xt7dfn10rr2k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dfn10rr2k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660202  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  2, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  2, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7dfn10rr2k section xt7dfn10rr2k nm jRwm

Vol. LVII, No. 73

University of Kentucky

LEXINGTON,

K.Y.,

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 2,

Surrey tells obout 'ideal lipstick': Poge Two.
Editorial compliments AWS, on 'slight liberaliiation' : Poge Four.
"Winter War in pictures: Poge Five.

J

UK battles snow to face Yandy:

j

Poge Six.

Students get holiday: Poge Seven.

Eight Pages

-

ff

v

'

19G6

Inside Todays Kernel

Students Join
In Protest Day

By RON HERRON
Kernel Staff Writer
While UK student teachers prepare to join Thursday's statewide teacher strike with varying emotions, the College of Education refuses to express any policy on the walk-ou- t.
Dean Lyman V. Ginger this
record as approving the
morning continued his "no com
walk-ou- t.
He blamed
ment" reaction to Kernel inquiries about the College's attitudes the deficient salaries on poor
local government rather than
toward the strike.
state government.
The College has simply adNew taxes will probably have
vised student teachers to conform
to come from the local governwith actions taken by the regular
ments, since Gov. Edward T.
teachers in their schools. LexBreathitt has vowed to prevent
teachers plan to strike
ington
any extra state taxes.
without approval of the Fayette
All student teachers conCounty Board of Education.
of the tacted by the Kernel have said
Dean Ginger, a member
they will take part in the strike,
National Education Association
will speak but some offered reservations
sanctions committee,
about it.
on sanctions Thursday at Lafay"I approve of their aims, bul
ette High School. Herefusedthis
I don't like their methods," one
morning to give any clues as to
said.
what he would say.
Similarly, another felt the
The Kentucky Education Asteaching profession was being
sociation has considered asking
degraded to the level of a common
the NEA to impose sanctions
labor organization.
on state schools if the walk-oThe most general agreement
fails to gain higher salaries.
was that salaries should be
This would blacklist Kenraised. As could be expected,
tucky schools spread news of
their bad conditions over the though, student teachers are less
worried than their graduate colnation encourage new teachers
to avoid Kentucky, and help leagues. For the student, there's
always the hope that the dirty
present state teachers to find
work will be done by the time
jobs elsewhere.
he gets out of school, and a nice
said two weeks
Dean Ginger
new salary will be awaiting him.
ago that he might find himself
UK's student teachers met in
and jury" as association
"judge
a seminar last Thursday, when
secretary and executive board
they were told to go along with
member of the NEA. Any sanction move would have to be the plans of other teachers in
their schools.
made through the national association.
At that time, he went on
d

Centennial Opera Presented

Music students look on as Dr. Kenneth R. Wright,
left, presents a copy of his opera to University
President John W. Oswald. Dr. Wright's opera is
the Centennial opera. The students, members of

UL

Phi Mu Alpha music fraternity, are John Carr,
president, a senior from West Liberty, and Charles
Hodges, recording secretary, a sophomore from
Louisville.

State Support Studied

The general assembly is expected to receive a resolution
today calling for the appointment of a committee to study
the possibility of the University
of Louisville becoming a
state-support-

institution.
Lexington's Rep. Ted
who will introduce the
resolution, emphasized that the
resolution should not be interpreted as suggesting that UL
become a part of UK. He is
hopeful it will pass the House
tomorrow, he said.
Dr. John Oswald, UK president, and Dr. Philip Davidson,
UL president, would appoint the
committee of persons interested
in higher education.
"This is but the first step
in an orderly process for UL to
become a part of the
system of higher education if this is what the people
of Louisville desire," Osborne
said. He is chairman of the House
Committee on Higher Education.
Working with the Council of
Public Higher Education and the
Legislative Research Commis- -

,

state-support-

sion, the committee will determine the "advisability and
feasibility" of UL becoming a
part of the statewide system.
By July 1, 1967, the committee's report is to be submitted
to the governor, the General Assembly, and the boards of
trustees of the two universities.
This proposed bill concerning
UL may be a part of a measure
reported to Gov. Edward T.
Breathitt last month by the
Council on Higher Education
recommending converting the
state colleges into regional universities.
recommendation
This
is
backed by Breathitt. It reportedly will change the membership of the Council of Higher
Education to include laymen
instead of educators.
A meeting of the Council on
Public Higher Education has
been set for Monday.
The Council, which can increase
tuition fees,
has scheduled a discussion of
admission for
te

