xt7dfn10q043 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dfn10q043/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19411114  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 14, 1941 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 14, 1941 1941 2013 true xt7dfn10q043 section xt7dfn10q043 HE KENTUCKY KERNEL

ON PAGE TWO
The Only Way Out

ON PAGE THREE
Short Or Tall, There's
A Proper Way To Dress

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

VOLUME XXXI

I

Z246

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

Harriet Henders To Be Soloist
At Opening Musicale Sunck
ay
Reception In Union
For Soprano
To Follow Concert

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SAE AGAIN LEADS

Popenoe To Speak
Wednesday
To Two Groups

i

OF FRATERNITIES
Six Greek Men
Make All A's,
Report Reveals

BOB AMMONS

,r

i

Six fraternity men achieved per- feet scholastic standings last
as Sigma Alpha Epsilon
topped the 18 organizations for the
second consecutive time, according
to statistics from the dean of men's
office.
Those with straight A's were B.
J. Butler and Robert Rudd, Alpha
Gamma Rho; Ralph Osborne. Alpha Tau Omega; Bernard Stall,:
Delta Tau Delta; John Gaines, Phi
Delta Theta; and Robert Rogan.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, although ;
still heading the list, went down
.025 of a point from a previous
semester. With but five exceptions,
the rankings of the various fraternities went up. Kappa Sigma
showed the greatest improvement.
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MUSICALE SERIES OPENS

with a brogram by Harriet Henders, brilliant you n u sobruno
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uiuuimeu ff..fuoui uie Metropolitan opera ana Arturo I oscanm.

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orated with candles and chrysan- - The followine stuaents nave been
themums.
asked to assist: Dorthy Vauhn, I
In the receiving line will be Miss
,i a a
t,h
j Hallie Chandler. Barbara Rehm
i.nuvi a im Tv,,,.r, ricoiuciik auu
u3oi, m .
Mrs. Herman L. Donovan, Dean Be"y Pugh. Betty Rose. Betty
w. E. Freeman, Dr. Alexander Ca- - Avent, Mary Gabbard. Louise Ewan,
BILL PENICK
Rl'SSELL PATTERSON
purso, Charlotte Sale, Jack Thoman. Aan McMullen, Virginia Haynes,
These tour students were selected to membersliib in Omicron .251.
Josephine Baldauf, Ida Schoene,
and Ben Lamason.
march in the
Miss Mildred Lewis, Mrs. Alex- - Doris Reichenbach, Rita Sue Laslie, Delta Kappa, men's leadership, fraternity . and l
Judging actives only, the Alpha
ander Capruso. and Mis. Donald All- - Mary Rion, Emily Olgan, and Mable fraternity's first brocessional at noon today
a
Gamma Rhos pushed out the
ton will preside at the tea table. Warnecke.
Tau Alphas for first place
with an average of 1.568. Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, Triangle. Phi Delta
Phone Numbers
Theta and Phi Sigma Kappa fol-

n

Gam-mam-

ODK Chooses Amnions,

In Directory
Are Corrected.
Incorrect

phone

numbers

were listed in the student directory for the following so- rorlties. The correct are:
4573
Alpha Delta Pi
4426
Alpha Gamma Delta
Alpha Xi Delta
;.. 5536
1421
Chi Omega

In Vagabond Series

FIRST TRIP

Dr. Sanders went to Bulgaria in
1929. following his graduation from
Washington and Lee university. He
taught first in Sotia, Bulgarian cap-

ital

Dr. Sanders met his wife while

Beta Gamma Sigma Pledges
Ed Bowne, Cloverport, Bill Pen-li-Lebanon, and Helen PowelL
Bowling Green, mere named to
Beta Gamma Sigma, commerce college honorary, it was announced
yesterday.
The students were, elected by
members of the honorary nd commerce college faculty members for
high scholastic standing.
k,

Institute.

