xt7djh3d2028 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7djh3d2028/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690919  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 19, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 19, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7djh3d2028 section xt7djh3d2028 Parking Structure No.

By TOM IIALL
Kernel Staff Writer
What's gray, four stories tall, looks a lot like an
aircraft carrier and has parking spaces for 685 cars?
UK's new parking structure No. 1, tliat's wliat.
Located in the northwest corner of the intersection
of Cooper Drive and University Drive, near the Medical
and Agricultural Science Centers, the garage opened
recently after being under construction for about a year.
It was designed for faculty and staff use, according
to Elgan Farris of the UK Planning and Development
office.
Cost of building the garage was $2,100 per parking
space, or about $1.5 million, Farris estimated.

1

Completed Finally!

r

the ag center parking lot will become the
site of work on a 310 million,
agricultural
science center, combining existing dairy, meat and office facilities to coordinate UK's agricultural program.
As a result, about 200 cars will Ik thrown into the
pool of daily users of the garage.
New Hospital
the nearby Medical Center workmen have
cleared the site for construction of a Veteran's Administration Hospital, taking another 200 or 300 parking
spaces out of circulation permanently, and supposedly
giving the new garage business.
Right now business is light indeed, and may stay
Continued on Page 2, Col. 1

Cars are parked on five levels, topmost Ixing the
roof. An elevator is provided and there are three stairways, one at each end of the building and one in the

a few months

y

middle.

New Construction Method
The builders used a new construction method, "post
tension concrete." Cables are placed in the forms and
concrete is poured in. When the cement sets up, the
cables are tightened, permitting structural members'
to carry more weight than was possible in the past.
All very interesting, but wlut about the human side
of the story, tle people who will have to use the thing?
It seems now that they will be mainly the faculty
and staff of the medical and agricultural centers. In

Ik-hin-

TEE KENTUCKY
Friday, September 19, 1969

EN E

University of Kentucky, Lexington

Vol. LXJ, No. 18

7
11

Precedent' Set
Draft Evader's Acquittal:

A 'Good

By GEORGE JEPSON
Kernel Managing Editor
When John Crump, a former
student at Maysville Communwas
acquitted
ity College,
Wednesday of a charge of draft
evasion, a "good precedent" was
set, according to UK law professor Robert Sedler.
Sedler and attorney William
Allison defended Crump on behalf of the Kentucky Civil Liberties Union in the trial held in
the U. S. District Court in Covington.
Crump was cleared on a directed verdict by Judge Mac
that
Swinford
on
grounds
Crump's local draft board had
not followed the prescribed
procedures in inducting him as

"delinquent."
"Many draft boards are very
sporadic when it comes to following regulations," Sedler said
in an interview Thursday.
Such had been the case with
Crump's board, Local Board 70
in Mason County.
Induction Ordered
Crump had failed to meet a
bus that was to take him to
his
physical examination on March 1, 1968.
Upon discovering this, draft
board clerk Betty Danner notified some members of the local
board by telephone and issued
an order of induction for Crump
on that same day.

"The rules states that he must
be advised that he is delinquent," said Sedler. "The board
must have a meeting to decide
upon his delinquency and he
must be notified and given time
to purge the charge."
Crump's board failed to follow this procedure, however,
and the result was his induction being ruled invalid.
Crump was indicted March
26 for his "delinquency" and
was taken by police out of one
of his classes at Maysville Community College.
He later returned to school
and finished out the semester
though he said he "couldn't

think straight" for its remainder.
He has been working in Lexington since that time.
Denied Objector Status
Crump had originally been
denied conscientious objector
status by Local Board 70. He
still wishes to pursue this course.
Sedler believes the Crump
case will have great significance
for' future cases of similar nature.
Allison, an attorney from
Lexington, said that "the ruling will make local boards in
Kentucky and the South much
more concerned about abiding
by the regulations."