Some legislators have called
for an increase in
fees.
non-reside- nt

Gov. Breathitt has said that
a bill which would contain the
Council's principal recommendations would be introduced soon.
-

ut

Mills Talks

On Capital
Punishment
By SHARON HORTON

If

'

Nr

Ki

'si2

non-reside-

Weather Forecast

No Melting Expected

The worst snow storm in 48 years has moved East toward the
Appalachians, but the campus is still griped by drifts and ice.
The Weather Bureau at Bluegrass Field reported this morning
that no melting is in sight for today. The temperatures are expected
to dip to five below zero tonight.
The freezing rain and snow has caused extremely hazardous
driving conditions in Lexington and on the campus.
Classes on campus were cancelled Tuesday, but M&O put
in one of its longest days. The Physical Plant Division spent most
of the day pushing or pulling cars through the drifts and this
sidewalks.
morning began a chemical treatment of the
The storm, moving through Kentucky, dumped its heaviest
snows on Northern and Central Kentucky. All along the Ohio
And Away We Go!
Valley, snowfalls set records. In Louisville, the heaviest snowfall
was recorded since January 14, 1918, when the area received Students decided to make a holiday a holiday Tuesday as snow
10.4 inches.
piled higher and classes were dismissed. These students chose to
Two Kentucky deaths have been attributed to the storms.
brave the slippery sloes with their sled.

Kernel Staff Writer
The public is lulled by the
idea that as long as capital
punishment remains on the
record books the worst criminals
are alleviated.
This was the main point
Maubert R. Mills, chairman of
the task force on criminal justice and Commonwealth attorney
from Madisonville, stressed in
his speech advocating the abolishment of capital punishment
before the Student Bar Association Monday afternoon.
Mr. Mills said that in order
to meet the barest minimum
moral standards capital punishment must be justified as
a punishment and an effective
deterrent to crime.
The task force has been
delving into criminal justice U.
the past year and a half, am!
this legislative session is sup
posed to consider the abolitioi
of the death penalty in Kei
tucky.
Since 1930 there have beet
99 executions in Kentucky; 87
of these executions have been
for murder, seven for rape, ami
fiv e for armed robbery.
Eighteen of those executed
since 1930 were under 21. Fifty-si- x
of the 99 had no previous
Continued On Pare 8

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Feb. 2,

19GG.

Coeds' Describe 'Ideal' Lipstick
By CAROLYN WILLIAMS

Following far behind the 96
percent who wanted a lipstick
that doesn't change color after
application is 48 percent who
want a long lasting lipstick.
Higher on the rating scale is 58
percent for a lipstick that's
creamy and moist in texture.
About 28 percent said they're
looking for a very light textured
lipstick that feels "like nothing

Kernel Feature Editor
Little did the first woman w ho
applied lipstick know what a
revolution she was about to start
by using it.
Little did she realize what a
multi-milliodollar industry it
woidd evolve into.
Hut prosperous industry or
not, centuries later women are
still searching for the perfect
lipstick. And according to a recent survey condicted by Charles
of the Ritz, about half of the
women questioned were dissatisfied with their present brand.
The results were compiled
from over 500 members of their
College Beauty Panel.
"The biggest gripe with lipsticks on the market today," says
Didi Massic, director ofthcCBP,
"is that they change color on the
lips after application."
"The women totaled a 96 percent who said they want lipstick that looks exactly the same
on their lips as it does in the
n

on."

