xt7dr785md5r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dr785md5r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670302  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  2, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  2, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7dr785md5r section xt7dr785md5r Inside Todny s Kernel
Dr.

Alvin Mogld colls the socialist
situation in Subsarahan Africa 'fluid':
Poge Two.

international

A special
dent supplement
four-pag-

e

begins

on

stu-

Page

--

Five.

A world traveler made it to the UK
Donovan program late in life: Page

Three.

Editorial discusses the progress in
integrating Kentucky schools: Poge
Four.

X-

"We dont' know how to cope with
LSD" doctors say: Page Nine. .
The UK physical therapy program is
being accredited in a time of need:
Page Eleren.

Vol. 58, No. 109

University of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 1967

Twelve Pages

Shipley Win
In Lslf ge AWS Vote
W arcL
By HELEN McCLOY

Kernel Staff Writer
Jean Ward and Mary Alice
Shipley were announced as the
new president and vice president of AWS this morning.
The pair were chosen Wednesday over two other candidates in each category in an
election in which a fifth of the
University's women students
voted.
Miss Sandra Kemp, AWS adviser this morning gave The Ker-

nel the results of the voting.
No individual figures were released.
Beth Brandenburgh, runner-u- p
to Miss Ward, and Julia Kurtz,
the vice presidential runner-up- ,
will also serve on the Senate.
Other officers chosen in a
turnout of 1,073 of the campus's
5,306 women are Kelly Kurtz,
Women's Residence Hall Council representative; Pat Wykstra,
Town Women representative;
Jennifer Burcham, Panhellenic
representative.
Runners-ufor these posts,
who become automatically senators for next year, are Mary Korf-p

hage, WRH; Roxanna Jacobs,
Town Women; and Bev Moore,
Panhellenic.
Representing the sophomores
on the Senate will be Mary Lou
Swope and Kate Elliston. Junior
representatives will be Barbara
Meyer and Libby Polintano,
while Vickie Vetter and Cleo
Vradelis were elected senior
representatives.
Miss Kemp said AWS had
not divulged the number of votes
polled by each candidate in previous elections and she thought
to do so was not her prerogative.
This should be left up to the
committee,
she said.
The 75 applicants for AWS
posts were trimmed to 38 by an
AWS committee.
The committee, which Miss
Kemp said completed the vote
count and recount at 1:30 this
morning "talked a little about"
releasing the individual scores,
she added, and decided against
it. At press time today, none
of the women on the elections
committee could be reached for
elections-screenin-

g

comment.

mm mi
TO

row

8

ft

it lie

I

r

Some people didn't take as serious a view of the AWS election
as they might have. Numerous signs like this one were posted
on the campus Wednesday. One asked, "This election is serious!"

Pravda

Miss Kemp said.
She felt there had been "much
more interest in the election" this
year than in the past. Last year's
turnout was 600.
Misses Ward, Brandenburgh,
Shipley, Julie Kurtz, Wykstra,
and Swope and currently on the

Winnie Jo Perry, an AWS senator and a defeated candidate for
the AWS presidency, manned the poll in the Student Center basement for a time during Wednesday's election. Other candidates
also served as poll officers.

Senate.

Miss Kemp said there had
been no contest of the election.
Joint meetings between the
old and new officers will now
get underway and Miss Kemp
said that the change in leadership will "definitely take place
before Spring break."
The election came at a time
when AWS has been more in
the news than at any time in
recent memory.
AWS discussion this semester
has centered around the results
of a poll on women's hours taken
last November. An experimental
hours plan is now before the
Senate and, if approved, three
women's residence units would
be on a more liberal hours system for three weeks beginning
March 27.
The newly elected Senate will
also take office during the discussion of a plan that would
combine the House and Senate
into a unicameral body.
The sentiment of the current
Senate seems to be that the reorganization of the student affairs administration by the University and the advent of the
student rights code requires a
new constitution to take the
changes into account. Such a
constitution, it is suggested,
might include the unicameral
legislature.

