE PLAY

Believe Me Xantippe
THE SEASON'S BEST COMEDY
Prices

Seat Sale Tuesday at Ben Ali
25c to $1.00

tlDA MEADE
"Superior Vaudeville"
ALL NEW BUT THE NAME- NEW SEATS
Same Management, Same Classy Shows
"If a Laugh Was Worth $1.00, You'd Leave Here Rich"
Boxes, 35c, 50c
Prices, 10c, 15c, 20, 30c, 35c
--

612

PHONE

Home of Paramount Artcraft Goldwyn Pictures.
High-clas- s
that's why they cost more.

Open from 10:00 A. M. to 11:00 P. M.

612

"TIQE"

TO

SPEAK

IN

CHAPEL.

DR. M'VEY SPEAKS AT

JOINT MEETING SUNDAY

Large Audience Hears New
President's Talk on
Friendship
INTIMACIES

HARMFUL

The Joint meeting of the Y. W. C
A. and the Y. M. C. A., held Sunday
night in the chapel, "was one of the
largest attended in years. Members
of the faculty, students old and new,
and Lexlngtonians gathered to hear
Dr. 'Frank iL. McVey address these
organizations.
"What is the biggest thing in the
To the question,
and Intimates."
"What si the biggest thing in the
world?" he answered "Friendship," a
thing every one can have according to
his deserts. He showed many examples of friendships in literature, but
pointed out that history has given us
few.
"Friendship," Dr. MoVey said, "is
like the uniting of two chemicals
Certain elements are necessary to its
maintenance. The person with noth
ing to give cannot be a friend. The
first element friendship demands is
respect, which includes mutual regard
A friend
and mutual understanding.
allows us to see ourselves as others
see us. It gives us our measure in
terms of another's mind.
The different types of friends, as
Dr. MoVey defined them, are the fair
weather friend, the tried and true
friend, intimates and the
associate. 'Dr. MoVey drew a dis
tinction (between friends
and inti
mates, saying that the intimate was
relationship based on deviltry and
required no high ideals as did friend
ship. He subdivided the classes of
intimates into the parasitic intimate,
who uses your books, bororws your
money and steals your time, the lonesome intimate who can contribute
nothing, and the chattering Intimate.
Dr. :McVey said with Browning that
youth is the time of a great plan and
all such associates who can contribute nothing to the plan weakens the
character.
'In college," he said, "is
the time to form friendships that will
last through life. My wish is that
every one at the University of Kentucky shall have such friends."
g

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THE ADA MEADE

Something new in vaudeville will
be seen at the Ada Meade the last of
this week,, beginning this afternoon,
when iHugo Jansen, in "Fashions a la
Carte," will create the newest and
most startlingly original gowns in full
view of the audience, aided only by
pins and the uncut material. Besides
this big act there are four more real
Keith features.
Monday afternoon another
Bhow of five acts begins. (Adv.

$1.00 Per ,Year

The College Boys" Store

A

AT

Kentucky Kernel

Chapel hour Friday morning will be
dovoted to student organizations.
It
mny have tlio nature of a football
rally, as Dr. Tlgert is announced to
speak.

Guaranteed Personal Tailoring Service

That is what you get when you order a Justrlght Suit or Overcoat. A GUARANTEE that assures you that the quality of the woolens used is of the highest grade, the linings and other findings of the
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Mr. M. Levy the cuttings and fitting being done right on our premises.
Our line of new Fall Woolens is ready for your inspection.

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Suits and Overcoat $18 to $25

UNIV. TO BE RUN
BY CONSTITUTION
The University hereafter will be
run exclusively under a constitution
which will be drawn up early in October by a committee appointed by
Doctor iMoVey from the council. This
announcement was made by Doctor
MoVey at his first faculty meeting
Tuesday.

Justright Tailoring Co.
WE FIT YOU.

