xt7dnc5s817j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dnc5s817j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19220303  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  3, 1922 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  3, 1922 1922 2012 true xt7dnc5s817j section xt7dnc5s817j The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

VOL. XII

LEXINGTON, ICY,, MARCH 3, 1922

No. 19 I

WINNING POEM IS TO
OFFERS WIDE FIELD

E PLACE OF

Personal Representatives To
Visit University March
4 to Interest 1922

Writer of Memorial.. Must
Under Regulations, Be
A Kenttickian

3--

Seniors
years,
in proceeding
Community Service is turning to the col
leges of the country and selecting a
number of fifteen or twenty of the
outstanding men in the 1922 year's
graduation classes for employment. Com-muiService is a national civic organization incorporated in February 1919
wtih headquarters at One Madison
Avenue, New York City. It exists to
assist American communities to make
the leisure time of their citizens more
valuable and more expressive through
community recreation, music, drama and
neighbhorhood organization. By so doing it aims to promote citizenship,
neighborliness, community spirit and in
general a more abundant life for the
locality in which it operates.
At the present time Community Service is promoting work in more than two
hundred American cities. Next year it
is expecting to increase its field of operaThis year, as

tions substantially and for this reason
its working personel must be enlarged.
The college, men chosen will be given a
very thorough training in the methods
and policies of the organization at a
training school to be held in Chicago
starting August first. Following this the
men will be sent out in the field in charge
of an experienced worker who will give
them practical training over a period
of several months. After this the men
will be fitted into the national organiza
tion (depending upon their own abilities
(Continued on Page 2)

L

C. FIELDER TO BE'

The above is the strong Alpha
for 1922. They defeated the Sigma
five in the final game.
Reading from left to right: Bud
Henry Campbell and Coach Lawrence

BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM
Tau Omega fraternity basketball team, winner of the silver loving cup
Nu, Phi Delta Theta fraternity teams and won over the Delta Chi
Meriwether,
Burnham.

Carl Ross, Walter Morris, Berkett Lee Pribble, Ed. Wiley,

U. OF K. TO BE ASKED TO

T

JOIN MEW CONFERENCE

CLASS GIVES 2 PLAYS

Big Intercollegiate Athletic
Association Hopes to
Improve College Sports

Second of Series of Little
Theatre Offerings Given

The University, of Kentucky was in
cluded among the names of those univer

The program for the regular Thursday
afternoon matinee which was given by
the class in Dramatic production in the
Little Theatre consisted of two short
plays; the first called "Bachelor Girls,"
in which Mary Elizabeth Crafton and
Margaret Lavin took part; and the second
consisting of two scenes, entitled "Success" in which Marjorie Riddle and
Henry Taylor took part.
Tea was served afterward
in the
Woman's Rest Room in White
Hall,
Elizabeth Hopkins being hostess of the
afternoon.
Tho play "Campbell of Kilmour" by
J. A. Ferguson, given last week, was a
viewpoint.
success from every
The
audience enthusiastically
predicted a
splendid matinee season. The cast was
composed of Corinno Cowgill, Jeanetto
Sasher, Henry Taylor, John Vogel and
Joe Wadsworth.
Next Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock
tho class will present "His Place in tho
Family," a play written by John M.
Brown, a former student of tho University of Kentucky, who is now taking
dramatic work in Harvard. The cast
will be as follows:
C. D. Graham
John Weatherly

Will Meet Contesting
Orators In Danville Satur
day Night.

L. C. Fielder will represent the Univer
sity of Kentucky in the State Oratorial
Contest which will be held at Danville
Saturday night. The subject of his
oration is "The Debt to Our Dead."
Unusual interest is being
in the contest this year, and a

of students from the University of
Kentucky are planning to attend.
Prof. W. H. Mikesell is sanguine over
the outcome of the contest, as he regards
the oration of Mr. Fielder as one of
marked merit..
Final tryouta for the debating team
will bo held in the Little Theatre Tuesday afternoon, March 7. Of the twenty
or more men who are trying for tho
team, six will bo chosen, three for the
tho regular team and threo alternates.
The University team will debate with
Vanderbilt, Sewanee, and North Carolina
University on tho subject of Immigration. In addition Professor Mikesell is
endeavoring to schedule a debute with
Harvard in April. Tho subject of tho
Harvard debate has not been definitely
announced.
O! DEAR

