xt7dv40jtc4b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dv40jtc4b/data/mets.xml Breckinridge, Issa Desha. 1884  books b92-53-27061982 English Press of R. Clarke, : Cincinnati : Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Hart, Joel Tanner, 1810-1877.Desha, Mary. "Work shall praise the master"  : a memorial to Joel T. Hart, the Kentucky sculptor, from the women of the Blue grass / selected and arranged by Issa Desha Breckinridge and Mary Desha. text "Work shall praise the master"  : a memorial to Joel T. Hart, the Kentucky sculptor, from the women of the Blue grass / selected and arranged by Issa Desha Breckinridge and Mary Desha. 1884 2002 true xt7dv40jtc4b section xt7dv40jtc4b 


















JOEL



T. HART



        THE KENTUCKY SCULPTOR

               PROM

THE WOMEN OF THE BLUE GRASS



  SELECTED AND ARANGED BY

ISSA DESHA BRECKINRIDGE
         A"D
     MARY DESHA



't8Rs



  6
of


 







CONTENTIS.



Memoir of Joel T. Hart.           By Edward J. 1uDermott..........................
Sketch of the Hart Xemorial Association.         By Is-a Desia Breclhin-
    ridge .
The Place in Art of " Woman Triumphant." By Ethelbert Dudley
    Warfield .....................................................................................
Kentucky's First Great Artist.......................................................
Hart's    Mother...............................................................................
A  King, yet Uncrowned.            By Falcon...............................................
Judge Mulligan's Speech, before the House of Representatives, in favor
    of an appropriation to aid in the purchase of Hart's " Woman         Triumph-
    ant." ...........................................................................................
Colonel Frank Water's Appeal, before Council, on behalf of the Hart
    Memorial Association....................................................................
Poem, inscribed to Mrs. W. C. P. B.. by Mrs. Rosa Vertner Jeffre ..............



A DV ERTISEMIEANTS.



Tiffany  Co., New York.   .  .   I
The Southern Exposition.        . 2
E. B. Nugent, Louisville, Ky ...    3
0. A. Gilman, Paris, Ky. .  ..... 3
Central University, Richmond, Ky ... 3
Bamberger, Bloom  Co.4.  ..      4
W. Kendrick's Sons  ... ..... I .... 4
J. M. Robinson  Co.  ............ .....  4
Walsh, the Tailor .. . ............ 4
Standiford Hotel.        .        4
Wrampelmeier  Co .................. 5
Barbee  Castleman..     .. ... 6
Louisville Hotel.     . ..     .  6
Sharpe  Middleton.     .. ..    7
Deppen's Clothing House. .  .  . 8
DeLong Co.. .  ....................al
W. E. McCann  Co. .. .. .. .. ... 52
Business Education.   ..   .  . 52
W. J. Jewell  Co..... . .. ..
'Thompson  Boyd ................ .. 54
W. E. Johns............  .....   54
John C. Berryman.. .........     55
Henry Bertsch.                   .55
Lexington Bottling Works.     .. an
Strader Jefferson....................  55
C. Suydam Scott      .    . ... ss
Breckinridge : Shelby.          56
Z. Gibbons  .....................56
Bronston  Kinkead ...    ..... -I6.... 56
M. C. Alford     ................56
Buckner  Allen..                56
Mulligan  Beauehamp ..5....6...   56
Stephen G. Sharpe ...6...... ... .... ... . 5
Milward  Co ...............7.. .. 57
Ashland Coal .... ....................... 57
Loevenhart's Clothing House ...  .  7
A. B. Chinn k tCo ........... ..... ... . 57
Ashland -;tock Farm .......... .    S...... M
Ross C. Adams. .......... . .. ... ...... .8
Wm. Adams  Sons ............... 5;
Treacv  Wilson ......... ... . . ... 59
G. W. Muir .................... I59
Wm. R. Snyder, Jr ....................  59
Louis Jk Gus. Straus ................ .  60
Platt, Innes  Williams  .       60
Mrs. Kate Wright   ....     . ... 60



