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 'I960 KENTUCKY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE ,
Date Opponent Site Starting Time
Sept. 17 *‘Georgia Tech at Atlanta ...,.................,.4....4......... 2:00 p.m. EST
Sept. 24 *Mississippi at Memphis ...............,.e..4....4‘.‘.A..‘...... 8:00 p.m. CST ,
Oct. 1 *Auburn at Lexington ...c.............,,...,.......A.A........... 8:00 p.m. EST
Oct. 8 Marshall at Lexington ..........l.......4...........,........... 8:00 p.m. EST 1
Oct. 15 *Louisiana State at Lexington ,....,....4,....,.............., 8:00 p.m. EST
Oct. 22 *Georgia at Lexington ........,.......4,....,..................... 8:00 p.m. EST j
Oct. 29 Florida State at Tallahassee ....4.......................4..... 2:30 p.m. EST I
Nov. 5 *Vanderbi1t at Lexington (Homecoming) ............ 2:00 p.m. EST `
Nov. 12 Xavier at Lexington .............,.,..........,....,.............. 2:00 p.m. EST , {
Nov. 19 *Ter§iessee at Knoxville ..................................,44.4. 2:00 p.m. EST r
Qi     ' l
  _ r ' 5; df’|`9S9 SEASON RESULTS
i ji;     G¤mes: Won 4, Lost 6 —- .400 r
W;r_S.EC Only: Won 'I, Lost 6 — .'I43 (Tenth PI¤ce)
? Date, l Opponent Site UK Opp. Crowd
U Sept. 19 *Georgia Tech .................. (H—N) 12 14 30,142 L
» ,· Sept.26 *Mississippi . 4..........4........... (H-N) 0 16 28,234 ,
Oct. 2 Detroit ...............,.,...,....,... (A-FN) 32 7 20,460
Oct. 10 *Aubum ........ . ........... . ........... (A) 0 33 30,000
Oct. 17 *LSU ............,..............,.,,..... (H-N) 0 9 31,936
Oct. 24 ‘Ge0rgia . .,,..................,,.,..,   7 14 19,351
Oct. 30 Miami ......,..,. . .,.,.. . ........ (A—FN) 22 3 34,547
Nov. 7 *Vanderbilt .... . ,....,.....,.........,.. (A) 6 11 25,000
Nov. 14 Xavier ........... . .......,...., . ........ (H) 41 0 20,024
Nov. 21 *"Tennessee ,.,..,.. . ...,,   . , (HC) 20 0 36,174 `,
140 107 275,868 1
* Southeastern Conference Game Home Attendance—165,861 `
H—Home A—Away N—Night FN—Friday Night

 I I
University of Kentucky
Q
Q •
I PUBLISHED BY: University of Kentu Q
T Athletics Association 2 / {é
I • ‘* *3 73*8.
°» a a» -,7
I rnzmnan Ann EDITED nv; °»f— Q, tj. ·;.
KEN Kuna %_ ,f. Q Q
Director of Sports Publicity Q` 0 QL Q,
{ ¢ ,
J. *6 ‘
• "¥
, J ••*'r*
COMPOSITION AND PRINTING BY: The Kernel Press, %—
University of Kentucky
•
sP0n‘rs Pu¤uc|TY omcz
TELEPHONE: 2-2200, Exe. 2241
V Memorial Coliseum
E Lexington, Kentucky
MRS. M-aYu.|s Punvns sc0TT|z HELT
` Secretary Student Assistant