There's a girl
That's a sensation;
She's awful fond
Of osculation.

to be held in Chicago

March 18, for the purpose of organizing
a central intercollegiate athletic confer
ence for all major sports. This move
ment originated at a meeting of repre
sentatives from a number of
schools in Illinois comprising the
Western conference, held in Chicago

February 25.
Other universities included in this list
were: Wabash, Michigan Aggies, DePauw,
University of Cincinnati, Marquette, Detroit University and Notre Dame.
Coach Rockne of Natre Dame in
speaking of the organization said, "There
is absolutely no question but that
athletics would be greatly benefited by
such a conference Unless a university
is a member of some conference, comply
ing with well defined rules governing
eligibility, it comes under suspicion, no
matter how clean it may try to keep its

SHERWOOD EDDY

EDDY STARTS

SERIES

OF LECTURES TODAY

Has a Message for Every
Student in the

University

Sherwood Eddy, tho noted
student
speaker, is hero at the
University of
Kentucky now. This is ono of the greatest of opportunities that has ever como
to Kentucky students and it is hoped
that they will all take advantage of it.
Doctor Eddy has an unusuul message on
all kinds of studnt problems and he
meeting.
will offer an opportunity for instruction on spiritual, political and sociul
EXPRESSION OF SYMPATHY
subjects of the day.
Doctor Eddy will give four lectures to
Tho faculty of tho College of Arts and
tho students. Theso are scheduled for
Sciences extends to Mrs. Alberta Wilson
tho fifth hour and at 7:30 p. m. both
Server its sympathy for her in the loss
Friday und Suturduy in chapel. Ho will
exof her futher and requests that this
also speak to tho fuculty at 3:45 Friday
pression bo ucnt to Mrs. Server; pub
afternoon. Mrs. Eddy, who is hero with
lished in tho Kernel und spread on the
Doctor Eddy, will speuk to tho women
minutes of tho March meeting.
students of tho University at 4 o'clock
A. C. ZEMBROD
M. M. LAUGHLIN
(Continued on Pago 2)

sports.
Athletic directors and faculty mem
bers of eligible institutions will bo invited and all open questions about rules
and regulations, schedules and associa
tions will be discussed at tho March

length or style.

Thursday Afternoon

sities which were slated for invitations
to a conference

The Kentucky Memorial
Association
has offered a prize of $50 for the best
poem commemorating
the heroes who
fell during the World War. Only
are eligible to write the poems
which are to be sent to Herbert Graham,
secretary of the Alumni Association.
Prof. L. Dantzler, head of the Department of English, at the University of
Kentucky, is chairman of the committee,
g
which is to decide the
poem. The other members of the committee, representatives of all the colleges in Kentucky, arc: B. F. Wise of
Centre; Clarence Freeman, of Transylvania; J. B. Jones of Georgetown; Boyd
Martin, instructor in dramatics at the
University of Louisville and Dramatic
Critic of the Courier Journal.
The winning poem will become the
property of the Kentucky Memorial Association.
It will be published, placed
on a bronze tablet and probably emblazoned on the wall of the proposed
Memorial Building. The committee is to
meet in the near future and announcement of the winner will be made soon.
Many applications from those not living in the state have been made but the
rules prescribe that the writer must be a
resident of Kentucky. More than sixty-on- e
poems have been received by Mr.
According to the rules each
Graham.
competitor must send five type-writtcopies of his poem and any poems not
complying with the rules will be disregarded.
There is no restriction in

