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The Kentucky Kernel
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TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
Membar

National Collrt. Praaa Aaaoelatlon
Kentucky InUreollrgKU Praia Aaaoelatlon
Ltalncton Board el Commarc
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OmCIAL NIWSPAPER OF THE STUDENTS OF 1HI UNIVERSITY OF
KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON
Subscription 13.00 a Year. Entered at
Lexington, K., Poetodlot Aa Second
Claaa Mall Matter
HFR.E SHALL, THE KERNEL ALL

8TUDENT3

RIGHTS MAINTAIN

SUNNY" DAY
3
ARTHUR MUTH

tiflor-fn-Ol-

Managing Kdttor

EDITORS
Jnrk Wild James Bersot Ellrabeth Baute
Elltubeth Baute
Jack Wild
John W. Potter
Jamri Bersot
Ben F. Taylor
ASSOCIATE

ASSISTANT EDITORS
Jane M. Hamilton
Mary Carolyn Terrell
Jack Wild

Literary tutor
Society Fdltor
stir. Societt Kditoi
Wrtteri
Frances Bush
Vnncy Becker
Lucy Jean Anderson
Virginia Bosworth
Mary Chick
Charlotte Coffinan
Feature Kdttor
LORRAINE LEPERE
Wrltert
Ed Shannon
Howard Cleveland
Dr. H. L. Franklin
Mary Rees Land
Eleanor Richardson William Carrell
Nev$ FMoT
JOHN 8T. JOHN
DOROTHY WHALEN
EU7.ABETH HARDIN
WILLIE H. SMITH

AB8ISTANT
B. Atkins
Leon 8pence

Tom

NEWS EDITORS

James Ratcltffe
Dave Balyert

REPORTERS
Delia Holt
Isabel Preston
Walter Rlddatt
Earl Bourgeois
Ropke
T. J.
Frank Borrlea
William Huston
Carl Boone
Betty Pennington
Miriam Rosen
James Anderson
Catherine Jonea
Margaret Cllnkscales Dorothy Nichols
Anne Phelps
Morton Collins
John Darnall
Virginia Robinson
Morton Potter
Sports Editor
WRITERS
Norman Ourllng
Jack Ooodykoonta
Charles Dunn
James Anderson

JAY LUCIAN
SPORTS
James D. Stephens
Max Lancaster

Manager
Advertising Manager
ADVERTISING STAFF
Cave Dlfford
Ernie Shovea

NED TURNBULL
IKE MOORE

C. V.

COFFMAN

Butlne$$

Circulation Manager

DEAN ANDERSON
After months of suffering, Fred
prick Paul Anderson, dean of the
Interna-tioC ollege of Engineering,
ally known, not only aa an engineering teacher but as a builder of
stalwart character among young
men and women students, sank to
rest Sunday evening shortly after
the twilight hour.
Forty-thre- e
years of his life, a life
of service to humanity, were spent at
the University preparing young men
for their life work. Engineering, at
the time of his early instruction
here, was scarcely more than a
dream; under his guidance there has
developed a college of engineering
that is considered second to none
other in the country.
lie was, perhaps, the best known
faculty member on the campus.
Daily he might be observed working
in his flower gardens, or strolling
along the west lawn, a small but
figure, which might
commanding
easily explain the affectionate title
of "The Little Dean," or "Little
Paul, as he was called by colleagues
throughout the country. A friend to
all students, he was especially loved
and respected by engineering students. In whom he Instilled his profound pmlosophy of sympathetic

understanding.
One often hears the saying that
there Is no indispensable man; however, there is on the University
campus a feeling that Dean Anderson was the "indispensable man."
lie probably has done more to promote a widespread Interest In our
school than any other person. Ills
efforts to place graduating students
In positions have received much
praise, and prominent engineers In
every section of the United States
are Indebted to him for their success.
Exemplary of the high ideals, the
foresight. Intelligence, and perse
verance for which we strive, his was
the truly great character, a
combination of the ideal
and the practical, of the visionary
and the courageous. His passing we
mourn, as a teacher and as a comrade. His memory we shall cherish
always, for he was ail that we aspire
to a success among men, a pioneer
in bis field.
rarely-equall-

