xt7dbr8mgj1g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dbr8mgj1g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670118  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 18, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 18, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7dbr8mgj1g section xt7dbr8mgj1g Inside Today's Kernel
documentary series is
here now: Poge Two.

A new

premier-in-

g

Lexington theater goers have an interesting season ahead of them: Page
Three.

Iditorial comments on the use of
"Dixie" at athletic events: Page Four.

and YAF present position papers
on the nature of a university: Poge
Five.
SDS

Gov. Breathitt
tees for UK;

names two new trusreappoints one: Poge

Vol. 58, No. 78

Eight--

Hope, Doubt Felt
About Rumors
Of Council Move
By MARVA GAY
Kernel Staff Writer
Sentiment of ix)Iitical science faculty members toward the reported interest of the Guncil of State Governments in moving to
Lexington is one of doubt mingled with hope.
Some faculty members doubt
2. Lexington
is near good
the move will ever come. Only transmrtation lines for lx)th air
one, Associate Prof. J. L Reeves, and road.
3. Lexington
is big enough
expresses any real hope.
The G)uncil is concerned w ith to meet the council's needs withstate problems. Long located in out overshadowing it.
Reeves said "if the council
Chicago, the council has a staff
of 57 and an annual working budwere to move here, I hope UK
would expand to some extent
get of $750,000.
Reeves said that Lexington
in state and local government
would benefit from the counand in service at the state and
cil's moving here. It would bring local levels.'' Reeves said that
many top officials here. Reeves UK might also acquiremore state
said.
and government documents and
He gave three reasons for might increase its general librarthe choice of Lexington as the ies.
council's future home.
However, the council is in1. Lexington is near the cencreasingly concerned with the
ter of the states.
problems of urban areas and
Kentucky is one of the few states
in which the urban population
docs not exceed the rural one.

Columbia
May End

Class Ranking

(c) New York Tlmei Ncwi Service
NEW YORK The Columbia

College faculty voted overw helm-ingl- y
last week to request the
university administration not to
release students' class standings
to Selective Service boards.
If adopted by the university,

the proposal would prevent the
registrar from issuing a certified
statement of rank in class either
to Selective Service Hoards or
to the individual student. Class
ranks could still be sent to graduate schools, however.
At present, university policy
directs the registrar not to release ranks to local draft boards
unless the individual student
On Tage

8

ECEIEKF
Kentucky
University

The Sigma Chis put their number one
rating on the line: Poge Six.

In addition, the facilities of
research, and
the computer
may not be enough to meet the
needs of the council.
Lexington does not have a
large convention center or a large
tourist trade with which to enhance state representatives to
UK, Spindletop

science-departme-

come here.
Two other sights are being
exconsidered by the
ecutive committee, which is empowered to authorize the headquarters move and to select a new
sight. These locales areColorado
Springs, Colorado, adjacent to
the Air Force Academy, and Indiana University at Rloomington.
A Member of the UK Political
Science Department said that
the Colorado sight would be too
far west.

Lr

of

LEXINGTON, KV., WEDNESDAY, JAN.

i"iK;-Jt-

' "''- -

iA bin in

m

m.f r..1
aimnf n.,n
ttm i nuiX
tion; and, on the right, Kcndrick Wells, a

You can read Henry Ward's campaign slogan
two ways. Co for Ward in '67, or go forward in
'67.
Either way is right, thegubernatorial aspirant's

supporters say.
Tuesday night they held a reception at Lexington's Red Mile Clubhouse to get more Fayette
Countians to go for Ward in the current primary
campaign.
The affair was an exercise in modern practical
politics.
"Look at this," said one of Ward's aides sweeping his arm around, "There must be fifty different
little groups of people making small talk, meeting
others, all enthused about the candidate."

'

,

r

third-yea-

law student.

Kernel Photo

"That's what we need, enthusiasm," said

an-

other.
With all the people running in this years
primary, there should be more than enough enthusiasm in the air. Ward's people want to get their
share, or more.
A dozen members of the University's Delta
Delta Delta sorority were recruited to distribute
Ward bumper stickers and pamphlets.
Other UK students are forming a campus group
votto take advantage of Kentucky's
ing priviledge. The organizers aren't ready to
discuss their plans, but they are already echoing
their elders' sentiments: "Co for Ward in "67."
said one, "and Kentucky will go forward in '67."