DR. ARNOLD

TO SPEAK

TO GIRLS SATURDAY

League Brings
Third Interesting Speaker"
to University

Woman's

Dr. E. H. Arnold, director of the New
Haven Normal School of Gymnastics, will
speak to the women students of the Uni
versity on "Physical Education as a
Vocation" Saturday, March 4, at the fifth
hour in the Little Theater. His lecture
is the third in the series of speakers
brought here by the Vocational Guidance
Committee of the Woman's League.
Doctor Arnold, who comes hero from a
meeting of the United States Education
Commission in Chicago, is particularly
well known in athletic circles.
Ho was
formerly president of the American
BePhysical Education
Association.
cause of his ability as a speaker and
his thorough knowledge of athletics, and
kindred subjects, all University women
especially
and
those
interested in
athletics as a vocation are urged to
hear Doctor Arnold.
Susan
Helen Wells
Tho New Haven alumnae of Kentucky
Tom
Elizabeth Hopkins will entertain with a luncheon, nt the
T. A. Bayless Lafayette Hotel Saturday in honor of
Jack
Tho class will serve tea afterwards. Doctor Arnold. That afternoon he will
All students and friends of tho Univer- meet a class of graduates of tho school
sity are freely and cordially invited to in tho Girl's gymnasium.
Immediately
witness tho play nnd attend tho tea.
following, Mrs. Stout will entertain with
a tea for him.
THE TEASER
ADVICE
Woodman, fell that tree,
Reporters, when you call on your girl
Sparc not a single bough;
and wish to demonstrate tho power of
I carved a girl's namo there
tho press, remember not to do anything
I love another now.
to .Interfere with tho circulation.

* MjluHiHiliMflW

MttMiiKMii

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OFFERS

COMMUNITY SERVICE
LARGE FIELD

(Continued from pngc 1)
nnd the emergencies of the situation)
either ns executive secretaries In ccrtnln
towns or nttnehcel to some tlepnrtmcnt of
the nntionnl hcntlqunrtcrs.
College men needed for this type of
work must possess executive nnd organizing tnlents; the nbllity to mingle
nnd denl with people; n brond soclnl outlook; nnd n desire to be nblc to render
some form of public service. Men coming Into the service hnvc been very hnppy
becnusc of the pioneer nnturo of the
work; becnusc of the increasing rocogni- -'
tion thnt lenders over the country nrc
giving to It; nnd becnusc of the unusual
type of person being nttrnctcd by the
The fnct thnt the orgnnizn-tio- n
movement.
Is comparatively new nnd the field
unlimited makes a strong appeal to the
nmbitlous young men who wants to grow
with the organization. Unusual opportunities for the development of the individual nrc nfFordcd through travel, con-tnwith nil types of people, nnd the
prestige that comes with affiliation with
a national organization.
Rohe Walter, a representative of the
Personnel Bureau of Community Service
will be in Lexington on Friday to talk
with any men of the senior class of the
University who might be interested in
becoming connected with such a national
organization. All men desirous of seeing Mr. Walter on Friday should arrange
for interviews through the President's
office.
EDDY STARTS

LECTURES

TODAY

(Continued from page 1)
on Friday and Saturday afternoons at
Patterson Hall.
Doctor Eddy will speak on the following subjects: "The Challenge of the
Present World Situation," "The Challenge of America's
Problems;" "The
Challenge of Campus Problems;" "What
Shall I Do With My Life;" "A Rational
Faith for the Modern Student."
Sherwood Eddy is acquainted with
every phase of student life and is known
equally well in Euporc, Asia and America
He is a man of varied interests and has a
worth-while
message for every student
of the University of Kentucky.

ENGINEERS

ILLUSTRATED

GIVEN
TALK

Mr. Pfisterer Spoke on Advantages
Mechanical Draft

of

Mr. G. E. Ffistercr of the Green Fuel
Economizer Company delivered a very
interesting talk in Dicker Hall last Friday afternoon. His subject was Mechanical Draft, and his talk interspersed with
slides,
was quite
instructive.
Mr.
Pfisterer was brought here under the

auspices of the National Association of
Fan Manufacturers, with the view of
explaining the practical application of
fans.
During the course of his talk, Mi
Pfistercr pointed out the fact that since
the general tendency nt present is to
use stokers, a good draft is requisite.
Hence n mcchanicnl drnft is necessary In
many cases. A mcchanicnl drnft grently
reduces the initial cost of production.
nnd it has been shown that to install n
fan or blower Is much cheaper than tc
build n stack sufficiently Inrgc to supply the same draft as that furnished by
the fnn.
Mr. Pfistercr also made manifest the
growing need for n larger number of
experimenters in the field of combustion,
nnd thnt it offers n very wide nnd ex
tensive field for growth nnd development.