 TO THE PRESS AND RADIO  
llere is your copy of the lSl(i() lientucky \\`ildcats Football Brochure  
which we sincerely hope will aid you in the process of covering U. of li. —,
football during the forthcoming season. If you desire additional infor— J
mation or have any questions not answered herein, please feel free to  
contact the Sports Publicity Ofhce. tg
A
Information if
\V()RI{ING TICKETS—.·\ddress requests to Sports Publicity Office as  
far in advance as possible. .-\fter Tuesday preceding the game. tickets Lf
will not be mailed. Pick up at the Information \\’indow in Memorial {
(lolisenm. directly across the street from the stadium. y I
(1OT»{PS—No individual game allotment.  
J
WVESTERN UNION—Advise if you intend to file from press box so i
that you may be assigned a seat adjacent to your \\~’estern Union opera— f
tor. It is also advisable to notify the Commercial Manager of \\'estern ’
Union in Lexington.
RADIO—s\pply directly to Radio Director, University of Kentucky.
McVey Hall, Lexington. supplying information regarding proposed
sponsors and any network arrangement. Booth assignment will be made
and working tickets issued by Sports Publicity Ofhce upon receipt of
approved permit from Radio Director. Spotters are available if re- li
tptested well in advance. Stations should order lines installed by con- ¤
tacting Commercial Department. General Telephone Co.. lil \i\i'alnut
St., Lexington. Rights to home games in areas outside State of lien-
tucky and state of visiting team assigned to (L. H. _[ohnston. lnc., New
York, N. Y. '
TELEVISION AND MOTION PI(1TURES—l.ive television coverage
prohibited except under N(1.\.\ auspices. .\ccredited 'l`\~’ stations or
newsreel agencies permitted to make motion pictures of game action
for delayed showing provided that no more than 200 feet of highlights  
of any game are used. .\n agreement to this effect mttst be executed tt
before permission will be granted. .\pplication should be made to the ,l
University Radio Director and forms many be signed for the entire i.
season. On request. the University will provide accredited newsreel  
agencies or TV stations·networks with a 200-foot newsclip of game t
highlights (processed I6 mm black and white hlm) at actttal cost of six .
cents a foot. y

 gi UNEVERSETY OF KENTUCKY
·* General Information
1 i.(}(1.\'l‘i()N—lxgxington. l*lCllill(`l§}'.
  l·`()UNl)iil)——l%iii5 l95E>»(}ilt *18). Ed Rutledge (\‘\lCSl(’l`ll Ky. '~1l), l“lO\\*11l`(l
SfllllCllL‘lll)Cl`gC1` (lientucky E36). Noun l)eel> (Eastern Ry. ’·l7), and
_]oe Shzannon (lietitntlty 59).
4 llli.-\l) ('lOA(Zl·lES OTHER SPOR'l`S—B;1sketball: Adolph Rupp; Base-
izttll: l‘lZll`1`}' liZl1l(`ilSlCl`Z Truck and (lross Country: l)on (Lush Seaton:
Swimnningz Algie Reece; Tennis: Bznllztrd Moore: Golf: D1`. L. L.
Mzirtinz Rille: l.t. (lol, Glenn \\'. Z;n`g_e1‘.
ll(1l{l{'l` SALES M1-\NAGER—H;11‘\‘ey l-lodges (lieinncky ’3l)
i_ .·\(l(lOUNTANT—_]ulien Harrison
  'l>l{.\Xl l’HYSl(ZlANS—l)1‘. (). ll. Nlnrphy und I)1: Ralph Angelucci
fl 'I`R.\lNER—_]ol1n l)1l}'ll(’ EQUIP. XlGR.—»Bnste1` Brown
5 SP()R'l`S l’lTi§l.lCI'l`\' 1)lRECTOR—l{e11 Kuhn (Michigan State *12)
  ll()USENl()'l`HERS—M1`s. Helen Fisltbzick (\\’ildt‘ut Manor) and Mrs.
, l:l“Illl(`Ch l‘il`i\llC1` (Kitten Lodge)
1 tQR()l‘Nl)5 SlYl"l`.—(1l:n1de (llucl;) lirnner
·)