More Specialization Amplifies
Teacher Shortage, Ginger Says

Why is there a teacher shortage in Kentucky?
Increased specialization is
one reason, one University educator believes.
Dr. Lyman V. Cingcr, commenting this week on the current shortage, said that "teachers are being taken out of the
classroom and placed in special- -

La-Vir- e,

Pro-grai- n.

miaul.

Ward Opens Drive A t Red Mile

"Most people feel a learning situation in w hich
the only prognosis is failure is unfair," Litton said.
"You can't do much to change the student; the
only thing left is to manipulate the institution's
program or curriculum. If you buy this concept,
there is no limit to how far you manipulate."
"In discussing
colleges, we let the
term 'college program get in the way," Litton
grasp the system's committment to "an education said, "and immediately talk about standards. A
of the most for the most," LaVire said, "it is more successful
approach is to look at the program
as a community service."
Third of four parts.
"That's right," LaVire, of rival University of
Florida, said. "Rut a disdain for traditional stannatural that 50 percent are trying to reshape comdards doesn't mean no standards." The two agreed
munity colleges into universities and 50 percent
of the
are trying to reshape them into high schools." that standards should be defined in terms
director of the University seriousness of purpose on the student's part, and
Dr. LaVire, associate
of Florida's Junior College Center, is strongly so as to measure the growth of each individual.
Litton said he had no sympathy with the stur
admissions policy and
committed to an
dent who made no effort, and would not hesitate
for those who enter com"success expectancy"
to eliminate him from the classroom, "but I don't
munity colleges, and to strong remedial programs. want to
keep even him from having that educational
Maurice Litton of Florida State University,
Dr.
"not sure how enthusiastic" he was about re- opportunity later, when he has matured."
"From Junior to Senior College: A National
medial programs, joined Dr. LaVire in an interM.
view on these and other aspects of community Study of the Transfer Student" by Dorothy
Knoell and Leland L. Medsker named motivational
recent community-junio- r
college life during the
lack a major cause for attrition of junior college
college conference here. Litton is codirector of
transfers. LaVire feels that authoritarianism in the
the Southeastern Junior College Leadership
LaVire is an associate director.
Continued On Page 7
open-doo-

W

Light Pages

"SPN

Flanking gubernatorial aspirant Henry Ward and
Mrs. Ward and Jerry Coins, an A & S Senior;
Charlie Reason, a junior in business administra

Community Colleges Need
To Understand Their Role
By HELEN McCLOY
Kernel Staff Writer
The number one problem facing community
colleges, according to education leader Willis
is a lack of understanding on the part of
lay leaders, faculty, and the public in general
about "what community colleges really stand for."
Because there is not time for the faculty to

'

"

18, M)b7

two-ye-

ar

ist positions becauseof increased
government funds."
The retiring dean of education agrees with Don C. Rale,
Kentucky assistant superintendent for instruction, that the
increased number of emergency
teachers in Kentucky this year
came alxnit largely becausequal-ificteachers are being used to
implement the U.S. FJementary
and Secondary Kducation Act.
Of the 200 Kentucky school
districts, 13 areemployiug emergency teachers, compared with
only 90 districts last year.
The specialist positions were
created under Titles I and II
of the Education Act. Such jobs
are in areas of remedial reading,
health, guidance and counseling,
library service and special education to handicapped children.
These and other programs already have been activated in
Kentucky.
A total of $25.8 million has
been allocated to state schools
this year under terms of the act.
"It is impossible to tell when
the need for emergency teachers
w ill peak, because it depends on
how much the government will
put into these funds in the future," Dean Cinger said.
"There is no backlog of quale
ified teachers," he added.
this drain began, Kentucky
hail a steady, rapid
in the number of emergency
teachers."
Dean Cingeralso points,
that many other states pay
higher salaries and qualified
teacheis olteu migrate to those
states anothci leason lor moie
cmclgciicy teacheis.
d