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Kentucky Will Beat HoosiersRay

Kentucky, and that they need to
By CHIP HUTCH ESON
beat UK in Saturday's opening
Sports Editor
John Ray hasn't been known game here.
The boasts by Ray have gotten
as a man of few words.
Since coming to UK, he has to Indiana coach John Pont. He's
made 125 appearances praising worried; but by listening to IU
the material he has and saying players such as Harry Conso
it won't take two or three years and Jade Butcher, one feels they
to build a winning football pro- aren't quite as convinced that
UK will be so formidable.
gram here.
And now in that game of
But lately Ray hasn't had too
much to say about UK's game psychological football, Ray has
plans or what he expects from let his talk of winning football
Indiana. His secrecy is a must. and how to accomplish it suReports from Indiana say that bsidebut not his enthusiasm.
the Hoosiers are worried about
UK Will Beat IU

In

a pep rally

Thursday at

Haggin Hall, a vociferous Ray
yelled that UK would beat In-

diana. The question remains-- Is
Ray the Cassius Clay of the
Southeastern Conference football?

Pont has been making quite
a few boasts himself. He says
Indiana will go to the Rose Bowl.
Pont claims that the opener
is important to Indiana that the
Hoosiers won't overlook UK because it is a
game.
Scouting reports reveal that UK
has a team to worry about.
"From what we saw of Kentucky in scouting its spring game,

it's a better team than the one

we played here two years ago,"
said Pont. In that last meeting
0
the Hoosiers pulled out a
win and went on to a berth in
the Rose Bowl.
And then UK has one edge-sev- en
more days of practice than
Indiana, since school started
earlier here.
The feeling that Ray brought
with him from a winning Notre
Dame team is also a big factor
in UK's psychological outlook.
Attack Unannounced
And then the exuberant Ray
Continued on Pare 6, CoL 1
12-1-

Concerned About Students

Dental School 'Best' In U.S.
ROBERTS
Kernel Staff Writer
"I guess I'll just have to be
frank with you. This is the best
dental college in the United
States."
Such is the opinion of Dr.
John A. DiBiaggio, director of
student and alumni affairs at
the College Dentistry.
"We know every student and
w e're damn concerned about his
By ELAINE

progress," Dr. DiBiaggio said
in an interview Thursday.
"They see patients from their
first day," he added, "and we
call them 'Doctor from their
first day."
students "doctors"
Calling

V

Kernel Photo by Dick War

Coach RaY

Coach John Ray told students at a pep rally last
beat
niil lhat UK vvoul,behindImliana-11- I Ull.pp ral,y
Haggin
and bonfire was held

before they have earned the
degree creates the proper professional environment, according to Dr. DiBiaggio.

Discussing what he referred
to as "our remarkably good stude-

relationship," the
doctor said, "we assume our
students are mature. We assume they are highly motivated.
We treat them as our peers and
they have a right to be frank
with us."
There are student representatives on all of the college's
standing committees and students adise on such matters
as curriculum and textbooks.
They evaluate instruction; and
the student who sits on the faculty council, a major governing
body of the school, participates
in such matters as student dismissals and the college budget.
Causes Relevant
Relevancy of course material,
which Dr. DiBiaggio said is
nt-faculty

"often a problem in undergraduate schools," is "just not
a problem here."
"On his first day here, the
student is taking case histories," the doctor said. "Soon
he is cleaning teeth. He is putting in fillings by the end of the
first year. He is very busy. His
course material is very rele-

vant."
Each student is given his own
patients from his first day at
school, and these are his until
he graduates.
"lie is taught to look at whole

families,"

Dr.

DiBiaggio

said.

"He doesn't need to do certain
numbers of kinds of fillings. Instead he is responsible for the
total dental care of his patients
until his graduation."
Continued on Pate 8. CoL 1

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

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Ketnel Photo by Rick Burns

The new parking structure on Cooper Drive opened recently after
almost one year of construction. It is designed for faculty and staff use.