'

"rJ

GIVENS UIXON j

in Bulgaria. Together, they return"
ed to the United States: he did
graduate work for two years and
they returned to Bulgaria.
During this second period in Bui.
Dr. Irwin T. Sanders, associate
garia. he was dean of the American
professor of sociology, will be host
7792
; Kappa
Delta
college at Sofia.
to the third "open class" In the
series sponsored by the arts and
sciences college at the third hour
today in room 121, Frazee hall.
An authority on social conditions
in Europe following his six yean
teaching in Bulgaria, Dr. Sanders
will lecture on "Ancient Minds in
the Modern World: a Consideration
or Uie Cultural Lag."
About SO extra persons can be accommodated
in the open class,
which will be part of Dr. Sander's
regular sociology course at thi
hour.
BALKAN I MTV
"If the Balkan nations would
unite, they could fight Germany
successfully," Dr. Sanders told The
Kernel yesterday in recounting some
of his experiences while teaching in
Bulgaria,
Bulgarian students worked hard
er at their subjects than American
students, the professor said. EmphaMIHI'S THE WORD
sis there is on the classic educatheory.
for members of Morlur Board, senior women's honorary, as
tional
Though the French language it they begin their flower sale for tomorrow's game.
I ront row, left to right, are Doris Jieu lienuai h; Mary Our- the general medium if thought ir
Bulgaria, English is spreading more ner, president; Rita Sue Laslie;' and Lida Belle Howe. Back row,
and more over all the Balkan na- left to right, are Dorthy I'uul, Sara Triplet!, Betty South, Lorraine
tions, he added.
Harris, Mary I'oweis, and Louise Xisbet. Absent members are

of

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convocation

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Charlotte Sale and Mary La Buih.

CKLIA

BLDERMAN

Members of the Mortar Board
sell mums before tomorrow's
game in front of the Phoenix and
Dunn's drug stores, at the hotel
headquarters of the Southwestern
team and at the game. Orders for
flowers will also be taken at the
desk of the Union
information
building.
The senior women's honorary,
which has been selling mums and
corsages for all home games and
dances this semester, plans to use
the proceeds from the sales to f- lnance their many projects during
their year.
on the campus in
Organized
1920, the group has as its pur- nose "to advance the snirit of ser- vice and fellowship among univer- sity women, to maintain high stand- ards of scholarship, and to recog- nize and encourage leadership."
PROJECTS
This threefold purpose is carried
out by the organization through
varied projects during the school
year. In the fall, in order to be- come acquainted with freshman
women, a picture show party is
given in Memorial hall. Further
encouragement, along the line of
scholarship, is given to freshman
w'jnteii ii! the curing ''"lieu tlie lyj;1- .

will

SST

Will Jia FnllnwpH
By PrOCeSSional

fr

The new members were chosen
Wed.
4 meetlng of the
nesday in the Union building.
Ammons has been outstanding
with
publications
m University
three years service on The Kernel
staff and a year with the Ken- tuckian. High in scholastic stand- ing, the Kernel editor was also
recognized for his fjrk in the
association.
Student Government
His home is in Lexington.
Patterson, now president of the
Student Government association, is
a senior engineering student and
a member of Tau Beta Pi, national
engineering honorary. Louisville Is
nls nome.
.

Bob Ammons, editor of The Ker- nel; Russell Patterson, president of
the student body; Givens Dixon,
SGA treasurer: and Bill Penick.
president of the Union board, are
.
.
I
LUC 11CW Wi- - IV LfiCVtBO.
These four students were selected to the national men's scholarship honorary on the basis of scholarship and campus service, John
Claike. president, said.
They will be tapped in the tra
ditional ODK initiation ceremony
which is scheduled for 11:50 a.m.
today in i the first year room of
the law building.
Following the initiation, the new
and old student members and the
faculty advisers and members will
march in a processional from the
Law building down the main cam- pus walk to President Pattersons
statue in the center of the cam- -

dixon
Dixon"

member of The Kemel
stafr has been prorainent in SuKy
campus pep organization;
and in
the student Government associa- tion now serving as treasurer. He
from Henderson.
nQW
resident of tn'e
is The Ker- student Uuio
nels music critic. former member
DUS"
of Lances, junior men's honorary;
FIRST TIME
and nas been outstanding in for- AU members of the society will ensic and social service. His home
be in academic robes for the pro- - is in Lebanon.