1

"Re-tor-

cut-bac-

k

how-ee-

i,

He cited Indiana, which pays
beginning teachers about $6,000
a year, while Kentucky pays
aUnit $1,000 less and has the
same ditterential tor more experienced teachers.
"Kentucky teacheis now eaui
higher salaries than they used
to earn, but the salary scale
has not mov ed up as in other
states scales."' he noted
Dean Cingcr pointed out that
Northern Kentucky has always
had a problem because of its
proximity to Ohio, which also
pays higher teacher salaries.
Louisville and Jefferson County,
he said, are forced to hire emergency teachers because of the
population increase and double
school shifts, and the county's
Indinearness to
ana.
The emergency teacher situation will continue to grow for
another two or thiee years,"
before it gets better," Dean Cinger believ es. He said the program
brought about by the new Federal legislation will continueand
that even more money will be
put into the Kentucky program.
better-payin-

g

A Kentucky emergency teacher must have at least
college
semester hours, plus nine hours
in the subjec t he teaches.
Dean Cingcr explains, however, that most emergency teachers are women who have college
degrees, often in one of the aits
and sc ienc es fields. Most o the in
were married following giadua-tioand for awhile weie
housewives. Otheis weie

n

full-tim-

oltice woikeis. "drafted" by local school ollu ials into the Jass
ioont.

e

* 2

--

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Jan.

18,

l)7

Docuniciitary Scries
Premierhig Here Now
The I'nivciMtx

It. is bet n selected for the
prcmiuc show inn f
document. ,i film drpk tinn life in lYm, Soiilli

new

Aimiii a.
Julicii

3

woild tr avclcr and cxccutiv c director of tin In- Film I'oiindatic n. is presenting siv of his recent films
dining a live day meeting in Lexington this week. The series will
i lost- Fiid.iv
Snvred by the Oliver Wcn-- 1
tI I Holmes Institute and UK's
(Council on Ajjinn, the scries alv
ti l nation.

HiA.m.

il

-

1

includes documentaries on
Turkey, the Middle East,
ancient Knypt and Israel, countries prominent in today s news.
The meetings will be held
at the Presbyterian University
Center on Hose Street. Subscription for the complete series is
$5, wJiich includes the
one guest.
Hus-si-

JULIAN

BRYAN

a,

UK Bulletin Board
students experienced in
layout, page design, copy counting and blockingon a high school
or college yearlxok are encouraged to contact the Kentuckian
All

Miss University of Kentucky
Pageant applications are available in Room 201 of the Student
Center and at the frotit desks
of the residence halls. Applications will be accepted through
Friday.

Office, ext. 2392.
Keys, junior men's honorary,
will hold its annual initiation
and banquet Thursday in the
lobby of the Commerce Building. All members and applicants
are urged to attend.

The A.C.S. Student Affiliates
will meet at 4:00 p.m. Thursday
in the Chemistry Conference
Room

CP-13- 7.

The Student Guide to Courses
Committee will meet Monday
at 6:30 p.m. in Room 117 of
the Student Center. All interested are invited to attend.

Christian Felwill meet this Friday
lowship
in Room 10D, of the Student
Center at 6:30 p.m.
Inter-Varsit-

y

FIRST AREA SHOWING!
PH.

r ELECTRIC

252-449- 5

R

Starts
7:30
Adm. $1.00

v$.

Tm
JJf o

MARRY
...OR DIE!

A

Power

The Philharmonia Hungarica,
with guest pianist Ludvvig Hoffmann, brilliantly performed four
intricate and precise compositions by musical greats Haydn,
Beethoven, Liszt, and Hartok.
Many of the musicians escaped from communist Hungary
during the 1936 rebellion, regrouping in Vienna to continue
their careers under director
Caridis. This is the orchestra's third tour of theUnited
States.
Haydn's overture to the opera
"L'incontro improvviso" began
the program. This three movement overture began slow and
ended slower. The sleepy little
melodies climaxed on a sour note
by the trumpet and mercifully
Mil-tiad-

Somerset Community College
Has Its Own FM Radio Station
To The Kernel

Special

SOMERSET One of the University's newest community colleges is also the first with an FM radio station.
educational
Initiating $10,000 worth of equipment, the
station went on the air this week at Somerset Community College.
tt

Broadcasting 103 and the broadcasting communications practicum
run the station.
The station concept comes from the possibility of a
associate degree program in communications being offered at the
two-ye-

college next year.
Although some programs will be pretaped, many, according to
SCC Student Council President Jerry Booher, will be student-produce- d
and originate from college concerts, panels and the like.
The station will broadcast from 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Somerset opened in the fall of 1965 and has a present enrollment
--

of 600

full-tim-

students.

e

yTytn

ended.