Forest Park Stock Farm .   .     el
J. M. Roche  Co .  ........1.......... .  61
D. A. Givens .  ................... 61
A. Hartstein        .     .      61
lCassell, Price  Co . .62
E. R. Spotswood  Son   .   .    62
Kentucky Asbociation    .   .    63
,eeoiid National Bank.             6
Kentucky University    .    .    64
Ashland House   .     .64
iinith  Nixon ........ . ............... 64
iChesatpeake and Ohio Railway.   .65
i klientuelky Central Railroad ..........a.........  65
Lexington Manufaturing Co..      66
 Mattie Robinsonl..                ......................... 64
Horace P. Gaines.     .          66
Roseline Barton.   .66
Fayette National Bank ... ....... .... 67
Standard Bred Stock Farm...      67
Roger H. Wilson  Co.    .       67
Phcenix Hotel Restaurant    ... 6s
Lexington City National Bank .. ;  f68
D. H. Baldwin ........ . ....... ....... 5, 69
Richardson  Simrall.....    .      9
Mullen, Photographer    .   .    69
;9avre's Female Institute.   .   70
Hlamilton Female College.    .     71
State College of Kentuckyj. .    72
Kentucky Agri. and Mechan. Assoc'n... 73
Singer Sewing Machine.  ....     74
Lexiington Plumbing Co.   ...    74
Cin., N. 0.  Tex. P. Ry ..... 75
John Church  Co..  ... ............. 76
A. E. Burkhardt C Co .76
Liudeman Bros . ... .....  ........ .... 76
H.  S. Pogue. . ... . .. ........... ... 76
John C. Davis............     .... 76
Burnet House......               77
Le Boutillier  Simpson.         77
Duhme  Co .78
A. B. Closson..........            8
Geo. A. Bowen.       .........   78
Gee. D. Newhall Co ............... . 79
Bell, Miller  Co ............  ...... 79
Robert Clarke  Co ...so.. . .   ....So



13

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3t6
39
41



45

48
5i)


 


                           1

       TIFFANY  CO.,

NEW YORK.             LONDON.                  PARIS.

                   BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT,

Gold and Silversmiths to Her Majesty the Queen of Eng-
    land, the Emperors of Germany, Russia, Austria,
           and to all the Courts of Europe.

                 IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN

Diamonds and other Precious Stones, Jewelry, Fancy
   Goods, rich Pottery and Glass, Marble and Bronze
          Statuary, and other Objects of Art.

                    MANUFACTURERS OF

Silver and Silver Plated Ware of the finest grades, Jew-
     elry, Watches, simple and complicated, Clocks,
          fine Leather Goods and Stationery.


    Their stock includes not only the most luxurious
and costly objects, but is the most complete assortment
of articles of the kind required by persons in moderate
circumstances, whose attention is asked, and comparison
of prices courted.
    Designs and estimates for special work sent on
application, and articles for selection sent to any part
of the United States, on receipt of satisfactory introduc-
tion or reference.


 




2



SOUTHERN EXPOSITION,
               -OF 1884,-
Opens August 16th, and Continues Seventy-one Days, Clos-
                   ing October 25th.

The Main Building Covering THIRTEEN ACRES of Ground, with a
        number of annexes, in a Park of Forty Acres.

     THE LARGEST AND FINEST DISPLAY
                         05'

MACIN IMY Il NOTION EVE1J IWADE.

           "'Woman Triumphant,"
                        AND ALL OF
   HART'S GREATEST CREATIONS
           WILL FORM A PART OF THE ART GALLERY.

      FIRE-PROOF ART BUILDINGS,
                     CONTAINING TIHE
Cam OUTCSTr 3_=1Cr'V=1Z-S      TINT     :EI

         TWO CONCERTS EACH DAY,
CAPPA'S MAGNIFICENT NEW YORK SEVENTH REGIMENT BAND, from the
     opening until September 23rd. and from that time to the close,
             GILMORE'S WORLD FAMOUS BAND.

      GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS ILLUMINATED BY
THOUSANDS OF ELECTRIC LIGfHTS.

REDUCED PASSENGER RATES from all parts of the United States during the
   entire period. EXCURSION RATES, North, South, East, and West,
       that will place it within the power of every one to visit the
  GREAT EXHIBITION OF THE NEW SOUTH.

       A SPLENDID HORTICULTURAL HALL,
Filled with Growing Plants, Flowers, and Fruits, and illustrating Tropical Vegetation.

      AN IMMENSE LIVE STOCK EXHIBITION,
Presenting at one time in line over 1,000,000 worth of horses, comprising all the sire
that have made Kentucky famous. The exhibit will surpass in extent the Royal
   Stock Show in London, and present to the visitor the grandest, completest,
     and most magnificent Stock Exhibit the world has ever witnessed,
         and a sight that can not be duplicated anywhere else.


 



MEMORIAL TO JOEL T. HART.



3



     To Joel T. Hart, Kentucky has a right to feel proud
that she gave birth, and America should gratefully en-
roll his name in the catalogue of her departed great.-
Extract from Courier-Journal.

               0. A. GILMAN,
                            DEALER IN

WOOL, HEMP, GRAIN, AND SEEDS,
      ALSO PROPRIETOR AND MANUFACTURER OF THE CELEBRATED

   SPEAR'S PATENT GRASS SEED GATHERER.
        BLXJUEI GRASS SEE1MD A. SPECIALjTY.
                 Paris, Kentucky. Or

    CENTRAL UNIVERSITY,


GOLLEGE OF PHILOSOPHY, LETTERS AND SGIENCE

                    RICHMOND, KY.
     Next Session will Open Wednesday September 3rd, 1884.

 ADVANTAGES.-A FULL FACULTY of able and experienced instructors. Com-
 prehensive course of study and thorough instruction. Completeness of buildings and ap.
 parattls.
 Social Influence.-The community is distinguished for its refined culture and hos-
 pitality, and young men find homes in the BEST families. Not a saloon in the City.
 Healthfulness of Location.-Richmond is at an elevation of more than Soo feet
 above the Ohio River, and free from all malarial influences.
 Accessibility.-Richmond is the geographical center of the State, in the heart of the
 Blue Grass region, and is within a few hours, by rail, of Louisville, Cincinnati, Knox.
 ville and Chattanooga.
 Moderate Expenses.-Board in the New Memorial Hall, lighted by gas and
 heated by steam-an elegant, comfortable home-ilo per annum for everything except
washing, and in the best families from 63 to 84 per Week. Total necessary expenses for
the ten months, from S,.o to 240.
For full information and catalogue, apply to
                       L. H. BLANTON, D.D., Chancellor.

       K. B. NUaENT, Louisville, Ky.,
                            DEALER IN
Rich Silks, imported Rich Dress Goods, Fashionable Wraps, Made Dresses, Parasols,
Ladies' Furnishing Goods, Gloves, Hosiery, Silk Underwear, Ladies' elegantly made
Muslin Undergarments, Corsets, Laces, Embroideries, Ribbons, Notions of every
Kind. Dress Trimmings, Linens in all Widths, Table Linens, Napkins, Towels, Do-
mestics, White Goods of every Kind, Cloths, etc.
Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods at low prices.
            OUR DRESS MAKING DEPARTMENT.
 We make Bridal Dresses, Party Dresses, Mourning Dresses, Traveling Dresses, etc.,
 and we warrant a perfect fit and style, at moderate prices. Will send samples and
 card for self-measurement by mail, and give estimates on Dresses, etc.
 REMEMBER-All correspondence, orders, and money orders, should be addressed
 to E. B. NUGENT, Louisville, Ky. Established in Louisville thirty-five years.
 We ship goods to all points by Express and Mail. Domestic Paper Fashions for
 Sale. Catalogue free.