early religious training.
The
(2)
peculiarity of their life In the Univer
sity. They nrc kept busy all week with
their college activities nnd Sunday Is
usunlly a dny or relaxation. (3) This is
n period of question nnd doubt nnd time
Is not tnken to nnswer these questions.
(4) They nrc tending to outgrow their
old religion. They hnvc left the old environment nnd hnvc grown intcllcstunlly
nnd In every other way except religious
ly. And so their old religion is outgrown.
"Religion is life nnd must go with the
other thinking. You must think through

"JUDAISM"
One of a Series of Sunday Evening

.

on
What the World Believes
Sermon-Lecture-

s

By MR. WARD

Centenary Methodist Episcopal Church
NORTH BROADWAY AT CHURCH STREET

the Bible. The purpose of the Bible is to
reveal God and to show his working with
men. It Is n record of the developing
conception of God's rcvclntion."
Eliznbcth Hume led the meeting nnd
Julin Willis rend the Scripturnl pnssngo.

7:30 P. M.

Lecture followed by Social Hour Refreshments
10 A. M. Special Discussion Classes for Students.

COME

V. M. C. A. Notes

Kappa Kappa Gamma had charge of
the second one "f the scries of Y. W. C.
A. programs given by the sororities nt
the rcgulnr Sunday evening meeting,
Doctor A. W. Fortune pastor of the
Central Christian Church was the speakReligious
er. His subject was "The
Problems of the University Girls." He
spoke in part as follows:
"Despite the fact that they have far
more problems than other people there
are three of four serious ones which con(1) Their
front University girls.
peculiar relation to the church. At home
they are perhaps closely identified with
the church but they are practically
strangers in their college towns. They
have no church responsibilities and so
are likely t grow neglectful of their

1

1

I

UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL
(The oldest Law School in Chicago)
Summer, Term, Wednesday, June 21 to
Wednesday, August 23, 1922.
Fall Term, opens Monday, September
25.

I

Faculty includes mem- bers of the Supreme Courts of the
following states: Colorado, South
Carolina, West Virginia
and
Illinois.
Requirments for Admission
Proof of
Candidates for a degree.
satisfactory completion of three
years of college study
Special Students. Proof of completion of four years of high school
or its equivalent.
Auditors. Members of the bar who
either cannot meet the above requirments or who do not ask for
credit for studies.
For bulletins and detailed information, address Secretary of the Law
University
School,
Northwestern
Building,
31
West Lake Street,
Chicago, Illinois.
The Summer