Cooper Giant

Parking Structure In Use

Continued from Pace One
that way for some time to come.
For almost a year the rumor has
circulated that the garage would
take hours to empty if it were
ever filled. There may be some

truth to this.
The garage has two entrances
and two single file exits. Most
of the faculty and staff at UK
go home at 5 p.m. A highway
engineer of the UK Engineering
College stated that it takes ahout
22 seconds for each car to leave
the garage, single file'. A
shows that 650 cars
would take two hours to leave
at this rate, using two exits.
Buses Solution
Joe Burch, safety and security director, said, "We'll do whatever we 'can to make it empty
as fast as possible." He acknowledges there is a continuing park-- .
ing problem all over the campus,
and sees the UK bus lines as
one solution to the dilemma.
More buses mean fewer cars on
campus.
Burch said the system of havd
buses travel difing
ferent routes t last spring was
dropped after bus company records showed that the number
of passengers was down 50 percent with the color system. Apparently, the typical student
didn't have time to figure out
the code and the different routes.
Burch' s aim now is to make
the buses "dependable." A canvass of student opinion shows
that the only thing dependable
about the buses is their smalllike pace, especially on overcrowded Rose Street.
Burch has decided not to use
little-arithmeti-

.

color-code-

week

r'

the buses to ferry people from
parking structure No. 2 to Stoll
Field on football game days.
There was little reaction last
year when buses were run from
the Cooper Drive lot on game

The second of the University's
parking structures, aptly named
No. 2, is now nearing completion. Located on Rose Street but
not emptying into it, it will hold
756 cars and cost $2 million.

days.

No. 2 has four parking levels
with 17,200 square feet in the
basement allotted to the University central telephone exchange.
The building is essentially similar
to structure No. 1, except for the
brick grillwork on the exterior
of No. 2.

.

"People just don't range out
that far," said Burch.
Dean Charles Craves of the
architecture school said of the
garage, "The structure utilizes
one of the best systems, but I'
suspect there may be a problem
of egress at peak periods." On
style, he commented, "It's a very
handsome building; the graphics
are good, not offensive at all."

tminu.1

Cates Broken
UK faculty and staff have
The
been issued, magnetized cards
which pop into slots and make
the automatic gates' to the garage
spring open, but someone broke
the gates off before the garage
opened, said Joe Burch.
He said there may be an attendant on duty to check stickers and speed things up when
the garage gets into use later
this year. In that case, the gates
won't be used at peak hours.
.

No. 2 may not be quite completed, but bulldozers are already

h JOHN
ar

smoothing out the ground on
Euclid Avenue formerly occupied
by the old Sigma Nu fraternity
house, the Wildcat Crill and
bowling 'alley, numerous trees
and a number of old houses.
On this site a vast parking
area will sprawl, pushing the
university's domain further in the
direction of downtown Lexington.
Hopefully, UK's parking problems will be lessened or solved
for a time when the garages and
additional lots, being built are
completed and put into use.

SIMON

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Sept.

nn
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Candidates Speak At YR Mixer

g

STUDENTS

UEC

Unas

oeuwery
THE CAMPUS

T

Phone

252-172- 2

Vm YOU'VE
AT

strengthen government, "not by
making it more powerful but more
efficient."
"You ami your colleagueswill
nted amid campaign posters and determine tlie outcome of every
race in this state this year," said
balloons for their first meeting.
Speaking beneath a poster let Thompson.
A central campaign committee
tered "UK College Republicans
The Organization Today," was for Thompson has formed and is
a candidate for state senator from
the 12th district, Cene Cravens.
He promised an approachof "creativity" in the post he seeks.
Also addressing the group was
the Republican candidate for
state auditor, Jim Thompson. The
future of the state depends on
constructive teamwork on all government levels, Thompson said.
Thompson expressed a desire
to remove "the tinge of partisan
politics" from the office of state
auditor. Politics is a dirty word
to many people, he said, but
that is because people "have permitted mediocrity in government."
Thompson said he wants to

SHOTS

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The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors,

TECHN1SC0PE"

4

CUNT EASTWOOD
MAKE THEM COUNT

TECHNICOLOR'

way.

iJ.r..'V'N.V

OHE

GOT TWO

planning class appearances and
debates for him on campus.
Candidate for tax commissioner, John Staton, spoke briefly.
The YR's are promoting a
dorm canvass this year to reach
a goal of 800 members. A voter
registration drive is also under

Sliding door were opened and
extra chair brought in Thursday night for the overflow crowd
of Young Republicans who mi-

.

flfforio's now

l9-- 3

19,

MATURE

COLOR
byDelixi

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United Art rata

(jro

Starts 8:00
Adm. $1.50

nitM
VT1

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;vry father's daughter la a virgin,.