 



MEMORIAL TO JOEL T. HART.



  The possession of such a work of art as "Woman
Triumphant," will be not only a distinctive landmark
in Lexington's culture-sustaining reputation, but will do.
more to attract the admiring gaze of the world than all
our fine horses and cattle have done for fifty years.-
Lexington Observer.

BAMBERGER, BLOOM  CO.
                    WHOLESALE

         A DERT                MOOD,
  NOTIONS, FURNISHING AND FANCY GOODS. ETC.
       Nos. 644 to 65O Main St., and 217, 219 Seventh, St.
115 and 117 Worth St.
       NE1W YORK.          LOUISVILLE, KY.
W. C. KENDRICK.                        G. P. KENDRICK.

  W. KENDIRICK'S SONS,
           336 Fourth Ave., Louisville, Ky.
RECEIVED THE MEDAL AWARD AT THE SOUTHERN EXPOSITION OF 1883, FOR
        DIAI4rOND WATCtES, ETC.
  Our Stock also embraces JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, CLOCKS, etc.,
                  of every description.
 Visitors to our city will be welcome to our store, and receive special attention.
 Our illustrated Catalogue sent free on application.
        (Mention the Hart Memorial Pamphlet in sending name.)
J. M. ROBINSON.     GEO. C. NORTON.     G. H. MOURNING.
        j. Me.   HO   1BO,;Qr,     Co.
                 IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, ETC.
      537, 539 and 54I Main Street, Cor. Sixth,
  New York Office,        LOUISVILLE         KY.
41 THOMAS STREET.


  WALSH, THE TAILOR,        tandiford i     ote,

232 FOURTH AYE. LOUIVISLE, SY.      LOUSVILLE, KY.
                          Cor. Tenth and Broadway,



4



.T. N. W-fLLARD,..,Vanager.



P. S.-FIRE GOODS EMUSIVEhY.


 

MEMORIAL TO JOEL T. HART.



            "We may not cease loving only taught
                Holier desiring;
            More thith, more patience,
            With more wisdom fraught,
                Higher aspiring."


 WRAMPELMEIER  CO.

                MANUFACTURERS OF



        FUIN ITUIE

STOIs, 54G 'i       550 FIO-z0    I'H .A-v

          Factory, 15th and Duncan Streets,


   LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKTY


            FIANS !S
f1llruyers of Hlifgh Grade Pin.os will find our stock the most comtplete in
the country. In GRAN-D, UPRIGHT OR SQUARE GRAND PIANOS
we can please the mo stidous tastes. In Medium or Lower Priced
Pianos, we offer goods and prices that defy competition. Every instrument
  fully warranted. Correspondence solicited.
      D. H. BALDWIN  CO.
158 W. Fourth St.,  236 Fourth Ave.,  95, 97, 99 Pe=a St.,
      CINCINNATI,     LOUISVILLE,   INDIANAPOLIS.
              WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS.
STEINWAY  SONS, DECKER BROTHERS,
        HAINES, J.  C. FISCHER. VOSE,
                AND D. H. BALDWIN  CO.. PIANOS.
 Ths oebbnted ISTY ORARfS, SIONIGXI       ORGANB.
        Pianos and Organs on easy monthly payments.



5


 


6



]BO AR D
  3.00
IPFR DAY.

SPECIAL. RATES
   BY THE
WREX or MONS



LOUISVILJILE



CENTRAL

LOCATION.


FIRST CLASS

ACCOMMODATION



HOTEI COMPANY,



              LOUlISVILEi, KY.

J. J. B. HILYARD, President,  PHIL. JUDGE, Manager,  C. H. GIBSON, Secretary.



JOHN BARBEE.