Former SC President
Hits Forced Housing
By FRANK BROWNING
Kernel Associate Editor

Reported plans which would require undergraduates to live

in University dormitories drew sharp criticism from a former

Indiana-Base- d

By RAYMOND H. ANDERSON

non-in- v

New York Time Newt Service

-

The Central Intelligence
MOSCOW
Agency was accused Wednesday of throwSoviet-Unite- d
ing a "sinister shadow" over a
States student exchange program
by manipulating it to send spies to the
Soviet Union.
The allegation was published in Pravda,
the Soviet Communist Tarty newspaper.
The paper asserted that CIA agents were
active in the selection and training of U.S.
scholars to study or carry out research in
Soviet universities and institutes.
It accused a number of professors of
Russian Studies at U.S. colleges of being
intelligence agents or of having cooperated
with the CIA during studies in the Soviet
Union.
Among those accused was Dr. Albert
C. Todd of Queens College in New York.
He was host to Yevgeny Yevtushenko, the
Soviet poet, during his U.S. tour last fall.
The paper also complained that U.S.
agents used "blackmail, intimidation and
provocations" in attempts to subvert Soviet
students in the U.S. and to induce them to
defect.

Exchange Program

tionary uprising in Hungary, Dr. Todd extended assistance to Hungarian reactionaries.
he came, at the recommendation
In 1958-5of the CIA, to Moscow University as a
scholar under the exchange program."
Pravda charged that two other scholars
active in the work of the
Committee, Edward Keenan and Michael
Luther, also had been assigned by the
CIA to perform espionage missions in the
Soviet Union while here under the exchange
program.
Other former U.S. students accused of
affiliation with the CI A included Prof. Martin
Malin of the University of California, and
John Adams, who was charged with having
attempted to gain access to secret topographic charts while studying at the University of Moscow.
The paper also asserted that the Ford,
Rockefeller, and Carnegie Foundations cooperated closely with the CIA in financing
student exchanges with the Soviet Union.
CIA.
The scholarships awarded by the founda"In 1949, he was expelled for espionage tions for study and research in Soviet affrom Czechoslovakia, where he was staying fairs, Pravda contended, went primarily to
as a religious missionary," the paper said. graduates of military intelligence schools
"In 1956, at the time of the
t'uutiiiuril On Tage 2

Pravda emphasized, however, that the
Soviet authorities did not consider all participants in the exchange program to be
secret agents, and it stressed the value of
the exchanges. The article noted approvingly
the angry reaction of U.S. students to disclosures of CIA financing of the National
Students Association and similar organizations.
Pravda charged that the CIA was damaging the "positive work" of the
Committee on travel grants, the
nongovernmental organization that negotiates the U.S. side of the program. The committee, directed by Prof. Robert F. Byrnes,
has its headquarters at Indiana University.
A
summer course for students preparing for academic woik in the Soviet
Union is guided by CIA agents, the newspaper asserted.
Prof. Todd, a former director of the
Committee was accused by
Pravda of being a "long-timagent" of the
Inter-Universi- ty

six-wee- k

Inter-Universi-

e

counter-revolu-

stu-

dent government leader Wednesday.
to questions
Speaking before a weekly
Responding
Faculty Club luncheon, last about parental pressure to have
students placed in University
year s btudent congress President Winston Miller, said such
housing, Miller stated, "it should
living restrictions would only be be a joint decision between the
an "extension of the in loco
parent and the student."
Dr. Robert L. Johnson, vice
parentis concept."
Miller is a member of the Unipresident for student affairs, reversity Senate Student Affairs sponded that the University's
Committee which this week position was to integrate resigained final approval of proposals dence halls into the educational
directions of the University.
removing much of the University's "in loco parentis" role.
"As far as I'm concerned, if
"If dormitory living becomes the residence halls be only places
to sleep and eat, we shouldn't
a requirement, it is my opinion
be in the business. If, however,
be an extension of
this would
'in loco parentis," " Miller told we're talking about residence hall
life which integrates with acathe faculty group.
demic life it's another matter,"
Miller explained that the Unihe said.
versity had been trying to treat
"1 would surely reject the
the student as an adult but would
notion that it's the kind of nonow "turn around and say it was
tion that the University is trygoing to develop the total ening to control w hat students do,"
vironment. I think as an individual this is an extension of he added.
Miller reaffirmed the position
the type of control we've been
he advocated for Student Govto get away from."
trying
olveernment last year of
ment in
political is-

Charges CIA 'Spies7 Reached Russia

Through

,

Miss Kemp said the rationale
behind not releasing the figures
was "to save face for those who
did not win" by showing the
campus by how much each was
defeated.
All but three of the women
running had been notified of the
vote results as of this morning,

9,

Inter-Universi-

sues.