 I
il
ATHLETICS AT KENTUCKY ‘
I
Kentucky's athletic program, a well—balanced and ambitious ac-  
tivity featuring inter—collegiate competition in nine different sports, is `_
organized under the Department of Athletics and a corporation known ,
as the University of Kentucky Athletics Association. gf
The program is conducted without overemphasis or sacrifice ol`  
educational objectives and in strict compliance with the rules of the  
University, the Southeastern Conference and the National Collegiate A
Athletic Association.
A Board of Directors. headed by UK President Frank Dickey, main-  
tains overall policy supervision of the athletic program. Dr. Leo Cha1n·  
berlain, vice—president of the University, has general supervision over  
the Department and serves as vice-chairman of the Board. Dr. A. D.  
Kirwan, one—time VVildcat coach and UK’s faculty representative to the li
Southeastern Conference, serves the directors as secretary and Dr. Frank  
Peterson, UK vice-president for business administration, acts as treas»  
urer in an ex-officio capacity.  
Supervising the steady growth and balanced development of one  
of the nation's top athletic programs is Bernie A. Shively, a former
Illinois grid All-American and a veteran of over 20 years in the post
of Director of Athletics.
The Association’s Board ol Directors is composed ol' the [ollowing:
Dr. Frank G. Dickey, l)r. Leo M. Chamberlain,
Chairman Vice Chairman
Dr. A. D. Kirwan, Secretary Robert Hobson
james B. Allen Prof. _]ohn Kuiper
Dr. Ralph Angelucci H. D. Palmore [
Dr. A.   Biggie Dr. D. V. Terrell
Dr. Aubrey   Brown Prof. \iVilliam A. Tolman
Dr. Thomas Clark Robert \/Vainscott
Dr. Lyman Ginger (Student)
Dr. IV. VV, Haynes
VICTORY KICKS 4
A game unique in University of Kentucky football history occurred
in 1900. Kentucky beat the Louisville YMCA, l2-6, without running a y
single offensive play during the entire game. Kicking on Hrst down ~
every time they gained possession of the ball, Kentucky made its scores
through the recovery ol opponent fumbles in the end zone.
4

   gy yy ey {7 ee yy y {ye yy 4;   :%
  {ti SEC ELEVEN OF THE DECADE (1950-S9) it
` Chosen For the Associated Press by 65 Leading Sportswriters
_ Q JV and Sportscasters of the South A
y * ‘]/& Lf
; Pos. Player (School) Senior Year
l {ii EN1)S ........4...............A. Steve Meilinger (Kentucky) ..........‘... 1952 X}
jimmy Phillips (Auburn) ........,....... 1957
l {X T.—\C1i1,ES .................. Lou Michaels (Kentucky) ...... . ....,.,. 1957 jp
  Bob Gain (Kentucky) .........,.........,.... 1950
  A CUARDS .....,........,..... Zeke Smith (Auburn) ..,.......4...,....._... 1959 T}
  'S Marvin Terrell (Mississippi) ..........4. 1959 S
  {X CENTER .....r............ Larry Morris (Ga. Tech) 4................. 1954 NL
l`_ Q_U.¤\R'1`ERB.·\Cl{ .... Vito (Babe) Parilli (Kentucky) ......., 1951 if
Q}: {X HALFBACKS .,,....,.... Billy Cannon (LSU) ...............,......4... 1959  
ll jackie Parker (Miss. State) ,44.......... 1953
{C l·`U1.1.BACK ...,r......... Charley Flowers (Mississippi) .,4,....,. 1959 Xg
The Associated Press poll also honored Kentucky players
Jig in the following manner: gg
Paril1i—Best Passer and Runner-up to Cannon as Out-
{Q standing Player, Best Back. Eg
Michaels—Top Lineman, Best Olfensive Lineman. Third
jg in Outstanding Player voting. `
T" (;ain——Second in Top Lineman voting. LS
<{?< 47* ifi   ·¥#— %? X? ¥¥ %?-   A? ¥?
HONORS COME LATELY
l From its football beginnings in 1881 through 1942, Kentucky had
· only one player named to a recognized All—America team. In the short
xl span of years since, no less than seven have earned first team mention on
the national honor rolls and four of the stars were repeaters. Sixteen
` \~\’i1dcats have received All-Conference recognition since the loop was
organized in 1933.
5