Tied with the same totals of
24 percent are the coeds who
want a lipstick that's shiny and
glossy looking and a lipstick that
won't cake. About 21 percent
want a natural looking product.
Wanting a lipstick that's
or contains a moisturiztr
are 14 percent.
A total of 15 percent revealed
they want a lipstick with a good
scent while another seven per- cent don't care for a scent in
lipstick.
Only three percent said they're
interested in an economical liptube."
And the women proved they stick. Perhaps evidence of
,
over the cost of lipstick
'didn't stop at the first lipstick
the "ideal" is the fact that the average panel
in their search ;for
lipstick.' A totar of 32 percent "member; owns eight lipsticks (and
admitted they had tried many uses only three, of them). Some
different brands and types before have only one and some have
as many as 50.
finding what they wanted.
But how important is any
What is the "ideal" lipstick?
Here's a check list of attributes. lipstick? A total of 71 percent
How well do they aggree with said the texture of it was most
what you want in a lipstick? important and just three percent
non-dryi-

non-conce-

-

-

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Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113, Journalism Bldg.
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed in The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not include,
as a qualifying consideration in deciding whether or" not to rent' to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.

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The Kentucky Kernel, University
of Kentucky,
Station, University 40506. Second-clas- sLexington, Kentucky,
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Linda Gassaway,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894, became the Record In 1900, and the Idea
In 1908. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.

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The Kentucky Kernel

UK-Flori-

STUDENTS

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roommate
Ken Morgan Apts.,
Apt. 4, $53 month,
After S p.m. 2GJ5t

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students hurrying home after
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1

as during
lipstick color at night
"This was qualified as
the day.
the same
many of them wear
but add pearl, silver,
basic color,
both
or lipgloss (26 percent use
and lipgloss) or outline
lipstick
in a darker color for evening.
"It also seems most of the
women only wear a different color
if they're getting very dressed
portant.
Miss Massie added.
And a total of 57 percent said up,"
color
Changing lipstick (cither clithe taste of lipstick didn't matter
or texture) for seasonal or
"as long as it wasn't overmatic reasons accounted for 54
powering."
said the
percent. Miss Massie
with main reason for this change was
lipstick
Coordinating
skin tone and clothes received the because they were tanned and
vote of being important from 39 this meant the general pattern
switched to a lighter color.
percent of the women.
These were the types of lipWell over half (62 percent) stick preferred: 54 percent said
47 persaid they usually wear the same
they liked shiny lipstick;
54 percent, matte (flat) finish;
wet looking; 60 percent,
cent,
.
silpearly looking; 32 percent,
looking; and 11 percent prevery
ferred lipgloss to lipstick (clear
lipgloss received the largest percentage at 31).
The favorite colors were pink,
The five finalists for the Out51 percent; brownish colors, 35
standing Greek Man and Women percent; coral, 27 percent; pale
will be presented during half-tim- e
and nude colors, 27 percent;
ceremonies at the
frosted colors, 17 percent; orange,
basketball game Monday
14 percent; peach, 13 percent;
night.
and red, seven percent.
But why does the American
The Greek Week Steering
coed prefer one lipstick to anCommittee, according to
other?
member JanieOlmstead,
Color is at the top of the
has decided to sponsor a stag
list with a total of 55 percent.
day for the game.
Texture comes next with 35 per"Since the candidates will cent and 21 percent goes to
not be allowed to have dates
keeping its color. A total of 12
in the special section allotted
percent buy their particular lipfor them, the Steering Committee
stick because it's flattering, long
suggested that the gamebe'stag'
lasting and goes with clothes.
for the student body, too," Miss
About 14 percent perfer the
Olmstead said.
lipstick because it goes with
facial coloring. Two percent
The Steering Committee anwon't change color, perhaps beticipates a larger turnout if the cause of habit. And one
percent
students are encouraged to attend the game without dates, use their brand to keep in style
with current trends.
she said.

considered it very unimportant.
The importance of the appearance of lipstick on the mouth
received a rating from 92 percent and only one percent said
it wasn't important.
A total of 95 percent admitted
color is very important; less than
one percent said it was not im-

(0.)

. U. of KENTUCKY

prtsentsj

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1900
1

-

Kvvivtv

'Spirit Hollow' Proves
Exciting, Uneven At SCC
By DEAN CADLE
Special to the Kernel
Editor's Note: Spirit Hollow
and Other Stories is a
literary
magazine composed and compiled by the fiction writing class
of Southeast Community
College.
Dean Cadlc, the reviewer, is the
librarian at the college.
Spirit Hollow and Other
Stories is an exciting but uneven
collection of freshman and sophomore writings. Despite serious
flaws, parts of the magazine surpass much of the creative writing
I have read,
by students of the
age and educational level of these
student-author-

s.