Outlining three areas Student
Government should not be in, he
said, "it should only try to represent opinions of students
which affect students in the institution. It should work for students in student issues such as
women's hours or the football
stadium."
Neither should the government "involve itself in things
which do not affect students as
students." He clarified his statement by saying it should not be
concerned with faculty salaries,
or with criticizing the University
or state about salaries, or with
public relations matters.
He also stated that a student government should not be
involved with or dominate other
student organizations.
Miller outlined four areas with
which student governmental
groups should deal:
1. Representing student opinion in matters directly affecting
University policy with both
faculty and administration.
2. Insuring that rights and
priv ileges of students not be usurped by faculty and administration, working against such things
Continued On Ptefe

12

* 2 --

March 2,

Till; KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday,

1!M7.

Canada's John Diefenbaker Asks
If CIA Money Helped Him Lose

Magid Says
Socialism
In Africa
Is 'Fluid'

New York Timet Newt Service

By HOWARD KERCHEVAL
Kernel Staff Writer
Dr. Alvin Magid, assistant
professor of political science, said
Wednesday night that if there is
any one way of describing
African socialism, it is
Sub-saha-

ra

"fluid."

DR. ALVIN MAGID
while advocacy of immediate proletarian revolution has been left
to the Chinese Communists.
He cited a recent trip through
East Africa by Chinese Premier
Chou En-lduring which Chou
angered many African leaders by
J
stating that the time was ripe
for African proletarian revolu-

He said that current socialist ideology in Black Africa is
a curious blend of
traditional culture, and colonial experiences of pragmatism.
Of the three, he s aid, "I would
is tions.
suggest that
the least significant"
Explaining that even though
Citing Julius Nyerere of Tan- ,Communist gains may be apzania and other present African parent in labor unions, Dr. Magleaders, Dr. Magid said many id said there have been many
Africans explain that African tradiplomatic failures.
Recent international diploditional communalism is different from Soviet or Chinese colmacy in Africa has been charlectivism.
acterized, according to Dr. Mag"Communist influence in
id, by "Communist fiascos, and
Africa dates to the end of ineptitude on the part of the
World War II," he said, when U.S."
most delegates to the Comintern
He said there are some diswere concerned with the "Negro cernible
"embryonic"
study
groups of Marxist orientation,
problem" of Africa.
but added, "in Black Africa, only
"Since 1945 the Soviet Union . . . has soft pedaled the the Sudanic Communist Party is
proletarian revolution line," Dr. vital today."
Dr. Magid observed that AfMagid said. This attitude reached
an apex, he continued, after 1956 ricans tend to view their socialism as different from European
in the Khrushchev era.
He explained that many ausocialism, adding, "African socialism defies a universal definithorities during this period, including Soviet theorists, believed tion."
the immediate leadership in AfSpeaking of the "search for an
African soul," he believes there
rica would be by an "enlightis a "greater need for psychoened national bourgeoisie."
During the last decade, Dr. logical development (an identity)
than for material or economic
Magid said, the Soviet Union has
tended to support the
development."
nationalist movements,
Marxism-Leninis-

ai

Marxism-Leninis-

Sub-saha-

ra

V.

VELVIN FRANK

A

Production

OTTAWA-Pri- me
Minister
Lester B. Pearson agreed Wednesday to And out in Washington
whether the American Centra
Intelligence Agency spent money
in Canada (hiring a period in
which the Conservative government of John Diefenbaker was
overthrown by the president Liberal administration.
The former prime minister,
now leader of the official opposition, said he called for the
inquiry on the basis of infor- mation that "has just come to
my Kiiciiuuu.
mtuuug iiu pun- tical inference, he said in Commons he wanted to know if CIA
funds had come into Canada
"between May of 1962 and June

the matter."
Last week Mr. Pearson informed commons that through
a New York foundation the CIA
had contributed $3,000 to the
Canadian Union of Students in
1965 and 1966. Mr. Diefenbaker
said he was not now interested
in that "extraordinary and completely unjustifiable conduct" by
the U.S. secret agency.
Mr. Diefenbaker refused to
tell reporters Wednesday what
specific "information" prompted
li. rw,..- It was during the 1962-6- 3
period that Ottawa and Washington became divided over the

However the opposition leader's objective seemed clear to
members on both sides in Commons. His period of concern was
relations bemarked by
tween the United States and
Canadian governments and by
two general elections in which
Diefenbaker's governments were
first reduced to a minority status and then defeated by the
Pearson Liberals.