63 o pm

A
. TsITTa

No.
,

this enga

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charc

no

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Alt

Beethoven's "Symphony

It is unfortunate that more
people didn't take advantage of
this fine orchestra. Their story
of escape and freedom is clearly
overshadowed by their capacity
to musically entertain.

The wild, sensuous, erotic
dance of death is recreated in the
listener's imagination. Bartok's
music is full of atonal chords
that fill the gap left by the
absence of the dancers.

1

TlTT'IMVr'i I1T1 1117

bhes l'lHlJlcILKiAlii)lliri
n

'

,

"rA

hr merriest men on
the holiest chase

""V'"""

Ludwig Hoffmann performed

And

Franz Liszt's "Concerto No. 1
in E flat major." Berlin born
Hoffmann is making his North
American debut with the
Hungariea. Hoffmann
has been internationally acclaimed for his "incredible technique and glorious musicality.

Evil

Are
In

Unholy
Wedlock!
ARTS

PRODUCTIONS

Memorial Coliseum has never
seen a more brilliant pianist.
Hoffmann's runs were flawless,
t,
his timing
and his
rapport with his music was complete. No one, with the exception of the composer himself,
near-perfec-

SAX ROHMER'S

IN

COLOR

k

I

Phil-harmon- ia

Joined

SEVEN

By DICK KLMMINS
Kernel Arts Writer
A
small but appreciative
crowd was treated to an exciting musical event Tuesday
night in the first 1967 concert
of the Central Kentucky Concert
and Lecture Series.

in B flat major," Op. 60,
was masterfully executed as the
next selection. This tedious and
difficult composition was done
w ith
surprising ease by the string
section. Beethoven's Fourth is
rarely heard, but has, of late,
been performed more and more
by concert orchestras.
After the intermission, pianist

f7?At Li

1

Music: A Delightful Evening

4

HEATERS

)

TIIE nilLHARMONIA IIUNCARICA IN PERFORMANCE

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beautiful

?

most

peter falk ianlmnnen
.Jonathan winters
11! 17 it,

...THE STAR STUDDED...

plays Liszt better.
The suitefromtheballet"The
Miraculous Mandarin" completed the program. Bela
ingenuous story of a young
girl forced to lure unsuspecting
men to her room only to have
them beaten and robbed was
superbly executed by the

niiD

3

maiKi

mwkl

LtAififj

wamau

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lantnarv

i)in

Bar-tok- 's

CHRISTOPHER LEE - DOUGUS WiLKER - MARIE VERSINi:THE

BRIDES OF FU MANCHU"

2nd First Run Terror

The Kentucky Kernel
SEVEN ARTS PICTURES RELEASE V7iJ

DANCING

every FRIDAY & SATURDAY,

2

p.m.

(Eantabg

708

E.

IN COLOR

MAIN Sr., opposite Henry Clay High School

FRIDAY

"THE

EXPLOSIVE

from Huntington,
SATURDAY

W.

DYNAMICS'

V.

"THE FORMATIONS'

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
UK Post
of Student Publications,
Office Box 4986. Nick Pope, chairman,
and Patricia Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894. became the Kecord in 1900, and the Idea
in 1908. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.
SUBSCRIPTION

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Yearly, by mail $3.00
Per copy, from files $.10
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Associate Editors, Sports . . .

News

Desk

Advertising, Business,
Circulation

J

C.Jwhat
they do

2321

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UW

together..
As

SHIRLEY

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..is a crime!!.VQ
MICHAEL

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,

1:20, 3:30. 0:25,
7:30, 9:30

2320
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* Tin:

Exciting Series Of Productions
Ahead Of Local Theater Fans
By ROBIN CRAVISS
Lexington theater fans are in
for an exciting run of
productions
through the combined offerings of