1

oraiy presents cups to those

mak- -

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Ken-tucki-

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Betty Wel1
Roberts, arts and
standings.
ing
To encourage leadership among ' sciences senior, was chosen from a
sophomore women, names of those group of three finalists, to appear
who have been outstanding leaders as University representative on Fred
are invited to a "Smarty Party"
in the spring of their junior year, Allen's weekly radio program next
The new Mortar Board group is Wednesday night, it was amiounced.
Miss Roberts, who was elected in
chosen from these junior women on
the basis of scholarship, leadership, an elimination contest by student
service, and character. Pledges are balloting
last week, will leave for
tapped in an impressive service at
New York city Sunday to appear in
the annual women's banquet,
st
talent contest.
The organization's aim of service the
and fellowship is carried out by a Winner of the contest will receive
forum on parliamentary procedure $200 in cash.
which It sponsors each spring and
A member of the Kappa Delta
which is open to all students in-- 1
rorny, mjss itooerts appeared last
terested in learning correct proced- ure. Mortar Board also awards a 'ear U1 the "Collegiate Follies" and
pair of bookends to the freshman ' for a tilne as soloist with Bill Cross'
girl with the neatest room in Pat- - orchestra. She is a member of Phi
Beta, honorary musical and damatic
terson Hall.
Previously to 1920 the campus oganization. YWCA, and has taken
senior women's honorary was known part in several Guignol productions.
as Staff and Crown. In that year
the oigani.'vation joined the national
honorary Mortar Board, which now
Jennie Puckett, arts and sciences
has about 75 chapters in United
junior from Indianapolis, Ind., has
States colleges,
The local chapter of Mortar been named honorary pledge and
Board was the first established chapter sweetheart of Alpha Gamin the south, and plans are being ma chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma,
made to establish an alumni chap- - national professional chemistry
i. "
'er in LeMiii'.'jn
muiuuiiteU 'estersla"

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all-- A

coast-to-coa-

Puckett Honored

",

ONE OF THESE WILL BE PERSHING RIFLES SPONSOR

Sponsor Will Be Named At Ball
's
Presentation of Company
Delta; Virginia Henderson and Ge- sponsor will highlight the eva House. Alpha XI Delta; Sara
annual Pershing Rifles ball to be Ewing and Sue Fan Gooding, Kap- from 9 to 12 Saturday night P Kappa Gamma; Sarah Ander- in the ballroom of the Union 801:1 a"d Caroline Conant. Chi Ome- building.
8a: Patsy Horkan, Alpha Delta Pi;
This year s sponsor will be elect- - Wilyah Graves and Anne VloxDelta Zeta;
ed from 22 candidates, two from
Alm
U
dG
each sorority except Alpha Delta
Alpha Gamma Delta;
PI. which nominated only one, and Crawford.
five independents,
at an election Letha Hicks and Lavenia Warner.
to be held at 5 p.m. today in Buell Zeta Tau Alpha; Katie Lee Sny- armory. Each girl will march be- - ler. Maureen Arthur. Helen Culton.
fore the company with Capt. A. J. Betty Lebus. and Harriet Hord, in- Spare, and will be voted upon by dependents.
the officers and active members.
Contrary to the procedure of for- The candidates, who were named mer years whereby the sponsor was
by sororities and a committee of known for several weeks prior to the
officers in the military department, dance, her identity this year will be
are Louellen Penn and Pauline Mac- - known only to the company officers,
Donald, Kappa Delta; Julia Johnson
Chaperons for the dance will be
C-l-

1941-- 42

-

CS.l.i.l;. .f

ovan. Dean and Mrs. T. T. Jona,
Dean and Mrs. H. H. Hill, Dean
Sarah Holmes. CoL and Mrs. How-he- ld
ard Donnelly, Lt. Col. and Mrs. A.
R. C. Sander. Major and Mrs. John
E. Brannan. Major and Mrs. Lysle
Croft- MaJr and Mrs- - Gerald Grif"
fin, Capt. and Mrs. Chauncey 1.
-