-

III

"

Mixer

Young Republicans enjoy their mixer at the Stu-Y- R
dent Center Thursday night. Two GOP political
candidates addressed the group.

UK Med Students Help SAMA

In Appalachian Health Program
Three ' UK medical students
John Collins, David Frost and
John Allen
participated this
summer in the Student American
Medical Association (SAMA)
Summer Project.
As participants in the project,
they accompanied doctors on hospital rounds and observed patients in the doctor's office.
In addition, they visited model
health programs and medical care

Just 7 minutes South on U.S.
27 (Limestone)

installations, and travelled to isolated rural areas with public
health nurses to study poverty
and Appalachian epidemiology
(the study of epidemics).
, SAMA, a student organization
including 55,000 medical students, interns and residents in
this country, administered the
project through funding by the
Appalachian Regional Development Commission.

Collegiately Correct

USE YOUR FREE PASS IN

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Kernel Photo by Dave Herman

COUPON BOOK

1st OUTDOOR SHOWING!

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* The Kentucky
ESTABLISI IED

Iernel

University of Kentucky

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER

1894

19, 1969

Editorial represent the amnions of the Editors, not of the University.

Janus W. Miller, Editor-in-ChiHob Brown, Editorial race Editor
(Vorgc II. Jcpsnn, Maiuifiinn Editor
Holx-r- t
Duncan, Advertising Manager
Dottie Bran, Associate Editor
Chip
Dan Gossctt, Arts Editor
Sports Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Carolyn Dunnavan, Women's rage Editor
Frank Coots, Mike Hcrndon, Jeannic Letclom, Hill Mathews, Jean Renaker
Assistant ManaginR Editors
Hutt-lirson- ,

A Ray Of Hope
If optimism

It seems Ray'senthusiasmisone

is a factor, tomorrow

'

of few such examples on this campus. Except for a mere handful,
students at the University have
shown little interest in the Free U,
needed revisions of the student
code and other pertinent issues on
campus.

may well mark the rejuvenation of
football at the University. New
head coach John Ray has set his
goals at an undefeated season, national ranking and a bowl bid, an
impressive list of objectives.
To the rational football fan this
seems a bit too optimistic, and at
times, ridiculous. But what is wrong
with a little optimism?
Ray is to be commended for his
enthusiasm and his intense desire
to put winning football back on
Stoll Field. He has certainly gotten
off to a good start at it. His athletic
program has proceeded steadily,
His
with few apparent hang-upemphasis on improving his team
academically has certainly left little
to be desired.
With strong community support
there seems to be little reason to
doubt the Wildcats rosy future.
a winning season, credit
If 1969-70i- s
will have to go to Mr. Ray and his

Some argue that football is not
relevant in an academic community. This is a moot question. What
is relevant is that students should
take a lesson in enthusiasm from
Coach Ray. To get things done, as
Ray hopes to do, there must be a
measurable amount of enthused
individuals prepared to get involved.

s.

M4

If students and administrators
would use Ray as an example, and
apply themselves to the issues as

"There it is!

Ray has done to Kentucky football,
then the question of apathy on this
campus could be discarded.

enthusiastic approach.

By

...

TriteMt

Kernel Forum: the readers write

the way, Good Luck, John.

To

the Editor of the Kernel:

This fall's city election for four members of the Lexington Board of Commissioners will be one of the most important
for determining the future growth and

j

v

-

i

,r.

1

4
3

4

An Element Of Color
Tomorrow's football premiere
brings a long awaited touch of
color to the UK campus. The Wildcat marching band has been rejuvenated for this season and all
concerned say the effort has been

worthwhile.
More than 200 men and co-ewill participate in Saturday's
ds

program at half-timuniforms brighten the scene,
New
and improved composition pieces
promise a bigger sound as the
band swings to "Coing Out of My
"Love-In- "

e.