145

West Main Street- -

Lexlngton, Kentucky.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.
CONTRIBUTED.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
MEETS MEW PRESIDENT

University

Problems
cussed at Board
Meeting

CAFETERIA

TO

Dis-

OPEN

of the
The Executive iCommltteo
University hold Its regular meeting
Wednesday In the president's room,
with Chairman C. iD. Nichols, John K.
Drown, It. C. Stoll, Frank uMcKee, Dr.
S. D. iMarks, and V, P. Johnston present. This was the first meeting of the
committee at whloh tho new president,
T)r. McVey, appeared.
The routine work of itho University
was presented and University problems discussed with the president.
The committee approved tho plans as
suggested by Dr. McVey for tho reconstruction and Improvement of the
Mulligan place as a home for the president. The work of placing tho contract was put Into the hands of a committee, which will act definitely today.

The committee extended the leave
of absence of Miss Mary E. Sweeney,
who Is now In Washington working in
with the Hoover movement for the national conservation of
food. Miss Ruby Buckman was made
acting head of the Home Economics
Department ad interim.
A resolution was adopted looking
toward putting into operation at once
a plant at the Experiment Station to
manufacture serum used in preventing
forage poisoning. The question of continuing the work of the cafeteria on
the grounds was left in the hands of
the president. Dr. Boyd was made
head of a committee to take steps to
the cafeteria on the statement
of the president that he saw no reason
wJiy it should not be operated successfully.
The board also instructed that Professor C. W. 'Matthews should act as
head of the Botany Department until
the return of Professor A. H. Gilbert,
who is on leave of absence. The title
of Instructor in Poultry and Husbandry was given to J. D. Martin. Professor iLaBaoh, who has been acting head
of the Department of Food and Drugs,
was continued at that post temporarily. Dr. F. E. Tuttle was given permission to do the outside work of
making gas analyses for promoters in
the Kentucky oil fields.
D. R. Ellis was authorized to conuntil the
duct military instruction
commandant appointed by the War
Department arrives. Action on a report by the iDean of Women incorporating rules and regulations affecting
the social life of the girls in the University was deferred.

ESTILL WOODS CHOSEN
NEW EDITOR-IN-CHIE- F
Estill Woods, of Nicholasvllle, a
senior in the College of Arts and Science, ihas been elected editor of the
Kernel, to take the place of Wayne
Cottlngham, Who Is not in the University this year.

LUNCH

Como bounding, bounding blissfully,
Down the lovely lano to me,
And linger on the laugh-li- t
lea,
And murmur merry, merrily
Oh Heaven

tho burst of gladsome
gleo
In Just tho nearness, dear, of thee
A part, tho very heart of met
Como sunny smile, como sweet repose
Como ibroath of peaco that somehow

grows
my
Whene'er
soul your presonce
knows
Then nil is good and all good seems
From Heaven's heart such rare, rich
gleams!
i.

am content to love thee, dear """"
And never love's sweet answer bear,
For In the love that turns to thee
A life, a light comes back to me.
So still the call of wild desire
And quench pent passion's growing
lire.
I

Page Three

STAND CLOSES

College
TO

Here is the best store to buy
Good Shoes at Right Prices

Mecca of the University
Ceases To Be After
Nine Years

No better shoes than those
made by "J. E. Tilt" and
"C. S. Marshall We
are exclusive agents for
Please to
these lines.
show you. : : : : :
"--

HAUNT OF CUPID
A campus landmark has passed Into
oblivion. The University lunch stand,
Mecca of Kentucky University students for nine years, has been forced
to close Its doors on account of tho
decreased registration of students and
the
of the proprietor, Mrs.
Barnett.
To the old students the University
lunch stand brings memories of study
hours and chapel periods spent inside
Its walls, of the smell of sizzling
steak, or tho pungent odor of ginger
bread;
of
coffee; of
ham and eggs; of chocolate pies and
cake which seemed to vanish miraculously into thin air; of chicken
steaming hot and delicately
brown, and of Mrs. Barnett, plump
and motherly, who was the author of
it all, and a friend and counselor

THE SPECIAL SHOE COMPANY
LEXINGTON KENTUCKY

Come to Chapel

Friday

amber-colore-

pot-pi-

"NEW

SOLDIER" WORK.