COMMITTEE OF 240
bit of missionary work,
for which all concerned should be
commended, has teen begun by the
University Publicity bureau, directed
A valuable

by Elmer O. Sulzer, which should

result In bringing to the University
of Kentucky a "bigger and better"
crop of freshmen in future years.
Under tlie plan, a committee of
240 members has been formed to
stimulate Interest in the University
among high school graduates in the

count lo$ of Kentucky. This
group, of which there are two members In each county, ft boy and ft girl.
will contact prospective university
students during the summer vaca
tion and help them decide to attend
a university and to make that uni
versity the University of Kentucky.
A feeling of the University author
ities that because of the chaotic
conditions of the economic depression, high school graduates should,
wherever possible, be encouraged to
attend a university, has been the
cause for the formation of this com
mittee, and also it Is felt by instigators of the movement that the
Information which will be given
committee members will not only
enable them to tell the prospective
students of advantages offered by
the University but will give them a
knowledge of their university which
they would ordinarily not have had.
In order for the members of the
committee to acquaint the prospec
tive students with facts about costs
and other things connected with
university life, a series of meetings
will be held at which members of
the committee will be given this
information; and In order for them
to give an intimacy with campus
scenes of Interest to the high school
graduates and their parents, a set
of slides has been prepared which
may be shown in the various coun
ties should this be thought advisable
by the committee members in the
course of their efforts during the
summer.
The committee is representative
of the students at the University,
and is also representative of the
outstanding persons of their counties
and communities.
President McVey, Mr. Sulier,
James Shropshire, manager of student publications, Miss Helen King,
assistant in the Publicity bureau,
and each of the 240 members of the
committee are to be wished success
in their undertaking.
120

.

UNIVERSITY AUDIT
REPORT
Reporting on the financial operation of the University, GrifTenhagen
and Associates, auditors appointed
by Gov. Ruby Laffoon to make a
survey of economic conditions at our
institution, issue the statement that:
"On the whole, the University of
Kentucky is economically operated
and its finances well managed."
Although the report on an audit
and budget survey commends the
economic manner in which the University has been conducted, it also
cites the liability caused by lack of
funds sufficient to maintain, repair,
and improve certain campus projects. As pointed out in the recommendations of the advisory council,
to continue to defer providing for
them is ''anything but economical."
Commenting upon the progress
made in the last several years by
the University in the matter of increased enrollment and new advanced degrees being granted, the
account remarked that the school
"has begun to take on some of the
marks and characteristics of a true
university."
Indicating the steady
growth of the University, figures
show that the enrollment in the
regular session in 1920-2- 1 was 1,259,
as compared with 2,485 in 1926-2and 3.171 in 1929-3"The present current deficit is
entirely due to lack of funds to pay
salaries, notwithstanding the reductions that have been effected" the
report of financial conditions set
forth, and that the school "has been
seriously handicapped by the falling
off in receipts from general property
and inheritance taxes."
As to the conditions of buildings,
$50,000 was stated as the amount
needed at once, and another $80,000
in the near future for the making
of urgent repairs. The council advised that a central power plant be
the next capital outlay of the
University.
This report comes to us at a time
when every person connected with
the University Is deeply concerned
about the outlook, the future of our
school. It Is encouraging in that the
seriousness of the situation evidently
is becoming realized. Were the University forced to close its doors, the
results would be appalling, a never- 7,

0.