development of our community. Those
selected must be willing to makedevelori-men- t
of Lexington as a "first class" city
their immediate goals. The immediate
problems of the poor and the black must
also be confronted and solved if our city
is to thrive. More
t
housing is
needed. Unemployment and discrimination in employment must be corrected.
Understanding and ACTION are needed
in these and other areas.
Four gentlemen, running for the City
Commissioners positions have addressed
themselves to solving these problems.
They are not running as a single slate,
but each can receive your vote September
20, 1969. Joe Craves, Johnie Jackson, Jack
Reeves and Harry Sykes are individuals
who would offer our community balance in
governing our city and particularly concern for the low income residents. Mr.
Craves and Mr. Sykes are incumbents
and would bring experience to the leadership needed in the 1970's. They have expressed themselves well on most issues
and have supported most efforts to improve
the plight of the poor in Lexington. While
they support the present sewer service
charge, they are willing to search for other
possibilities. Both Jackson and Beeves
oppose this charge. Mr. Jackson, a local
barber, and Mr. Beeves, a retired political
science professor, are new faces attempting to work actively in our city government. Both have lived in Lexington for
many years and have frankly discussed
the problems of our community. They
would be concerned with eliminating the
discrimination which exists in our community. They would bring new ideals
and energies to this "team".
All of these gentlemen are pledged
to improving race relations in our community, in an atmosphere of calm, but
urgency. I support the election of these
candidates Graves, Jackson, Beeves and
Sykes and would encourage those
who want a City Commission
which is concerned with problems of those
who are still discriminated against in
Lexington the poor and the black to
give them consideration. With annexation a certainty in the near future, our
city will continue to grow. These gentlemen can lead our community in attack
low-cos-

-.-

Head," "California Soul," "Lover," "Dear World" and of course,
"On, On U of K."
Band director Harry Clark was
quite successful in pulling last
year's band from the trough into
which it had fallen. An able band
president and many enthusiastic
participants promise UK observers
and ABC's
watchers an entertaining event.
"Came-of-the-Wee-

k"

It might be worth sacrificing
that

half-tim- e

drink for.

"

Just over the next dune!"

City Politics

v

Sywhcatt

ing vigorously the problems associated
with the less fortunate of Lexington.
CEOBCE C. HILL, PH.D.
Biochemistry

Domino Or No
To the "Soapbox" article of Messrs.
Obradovich and Wertheimer I would like
to add a comment on the "domino"
theory. There are two ways for the Communists (or anybody) to take over a country: either by massive force or by popular
support (called "subversion", by whoever
is against who's taking over). The latter
may sometimes be gained slowly, but it
is needed. Cuerrilla revolutions, as in
Cuba, can succeed only with popular
support. The NLF in Vietnam must liave
popular support, or it could not have
lasted so long. To suggest that, e.g.,
Australia might be just another domino,
is quite ludicrous; the Communist Party,
while being quite legal and unmolested
by the police, is generally laughed at by
the population in that country. It doesn't
have a leg to stand on in elections, although it tries hard. The other alternative, massive-forc- e
takeover, would be
quite a formidable undertaking.
The point is that theories such as
these are advanced by people who are
trying hard to rationalize their quite
irrational and paranoid hatred of communism. A far more rational way of
"overcoming" communism (if this be desirable) would be to make the capitalist
system immediately attractive to starving
people. If successful, this would assure
lack of popular support for communism,
and its defeat.
D. BRITZ

Chemistry

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Sept.

-

-

CLASSIFIED

CUtslfl4 Advertising will be Bessy-Ua ft
btslt If. Ads m
vUetd la
rin Msndsv thr(h
Friday r by mall, payment IncUtcd,
U THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, SUssa
111, JrnilUm nidf.
Rate ire fl.ts far to warda, f S 00
far three eomcatlve latcrtlana at tba

19,

l9-- 5

Established 1883

S'

ad af Z0 wards, aad IS.7S par
week, to wards.
Tba dtadllna la 11 t.m. tba day
prior ta pabllcallan. Na advertisement
mar dta raea, rellflen ar natlens.1
arlgla as a qaallfleatlaa far raatlaf
raams ar far employment
aama

WANTED

.:

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

pra-ps-

b

MEN & WOMEN between the fts of
18 and 30 Interested In earnUrf $10,000
a year or better on a prfrt or full
time effort In W, ss ntxl Konmetlcs;
A
no experience n
ry: will train.
between
Call Mr. Ed Wh
9 a.m. and 12;
except Satur- -

day and Sunday.