By news received from widely sepa

rated sections, it is evident that the
college associations
are striving to
live up to their obligations under
these new conditions. The associa
tions are seeing that men In the service are toeing supplied with college
news, including the college papers,
that personal letters are written giving interesting details about college
happenings, and in many other ways
are showing genuine practical interest
in their highest welfare.
The work for our men in the army
very much reminds one of a great concentration of new student campaigns.
Every reason for striving to interest
new students in the Christian life and
Its work applies- with even greater
force to the opportunity among the
"new soldiers." Those of us who, for
one or another good reason, have to
"stay by the stuff," must seek in every way in our power to be of assistance to them. North American
-

They say that It was a favorite
haunt of Cupid, and it must be so,
judging from the number of campus
romances which have .begun there
and continued there under the watch
ful eyes of Mrs. Barnett.
In nine years thousands of students
have rung the bell that guards its
door. The University in that time has
grown and prospered, and the little
place down under the hill has grown
and prospered, too. Students and pro
fessors have changed in that time,
path has never
but the
been allowed to grow green. The
lunoh stand has passed and in its
passing, hungry students old and new
have reason for sorrow.
well-beate- n

MAGAZINE

REVIEWS.

Members of the faculty will be inIn two articles in the Nation
for September 6, "The Bigotry of the
New Education," by Paul Shorey, and
"The University Crisis," by Edwin
Greenlaw.

terested

STUDENTS AND THE WAR.
Thirty thousand men, mostly students and alumni, entered the thirteen
officers training camps in May, 1917.
Many thousands more are now in the
second series of officers' training
camps. Hundreds of these men, our
fellow students, are already in France
risking their lives that we may have
We who are
liberty and security.
privileged to be in college .this war
year owe tills privilege to our brother
students who are fighting our battles.
We are therefore under obligation
to know the facts of the war, to do
our bit at home in preparation for
future service, and to live simply
realizing that no real patriot can be
extravagant when money is so much
needed.
Furthermore, since this is a war for
righteousness, there should be a rising tide of honesty, purity, and righteousness at heart In the colleges of
America.
high
demands
Plain patriotism
thinking and simple living in this critical year.

Men!

An interesting account of the development of motion pictures is "The
Infant Prodigy of our Industries," by
Homer Croy, in Harper's for August.
In the September Harper's is an article by President Hadley, of Yale, entitled "College Studies and College
Tests."

"Professor's Progress" Is the title of
an anonymous novel which began publication in the September Atlantic. It
is the first serial novel they have
brought out for five years and they
claim It has a flavor all its own.
mountaineer led his
overgrown son Into a country school-housA

keen-eye-

"This here boy's arteV lamin'," he
announced. "What's yer bill o fare?"
"Our curriculum, sir," corrected the
schoolmaster, "embraces geography,
arithmetic, trigonometry"
"That'll do," Interrupted the father.
"That'll do. Load him up well wltii
He's the only poor
trlggernometry.
shot In the family." Tho People's
Home Journal.

Woods returned after a year's absence from the University to take up
his work here again, and found a
man's size job on the Kernel waiting
for him.
STAFF MEETING.
Woods is a journalist of more than
average ability, and it is thought that
Members of the Kernel staff are rehis leadership the Kernel will quested to meet in tho Journalism
a girl who is always
under
"There's
rooms tomorrow at 12:30 Friday.
not fall below Us usual standard.
anxious to take my part."
EDITOR.
"A devoted friend, eh?"
The new editor was elected at a
meeting of the Kernel board hold In
'My understudy," explained the star
tho Journalism rooms 'Monday.
Patronize Our Advertisers simply. Louisville Courier-Journal.