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Car'er' Lt; and
and Lt- -

Jamie Thompson and his orches- tra. featuring Dorothy
SUtteu,
"Miss Kentucky of 1941", as vocalist,
will play for the dance, which is
l.
Tickets will be S1.10,
including tax and may be obtained
from any PR candidate, active or
officer of the company, or at the
information
desk in the Union
semi-forma-

COUNCIL MUST
APPROVE CHANGE
Future Holidays
Will Be Considered
President Says
No extension of
Thanksgiving holiday
ed, it was decided by
faculty at a meeting
ternoon.

the

one-da- y

will be grant-

the University
yesterday

af-

In an exclusive interview witu
The Kernel. President Herman L.
Donovan, who received the students'
petition after his return from Chicago Wednesday, set forth the reasons for refusing to grant th- - holiday extension.

"In the first place, the Counril
on Public Higher Education of Kentucky approves the calendai-- of the
University and the teachers colleges.
These calendars must be submittr!
a year in advance, and. once approved, are not to be changed without consent of the Council." President Donovan said.
The council will meet today in
s

Frankfort.

12t

WILL BEGIN
Yearbooks To Sell
For $4 Each
November 9

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Leaves Sunday
For New York;
Contest Wednesday

SALES CAMPAIGN

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1942 KENTUCKIAN

Sales campaign for the 1942
will be opened officially
Monday and continue through the
date of the annual Kentuckian
dance November 29. George Nollau.
business manager of the annual
announced yesterday.
j During the advance sale, price of
the yearbook Is $4. NoUu said, tut
after November 29 annuals will not
be on sale until next spring, when
the price will be higher. A dollar
deposit Is required on each Kentuckian.
Climaxing the annual campaign
will be the traditional Kentuckian
ball and crowning of "Miss KenFraternity
Rank Rank Standlns
tuckian." the year book beauty
Km. '2 sem.i i2sem.
Sigma Alpha: Epsilon
495
queen. Reigning with the queen will
1
1.481
Gamma Tau Alpha
be the campus' most popular man.
Alpha Gamma Rho
3
1.485
Phi Delta Theta
4
1.355
Candidate for the queen and
Phi 8tgma Kappa
1.32
J
most popular man honors are seTriangle
7
1.279
.953
fraternities,
lected by sororities,
Delta Chi
li
Delta Tau Delta
1.19S
groups upon a
and Independent
8igma Chi
1.187
II
sales basis, one candidate being perKappa Alpha
1.201
I
Alpha Tau Omega
1.317
mitted for each 15 sales.
Pi Kappa Alpha
10
194
The first meeting of the KenSigma Nu
13
1.135
Kappa 8igma
13
1.181
tuckian sales staff will be held at
Sigma Phi Epsilon
14
M
3:30 p. m. today in the Kentuckian
Alpha Sigma Phi
17
.871
Phi Kappa Tau
.917
If
office. Betty Howard, sales manager,
Lambda Chi Alpha
.771
It
yesterday.
announced
Tentative
salesmen for the fraternity, sororiStudios Go International
ties, and dormitories will be apThe University radio studios ex- pointed at this time.
tended their range to another naAll organizations desiring a page
tion when the Mutual Broadcast- in this year's annual should come
ing system arranged recently to to the Kentuckian office before 5
send its programs over the Canadian p.m. today, the sales manager added.
Broadcasting system.