The Lafayette

Keeping faith
'with the

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* 3

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
beliefs through law, when the Baptists
hnvo nil through tho nges stood so con
sistcntly for tho freedom of conscience
nnd ngninst any lnw controlling nny one's
right to worship ns he plcnscs.
4 Jfa
AA A A J
4 '4 4
l
Jl J
mQ
l
J l( l l l
'' ? 44 4
J t4
4, i
if.
j 2p
!
l.
"I nm enclosing n clipping from the
Alumni of University of Kentucky who hers of the Kentucky General Assembly Topcka Cnpilol, tho most widely rend
hnvo been nctivc in the support of their in the Interest of n more liberal support dnily pnpor published in Kansns."
Almn Mntcr in legislative mnttors nt of the University. Members of the Legis"Education In Kentucky"
Frnnkfort hnvo received spcclnl recognl-tlo- n lature hnvo expressed pleasure nt tho
Tho chnnccllor of the State Univcr
nt the hnnds of their follow lnw Interest of the former students in cducn-tionsity nnd other educators in Kentucky
This correspondadvancement.
Chnirmnnship
of important
makers.
nrc protesting ngninst n bill, snlil to hnve
to the ence hns been cnrrlcd on by tho oldest the support of n good mnjorlty of both
committees hns been nwnrded
nlumni In the House of Representatives nnd tho youngest of the nlumni, writing houses of the stntc legislature, which
nnd three of them nrc on the Rules Com- - to stntc olTiclnls, the solons nnd others forbids the tcnchlng in nny stntc school
mittcc which is in entire control of interested in public mnttors, not exclud- of "nny theory of evolution thnt derives
legislation during the last twenty days ing editors of tho lending nowspnpers of mnn from tho brute, or nny other form
of the session. These are John E. Brown,' the State. Typical of these communiof life, or thnt climlnnttes God ns the
Joe F. Bosworth nnd Arch L. Hamilton.1 cations nrc the two following addressed crentor of mnn by a direct creative net."
In the Senate J. Will Stoll has been' to tho Speaker of the House of RepreIn n word, Kentucky's legislature has
appointed on the Rules Committee, the sentatives nnd a Kentucky college prj- - henrd of the
Dnrwininn theory.
'
second Republican to hold such a postf sident respectively:
Probnbly the chnnccllor doesn't tench it,
To The Speaker
in n Kentucky Senate. The first was Joe
but objects nevertheless to being directF. Bosworth also n former student of( "I think the treatment the Univer- ed whnt to teach by a stntc legislnturc.
In the world ns n whole it would be
the University. Senator Stoll directed, sity has received at the present session
the defense of the University in the dc-- j from the Budget Commission is a public disastrous if lcgislnturcs with nil the
"monkey bllls." outrage, nnd the petty tomfoolery that other problems
they hnvo to settle
bate over the
Supporters of these bills in debate sug hns been enrred on nbout the monkey should now nssume the function of tellgested widespread nthcism among unl stuff is even worse. I hnvo just return ing experts whnt to tench in their
ed from a considerable trip through specinlty though it mny make little
vcrsity graduates and teachers.
Consideration of the evolution meas several states and have noticed editorials difference in Kentucky, where any teachures in the Senate was postponed by a in nil of the pnpers everywhere ridiculing ing Is better thnn none. It would not
vote of 19 to 17 until n time when the the Legislnturc of the Stntc of Kentucky greatly startle the world if tho KenRules Committee would take charge. A nbout thi3 so called 'monkey business.' I tucky legislnturc should- require the
majority of the Rules Committee are op- believe the Legislnturc enn snfely leave schools to back up the Voliva physics, ac
posed to any legislation on the subject, to the fifteen reprcsentntive citizens of cording to which the heavens nre conconsequently the "monkey bills" are con- Kentucky who constitute the Board of stituted of brass, or some such firm
sidered dead. Similar measures in the Trustees of the University to see to it solid, nnd the stnrs nrc hung from it
House now become the charge of the that nothing is done at the University in the manner of chandeliers, while the
Rules Committee there which has taken that will jeapordlze the' safety of the earth is not a sphere but a plane, the sun
the attitude that other matters deserve young citizenship of this State that may is only 8,000 miles distant and the earth
earlier attention, so Darwin will be al be enrolled there. Furthermore we have is surrounded by n fence of ice to keep
one of the very highest class men, Dr. mariners from fnlling off. This sort of
lowed to rest.
McVey as President of the University, a philosophy would probnbly suit the KenX
X
Christian gentleman is every respect, and tucky mountaineers well enough, of
Press Tells of Strength
In dispatches of the Associated Press he will see to it that nothing is taught whom the story has been told that following the appearance of a book agent
last Sunday was an account of the grow- that is not strictly all right.
"I certainly hope you can see to it that some years ago selling Rollin's Ancient
ing strength of the University in legislative circles at Frankfort. Two meas proper appropriations are made to take History, which one of the Kentucky
ures designed to bring an added re- care of the University and that the denizens was reading aloud to the comvenue of more than $150,000 annually present session of the Legislature does munity, betting was running high as to
have been introduced in the House. A not adjourn and leave the University whether Titus, the Roman Emperor,
revised inheritance tax is provided in a to flounder along for another two years would capture Jerusalem or not.
Legislative strictures on teaching are
measure introduced by Dr. B. A. Muster, with inadequate support. You have no
chairman of the University Committee doubt read the report of the Commission nothing new, being the rule rather than
in the House. A bill limiting the fee of of high class citizens who made the in- the exception during the Dark Ages,