KERNEL

Although it is said that every
ending disgrace for Kentucky, a blot
cloud has a silver lining, we fear
never could be erased.
that
Try as thry can, the men in charge that the Inner covering of the Uni
of the University's finances are versity's financial visible vapor is
powerless to act unless sufficient slightly tarnished.
money is appropriated.
Their success in managing on a minimum has
been praised; but no institution can
exist without funds. We, upon whom
the welfare of a new generation
rests, demand Justice, not politics
this, our plea for education, should
not be denied.
Dear Editor:
I feel that in bringing this subject
before the student body of the UniA LITTLE LEARNING
versity. I am expressing the senti"A little learning" is a dangerous
ment of many. I hope that what I
thing. Our nation and the world say will not be taken by those contoday is imperiled because the people cerned as absolutely destructive
criticism, but merely as an effort to
composing them have Just a little promote better feeling between the
learning instead of an education students and the administration.
There Is scarcely a course offered
applied to the practical and cultural
life. If our education was as broad in the English department where
the buying of at least two books,
and deep as it should be, considering and In most
instances more than
we have had two, is not necessary! Not only do
the opportunity that
our long days would become shorter, we have to buy the books at treour work and our play would become mendously high prices, but quite
a thing of joy, and life would be often they are used a few times and
then discarded. It seems that there
broadened to a greater extent.
should be some way possible wherewe have Just enough by the course of study could be
However, if
learning to cause our twisted and arranged In order to eliminate such
narrow minds to function improper- things.
As everyone knows, for the past
ly, then, indeed, we should fear this
two or three years, we have passed
period as a dangerous age. It seems through a time of financial stress.
that at present we are in the depths We are supposed to be pulling out of
of such a period, a time when we that period, of course, but a glance
University
in anything at the credit forms of the
are not
business office, where the student
for which we are striving. Such a agrees to pay "so much now" and
time is truly dangerous and un- - "so much the first, etc.," for the past
semester will show one at a glance
beneficial to our race.
This point is easily illustrated in that college students are still in no
secure financial position. If they
the present development of our in have a hard time even getting into
dustrial life and in the development the University, why must they be
of our mental temperament. We met at their first English class with
Your
have created a bloody monster "Your text will be
reading book will be
which annually slays 30,000 of our comparative Your books for outside
people and injuries 850,000 more, reading will be
English is a required course and
This monster is the automobile,
which has been improved and mod- is of course essential in a curriculum,
the most exernized to the highest degree by our but why should It becollege?
pensive course in its
engineers. At the same time, civil
Then there is the practice which I
authorities have neglected to ses believe has been severely criticized
that improvement of roads, of in before in letters to The Kernel called
use
structions for drivers, and of traffic "trading" when professors gain. each
personal
laws be made and they have for other's books for belief
that some
It is my sincere
gotten to devise a system by which attention should be given to this
matter, which I believe is a serious
to determine those able to drive.
one and affects the majority of
Another example of
students.
Is the highly developed but insensiD. S.
ble use of the radio. We are merely
wasting our time in listening to
Jazz and cheap comedy. The radio
is an apt Instrument for widening
our breadth of reason, and for raising our sense of appreciation In the
cultural field, if used in the right
By WALTER GIRDLER
manner.
A great amount of this waste Is
contributed by our young people,
Back to Nature Act
which may readily be discovered
ATO "Slob" Vanaman was caught
upon examination of some statistics swimming in the creek beside the
upon accidents and other evils of gym a short time ago in his birthday suit. . . was this a bet or a dare?
the day.

STUDENT
OPINION

Tuesday, April

Anna Bain Hillenmeyer a box of
hung around in
hopes of getting a sample. . .Bain
foiled him and saved It for her
many other admirers.

candy Easter

a

This "Orr" That
Kappa Roberta Henry Is much
Interested in geology .. .Delt Jack
Hirsch seems to be the Innpiratlon
...Jack, don't forget about the PI
Phis at Northwestern. . .There may
be someone there who is also interested in geology.

f n Fewer Words
Dossett Reld and Helen Young
have come to an understanding...
Helen is rlow wearing a Phi Delt
pin.
a

a

a

Lambdachi Roy Hogg breaks over
and escorts five ferns to lunch Saturday at Canary Cottage. . .Was it
dutch or all on you. Roy?.. or maybe the depression Is really over...
a

a

Lloyd Featherston has
FLASH
done away with his S.A.E. pin and
has setled down to his present one
and only. . .
a

"Dimpled Cheek" Whit Goodwin
carries a pair of handcuffs in his
car. . .Is it necessary to say more or
must it be added that all power
houses work that way.

It is up to the present college man FLASH 'Tis rumored that a
and woman to obtain more than popular coed from the Alfagam
" a little learning," in order to keep lodge has promised to be faithful
this vast and shallow civilization of to an aviator friend for life. . .
ours from breaking into an orgy of
Fooled
insanity, upheaval, and turmoil.
On Easter morning Pat hall was
flooded with flowers. . .The most
popular room was Marian Connor

JEST AMONG US
report that the University has
an average enrollment of 12.9 students for each instructor leads us to
wonder if maybe we aren't one of
those fractional parts.
A

Dawsons, which received two cor
sages and a bunch of roses... Marian was in Nashville visiting a

friend

(?).