ROBERTS WILL BE
REPESENTATIVE

Dr. Paul Popenoe. convocation speaker for Wednesday,
will speak on "How Do You
Know It's Love" at 4 p.m. Wednesday in the Music room of
the Union. The program is
sponsored by the Campus Service group of the YWCA.
At 5 p.m. the same day. Dr.
address
Popenoe
the
will
mothers and housemothers on
"Growing Up Emotionally." The
talk, held in the Music room
of the Union, was arranged by
Mrs. Sarah B. Holmes, dean of

lowed in rank.
Considering
achieve
academic
ments, Sigma Alpha Epsilon had
the select group of pledges of last
semester. After the Kappa Sigma
pledges came Delta Tau Delta and
Phi Delta Theta in order. During the first semester
of
1940-4- 1
the fraternity men in the
education college ranked first with
1.38; agriculture next with 1.20; engineering and commerce with 1.18,
and last of all arts and sciences
and law with 1.05.
The complete standings are:

FOR ALLEN SHOW

Morlur Board Sells Flowers
Jo Promote Campus Projects
Br

Penick, Dixon,Patterson
Initiation Today

t

No Holiday Extension
To Be Had This Year.
UK Administration Says
IN STANDINGS

c :i
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Third Lecture' """

second

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Sanders To Open Class
On Modern Cultural Lay;

The

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the year will be held the second
hour Wednesday in Memorial
hall with Dr. Paul Popenoe, director of the American Institute of Family Relations, delivering the address.
Dr. Popenoe, lecturer in biology at the University
of
Southern California, spent several years as an agricultural
explorer in Africa, India, and
Arabia before taking up his
work with the family relations

ya

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4

1941-19-

Paul Popenoe
Convocation Set
For Wednesday

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Harriet Henders. young American
soprano of New York city, mill be
featured soloist on the first Sunday
afternoon musicale of the
season at 4 pjnM November 16 In
.Memorial hall.
The young singer mill be accompanied at the piano by Walter
Taussig.
Singing the part of Sophie in
Strauss' "Der Rosencavalier". Miss
Henders made her debut In New
York at the Metropolitan Opera
bouse.
She had preceded her New York
debut with seven years of achievement abroad during which she sang
57 leading roles in as many operas
in Vienna. Leipzig, Prague. Hamburg, Graz, and Budapest.
Toscanini chose her for the part
of MarzeUine in "Fidelio", which he
directed at the 1937 Salzburg festival Miss Henders has been soloist
with leading symphony orchestras
f this country and has just completed her second engagement with
the famous Worchester festival.
In honor of Miss .. Henders, the
.
music committee or the union and
Mu Alpha, men's music honor- Phi
ary. will hold a Joint reception In
the Great hall of the Union build- imr followine the concert. All stu
.
ii.nt anri faMilt memheni are in- .
vited.
Sue Pan Gooding. Lexington, is
In charge of arrangements, assisted
by Josephine Baldauf, Molly Clay- ton, Jane McConnett, George Dud
ly, and George Gilbert.
The tea table and hall will be dec- -

II.

FRIDAY. NOVEMBER

SIGN ATV RES

The petition, which was put iota
circulation by the Student Bar association, was signed by at least
1200 of the 3500 students in the
University. The Student Government association submitted a resolution to President Donovan giving complete endorsement to the
proposed vacation.
"We hate to refuse the petition,
but we hardly think it fair to students, faculty members, and organization
that have already made
Schedules,
plans for the week-entocial programs and other engagements would have to be completely
disrupted," President Donovan said,
speaking for the faculty.
'Omicron Delta Kappa wonM
particularly suffer if the extension
fs granted, since they have already
mcde plans for a dance on November 22, and have engaged an
orchestra," he added, "This
would certainly not be fair to the
boys."
TRADITION
Another view of the situation
would be the deviation from a tradition that has been practiced as
long as the University of Tennessee have played a Thanksgiving
football game for the coveted beer-keOn the years the Wildcats go
to Knoxville, the students get a
three-da- y
When
the
vacation.
game Is played on Stoll field, only
Thanksgiving day is declared a holiday.
Four years ago. when the game
was here, the University "admihS-trati- on
granted an extension of the
holiday. Two years ago. no extension was given.
"We will be glad to take under
consideration any holidays in the
future that may be presented, with
the understanding that can be workbasis"
ed out on a long-ter- m
President Donovan said.
"It is necessary to be systematic
about the school program, and to
get the consent of the council in
time." he added.
NEXT FIVE TEARS
"For the next five years the Tennessee game will be played on the
day. and the faculty will be glad
to arrange the holiday on a long
time basis In a manner that will
suit the greatest number of students." Dr. Henry H. Hill. Dean of
the University, said.
Spring vacation has already been
scheduled to include Easter, a request made by the students through
the Student Government associ-tio- n.
Dr. Hill added.
d.

g.