Continued From rage 1
and to employes of Naval Intelligence and the National Security Agency.
Students in the exchange program, Pravda alleged, are required to complete
and annual questionnaires prepared by the CIA to elicit intelligence information.
Despite its accusations,

of 1963."

low-eb- b

Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113. Journalism Bldg.
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed in The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not include,
as a qualifying consideration in deciding whether or not to rent to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.

GIRL'S BLUE COATS accidentally
taken from Kappa Sigma House
Saturday. Please exchange at Kappa
2Mlt
Sigma House or call
FOR SALE Olivetti portable typewriter. 6 years old. Barely used, $35.
Call
after 5 p.m.
2Mlt
HELP

Must

week,
transportation.

have

7.

part-tim-

SKATING

KM

JwiuoNct

,

COLOR by DLux
UNITED ARTISTS

"Far from all American scholars and students who come to
the Soviet Union are professional
agents of U.S. intelligence or
'volunteers' who take up

onage activities," the paper

espi-

FOR RENT
AVAILABLE

NOW Roomy efficiency
apartments.
completely
furnished,
wall to wall carpeting, limited number available. 422 Aylesford Place.

WANTED Bus drivers. Must have
valid Ky. driver's license. Must be
over 21, have mornings or afternoons free. Apply Wallace's Book
7Ftf
Store.

2Mtf

needs
your used textbooks. Bring them in
We pay top prices. We buy
anytime.
9Ftf
all used textbooks.

WALLACE'S

BOOK

STORE

The Kentucky Kernel

Good looking, liberal
minded female companion for Florida trip during spring break. All
expenses paid. Travel via Vette.
Call Jeff
28F4t
9.

FOR SALE

23F5t

Electric motors, used,
horsepower, $5.00 each. Bulk
all makes. Call Dennis,
22F19t
after 6 p.m.

SALE

FOR

Vs

FOR SALE 1959 Rambler American.
0.
Good tires and battery. Phone
28F3t
FOR SALE

Austin-Heal- y

19591006

hardtop; radio, heater; runs good.
Body needs some work. Call Lieland
lM3t
after 5:30 p.m.
278-45-

FOR SALE

1963 Volkswagen. Excellent condition, low mileage, radio,
Call
2M6t
clean.

Fri. and Sat. nights
SUGGESTED

own

e
Students
leave name and
phone number and you will be contacted.
lM3t

7:30 'til 10;

Pravda made clear that the Soviet
government continued to regard
the endeavor as worthwhile.

WANTED

269-99-

li

baker and his cabinet supporters
have never made a secret of
their belief that the Kennedy
administration did all it could
to bring about the Conservative
prime minister's downfall and
help Pearson to power.

semi-annu- al

discount;

HELP WANTED Student's wife
Good typist, some shorthand; 5 day
8:30-4:3- 0.

.

between

Pravda Indicts Exchange Program

'.a &

WANTED

WANTED
work. Call

1

relations

Personal

Diefenbaker and the late President Kennedy had previously
cooled as a result of exchange
of visits by the leaders in Washington and Ottawa. Mr. Diefen-

WANTED

LOST

266-48-

.MUNtuntiuts

ed.

CLASSIFIED ADS

HELP
w

defen-

others-resign-

se-among

1.

IRRESISTIBLE!- "-

"A FUNNVTHING
HAPPENED
ONTHEWAYTO
THE FORUM"

3rd
Week!

nuclear issue. Mr. Diefenbaker
decided not to accept U.S. atomic warheads for the Bomarc
missiles installed in Canada for
mutual defense. Mr. Diefenbaker's cabinet split over the
issue and the minister of

Mr. Pearson told Commons
he would "be glad to look into

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
$8.00
Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files
$.10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
2321
Editor
Editor, Managing
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports .... 2320
News Desk
2447
Advertising, Business,
2319
Circulation

10 'til Midnight

Sunday night
10

DANCING

7:30 'til

every FRIDAY & SATURDAY,

2

p.m.