Effect of Spring
Flowers, candy, a picture, and a
Pi.K.A. pin were showered upon
by
Scotty Hobart Easter Sunday
the smiling Happy Houlahan in.
Congratulations. Happy

FLASH
Delt Beecher Tanner
takes popular Alfagam to Canary
We believe that it might be a good Cottage. . .orders cocktails. . Tanner
idea if some old-tistars of radio can't take it... date drinks cock
tail for him. . . .
would stoop to acquire the personaa
ality and technique of NBC's child
Foiled
artist, Baby Rose Marie.
Slgmachi Prentiss Douglass took

New Reduced Fares to

AH

ic

a

She Must Know Prentiss
Tridelt Scotty Chambers, one of
Kentucky's best judges of men, says
that Prentiss Douglas, after seeing
him in a basketball uniform, should
wear a girdle.
FLASH Gene Bryant says. "No
more dates with Marian Connor
Dawson."
a

a

What is the meaning behind "The
Blonde Bandit," a name just recently given Chlo Jane Crane, and
why does she become ruffled upon

hearing it?

a

a

3-- D

CHALLENGE
CHATS

Tridelt Jean Short is so much in
With this issue of The Kernel is
love with a certain ed on the campus that she. has flowers on her inaugurated the first of a series of
"nities" to remind her of his "Challenge Chats," short- religious
sweetness and kindness.
discussions written in a challengaaa
ing manner, that will appear weekly in this column. They are deWhich One?
Whose Phi Sig pin has Chlo signed to meet a specific need for
discussion
Betty Bosworth . . 8am Halley or some
Henry Forbes of W. and L? .Come, of religious and moral problems peBetty, which one is it?
culiar to student life, and will be
a
prepared by those local religious
Triangle Jack Faunce leaders most conversant with U. K.
FLASH
couldn't wait for spring ... He pin- student thought.
This column, sponsored Jointly by
ned his old gal all over again and
the
the road to continued happiness the YM.C.A., the Y.W.C.A.,
seems to lie ahead.
Catholio club, the Baptist Student
-

.

The
o

TEST...

THE DIRT

Dust was blown over the face
of various types of summer suitings. The suitings were then
rinsed in clear water. The dirt that
adhered to the fabrics is plainly
shown by the color of the water
after rinsing. Note that the water
in the case of the Palm Beach
Cloth tests is almost clear. Other
fabrics tested retained from tut
It fivt limes 0t much dirt.
Your Palm Beach Suit, because
of the smooth yarns of the cloth
and its patented construction,
sheds the dirt, keeps clean and

Points on the

''

-

"

SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM

REV. GEO. D. HEATON

Nothing is more ridiculous In appearance than spats, unless it could
be some of these funny-lookithings that girls wear on the other
extremity, and which are known as

"hats."
a

a

Yogi Alpha, internationally known
psychologist says that "hard work
will never bring you success," further easing our consciences now
that spring fever has set in.

Palm Beach Suits

J

11

M

'

'

students are not Christian.

dust hops off
these NEW

needs less laundering.

vf h

ONE WAY FARES

iyc

per mile, good in coaches only. 3c per mile,
good in Pullman and Parlor Cars upon payment of Pullman charges.
ROUND TRIP FARES
2c per mile, limited to fifteen days.
per mile,
limited to thirty days. Both good in Pullman cars upon payment of Pullman charges.
PULLMAN SURCHARGE is entirely suspended.

PALM BEACH

2c

FABRIC NO.

2

Southern Railway System
FABRIC NO.

YOU CAN GET IT
Hundreds of teachers, students and college graduates will earn two hundred dollars or more this summer. SO CAN YOU. Hundreds of others
will secure a better position and a larger salary for next year. YOU CAN
BE ONE OF THEM. Complete information and helpful suggestions will
be mailed on receipt of a three cent stamp. (Teachers address Dept. T.
All others address Dept. S.)
Denver, Colo.
Covers the ENTIRE United States
School Officials ! You may wire us your vacancies at our expense, if speed
is urgent. You will receive complete, free confidential reports by air mail

y

q

IO3w

FABRIC NO. 4

CONTINENTAL TEACHERS AGENCY, INC.
1812 Downing St.