Literary Society
Names Deadline

For Papers
A week remains before the
deadline for Patterson Literary
Society papers. John Long, president, announced yesterday.
These papers
of moderate
length and on any subject which
lends itself to philosophic or literary treatment should be
turned in to the office of Prof.
Marshall Ketchirm hi White
hall, or to Long before noon
Friday, November 21.
New members of the society
will be chosen from those submitting the best papers and
making a
talk on the
subject of the paper

* ill. What Can

The

Generation

What-The-He- ll

(This is the third installment of a three part
editorial on thr "
of the
present generation of college students. In
ones, the attitude was described as a
of confusion and unconcern . and it was
suggested that it teas a result of students' loss of
faith in the future. Today's will offer some suggestions as to what can he done about it.)
pre-redin-

tnix-tur-

e

If ihev vcr expert America to hccunie more
ious
than a Inmlwrinj;.

dwarf of

'

a

If ihev ever look fnr a world where freedom
and elciooe rae v rait live without paving lor the

privilege with ihe br-- live of everv oilier general ion:
If they ever hojif for wore than a cigarette-- ,
a .' k of cards, and a Coca-Cola- ,
the oiiU'e
of Amr-rwhave o wake up 10 one ihing:
dodging ihe questions all around ihem is uiterlv
finite.
The problems springing up are like weeds:
ihe more you ignore ihem. ihe more ihev grow.
Moping in a rorner can result only in ilie development of more things 10 mex- - over: laughing
i li in off ran end only in more and more unlit
there are ion many to laugh off.
(Vnainlv it would he pleasant if college
suidc-iuthemselves with
didn't have to
what is going on in the world, but the fact remains that I hey do. If college students, with
their opjioriunitv for extra training, fall down,
the place will he often for a plat it iide-s- i muting,
long armed demagogue to step in.
If college students continue to plav the
if they keep up their shallow. siier-fiattitude of unconial.
cern, if ihev continue 10 defer consideration of
the time will come
the war and the after-war- ,
when ihev are called upon to help determine the
pnlicv of their countrv, and ihev will have to
answer Not prepared.
It is not onlv desirable, hut it is iniK-ralivthai American universitv undergraduates hegin
immediately to prepare for what is ahead. With
a lutle effort bv their parents, direction bv the
universities, and a new outlook on the part of
the students themselves, we believe they can
do it.
stn-Hen-

lotus-

-eaters,

c

psctid-sohHticate-

d

What The Students Can

Do

age-ol-

whole-hearte-

d

eontc-m-Krar-

sola--lioi-

r

nrr-r

(uessing Game, 1911
..

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Opinion

In the Princeton Alumni Weekly
of October 10. there appeared a dissertation on "Our Mother Tongue"
purported to portray the manner of
speech of Princeton men. It was
written by two young alumni. Robert Bordley and H. L. Austin, who
called themselves Mr. Physteriss.
These
authorities on
campus talk credited the Tigers
such
with colorful phrase-makin- g
as this "Beans got his stiff card,
hopped the hound for
today
for
to show at the Cadwallader
and a quick load. Send
it to the Great Bear. The old Buak
will render me. Are you having a

d

group.