Some of the weaknesses and
flaws found in such collections
are here: concentration on death
and related mystical subjects, the
attempt to handle too much
material and too much time in
too few words, and occasional
imitation and hackneyed situations.
But for the most part a sense
of honesty, of independence, of
bei ng one's self, characterizes
the magazine. Two interesting
omissions, with one exception,
are sex and religion. Too often
they arc the ruination of undergraduate collections.
Collections such as this one
raise the question of when a verse
stops being a verse and becomes
a poem and when apieceofprose
is a short story and not a sketch.
The sixteen writers represented
have contributed a total of thirty-nin- e
selections: nineteen poems
and twenty prose pieces. Yet,
six of the pieces are closer to
being verses than poems, and
seven of the pieces are sketches
rather than stories.
Works of particular merit have
been submitted by Barbara Lee
Sewell, Tammie Dowler, and
William Turner. Although Miss
n
Sewell has contributed two
in thought and
stories,
language she is primarily a poet.
The two qualities that distinguish
her writing are her ability to
use language effectively and her
techniques.
She is able to evoke numerous
and at the same time contradictory meanings from words. In
her use of words, things truly
are not what they seem. In the
story "The Stones" she creates
in the reader simultaneously the
reactions of revulsion and elation.
Miss Sewell knows at what
point to begin writing; she is
highly selective; she can handle
point of view and flashbacks
convincingly; and she can create
suspense by rearranging material
and by withholding certain facts
from the reader until she is ready
to tell him. In short, she is able
to cause the reader to suspend
his sense of disbelief.
Two other noteworthy selections are "Hell is Just Like
Heaven" by William Turner and
"The Apartment" by Tammie
Dowler. The first is a science-fictio- n
treatment of a significant
theme on integration, and the
second is a realistic portrayal
of two girls working away from
home. Both stories are good, but
they can be improved considerable.
There are other flaws in the
magazine more serious than those
dealing with choice of subject
matter or manner of treatment,
for
they indicate that Lee
Pennington, the class instructor,
has not been adequately concerned with manuscript revision.
The title Spirit Hollow and
Other Stories is unnecessarily
misleading, for only half of the
contents is stories. Excluding
misspelled words, there are at
least 89 other gramatical errors.

And occasionally there is an illogical use of words and expressions. In one story a body
"crumbled" to the floor, and in
another there is nothing to prepare us to accept the observation
who has been
that a
in the mine all day has a "suncoal-load-

burnt face."

In his introduction Mr.
Pennington states that ". . . in
this class I have read much outstanding fiction." Some readers
might want to know: Outstanding by what standards? In
comparison with what? And why
wasn't more of this "outstanding
fiction" used in the magazine?
I mention these flaws because
a creative writer must strive for
exactness in the essentials of
writing and in the implications
of statements as well as in the
recording of human emotions,
and that a teacher of creative
writing must require these disciplines in his students.

Artist's Have Day
Along With Snowman
Headlining UK arts events for the next few days will be the
Mathis in "Our
Johnny Mathis concert featuring the velvet-voiceYounger Cencration" at 8:30 p.m. Friday at Memorial Coliseum.
Tickets are $2 advance and $3 at the door.
If you're an experimental film
collage-painting- s
The
of
fan, don't miss the Wednesday
night premier showing by the Frederic Thursz, UK associate
Experimental Film Society at professor of art, arc being shown
for the final week in the Fine
7:30 p.m. in the Student Center
Theater. "Sin of Jesus" will be Arts Gallery. The show will close
Feb. 6. New techniques, abstract
featured.
symbolism, and a number of
music everywhere
Music,
along with the snow. Thursday "sold" signs characterize the exnight the Heritage String Quartet hibit.
will perform selections of Mozart,
"Stylus" is on saleat the book
Shostakovich and Beethoven at stores to
occupyyour timeduring
8 p.m. in Memorial Hall.
the "freeze in" with somber sen9
Feb.
Nicanor
harpist
timents of UK's student writers.
Zabaleta will give a recital in a
Chamber Music Society Concert
at 8:15 p.m. in Memorial Hall.
Students will be admitted by ID.
Musicale's conUniversity
tinue on Feb. 10 with the Faculty
Mon., Tues.,
Brass Quintet at 8 p.m. in
Memorial Hall.