Athletics,

Publications,
Organizations

Support Student Activities

Your Attention
POR A PEW MOMENTS
PLEASE THAT IS IP YOU

ARE INTERESTED IN
WHAT IS GOOD AND
ECONOMICAL IN PALL
AND

WINTER WEARABLES

THIS NEW IDEA SHOP BEGAN PROVING
TO THE UNIVERSITY MEN TWO YEARS
AGO THAT IT IS USELESS AND FOOLISH

TO HELP PAY THE BIG RENTS AND HIGH

FALUTIN FIXTURES OF STORES WHEN
BUYING CLOTHES.
THE REMARKABLE

AND

EVER-GROWIN- G

RESPONSE TO OUR ECONOMY PLAN
SHOWS THAT YOU FELLOWS

KNOW A

GOOD THING WHEN YOU SEE IT.

WE ARE GOING TO SHOW YOU SOME
REAL SPEED THIS FALL. SEE OUR FIRST

OFFERING OF NEW FALL AND WINTER
SAMPLE LINES NOW READY.
FALL
HATS, CLOTHES, UNDERWEAR.

C4SW MAMAffSrOPi

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

Pgge Four.

The Kentucky Kernel
Published every Thursday throughout the College year by the student body
of the University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
nlumnl and faculty of the Institution.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL Is the official newspaper of the University,
It Is Issued with a view of furnishing to Its subscribers all the college news
of Kentucky, together with a digest of Items of Interest concerning the
universities of other States and Canada.
FIVE CENTS PER COPY.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR.
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflce as second-clas- s

..Editor-in-Chie-

f

.Managing Editor
Associate Editor
. "Squirrel Food"
Sporting Editor
Feature Editor
Mechanical
.Patterson Hall
REPORTERS.

.Miss (Margaret Wilkinson.

Appreciation.

ing of the fruit and vegetables used by
the penny lunch stands In the city
schools. Miss Ina Seherrebeck, student secretary of the South Atlantic
field, In which Kentucky falls, commended Miss Lilly for her successful
work.

Henry Grehan.
Business Manager

"Stick For the Finish."
The Kernel learns with regret that several men
who have numbers in the draft list, but who have not
yet been called, are contemplating leaving the University.
im&t
We feel that this would be a grave mistake and
hope that those who are thinking of going home will
carefully reconsider the situation and see the matter in
its true light before their mistake is irreparable.
All who are not included in the first quota will very
likely have the opportunity of completing the present
collegiate year before they are called to service, as the
Government is busy training and equipping the "first
half million," which is no small undertaking for a nation that has thought peace and lived peace for more

than half a century.
President Wilson has requested that college men
pursue their studies whenever possible and has placed
the utmost emphasis on the need for college men in all
branches of national service. One more year's work
will be valuable after the return from the army, invaluable when young men are called to the front as leaders in the great struggle.
Now more than at any time since the history of
the world began is there a call for trained men. At
present, when efficiency means everything, there is no
place for a quitter and they only will command entire
respect of their fellow countrymen who fight to the finish. We know that it is hard to settle down to work
while the future seems uncertain, but to cease preparations now and wander aimlessly through an entire
scholastic year, with nothing definite in mind but to
wait, will lay them unquestionably open to criticism as
slackers. As true Kentuckians we know that not one
drop of slacker's blood contaminates our veins; let us
prove this fact to the world.
The man behind the firing line is no less a hero than
the man at the front. But this is true, only if he does
his part. Our President has indicated to us our duty;
let us follow his lead.

Opportunity For Real
The shearing of freshman locks has begun. The
Kernel wishes to remind the students that this is forbidden by the authorities of the University.
As a student, and frankly speaking, the editor of
g
the Kernel has been inclined to look upon
predilection for
as an innocent expression of boyish
mischief and fun. Unfortunately, however, in years
victims of the clippers have
gone by,
shown fight, and serious consequences have flowed from
it. In several instances, we are told, grave physical
harm has been done.
In fact we