Another oini of disillusionment for young
has been the haggling, profiteering, and
of Big Business, labor, and the
itself in connection with dele-ussending. Knowing as ihev do thai this placing
of KTsonal interest above community inteiest.
even at ihe danger to the very life of the community, was the main cause of the fall of Franc e,
thev ran only view such actions with forelioding.
takes
We believe that if the government its-Ithe lead bv untangling its own messy delense organization and stopping the scrapping over jurisdiction, supervision, and control of defense funds
bv government agencies. Big Business and lalioi-wilsooner be inclined to lay down the ax until
the emergency is over.
lt is not through selfishness thai we suggest
the next move the goverment can make: stop
drafting college students. Indications have been
made by some army officers that ihe army has
more men than il can train properly right now;
and the complexion of the war, with its emphasis
on naval and air sirength, seems to make an over-largarmy inadvisable.
In view of the fact that the ten years of adjustment after the war will Mobably Ik- just
as important for the long-ranggood of
the snapping off of education of future
leaders seems to be a short sighted move.
nickel-grabbin-

self-styl-

government

re

soft-soli-

f

What The University Can Do
Because they are closest to the students, the
universities of America will necessarily be the
most important factors in the reshaping of the

Generation.

Previously we pointed out the necessity for
more intelligent discussions by present day sin- dents, but, of course, we don't expect evervone
orniiiwl

lhit-

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ti

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Hooey Pollui

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Could good We mittht as well go around
making Blinding noises in our
Which means in plain unadulfr. throats and writing our theses in
Hmm. miaht be a good
ated English A boy named Beans dr.uble-talrece:ed ix.i invitation, took a bus idea at that,
for Baltimore to a'tend the Cad- drunk. If you will send the bill to
Thp wher day ,n ft loca, UM)k
my father he will pay it. Do you snop. a lady was making every effort
have a date for the Yale game? to appear erudite to the bookseller
I am not sure but I have sent and a few browsing customers. She
remarked that she was particularsome telegrams.
ly fond of the novels of Edgar Rice
The odd thing about it all was Burroughs. The salesman pointed
that the Princetonians couldn't un- to the shelves and inquired if she
derstand it and we can readily un- had ever read "Lost On Venus."
a
derstand why. Such talk is a bit She wrinkled her brow, assumed
reflective pose, and finally broke
high falooting and in this case when
out "Oh yes. I think that la a
even the users don't understand it
marvellous story too. so well writwe are afraid it Isn't very much
ten by those two fine authors Offset and Dunlap!"
spook for the Yale mingle?
be. the grams are out"

k.

Il seems that now is the t Illicr you
nd place to inform all
that henre-fortcherts and
it

coed-chase- rs

..

De-s- e

i

be done to insure us of better service for our money? Or do we have
to go on letting our illnesses grow
worse while we wait for our nurses
to get, in the mood to minister
An infirmary is maintained by to our needs?
fees paid by the students and the
DORM RESIDENT
rule book plainly says. "All cases
of illness must be reported at once
to the resident nurse." But what
happens when you do report an illness? Well, as often es not absolutely nothing happens.
If you are lucky enough to find
one of the nurses, she might, just To the Editor of The Kernel:
'
might, condescend to give you a
"The letter of "Upperclassman
couple of aspirins and tell you to seems to have created a great deal
go swallow them. On the other of indignant opposition among UK
hand, she might tell you to go students. However, the manifesta-awa- y
and leave her alone because tions of this opposition appearing
she doesnt happen lo want to be in The Kernel are little more than
bothered just then.
sarcastic generalizations, and
I had a very, very sore casm is a poor method of combat-throa- t.
Following the directions in ing criticism.
my rule book. I went to the infirmLet us be factual, if we would be
ary. There sat two nurses and one effective. Mnst of us. if we are hon- of the staff members. I told them est. will admit thit we are not
my troubles and expected to get a getting as much from our colleee
little attention. Instead I was told experience as we should. We cram
to go home and wait until office for an examination, pass it. and
hours. Then, thev said, thev would
,n fnrott
cfllHv
fin
see what they could do for me. I -- - i,s a tmnl nnd we miss the thrill
have never seen or heard of a good f learning something purely for its
nurse who will deliberately stand own sake.
by and see someone suffer merely
The Universitv of Kentucky is
because it was not office hours. If nnpularlv fennun as the Co!.ntrv
I had been seriously ill. it would Cub of the South". I have heard
have been the same.
This is not the only complaint
about the infirmary service. Ask
any dormitory girl about the conditions there and she will cite example after example to illustrate
the poor service we receive. And if
,
we call an outside doctor, we are
molded severely,
,
Isnt tnere something that can

YOUR COURAGE.
YOUR CHEERFULNESS,

and
YOUR RESOLUTION
you approximately
more.