SCOTT'S
ROLL-AREN- A

3rd FUN WEEK!

NORTHERN

BELTLINE
708 E. MAIN St., opposite Henry Clay
High School

"A FEW MORE PICTURES LIKE

"EVERYTHING FANS CAN ASK FOR IN THE
WAY OF EXCITEMENT, MYSTERY SUSPENSE
VIOLENCE AND DALLIANCE WITH LES GIRLSP
-- N.Y.

DAILY

'QUILLER MEMORANDUM' AND
MAN MAY YET WIN OUT,
WITTY AND

NtWS

The Oxfords
The Formations

Friday
Saturday

FULLOFSURPRISESr
-- HtWSWUK

Battle Of The Bands
Featuring

THE TORQUES and THE
with
Girls

MAG-- 7

Go-G- o

I

Y

A

1

I

CinimaScopE
COLOR
oe Luxe
by

tW?Udiill6r
Memorandum?
(

GEORGE SEGAL ALEC GUIHI1ESS

' MAX

V01J SYDOW SIUTA RERGER
in"

'

Vl!!i!2',!S','ii

Ji"?'""! VuMimtL

wf-MM-

ii

auiuioa

V"frr

to1.

and WVLK's
JIM JORDAN
SATURDAY, MARCH 4
8:30-12:3-

0

p.m.

STUDENT CENTER BALLROOM

Admission $1.00 advance. Ticket sales at the
Complex and Donovan Hall Cafeterias on
Thursday and Friday.

* .TIIK KENTUCKY

fFice Travel
Led Scholar
To Lexington

fu

m

1

Paris, London, China, and
Cambodia may seem like part
of a dream to the hopeful traveler, but to Mrs. Suzanne
a
Donovan
Scholar
now residing in Blazer Hall, these
places have been a reality.
For Mrs. Lepreux, the opportunity for and interest in travel
came at an early age. At 18 she
left her native Paris to study in
London at the University College
there.
After returning to Paris for
several years, Mrs. Lepreux had
the opportunity to go to China
in 1932. There she taught French
at the College of Law and Political Sciences in Shanghai.
Several years later Mrs. Lepreux joined the French Municipal Council in Shanghai, as bursar for Public Works.
Why did she devote so much
of her time to life in China?
"Well," she said, "I have studied
philosophy, mainly oriental philosophies, and I suppose that
this is the reason why I went
to China to start with.
"I was in Chinaduring World
War II during the Japanese occupation," she said, "and that
was no fun."
After 14 years in China Mrs.
Lepreux returned to Paris but
later decided to come to the
United States in 1946 as a staff
member of the French delegation at the U.N., first in the
legal department, and later in
the technical assistance department.
However, her love for new
experiences did not end with
this encounter with an atmosphere of virtual change. After
five years at the U.N., Mrs. Lepreux left and began working
in the administrative depart-

Uf

V--

'

i

m

ments of several American export

businesses.

"I like change and I like to

see new countries and new
people," she explained. "I would
not hesitate to go to the other
side of the world tomorrow if

job," she

added with a glint in her eye.
After living in the U.S. for
years

Mrs.

l'M.7

-

Lepreux

traveled to Cambodia for the
U.S. government. There, she
worked for the International Cooperation Administration, an
agency of the State Department.
In Cambodia, Mrs. Lepreux
did not want for excitement.
While she was there she lived not
in the city, but in the jungle.
(Only a mile from where she
man
was killed
lived
a
and partially eaten by a tiger.)
In Kompong Kantout, Cambodia, Mrs. Lepreux was administrative assistant for a U.S.
government project at Centre

A tie for third place last weekend in the exclusive Naval Academy Invitational Debate tourney has earned the University team a bid to the'
national invitational debate finals.

I

The tourney at Annapolis was one designated
to select participants for the National Invitational
Debate Tournament to be held at Michigan State

University.

N

0

Clairol create
the look that tool

x,

several

L

Debaters Win Invitation To Tourney

By OSSILYN ELLIS
Kernel Staff Writer

someone offered me a

KERNEL, TlmiMl.n, Manli

MRS. SUZANNE LEPREUX

Pcdagogique,
capital.