8S151

NEED 8 men to sell specUl Item at
UK football games, pffore game
Mrs. Pat
and during first hdl-ZCa- ll
Marcum, Phone 277W039 after 6 p.m.
17S3t

PART-TIM- E
Jobs for men, evenlni
Volunteer! to help teach
Saturday ana sunns
sewing and clothing skllli to young ' shift Friday. free meals and uniforms
Inner-cit- y
Good wages,
18M
glrla. Call
furnished. 20 years of age. minimum.
bedROOMMATE, male, share slnc
Apply in person, Lottsl Sdndwlch
Shoppe, 1951 N. Broadwair at 17S5t
room, Cambridge Dr., $fi.5(Kmonth.
Call after i p.m
l6S3t
NEEDED Witness of tWaccldent at HELP WANTED v6 a.m. -- 12 noon,
Mon.-Frl- .,
Slrtbel Kennel,
the Chemlstry-PhysiBldg. and
2586 Richmond Rd.; drivers license
Rose St. on Frlddyfiictcrnoon, Sept.
and fair knowledge of city streets.
12 at 3:55 p.m. Plfcfise caU D. Fooks.
17S6t

127

(0

WANTED

E.

0

Main Street

WHAT IS A SWEETHEART?

Ii

7.

y

1.

pf

,2

8.

Share house, jftivate
bedroom, TV, washer and' dryer,
all utilities. les&thaji 145
kitchen,
18S3t
per month. Call
FEMALE roommate. Luxuriously furnished apartment; two bedrooms,
swimming pool, private lyhone;
18S5t
carpet.

ROOMMATE

1.

wall-to-w-

."

FOB SALE
1963 CORVAIR
for only $200.

call

233-17-

Owner wilUrtg to sell
Only Interested parties
from 101 aim. to 5 p.m.
1
8S15t

for saleOwner purchased new Cadillacand must sell
Triumph. Can arrafe take over at
low Interest rattVP lease call
8S15t
10 a.m. to S p.m.
1968 HONDA 125 Scramtjfer, perfect
condition; one owneyr helmet and
accessories lncludejPhone

1967 TRIUMPH

233-17-

8.

17S5t

FOR

SALE

Austin Healey
work. Call 269- -

--

Sprite. Needs

17S5t

2979.

Jobs formen, evening
shift Monday througn Friday. Good
uniforms fur- wages, free meal
nlshed. 20 years
age minimum.
Apply In persoi tt LO tta Sandwich
ville Rd. 17S5t
Shoppe, 2468 Nichl
CAR WASH WINDOW
and detail
work part time. Morning, afternoon
and weekend!. $1.25 rier hour ud.
Mr. Maelc CaK Vashy
Southland
18S5t
Drive.

PART-TIM- E

Oval

111

L

Students for .sales work;
leads furnished, (Tall Mr. Mitchell.
18S3t
after 6t.m. r
vi
or journalism
SENIOR
advertisin
major with good typ ing ability need- ed for Inter esuiw position, fifteen
-- 5996
hours per w
lor
view.
V
5
As mother's helper,
GIRL
hours per week; light housework
and baby sitting; schedule flexible.
Close to campusr Good pay. Call
WANTED

sweetheart is the one you kiss
And make up with again
When there's a little difference
Of opinion now and then.

Emerald

Round

A sweetheart is the someone
That you're always thinking of
And the very special reason
Why you know that you're in
LOVE.

18S3t

VW.

FOR RENT

0.

FURNISHED apartments for rent for-or 4, between UK and town. Ap5S10t
ply Apt. 1. 340 So. Upper.