 .1
DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS  
BERNIE A. SHIVELY
Superxisiug the steady growth and balanced development of one
of the nation`s top athletic programs is the Herculean task being car-
ried out successfully by Bernie .»\. Shively.
l·`ew who have observed the untiring efforts of the tall, silver-
haired former .-\ll-America footballer in the service of the University
of lientucky since 1927 and as Director of Athletics since 1938 will argue '
his lituess as an athletic Hercules. Not only has Shively guided the de-
velopment of Kentucky as a
nationally—respected p o w e r in
  ._ » major sports, but he has also
  "   ..   - j gained personal prestige through
    _ Q a [air-minded approach to many
      t.— ’ `_ problems.
    a»°»·/   I ‘ l)uring his tenure as Athletic
  L  I  Vr_     Director, Shively has directly su-
      ` ` pervised major expansions in j
   5. ji     l{entucky's athletic plant result- l
  `  $4 f ri Y  · ing from the progression of the  
  _     1 school’s football and basketball *
  iiil   »  ·  I . , teams to greater national promi-
Y, · *2, _, ‘ nence and increased patronage
   3*   ,1 ‘ by the sports-minded public.
  _- 'l`he seating capacity of Ken-
    tucky’s football stadium, McLean
  I " - Stadium on Stoll Field, has been
  j doubled to bring the current
  .   number of seats to approximate-
  » ly 37,500 and on par with 111OSt
  I other schools located in heavier-
ii populated areas. Powerful light-
ing equipment also was installed
during the 1948-49 construction
to bring night football into new popularity. Partly to satisfy the over-
whelming number of basketball devotees, who could not squeeze into
‘ the 2,800-seat Alumni Gymnasium, a long—p1anned Memorial Coliseum _
was completed in 1950. Seating 11,500 persons for cage contests, the `
l`our·million dollar Coliseum also houses the Athletic Department.
6

 More recently, Shively directed the acquisition of a pair of modern,
‘ ranch—style living units which have served as the home of the football
* team since 1954. "\¢\’ildcat Manor" and "Kitten Lodge" replace three
{ frame houses which the gridders had occupied since 1949.
` A large dressing room building and football practice Field, used
since 1955, was abandoned in 1959 to make way for a huge new ]l1€l`l’S
dorm. Under Shively's supervision, a spacious new Sports Center was
A prepared a short distance away on the University farm to take even
better care of the footballers and spring sports teams. The Sports Cen-
ter is generally regarded as one of the Finest sports facilities in the
nation.
Y All-America Guard At Illinois
A native of Paris, Ill., Shively attended the University of Illinois
where he was an All-America guard in 1926 on the same grid team
A made famous by Red Grange. Demonstrating a claim to being one of
A the finest all-around athletes in Illinois' history, "Shive" also laid claim
i to the Big 10 heavyweight wrestling championship and annexed letters
in track before graduating in 1927.
Shively came to Kentucky in 1927 as line coach of football under
Harry Gammage and six years later was named head of the UK Physi-
cal Education Department. He succeeded Chet \*\’ynne as Athletic
Director in 1938. During this period and the years following, he also
served as track and baseball coach for several seasons and continued
to assist the football staff as line coach until 1944. The next year, 1945,
he assumed full charge of the grid squad for one season before turning
the job over to mentor Paul (Bear) Bryant in 1946.
The Kentucky Athletic Director served as chairman of the South-
eastern Conference basketball committee for a number of years and
for the past seven years has been president ol` the SEC Coaches and
Athletic Directors Association. Currently, he is the new chairman of
the NCAA Basketball Tournament Committee and of the NCAA
Summer Baseball Committee. He also has been active in numerous
state and civic organizations and projects, including present direction
of the county recreation board. For several years he was Supervisor of
Olhcials for the Ohio Valley Conference.
Shively and his wife, Ruth, have two children. Doug was a star end
» on the UK grid team for three years ending in 1958 and is now coach-
ing at VPI while daughter Suzanne was a Phi Beta Kappa graduate
ol` UK in 1957.
1

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°'¢n1·|, " com  ‘    

 BLANTON COLLIER
Head Football Coach
. (Six Years — Won 3'I, Lost 27, Tied 2)
i A quiet-mannered native Kentuckian who is widely regarded at
all levels of the game as one of football’s most brilliant tacticians and
, finest gentlemen, Blanton Long Collier is a man of unique background
` and the personification of a patient, thorough teacher.
\Vith only six years in the collegiate coaching ranks behind him,
, the popular VVildcat mentor might be considered a novice to the un-
l informed. But to his fellow mentors throughout the country, who know
, the facts of his background and football philosophy, he is held in the
  highest respect and already has been accorded "Coach of the Year"
l honor (1954) in the nation’s toughest football 1eague—the Southeastern
_ Conference.
A great many experts feel that Kentucky is fortunate to have the
services of one of the keenest minds in the grid sport who needs only a
1 few more "too1s of the trade" (outstanding players) to boost the \iVild-
cats to the top. Although his first six Kentucky elevens have not reached
the Southeastern Conference throne room or taken part in a bowl, both
University ofhcials and the "Man In The Street" are solidly behind
Collier and the program he directs with hardworking efficiency. Illus-
trative of this confidence is the new contract that the coach was awarded
following the 1958 campaign, extending his services to Feb. 1, 1965.
\~\’hen he gave up the security of a position as backfield coach
of the Cleveland Browns to take over at his home—state university in
1954, he fulfilled a life—long ambition and climaxed a unique rise in the
coaching game. He became a college coach for the first time after nearly
a quarter-century in the profession of tutoring football.
Born in Millersburg, Ky., july 2, 1906, and brought up in Paris,
Ky., only 17 miles from the University campus, Collier began his ath-
letic career at Paris High School by playing both football and basket-
ball. Later at Georgetown College, he lettered in both sports. Although
not an outstanding gridder because of his lack of size (he weighed only
125 pounds then), he nevertheless was regarded as a close student of the
{ game and, upon graduation in 1927, was named coach of all sports at
Paris High.
He held this position until he entered the Navy in 1943. During
16 years in the schoolboy coaching ranks, his teams won or shared two
Central Kentucky Conference football titles and six basketball cham-
9