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Liberalization Needed
AWS deserves a compliment for
its slight Moralizing of standards in

students any more than their male
counterparts. Nowadays, it is the administrators who are literal, and the
AWS members who indecisively decide maybe a curfew is really best
after all. Vastly superior juniors and
seniors of AWS, and the few lower
division members submissively backing their stands, decide that freshmen and sophomores are really "too
immature" to use a late closing hour
wisely.

allowing junior women the same late
signont privilege as seniors, hut the
step they have taken is only a small
one.
AWS still insists on playing the
role of the long arm of in loco,
parentis, a role neither Dr. Oswald
nor the Dean of Women feel the
University should play in guiding the
lines of students.
It is extremely ironic that while
Yet we wonder how these same
administrators are willing to grant
students would react if a parent or
stumore responsibility to the women
the Dean of Women put down a
dents, AWS prefers to climb lichind
immathe strong tradition of "a barrier of finger and said, "You arc too
of the dormiture to use time out
protection" for the campus woman.
tory after 10:30 p.m. wisely."
Such treatment is incongruous with
the atmosphere of the University,
Many students arc appalled to come
which treats the woman and the man to the "liberal, mature center of learnstudent equally.
ing" to find they are put under much
in stricter confinement than they ever
We think it extremely odd that
conthe days of President Patterson when were at home. Even
sidered legally responsible in all
women students were placed under
under lock and key
highly stringent rules, there was great states, are put
like all the other dormitory residents.
pressure for the complete removal
of the barriers constricting women
AWS constantly offers the flimsy
excuse of "personnel difficulties" in
extending dormitory hours. So it
would seem that University policy
was not being designed for over
2,500 female dormitory residents but
for some 30 housemothers. Adding a
"night shift" of dormitory personnel,
if needed there must be personnel
"on duty" whenever a woman is out
of a dormitory, could solve this problem. The women's dormitories could
lie run exactly as are the men's.

nfc

M Hii6Ton

--

toft

Penn's Free University

Every multiversity faces the increased alienation of students and
faculty members through sheer population growth if steps are not taken
to establish and preserve a meaningful interchange between them.
The University of Pennsylvania is
one large university which has taken
a significant step designed to preserve this dialogue between students
IN LOCO PARENTIS
and professors in the Free University.
This program, briefly, consists of
small group evening seminars, conducted by professors and students
on a purely voluntary basis. The program is similar to the Blazer Seminar
Dissent and responsibility, those in- hallmark of a university. Occasionally
at UK, but it's scope is much greater.
separable partners in the speeches of the university will foster such misTopics of interchange run the gamit
of subjects, but the seminars are
administrators, emerged once again understanding because of the delibin a commencement address by Unierate exploitation by a few of the usually likely to deal with issues too
President Stanley Wen-bcr- g right and responsibility to dissent. specific or too transitory for incluversity Vice
'at "Northern Michigan Univer- But such misappropriation of a right sion in a regular course of study. One
over the weekend.
only serves to underscore the need to of the current seminars specializes in
sity
Wcnberg appropriately quoted keep vigorous the unending process Chinese politics.
The seminars are held in informal
Henry Steele Commager: "It cannot through which educated men seek to
be too often repeated that the justi- find their way to a peaceful and full surroundings and encourage group
fication and the purpose of freedom realization of their purpose of life." discussion over the traditional lecture
of speech is not to indulge those who
The seminars are free of
Mr. Wenberg. We do technique.
want to speak their minds. It is to
the pressure of grades, tests and other
with pride recall occasions when the
such measures.
prevent error and discover truth."
University has resisted public presThe University might do well to
Significantly, Wcnberg said he be- sure to
quash freedom of expression.
lieves dissent on American college
study Penn's Free University with an
We also, however, remember when a
campuses today is, by and large, reeye toward encouraging similar prospeech was cancelled to avoid offendwithin its own students and
sponsible.
a more specific public Minnesota grams
Furthermore, public opposition ing
faculty. Certainly the opportunities
But anyway, Mr. Wenshould not sway, a university from its legislators.
for student-facultinterchange on
berg,
mission of
this campus are indeed poor.
Wcnberg
Tlie Minnesota Daily
said. "Occasionally the public will
Aside from the Blazer seminar,
misunderstand this responsibility to
search for error and truth that is the
This clinging to the cradle and all
its traditional confinements by AWS
is indeed ridiculous. AWS should reexamine its role in terms of the purposes for which it was founded and
strive to make women equal members
of the University community and
role of an
drop the
overly-striparent.