oil inspectors and giving the surplus to spection tour of the various universities when the penalties were more severe
the University may be a compromise be- last May and recommended a liberal ap- than those provided by the Kentucky
propriation for the University of Ken- legislature of a maximum fine of $1,000.
tween Representatives Arch L. Hamilton and Frank Stranger who introduced tucky. The State of Indiana just to our This is a comparaticely mild infliction
measures with a similar intent. Repre- north maintains two state universities. for heresy, so that it may be said that
sentative Oscar Vest was author of a bill Purdue at Lafayette and Indiana Uni- the new "Kentucky resolutions" prove
to abolish the office of oil inspector, versity at Bloomington, each one of which in spite of themselves that "the sun do
which after heated opposition and re- alone receives more money from the move." Topeka Cappitol (Kan.)
State than our own University. It is a
X
X
peated amendments was
serious situation when the young men
and is expected to give way to the Hamilton-S;
&Mtf"lHl'fMfr
,.4"t44tttt'4tl"l,l,t'iM
trange
and women of this State apply for adbill.
of the mission at the State University and arc
An interview with Speaker
House James H. Thompson by Herbert turned away on account of lack of funds.
4$$4S44$4t4f4S4
Graham, the Alumni Secretary, expressed With a properly supported University
444S44t4444St44S4f44t44S
the great need of a more liberal financial the great natural resources of Kentucky
Daniel W. Perry, '13, writting from
support for the University. Mr. Thomp- can be developed and a handsome return McKinzie, Tenn., states that he has
on the investment in this University will severed his connection with the Westing-hous- e
son who has been mentioned as a potential Democratic nominee for Governor be received by the State each year in
and Electric and Manufacturing
next year has taken a stand in favor of the number of graduates turned back into Company, Pittsburg, where he has been
tax reduction. In addition to favoring a the State as a finished product for the for several years. His present address
I is 127 Cherry street, McKinzie, Tenn. Mr.
larger annual appropriation for the Uni development of the Commonwealth.
versity he advocates an expansive build- certainly hope you can bring your good Perry registered a protest n receiving
ing program for the next eight or ten influence to bear to help out this situa- his copy of the Kernel after having left
years, as recommended by the University tion."
Pittsburg, and urged thnt the change be
its work last
followimr
Commission
X
X
made at once ns he is "missing all the
spring.
James Anderson Yates, '90, head of the news."
The State Board of Health which suc- department of chemical
XX
and physical
ceeded in taking from the University and sciences and director of electrical and
James Madison Graves, '00, is assistant
Experiment Station the Puro Food and mining engineering at the State Manual general manager of the Dupuenso Light
Drugs inspection in 1918 and sought to Training Normal School at Pittsburg, Company, at Pittsburg, Pa., his residence
complete the separation act by removing Kan., aroused over the movement to ban address being 435 Sixth avenue. PreviPublic Service Laboratories by a bill the teaching of Darwinism in
ous to his present connection he was
introduced at this session has received a
Kentucky educational Institutions, superintendent of the power station of
Provision was has written to a college president in the Duquenense
very marked
His home
company.
mado for an investigation of the finances the state as follows:
Mr. Graves is
nddress is Lexington.
of the Board and a separate State Board
president of the Pittsburg Alumni Club.
To a Kentucky College President
for Chiropractors, both of which were
XX
"I notice in tho Journal published by
Vigorously opposed by the Board of the American Association for the Ad- Lynn B. Evans, '15, is manager of the
posHealth officals. Indications of a
vancement of Science and nlso from the Kansas City branch of tho Studebaker
of the Board by
sible
larger daily papers quite a little com- Corporation, his address being 2029
legislative action have been noted at ment concerning the proposed legislation Grand avenue. In 1920 he was sales
Frankfort.
beforo the present Legislature of Ken- manager of the Hare Stoker nnd Furnnce
A return of all the Pure Food and tucky.
I have understood
that the Company at Detroit, and previous to that
Drugs work to the Experiment Station Baptists are pushing this legislation.
was with Franklin Manufacturing Comis provided in measures already intro"I have said to friends who have tried pany, Franklin, Pa. During the wnr Mr.
E. Brown
duced by Representative John
to twit me about tho matter that I was Evans was a junior grade lieutenant in
and Senator Newton Bright.
certain that the leaders of the great the navy.
Tho right of eminent domain Is given Baptist hosts of Kentucky were not beX
X
the University and tho State Normal hind this movement, and certainly would
Miss Freda Lemon, '18, who has been
by RepreSchools In a bill introduced
lend their influence to correcting any statistician with tho Warner Sugar Comsentative JameB Park. Senator Starling freak Legislation that would tend to pany, 79 Wall street, New York City, for
Marshall and Representative John Tins-le- y nromotc discussion of any conflict be- moro than a year, has changed her resihave introduced bills that would make tween religion and science; that there is dence address from Fort Washington
women eligible for appointment on the absolutely no conflict which every well avenuo to COO West 157th Street. Miss
Board of Trustees.
informed individual knows and I am sure Lemon was instructor in radio during
that your leaders in education work will tho S. A. T. C. at tho University in 1918.
see to it that no legislative enactments She was graduated as an A. B. in EduAlumni Law Down Barrage
There has been nothing of timidity are mado that would put our denomina cation. Her home address is Providence,
In the approach of the alumni to mem- - tion on the side of controlling religious Ky.