 pionships. His last high school grid team (1943) ranked as unofficial
state champions. Also during this period he took postgraduate work
at the University of Kentucky and received a master's degree in educa-
tional administration in 1942. V
It was while he was stationed at the Great Lakes Naval Training
Station during his Navy tour that Collier and Paul Brown discovered
each other. Brown, a lieutenant and head coach of the Great Lakes
football team, became impressed with Yoeman Collier’s football knowl-
edge and added him to the staff as an assistant coach. The following
year (1946) when the Cleveland Browns were organized with Brown
as head coach, Collier made the unique jump from high school ranks
(via service ball) to the pros by going along as backfield coach. ?
During eight seasons with the perennial world champion Browns, (
Collier made a reputation that stamped him as a great teacher of foot- I
ball—determined but quietly patient. His special function as number (
one aide to Brown was pass defense and the club consistently ranked  I
tops in the league in this department. ‘
Enters College Ranks In 1954 As UK Coach
\/Vhen the Kentucky job became available in 1954 with the transfer
of Paul Bryant to Texas A Sc M, Collier was lured into collegiate ranks
for the first time in nearly a quarter—century of coaching experience.
Given a three-year contract, Collier launched an immediate attack
based on his version of the Split T offense and spiced with a generous
helping of gridiron fundamentals and stress on perfection in play
execution,
The results came almost immediately as the \Vildcats forged a vic-
LUl`y string of five straight from mid-season, capped with a win over
arch-rival Tennessee The Kentuckians were in bowl contention all the
way as they wound up with a 7-5 record for the 1954 campaign.
Coach Collier was rewarded by grateful school officials with a new
Hvc-year contract and fellow mentors of the Southeastern Conference
voted him "SEC Coach of the Year." In gaining this honor in his "fresh-
man" season at UK, an achievement made all the more noteworthy
since it was the first time the title had been bestowed on a coach
in his initial year of college tutoring, Collier climaxed a unique rise in .
the game. l
The 1955 campaign was virtually a repetition of the previous year. l
ln carving out a 6-3-l mark. Collier could point with pride to the fact (
that his men registered a win over Ole Miss, the only setback suffered l
10