The production dates are Feb.
17, 18 and Feb.
Anton Chekhov's "The Sea
Gull" will be our next stop on
the University's Cuignol Theater; the circuit. Pnxluced and directed
Lexington's Community Theater, by Wallace Rriggs in Cuignol
the Studio Players; and the TransTheater, Feb. 22 through 26, we
are again extended the promise
ylvania Theater Association.
The first production offered of a memorable evening of thewill he Garcia Loca's" Yearma,"
ater.
directed by Phillip Chapman,
Chckliov discribed his works
produced in Transylvania's
as comedy, however, in "The
Little Theater. Production Sea Cull" as in most of his
dates are Feb. 14 through Feb.
plays he saw drama in the every18.
day lives of human beings in their
Yearma is a young Spanish
constant effort to endure, survive,
peasant girl, who after several and surmount their problems.
years of marriage, has not been
This story of a middle-ageable to bear a child. The story
and fading actress, her lover, son,
tells of her frustration and anxand his love for an aspiring actiety through this period of steriress is still in the casting stage
lity.
of production.
Marty Smith plays the lead
Guignol's final production,
role of Yearma; she is supported
scheduled for April
is
by J. J. Smith, Grady Lehman,
Brecht's "The Good Woman
Jan Lipuma and 23 additional of Setzuan."
Raymond Smith will
performers.
direct this major drama. The
"The Subject Was Roses"
calls for three acts, many
which won a Pulitzer Prize for script
interludes, and a cast of 21 men
author Frank Gilroy will be Stuand ten women.
dio Players' first production of
The story is of three gods
the year. Director Louis
who come to earth in the quest
has indeed promised us an for
goodness. They discover Shen
unforgettable evening of theater Te, a prostitute, and see her as
in his selection of the cast. He
is putting on a Lexington stage
three outstanding performers,
254-85- 83
Jane Lambert, Charles Drew, and
23-2-

Car-ric- k

d

Bar-to-

5-- 9,

Wein-stei-

n

1

J'

,

y

;

t

j.m. ih, im,7

wycIimmI.iv,

;

the only one worthy of their gifts.
She is given gold to buy a tobacco shop, but becomes the victim of parasites, for in her goodness she can't refuse to help those
less fortunate.
"The Cood Woman of Setzuan" has many fine comic effects woven into the thread of the
drama, the gods themselves fall
victim to many of the troubles
which beset mortals.

Studio Players finishes the
season with a comedy, "Critic's
Choice." Ira Levin is author of
this Broadway hit which featured Henry Fonda in the role
of the beleaguered drama critic.
The hero is a drama critic.
What is the most searching way
to test his integrity? Have his
wife write a play. A stinker, naturally. There you have the beginnings of the problem. There
are complications .
results,
laughs that are good ones. Mark
your calendar for April 14, 15
and
Variety is the keynote of the
scheduled productions, entertainment ranging from tears to belly
laughs, certainly something for
everyone who loves the theater.
.

.

20-2-

I

f

for DELIVERY

William Stakelin.

klmtcky kkkmx.

i

r

fcl'imnnr--

'

'

i

iihimi-

:"--

-

ii'n

n

'' j

':K.

$

.

THE

This comedy-dram- a
about a
young soldier's return home after
an absence of several years, has
something for each generation.

1

DAILY

University KARATE CLUB

TWO KEYS
DELIVERY

Presents A one hour free demonstration of the power and effectiveness
of self defense for men and women through Karate. It will include a demonstration of mental power through which the demonstrator can perform:
1. BREAKING BOARDS IN THE WATER.
2. KICK A HUGE BOARD INTO HALF IN THE STOMACH
OF A
WOMAN WITHOUT HURTING HER.
DONE BY TWO
3. WITHSTAND THE
HUGE

SUNDAY

HOURS

CLASSIFIED ADS

FINGER-BREAKIN-

GIANTS.
Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed in The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not include,
as a qualifying consideration in deciding whether or not to rent to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.
FOR SALE
FOR

New

Moon

10x56.
separate dining room; hidden bed; 2
bedrooms; fenced yard; awning; storSALE-19-

64

age bin. Call
FOR SALE

16J5t

51x10 mobile

1964 Elcona

home
everything connected;
wall to wall carpets; washing machine. Take over payments. Call
or
16J5t
set-u-

266-24-

1953 MG-TERG. black
interior, walnut dash, AM-Fradio,
new paint, completely rebuilt mechanically. Closest offer to $1500.

FOR SALE

17J4t

WANTED
WANTED
Ride from Richmond to
UK four days a week. Classes from
until four. In Richmond call
eight
17J2t
WANTED
Drummer and lead guitar
to complete a group with a bass,
sax. and organ. Prefer singers. Call
254-1717J2t
ask for Larry.

wanted. 336 S. Mill,
plus utilities. Large 3 rooms
plus bath. 10 minutes from campus.
17J2
Off street parking. Call
MALE WANTED to share house with
or come
three others. Call
17J4t
to 123 Transcript.
ROOMMATE wanted Female to share
new efficiency apartment, $50 per
month. 334 So. Broadway.
ROOMMATE
$33.33

233-11-

FOR SALE

after

1962

radio; snow
6 p.m..