Alumni Notes

Betwixt Us

Thomns Henry Cutler, 'OH, is superin
tendent of construction for tho Powers
Thompson Construction Compnny,
nt
Jolict, III. Mr. Cutler wont with his
present firm compnrntivcly recently nf- ter hnvlng been nn engineer nnd c"n
trnctor nt Gnry, Ind., for several yenrs
Mrs. Cutler wns Miss MIrinm N'nive, 'OH.
Their homo is nt 111 Herkimer street,
Jolict, III.
X

X

Evnns L. Shuff, '10, is now with the
Combustion Engineering Corporntion, 13
Brond street, New York City. His home
nddrcss is Georgetown, Ky. Mr. Shuff
Mnchine
wns with tho Wcstinghouso
Compnny for n time nftcr his grnduntion
from tho College of Engineering, nnd
Inter wns with the Wcstinghouso Electric
nnd Mnnufncturlng Compnny, in Chicago.
Following his dischnrgc from the nrmy
in which he served during the war, he
was nsalesmnn with th" Western Electric
Cmpnny, nt Cincinnnti, nnd before going with his present New York concern,
wns with tho
Frederick Engineering
Compnny, nt Frederick, Md.
Llewellyn Chnuncey Brown of the clns3
of '00, is mnnnging editor nnd pnrt owner
of the Evening Independent nt St. Petersburg, Fin., with which newspaper he hns
been for the Inst several years. He was
graduated with the degree of B. M. E.,
and in 1911 was granted the E. E. degree.
He is a native of Harrodsburg.
X

Ho was granted the L'. D. degree by
the University in '1(1 nnd by the University of Louisville in '09. He is n nntlvc
of Lexington.
'8(5.

X

A lumni Directory
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X

In a recent article on the fortieth anniversary of the dedication of the first
three buildings on the University
campus, Dr. John L. Patterson, dean of
the College of Arts and Science, University of Louisville, was listed as a member of the graduating class that year, '82.
Dr. Patterson took his A. B. at Harvard
in '83, and his A.M. degree at Kentucky In

X

Mrs. Guy W. Smith (Miss Linda B
Purncll) who wns grnduntcd with the
degree of B. S. in Home Economics In
'17, Is now mnklng her home nt Lnwrcncc,
Knn. She wns In chnrgo of the University
enfetcrin when It wns first cstnblished,
for severnl yenrs.

t

Blandville, Ky.
ptfc

A A AJJnJnJ A A A A. J A A.m4mmmm

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NORTH LIMESTONE

109

Hats, Caps and Furnishings
of distinction for men and
young men.
The very newest styles alwayson hand

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inMiH

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

m

forwnrd, strongest link in the Wildcat
George T.
chain was injured nnd unnhlo to play in
BARBER SHOP
4
vcy Frld Ay throughout thp the crucinl test with Mercer which ended
Haircut
I'ulililiod
CollcRe yenr liy tho nturicnt Imily of
26
Shave
Kentucky's nspirntion for tho Cup.
the Fnlvornlty nf Kentucky.
Turkish, Shower nnd Plain Bnths
This game closes tho basketball careers
TIip Kftitiirky ICorucI Is the ollllrlnl nuws
139 East Main St.
Basement
pniiT of the Mutlent mul nliimnl of the of Adkins, Jfnydon 'and Lnvin, so far
Opposite the Phoenix Hotel
University of Kentucky.
as tho University of