 by the eventual SEC and Cotton Bowl champs, and a second straight
triumph over powerful Tennessee that eliminated the Vols from bowl
contention and again boosted the \Vildcats’ stock for a post-season date.
V In 1956, Kentucky slipped to sixth place on a record of six
wins and four defeats and in 1957 hit rock bottom in the conference
standings as the result of only three victories in 10 starts against some
of the South’s toughest grid powers. But there was some solace to be
gained in the knowledge that impartial observers classed the '56 record
as remarkable in view of personnel problems and praised the 1957 out-
fit, which wound up in a blaze of glory by upsetting Tennessee for the
third time in four years, as "probab1y the nation’s best non-winning
1 team." Another point of pride in the luckless ’57 record was the Wild-
` cats’ near upset of eventual national champion Auburn, who needed a
‘ key penalty and questionable help at the goal line to eke out a 6-0 win
1 on their home ground.
l The last two seasons have seen the Wildcats plagued alternately by
 4 injuries to key personnel and ill luck against many of the top teams of
the country while playing a calibre of ball that should have had them
‘ winning consistently. The ’58 record of Hve wins and a tie in 10 starts
was remarkable to observers in view of injuries and a "killer" schedule
while last year’s club (like their ’57 predecessors) was a gridiron enigma.
UK played to the limit of its ability, throwing serious scares into three
of the nation’s top five teams (Mississippi. LSU and Georgia won by an
average margin of l() points) before luck ran out. The Final, 4-6 record
failed to reflect the impartial opinion that they were the best non-
winning team in America.
Coincidental with his success on the football Held, Collier has
gained increasingly wide popularity and respect throughout the state
and nation. Relations with Kentucky high school coaches are at an all-
time high and the \N’ildcat mentor is constantly in demand as an au-
thoritative lecturer at coaching clinics all over the country. In the sum-
mer of 1957, he went overseas for the Army and Air Force to conduct
clinics for armed services personnel in japan and Hawaii. I-Ie also
served as head coach of the Grays in the 1958 Blue—Gray Game and pre-
viously assisted on the East coaching staff two straight years (1956-57)
for the animal Shrine East-\·Vest Game at San Francisco as well as the
1955 Christian Bowl game.
I Collier married Miss Mary Forman Varden of Paris in 1931 and
, they have three daughters-—Caro1yn, Kay and _]ane.
1
11

 KENTUCKY COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS
Record ·
Years At UK Coach-School Tenure Won Lost Tied Pct. "
1881 Unknown .................................... 1 1 2 0   _
1882-1890 No Competition `
1891 Unknown ...............,.................... 1 1 1 0 .500
1892 Prof. A. M. Miller (Prineeton).. 1 2 3 1 .416
1893 john A. Thompson (Purdue) .. 1 5 2 1 .687
1894 W. P. Finney (Purdue) .......... 1 5 2 0 .714
1895 Charles Mason (Cornell) .......... 1 4 5 0 .444
1896 Dudley Short (Cornell) ............ 1 3 6 0   ·
1897 Lyman B. Eaton (Cineinnati).. 1 3 5 0 .375
1898-99 W. R. Bass (Cincinnati) .......... 2 12 2 2 .813
190()—01 W. H. Kiler (Illinois) .............. 2 6 12 1 .342 ‘
1902 E. N. McLeod (Michigan) ...... 1 3 5 1 .389
1903 C. A. Wright (Columbia) ........ 1 6 1 0 .857
1904-05 F. E. Schact (Minnesota) ........ 2 15 4 1 .775
1906-07 ]. \Vhite Guyn (Kentucky) ...... 3 16 7 1 .687
1909-10, '12 E. R. Sweetland (Cornell) ...... 3 23 5 0 .821
1911 P. P. Douglas (Michigan) ........ 1 7 3 () .700 ,
1913, ’15-16 ]. ]. Tigert (Vanderbilt) .......... 3 16 4 3 .760 `
1914 Alpha Brumage (Kansas) ........ 1 5 3 0 .625
1917 S. A. Boles (Vanderbilt) .......... 1 3 5 1 .389
1918-19 Andy Cill (Indiana) ................ 2 5 5 1 .500
1920-22 W. ]. Iuneau (Wisconsin) ...... 3 13 10 2 .560
1923 ]. ]. Winn (Princeton) ............ 1 4 3 2 .556
1924-26 Fred ]. Murphy (Yale) ............ 3 12 14 1 .463
1927-33 Harry Gammage (Illinois) ...... 7 32 25 5 .556
1934-37 C. A. Wynne (Notre Dame) .... 4 20 19 0 .513
1938-42, ’44 A. D. Kirwan (Kentucky) ........ 6 24 28 4 .464
1943 No Team—VV ar Year
1945 Bernie Shively (Illinois) .......... 1 2 8 0 .200
1946-53 Paul Bryant (Alabama) ............ 8 60   5 .710
1954- Blanton Collier (Georgetown)., 6 31 27 2  
29 Coaches in 69 Years—Record for 612 Games ......   239 34 .581
GALS’ COACH FIRST UK MENTOR
Prot. .~\. M. Miller, who became Kentucky's first football coach in l
1892. was chosen because he had learned about the game from sideline
observations while a student at Princeton. His only previous coaching `
experience was at a girls` school in Pennsylvania. i
12