20 miles from

UK's Coeds:

the

Mrs. Lepreux explained that
French was a necessary language
in Cambodia because it was
taught to the Cambodians when
they were under French Protectorate. "All the educated people
speak French," she said. The
students there had previous education and could already speak
the language, in addition to their
native tongue. But, she said,
the shop keepers and trades
people mainly spoke Cambodian
and Chinese.
Following her work in Cambodia, Mrs. Lepreux returned to
the U.S. and since has spent
most of her time in New York
City.
What brought a person with
her credentials as a world traveler
to Kentucky? "First," said Mrs.
Lepreux, "I was interested in
older people and I began doing
volunteer work for eight Unitarian Churches in New York

JM.

4

x

City.

"In August of last year I
read about the Donovan Program
at UK in Time magazine. Before
that time I had written to Washington, D.C. and to Albany, N.Y.,
inquiring about such a program
for the aged, but they all said
'not yet.' So, when I read this
article I wrote to Dr. (Earl)
Kauffman, director of the program, for further information."
At the time she wrote, she
did not realize that she and Dr.
Kauffman had met in Cambodia.
"To me, this came as quite
a coincidence," she said. "I was
surprised to find out that I had
met Dr. Kauffman in Pnom-pneCambodia, about 20 miles from
where I was teaching."
After coming to Lexington last
September to look over the city
and the University, Mrs. Lepreux
decided to accept a Donovan
Scholarship for this Spring.
As for her study here, Mrs.
Lepreux' s main interest is in
magazine article writing. "I like
it very much," she said, referring
to her writing course. "I enjoy
living here too and I like the
girls in Blazer; they seem very
nice. In France and London there
were no campuses, here it is
much nicer and more

h? r: i

v;

A(

''fvA"v.,
"

s

;

,

'

,

J

-

'

,

'

-

J

-

h,

;

,

Clairol's new Lip Colors give lips new ffGo 11
shades for everyone-brownett- es,
brunettes, light
Special "can't-clash- "
blondes, honey blondes, redheads and silvers, too. They're shinier,
creamier, lastier lipsticks that flick on at high voltage when you apply
them... keep glowing in sunlight or 'til dawn!

UK Bulletin Board
Completed applications for
the Peace Corps may be turned
office
in at either the
in the Student Center or to the
Director of Placement Office in
White Hall.
YW-YMC- A

Part-tim- e
students will not
be required to purchase UK identification cards in order to be
served meals in the University
Food Service units.

University Musicale Series
The Lexington Philharmonic will feature Bruce Freifeld, a
Orchestra will feature Lili Chook-asia- member of the University of Kenin a concert Friday night tucky music faculty, in a violin
in the Memorial Hall. The 8:15 recital, at 8 p.m. Friday in the
p.m. concert is the next to last Agricultural Science Auditorium.
of the Philharmonic's season.
Alvin M. Liberman, the DeSelective Service Qualificapartment of Psychology of the
tion Test will be given March University of Connecticut, will
speak March 7 and 8, on "Speech
11, March 31, April 8. Applications must be obtained from any Perception" as part of the visitdraft board and returned to Sel- ing lecture series. The seminar,
scheduled for Boom 422 of the
ective Service Examining Section, Educational Testing Ser- Commerce Building, is open only
vice, P.O. Box 988, Princeton, to staff members and students in
the Department of Psychology
N.J. 08540 no later than midand psychologists in the vicinity.
night Feb. 10.

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* i

The Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED

The South's Outstanding College Daily
Univk.hsity of Ki ntucky

THURSDAY, MARCH

1894

2, 1967

Editorials represent the ojnnions of the Editors, not of the University.

Walter

M.