Diagrams don't do it justice. What we need is
a microscope. Then we could show you how a
flock of dust comes down on a Palm Beach suit
and bounces off... doesn't cling
We could show you how the clean, sanitary,
fibres of Palm Beach resist dirt. None
of the whiskers or scales (scillia) which make
wool catch dust and hold it. That's why Palm
Beach suits mean smaller laundry bills.
Treat yourself to the cool cleanliness of the
new Palm Beach this summer. Look for the
label so you'll be sure to get the genuine Palm
Beach. ..smartly tailored by COODALL...in
mm gm
white and handsome colors.
At your favorite clothier's
un-fuzz-

A Better Position !

within 36 hours.

Kappa Slg Bill Galllard ia se- union, and the Pitkin club, will alcretly in love with a certain Chlo ways welcome student suggestions
but is too bashful and won't ask and comments.
aa
for a date... Did you know that she
had taken a pin bark again. Bill...
If Christian Students Were
Stick around; maybe she will once
Christ Inn
more change her mind.
If Christian students were Chrisa
a
tian there would be many radical
FLASH
The name of Lover's changes observable In student life.
Lane has been changed to Taylor-wal- k Narrowed down from the universal
road.
view of what the world would be
aaa
If Christians were Christian, in the
Plkap Dan Ewlng took a dollar student world this thought provides
bet last week and walked from his Interesting speculation.
lodge to Dunn's and back In a pair
students were ChrisIf
of shorts. .Observers along the way tian, Christian
intellectual theory would bewere the Kappas and DK's.
come energized by actual participaaa
in human problems; students
FLASH Kay John Davis Hag- tionsociology would feel
the despergard says that he is fooling the of
ate plight of
women. . .Explain what you mean quents coming the Juvenile delinfrom the slum area
to us all John, won't you?
of this city; students of economics
a
a
come to grips with the probPat Tressler, who has several pic- would
tures of popular eds decorating her lem of 6.000 unemployed in Lexingwalls, also has a DKE pin... Even ton, and students of history would
the dearest things will leak out understand the folly and futility of
war, and devote themselves to consometimes or other, Pat...
a
a
structive measures of peace. If we
were real followers of Christ, theStill Waiting
June Curd wants a frat pin.... ories would be vitalized with sacri- What Is wrong with the boys at ficlal living.
If Christian students were ChrisU.K.?... Isn't the right man to be
found among them? Some of you tian, the moral standards of the
campus would be greatly changed:
pin givers better look Into this,
a
a
standards of honesty would nave
What picture sits beside Betty meaning for the class room, and
would have
Price's on Phidelt Jolly's desk? We standards of
understand it is an Atlanta girl. a new Interpretation. The students
would capitalize on their new freeNorris ...One of the old flames or
dom by gaining a greater control
something like that?
aaa
of self with all its ambitions and
SAE Ralph Fontaine is doing desires. The ethical standards of
right by the KD's...OnIy three in Jesus were such that we never atthat lodge are receiving his per- tain, but only reach higher and
higher, so that the right of today
sonal attention. . .while at the
house Bob "Smoocher" Herron is becomes the wrong of tomorrow, as
allowing two girls to enjoy his com- it is supplanted by a higher interpretation.
pany.
aaa
If Christian students were ChrisAlfaslg Oscar Reuter tian the resources of life would be
FLASH
seems to be getting pretty much better utilized, and cruel waste
found
that way about aa certain Alfagam. would be lessened. Jesus prayer;
a
a
vast strength and power in
FLASH Celanlre Paradls is no this fellowship with God was of
longer the bearer of Howard great moment to Him. Those reSmather's Slgmachi pin... a ro- sources are still available, and real
Christians would incorporate them
mance short lived.
in their beings. The resource of
friendship would be the nobler for
havng known us.
If Christian students were Christian, there would be many changes,
in personal lives, and in campus
atmosphere. That it would be better no one can deny. That it would
Conducted bv
require courage and rugged stamSYLVESTER FORD
ina is perhaps the reason Christian
sex-puri- ty

Embarrassing Moments
Phyllts Caskey let her heart
speak for her while dating one of
boys, and called
the
him Bud Hunt... If we were tossing
roses in this column we believe this
girl would get it, as she came as
close to being the color of one as
we ever have seen when she realized
her mistake.. .Congratulations, Bud,
on your seemingly rapid progress.
Hereafter, Phyllis, remember your
date s name.

?"

SCANDAL
SNICKERINGS

10, 1934

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CINCINNATI

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