 THE COACHING STAFF
_Q   . ;·. _] ERMAL ALLEN
, . YT  ·-=*   · (Kentucky '42)
¤   Defensive Coach
3*       One of Kentucky’s most famous athlete graduates,
‘ ’     F Allen, at 39 has had a full career as a collegiate
3 ( ,   star, pro-football player and successful college grid
  _=_v___ coach. He starred at quarterback for the \Vildcat
   ```   forces from 1939 to 1941 and entered military serv-
_     ice following graduation. Retuming as a graduate
“ student after his discharge, Allen played two games
` of the 1946 season before a rules interpretation made him ineligible.
Allen joined the UK coaching staff of Paul Bryant for the remainder of that
season, spent the ’47 campaign as a T-quarterback with the professional
Cleveland Browns, whose backfield coach at this time was Blanton Collier,
and then re-joined the VVildcat staff in 1948. He became Kentucky’s head
freshman mentor in 1950 and was promoted at season’s end to backfield
J coach. Allen was retained in this capacity when Collier became head man
of the Wildcats and now is chief aide in charge of defense. In the off season,
he plays a lot of golf and copped the state amateur championship in 1955
and 1958. The mentally-sharp Allen holds a master’s degree. Hometown:
Morristown, Tenn.
(gf?. `·r‘ ~ _ JOHN NORTH
· 2 (Vanderbilt '48)
ff?     A Offensive Coach
    A former star flankman at Vanderbilt, ]ohn North
"Tv   joined the Kentucky coaching staff in the spring of
p -   ’`'’   1956 as Freshman Coach after a full career as col-
I  ‘_—_ »    legian, pro player, high school and college coach.
  The 38-year-old Tennessean played at Vanderbilt
  in 1941 and 1942. During \Vorld VVar II, he served
three years in the Marines. Despite shot—up legs
from South Pacific battles, he earned second string All-SEC honors at Vandy
in 1946-47 and played end two years for the Baltimore Colts. He started his
` coaching career in Tallahassee, Ala., in 1951 and three seasons later became
line coach at Tennessee Tech, a job he held until his transfer to Kentucky.
i After guiding the Kentucky freshmen to two straight undefeated seasons,
· ]ohn moved up to varsity end coach and last year changed duties to take
l over offensive backfield operations. North holds a master’s degree from
’ Peabody College in Nashville. Hometown: Old Hickory, Tenn.
13

 . A.»;.¢.,     {sév BILL ARNSPARGER
,   ’ f   (Miami (O.) ’50)
V  =‘` i  Offensive Line Coach
T · »
f "”     One of Coach Collier’s former grid pupils at Paris
, fr li?  g t (Ky.) High School and a native Kentuckian, Ams—  {
·~>·   ---` f¥° parger joined the UK staff in 1954 as an assistant _
. if  in charge of offensive line play. The 31—year-old  
·’   · ‘*`4 former Marine brought to the staff an excellent back-  
  ‘ , ground of coaching experience which began at
Miami (Ohio) U. following his graduation from
that school in 'SO. In 1951, he moved with boss \Voody Hayes to Ohio State
where he was tackle coach in charge of offensive line play for three seasons. x
Arnsparger played at tackle and guard on Collier’s teams at Paris High from
1941-43 and entered UK as a freshman in ’44. His tour of duty in the
Marines began shortly thereafter and he transferred to Miami U. after his
discharge to play under Sid Gillman and later Hayes. Like his current boss, V
Bill has his master’s degree. Hometown: Paris, Ky,
  BOB CUMMINGS
I ‘ i   (Vanderbilt '48)
    Defensive Line Coach
  Qi   f   Boasting thc unusual feat of playing collegiate ball
    »  ° ` % at two SEC schools—Vanderbilt and Georgia Tech-
  *v_;  ag   plus 13 years, coaching experience, 38-year-old Bob
    Cummings was appointed to the Kentucky staff in
      1959. He lettered as a varsity center at Vandy
  A ',,;;_;·QC  in 194:2 and a year later, upon entering the Marines,
" ‘  ‘° was sent to Georgia Tech under the Navy V-12 pro-
gram. He played on Tech’s SEC and Sugar Bowl championship team of
that season. After service duty, he returned to Nashville and joined the
Isaac Litton High School grid staff in 1946. By mid-season,