overly-cautiou- s,

new-foun- d

ct

Dissent And Responsibility

Well-state-

d,

y

well-state-

d.

tfnth-scckin- g,

The Kernel welcomes letters from readers
wishing to comment on any topic. Because of
space limitations, letters should be limited to 2iM)
words. We reserve the right to edit letters received. Longer manuscripts will be accepted at
tne editor's discretion.
The letters submitted should be signed as
follows: for students, name, college and class and
local telephone number; for faculty members,
name, aepartment and academic rank; tor
alumni, name, hometown and class; for Univer-

sity staff members, name, department and position; tor other readers, name, hometown and
hometown telephone number. Unsigned letters
cannot be considered ior publications. All letters
should oe typewritten and double spaced.
Letters snould be addressed to: the Editor,
the Kentucky Kernel, Journalism Building, University of Kentucky, or they may be left in the
of the Journalism
editor'! office, Koom 11J-Building.

The Kentucky Kernel
1894

University of Kentucky
WEDNESDAY,

Walter Grant,

FEB.

2, 1166

Editor-in-Chi-

Linda Mills, Executive Editor

Terence Hunt, Managing Editor
John Zeh, News Editor
Judy Crisiiam, Associate News Editor
Kenneth Green, Associate News Editor
IIenhy Rosenthal, Sports Editor
Carolyn Williams, Feature Editor
Marcaret Bailey, Arts Editor
William Knafp,

Business Staff
Advertising Manager

y

ot

y

little-activ-

Good Choice
With international issues at the
fjrefront of the news today, we think

tl3 planners of the Founders' Day

Convocation have secured an excellent speaker in Ambassador Arthur
Goldberg.
Ambassador Goldberg combines an
excellent record as a public official
and a scholar and should have something extremely worthwhile to say
to a college audience. He has had
recent experience in two important
branches of American politics, the
national judicial sphere and the sphere
of international relations.
We hope University community
members will take advantage of their
opportunity to see one of America's
most outstanding statesmen, and, we
might add, best public speakers.

Kernels

The South's Outstanding College Daily

ESTABLISHED

most opportunities for student-facultmeasures
interchange are one-shsuch as the Student-Facultweek.
Open, informal seminars certainly
would multiply the benefits of such
contacts.
The University perhaps could encourage professors to take part in
such activities by cutting their regular work loads if they agreed to
conduct a seminar.
Perhaps the establishment of such
a program could be a worthy project
for Student Congress or for a coalie
tion of the
scholastic honoraries.

Marvin Huncate, Circulation Manager

Knowledge, in truth, is the great
sun in the firmament. Life and
power are scattered with all its
beams.
-- Daniel Webster

If you stop to be kind, you must

swerve often from your path.
-- Mary Webb

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Fib. 2,

W ar

19f.fi

--

5

And Peace In The Gardens
...

.

y

'

r

"

y;

Silent Retaliation

A Winter War

Down But Not Out

1

Il
I
I

W.

She's rom tropical Hawaii where snow never
her Tuesfalls, but you couldnt tell by watching
day afternoon.
frexhnmn Ruth Gullion, from Honolulu,
Steven
waged winter war with her boyfriend
classes
Winfrey, Campbellsville freshman, after
d
were dismissed. A hillside in
Botanical Gardens, clogged with
7,
.1
feUoto sfudenfs, was the batue grouna.
ttfOufcZ admit u;fco ired fie first shot; and when
it was all over, observers weren't sure who was
the winner.
the hill,
Slipping and sliding, Ruth charged up
Steven kept his balfalling between barrages.
ance until the end. Finally, laughter and peace
talks led to a truce.
snow-covere-

sled-ridin- g
T

1

r'

She's Gonna Get Hers

T

.1

vti-i

Kernel Photos by
Dick Ware and John Zeh

ru f