Two-dosedansOne ownactual miles.Will accept
trade. Can arrange firbftclng. $1395.00
18S5t
or 2524053
Phone
Furnished apartment.
FOR RENT
One block from the6tudent Center
3.000
1963 VW, Red. Good coffdition.
on the corner oS Lexington and
miles since engine rebuilt by Cookes.
15S5t
Maxwell Sts. Call
Radio. Phone 299LM91 from 10 to
18S5t
4:30 weekdays.
MISCELLANEOUS
2 1958
MECHANIC'S
SPE(
TR-3- 's
OK, runs
for price
4llVa E. Max- - PIANO SERVICE Reasonable prices.
well. Beautiful
All work guaranteed. Trained by
18S3t
well.
Steinway & Sbnd In New York. Mr.
26A20t
Davies,
1967 Ha f ley Davidson
FOR SALE
i!.xceeni cunuiuou.
Sportster jilii;m. ask fir Joe Stearns.
and
Call

1967 MG
er. 30,000

Heart Shape

A

277-82-

0.

ics

swectlwart is a knowing look
liand within your own
The voice you want to hear
When you pick up the phone.
A sweetheart understands your moods
And laughs at things you say
Or sees you when you're at your worst
But loves you anyway.

Part-tlm- a'

I

Marqule

A
A

work, Thurs
V.
days, $1.50 pertronone Call
leave name and
iimber, you
l?S5t
will be contacted.

STUDENTS

red with sunroof; good
condition mechanically. New tires;
17S5t
must selL Phono

1963

sweetheart is the someone
You could tvrite a book about,
The one you love to be with
And hate to be without.

A

Pear Shape

or

233-02-

.'.YWftlWkViJV

5.

J

252-ie-

254-89-

I
TTPINQ

use the

Themes,
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
theses, term papers dissertations.
IBM, pica, carbpnfibbon, 60c p.p.
Bill Givens, 253ira7 alter o p.m.

i,
V

i

I

i

V

I

SALTY TOM'S
Oyster Bar

LEXINGTON'S FINEST SEAFOOD

RESTAURANT

If

and CHERRYSTf
CLAMS now in season.
Carry-Ou-

t

Service

j

if

Banquet Facilities Available

2022 Liberty Road

i;

Phone

252-950-

6

A

u

i

v

i

Hosiery?

'

'

x

i

FRESH OYSTERS
Also Fast

ii

Z

.7
Harvey.
Was it really
my paruiane

,

'

V
'

V:

'H
i.

.

!

i:

i

Iji

v,

'

A I' li
See all the exciting
styles
of panty hose and casual stockings now
at great savings!
back-to-scho-

m cb
HOSIE

TP sxipDIL aL

TURFLAND MALL
278-830-

I madkas trtuos.
1 UATMIt GOODS,

W
C

Xj

riiASUMs

S

to rutftt

MUAMCHOIY ANO MAJCI
U'l MOM IMJOTAIUI

k

SSt

'

1

RTX"

DAHSKIN
LEOTARDS
TIGHTS
SWEATERS

ARE YOU USING THE RIGHT ZIP CODE?

Students living in University dousing only, your zip code is 40506.

I

f
1

Students is

housing, check your phone directory for proper sip code.

i

J

H

1

1

* G--

.

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Sept. 19, 1909

TIIE

Rar Mum As Opener Approaches
J
JL

JL

Continued from

rge

Asked if UK could beat Indiana,

One

has only talked about UK's pride
hasn't said what
and ability-- he

Butcher reportedly said, "Those

guys down there. I feel sorry
for that new coach coming there
from Notre Dame, but the only
way he could ever win any games
with that bunch is to red-shithe whole team and sit out till
next year."

they'll do against Indiana. The
Hoosiers don't have too much
of an idea what UK will try since
the whole offense and defense
has been revamped.
The home crowd will add to
sound
offensive
Indiana's
the UK psychological advantage.
team is rounded out by such
Ray said he doesn't think the players as Hank Pogue, a gradWildcats will be too high psyuate of Ft. Thomas Highlands,
chologically. "After the first play perennial threat in Kentucky high
school ball. Pont says that Pogue
they'll be all right."
Indiana is a is one of the most underrated
Offensively,
players on the team.
powerhouse, with only two starters missing from last year's startTight end John Andrews is
ing unit that broke all Indiana
expected to surprise many opyardage records last year. The ponents this year.
offense is expected to be exploDefense A Problem
sive and with an extra year unAs solid as the offense is,
der their belts, more experienced.
the