Volvo

tires;

PV544;

AM-F-

clean. Call

16J5t

36,x48' drafting table with
parallel bar for ambitious engineerCall
student.
ing or architectural
16J5t
after 6 p.m.,

FOR SALE

MUST SACRIFICE 1966 two bedroom
mobile home, $3,300. Ready to live
in; lot 31 Holliday Park, 1063 New

Circle Road. Call UK College Educa17J3t
tion 2771. Station 331.

FOR

rent

ator.
from

UK.

or

9

Linden
after

COME AND WITNESS FOR YOURSELF

12J5t

RENT--On- e

347

352

girls,

255-46-

Linden

room

w

BRING YOUR DATE

ith refrigerOne block
13Jtf

Walk.

Call

FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 7:30 p.m.

17J2t

KERNEL CLASSIFIED ADS BRING RESULTS

Taylor Education Building

TYPING
WILL

DO TYPING. Call

BABY SITTING
FACULTY WIFE will care for 2 to
4 year old child in my home week17J2t
days. Call
MISCELLANEOUS
RIDING

Priindoor
vate lessons only. Saddle riding.Mary
seat,
Glenn Blankenship. Hunter seat,
Nancy MacLean.
Sheragay Farm.

LESSONS

41

18J3t

JOANN G. I shall have my revenge.

NOW
Spacious, modNice.
'tween
Must be mature. $92.50 up.
5
HJ15t
p.m.

AVAILABLE
ern, close,

S. U.

252-90-

1,

26

16J3t

HAPPY BIRTHDAY
from his "baby."

to the big

Beginning 5:00 p.m. 'til closing

2

EXTRA SPECIAL OFFER O
Any order of 5 or more Pizza's

Ml

O

D

Clearance Sale In Progress

earns caller

Winter

SCOOT OVER TODAY FOR SURE

W

Med.

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MOZZARELLA

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1.05

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OLIVE

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* The Kentucky Kernel
The Smith's (hitstanding College Daihf

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I'.NIVI HSIIV OF Kl.N'll'CkY
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WEDNESDAY, JAN.

1894

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The Land Of Cotton
Two letters appearing in today's
letters column raise anew the
question posed by two graduate
students during the fall semester
final examination period:
Should Dixie be played at UK
athletic events?
The two students asked Band
Director Fred Dart and Athletic
Director Bernie Shively to drop
the song from the band's portfolio since it is often identified
with the diehard segregationist
movement and is, in fact, the Ku
Klux Klan song. In addition, the
playing of Dixie at UK athletic events is often the focal point
of the chorus of "glory, glory segregation," the waving of Confed- -

It is indeed unfortunate that
students feel inspired to rise and
cheer to the playing of Dixie
and that Confederate flags are so
conscious a part of the athletic
scene, especially football games.
toDixie is as out
day as the ridiculous car bumper
plates with the words "Forget,
Hell!" superimposed over a Confederate flag.
g
oriRegardless of its
gins, Dixie has become a rallying march for segregationists.
Therefore, we think it should be
in the band's proif not dropped altogether.
gram,
We do not think the song should
be banned entirely. It has been
played and sung for many years
and is rich in tradition. Yet, it
is a credo for segregationists and
an insult to Negroes.
Dixie, we think, should be
viewed by Band Director Dart in
that light not merely because it
is pleasant music or a good cheer
song.
f-place

K

V"

CMt

Ol!E

folk-son-

Kernel Cartoonist

"Why can't they leave you alone, John?"