Ghant,

Editor-in-Chi-

Sti.vk Hocco, Editorial Page Editor

William Knatp,

Business Manager

A Watchful Eye
Kentucky is considered one of

the most thoroughly desegregated
states in the Southern and border
region. Only 12 schools in the
student bodstate have
ies, and these have integrated faculties. All school districts, according to the Kentucky Department
of Education, are complying with
the new federal desegregation
all-Neg- ro

guidelines.
Yet civil rights leaders are not
satisfied. "We still have a long
way to go for genuine integration,"
says Galen Martin, executive director of the Kentucky Commission
on Human Rights. The segregation
that exists is de facto, he says,
agreeing with the education department that legally, progress is
being made in desegration at the
student level and faculty integration is underway, as demanded
by the guidelines. Legally, but
not really he insists.
Elsewhere, especially in the
Deep South, segregation has not
been so subtle. Officials have openly defied and flouted the Supreme
Court and Congress while attempting to perpetuate a largely segregated public school system. The
pace of school desegregation has
been "shameful," the Southern Regional Council has charged.
But now, as the Fifth U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals ruled
in December, "after 12 years of
snail's pace progress toward school
desegregation, the courts are entering a new era. The clock has ticked
the last tick for tokenism and
delay in the name of 'deliberate
speed.'" The court's ruling accepted the Office of Education's
guidelines as the official standard,
arming the government with a weapon with which to insist on strict
compliance.
The Lexington Congress of Racial Equality has been particularly
outspoken in charging tokenism
and stalling. CORE wants the Office of Education to insist that
Lexington city schools proceed immediately with plans to fully eliminate what it calls discrimination.
The City School Board wants a
year's delay in which to better
effect the proposed merger with
the county system.

Kernels
War is cmel and you cannot
refine it.
William Teeumseli Sherman
Persistence
covery

is

tin key to

dis-Stanl-

.

McCUnj

Our Creator would never have
made such lovely days, and have
given us the deep hearts to enjoy them, above and beyond all
thought, unless we were meant
to he iininoital.

Nathaniel Hawthorne

While in general CORE's stand
on desegregation cannot be challenged, its demands in this particular case are a bit too harsh.
The city board is attempting nothing underhanded. It has made public the proceedings relating to its
request, and asked the Office of
Education to send in investigators.
While desired integration in the
Lexington system has not been
fully achieved, progress has been
made. The city board deserves
the opportunity to, as it has said,
provide a workable merger that
will result in furtherance of the
civil rights act's ends.
The Office of Education should
keep a watchful eye, however, on
Lexington, and the rest of Kentucky, and should be quick to see
that any abuses of the law are
corrected.

"No

Not Again!"

Letters To The Editor

Discussion Continues On Rupp, Editorials
achieve: the U.S. Ambassador's
To the Editor, of the Kernel:
'Award for excellence in history),
I am a United States naval aviator who has flown throughout and there is only one reason why
World War II, was recalled to fly I want him to attend UK: so that
during the Korean conflict and he not only can have the very
am now doing a little flying for best in educational opportunity
(which he can get at so many-othe- r
the Vietnam cause.
schools), but at the same
During these conflicts I have time have an
opportunity to play
flown 9,500 flight hours and if you
basketball for the greatest coach
multiply that by an average speed on earth (this he can only
get
of 300 mph you can see I have
under the Master Coach, MR.
passed over and touched base on ADOLPH F.
RUPP).
a fair amount of the earth's surface. On second thought, and since
Should any of my three sons
I suspect you aren't too proficient
be fortunate enough to play for
in the art of logical conclusions
the Baron of Basketball it would
from known or assumed facts, parbe one of the proudest periods
ticularly as demonstrated by your of my life, but should that son
and nonsensical edi- ever question the authority of
torial of recent on the greatest Coach Rupp and not receive a
basketball coach in the world, I reprimand in return, then I cerwill multiply the above foryouand tainly could not continue the high
point out that I have flown over regard I have for Coach Rupp,
2,850,000 miles.
nor would I want my son to conFor all those miles and many tinue under his leadership. Knowthousands of ports and villages I ing Coach Rupp and knowing my
have frequented, I would like for sons, I have no fears in either
you to know that at each and direction.
every spot, no matter how big or
In conclusion, I'd like to say:
how small, I find many people A million, million thanks for
who are most familiar with the Adolph F. Rupp and
may he be
great feats of Coach Adolph Fredwith us and coaching for many,
erick RUPP, and in all cases have many years. There is no doubt
nothing but the highest praise for in my mind that Coach Rupp's
him.
great accomplishments will live
on after the Kentucky Kernel corn
I did not attend UK, although
I often wish I had, but
only for has failed to germinate for the
a great desire to play basketball "eonth" time.
for the greatest coach ever. I conLICdr. Glenn "Red"
sider it