Men-denh-

...

...

...

They Say...

sar-Tod-

n,.

A7- -

bo-R- ita

miipK

-

JUST

All the education in the world will do no
good, however, if students tan still see no hope
in the future. It is up to the government and to
ilie parents of the students to ro ide the makings
of that.
A great source of disillusionment to the pres-in undergraduate was the Great Fizzle of l!M8,
the peace that was lost alter the war was won. the
'I reat v of Versailles: a great condit ioning factor
in their hesitancy about entering another war is
(ear of another Versailles. And as yet. the lead
cis of this country and ol F.ngland have given
no assuranc e of anv sort of eac e sen lenient to
work toward, and stude nts can only siishi i that
reaccanglii in the inevitable wave- of xst-wa- r
vindictive, overto another
tion, thev will le
balanced, retaliatotv
The students of America are not willing to
world domfight fot another svstem of
ination, even if it is by ihe llriiish Fmpire and
i IkI'nited Slates, because- such an unnatural
siate of aflairs can only be maintained by light
ing a war everv 2S vears or so. What they Vant
instead is a promise- of international cooiicra
lion, some sort of balance which will maintain
iiself without the necessiiv ol a World War III
-

one-side-

-

-

-

and World War IV.
I he parents and leaders of IHII must eiuil
bumbling around, trying to justifv a peace treaty
vkie.li the isi ok liu has pi oven a Hop F ng

A

STUDENT

...

'I

"

.

...

a

.

war-broke-

I

lAT

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u

ifitl

...

Heatliiuarlers for Victor
anil liltiehird Keeords

that's what students loda need, and Ihnt
is what can be done about it. They need a realization of their own position, and that can nl

wms

come from themselves; they need a hope of the
future, and that can only come from ll"how in power; they need the training (or 'hf
future and that tan come only from the unn :
-

';

ONLY YOU
can give
this pleasure

Avikrica's favorite oxford
Arrow's handsome GORDON and we
have a swell collection of
including some
Gordons
just your size! Gordon's a
t;reat shirt for sports and
business both. Get it today. Only $2.

.

What-The-He-

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

This is the gift that's
yours alone so personal and distinctive that it
is certain to be the most
treasured of Christmas
presents.
Better plan
early. Appointments are
suggested.

our "News

was

SWINGIN

ON

'j

7"

CPY
-

kJ-

NOTHIN-Tomm-

Dorsey
KOCKIV t'HAIK
Artie Shawls IT TABOO
Artie Shaw
THE SKI NK SONG
Tommy Dorsey
THIS IS NO
I.Al'GHING MATTER
Sammy Kayt--

Cabinet

.harp"1'"'-- '

l.""lMlr

I

made bv

Doirn

$Q50'
I

Lafayette

tuna

STUDIO
Phone 6271

ed

n
,l,in2tn;

SPECIAL

Victor Records

oonei
ah.'tor

--

1

1

'

-

II

CHRISTMAS

Popularity Contest

If that is forthcoming, if all these people are
willing to look into the future and forget
paltry little satisfactions to be won today nl
the expense of tomorrow then the
(wencration may eventually be the our to
set a stumbling world back on its feet.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Fditor
Ikm Ammons
Managing Tditnrl
Hanaue
Pat
Nfws Fditor
Jim WooiJincE
Business Manager
Bon HiL! fnmfyfh

:S

...

So,

pint

many people comment on the lack
among
of intellectual atmosphere
the students but you do not need
to base conclusions on this. Listen
in cn a few grill conversations for
definite proof.
When we finish college we are
going to. face a reality that is far
from bright. We must now prepare
ourselves to clean away the mess
made by the mistakes of another
feneration. I believe the best pre- paration for this is through edu- cation.
we need to forget about stand- ings or credits and do some con- Tf snrffc Ar
W1
from fit? a cfuHfirc
nrt riarino anri more clear
thinking, perhap