Letters To The Editor

Is 'Dixie' A Symbol Of Racial Bigotry?

f

the Editor of the Kernel:
True, Dixie is a good rabble-rousin- g
Ann Long's message to UK in
song, but the association
the Dec. 13 Kernel made it clear that has fonned between Dixie
that the University does not af- and racial bigotry is almost ines'
ford a good environment for Negro capable. Although the playing of
f
students.
Dixie does not force a student
To defend ourselves, it is temptto act unjustly toward Negroes,
to compare UK with Ole Miss, it does add to the social pressures
ing
erate flags and such outbursts as
Alabama and other Southern un- which prevent many white persons
"get that nigger" (a shout that
iversitiesUK would seem to have from treating Negroes with comwent up during the
an ideal racial situation. Why, mon courtesy.
game.)
then, do so few Negroes attend
The responsibility for treating
UK?
Dart and Shively, who apparentall people fairly, regardless of race,
There must be something wrong.
ly intend to let the matter drop,
rests with the individual. At UK
retorted that Dixie is a good Judging from Ann's letter, that it would eventually become easier
is a lack of regard
for white students to treat Negroes
spirit song, that students like it ''something" white
students for
better than the fight song or the among many
fairly if the band would stop play"Ama Mater" and that is a the feelings of the Negroes.
Such action would
Dixie
In too many instances, if a white ing
legitimate folk song of the South.
not be a panacea, but it would
UK student wants to remain a part
be a step in the right direction.
All, of course, are true, but of his social group, or "in" crowd,
on the balance we think the gradhe cannot, in a conversation with
Jeff Wade
uate students have the better arA & S Junior
his peers, defend the Negro. To
gument.
.disagree with someone who suggests that Martin Luther King,
for example, is an sob is too often
Wants 'Dixie' For Dixie
Kernels
I was infuriated when I read
socially unacceptable.
No great man is ever born too
When a white student yells
that actually two students urged
soon or too late. When we say
"nigger!" at a Negro, or shuts a to do away with the song Dixie
that the time is not ripe for this door in a Negro's face, he is showfrom school events. The students,
or that celebrity, we confess by
I assume, are either Yankees or
ing his friends that he is not a
implication that this very man, and "nigger lover" it's all a part of Communists.
no other, is required.
being cool.
As for the Yankees, since they
(George) Norman Douglas
Hegardless of'what he really bewon the war, that is good; we
o
lieves, an individual follows certain
might substitute Yankee Doodle
Call for the grandest of all cues, consc iously or unconsciously,
after each touchdown for their
in forming his attitudes and beearthly spectacles, what is that?
pride. As for the Communists, we
havior. The playing of Dixie at
It is the sun going to his rest.
might substitute the chant We
ball games is a cue which reminds
Call for the grandest of all human
Sfiall Overcome whenever the
the student that he is in the land
sentiments, what is that? It is
gets ahead of us.
that man should forget his anger where whites are supreme, and
Of course this is nonsense. Why
Negroes are to be "kept in their
before he lies down to sleep.
not sing the song Dixie in Dixie?
- - Thomas De Quincey place."
To

UK-Illino-

is

.

on

The song Dixie was written before the Civil War and I imagine it
will always be around unless some
Yankees and Communists take it
away the song (sic). The song refers that people are glad to be
in Dixie just as other regional
songs are about the West and the
North.

President Johnson says he sees
no North, no South, no West but
the people know that it is not so
in their hearts. The Southemors
(sic) have their heart in Dixie and
that is where it will stay.
Songs are intended to make
people happy and the song Dixie
does just this for Southemors (sic).
I am sorry that the Yankees are
jealous that they don't have a
song as happy as Dixie. It is not
the job of northernors (sic) to try
to reform Dixie. It is our job.
No one likes anything such as
suppression (sic) of freedom of
speech and song to be shoved down

their throat.
suggest that if any other moves
are made by the Yankees and Communists that the KKK (Kentucky
Kampus Klan) get organized in
their opposition's style with protest marches and give the Yankees
and Communists a KKK (kook'em,
kan 'em, and kick 'em) job.
I

Dixiecrats! We lost the last war
but at least let's not loose our
Confederate flags and Dixie.

Jim Savage
Junior History Major
Austin Peay College

* THi: KENTUCKY KERNEL. U ' dm sdav, Jan.

18,

I'm?

-'

POSITION PAPERS: THE NATURE OF A UNIVERSITY
YAF:

Adrift From The Past At Our Own Peril

By HANK DAVIS
YAF Vice Ch airman

progress, in reality the things that a conservative seeks to maintain are largely

Quite txmihly, the reader is wondering
why YAF, a political action group, should
be setting forth views on the nature and
purpose of a University.
We feel that compelling reasons exist
for this inquiry. For one thing, our YAF
chapter is a University organization composed of University students and is thus
involved in the activities of this Univer-

immaterial and intangib