JOHN. B. CASTLEMAN,



         BARBEE  CASTLEMAN,







         504 MAIN'STREET, LOUISVILLE, KY.

Controlling over 40,000,000 of Fire Capital, and
        Operating in Ten Southern States.

  Agents throughout the South. Managers of the
Royal Insurance Co. and London and Lancashire Fire
           Insurance Co., of Liverpool.



f0taI


 


7



                  LOVISILLEM, KY.

         SHARPE  IBDDLETON'S

   brg Moods anO Tarpet 'oust
              IS THE LARGEST SOUTH OF THE OHIO RIVER,
  COVERS 32,000 SQUARE FT, ON THE GROUND FLOOR.
        Notice a few of the Leading Departments.

                       CARPETS.
The largest stock in the city-Axminsters, Moquette, Velvets, Wiltons, Body
   Brussels, Tapestry, Brussels, and Ingrains. Borders to maLch. Rugs of
   all descriptions. Our Upholstery department is unsurpassed.
               CLOAKS AND SUITS.
This department contains everything in Ladies' Wearing Apparel. Ready-
   made Dresses from 8.00 up. Cloaks in Se4l Skin, Silk, and Cloth of
   every description. Over 3,000 garments to select from. Children's
   Cloaks in great variety. Ladies' Muslin Underwear a specialty of this
   department.
           SILKS AND DRESS GOODS.
Do n't fail to see our immense stock of Silks. No matter what you want,
   you can find something to suit you, our variety is so great. Our Dress
   goods are beyond description. You will find Dress goods from ten cents
   per yard up to the finest.
                  DRESS MAKING.
You can have a dress made in 24 hours after leaving the order. Our prices
   are reasonable and the styles are always the latest. Our modistes go
   to Paris every year. This department has grown to be one of the largest
   in the United States.
                   FANCY GOODS.
KID GLOVES of every description fitted to the hand.
        HOSIERY-The largest stock in the city.
              DRESS TRIMmINGs-All the new things from Paris.
                     EMBROIDERIES, Laces, Handkerchiefs.
                            NECK WEAR of every description.
                                    RIBBONS in all the new shades.
                SHOE DEPARTMENT.
LADIES' FINE SHOES A SPECIALTY.

          agW         Y'ORm       sTroRE.
335 and 337 4th Ave., and 335 to 341 W. Jefferson St.


 


8



     FOUR DEPARTMENTS,
All filled to completion, and prices guaranteed to be
as low as same class of goods can be bought anywhere
in the South-west, on day of sale, and then we refund
money on purchases made, that prove unsatisfactory
after inspection at home.

      'WENI'S READY-MADE DEPARTMENT.
    We offer here a character of goods suitable for all
classes of people. These goods are cut right, made
honestly, and fit fashionably.

      BOY'S READY-MADE DEPARTMENT.
   This department, filled with beautiful kilt suits,
plaited suits, long pant suits, and shirt waists, is located
on the second floor of our establishment, and reached
by handsome elevator; attached to this department
are reception and toilet rooms for ladies and children,
with waiting maid constantly in attendance. The
finest children's department in the Southern country.

       MEN'S TAILORING DEPARTMENT.
   In this department we do nothing but strictly first
class work. The products of the choicest looms of the
great factories of England, Scotland, France, Germany,
Austria, and the East are found on our counters, and
no house in the South-west will show more novelties
than ours.

     MEN'S FURNISHII1NG DEPAR T1ENT.
   Our stock of novelties in men's underwear and
neckwear is unusually select; of staples we carry an
immense line. Full lines of every thing needed for a
gentleman's toilet.

    BEPPEN'S CLOTHING HOUSE,
Corner Fourth Avenue and Market Street,
              LOUISVILLE, KY.
     THE GREAT RETAIL CLOTHING HOUSE OF THE SOUTH-WEST.

 This page in the original text is blank.


 
































                            MULLEN




/-7             ael1-1      4S 1
" 1_10

 



"THE


   YVoRK



s



HALL



PFRAISE



THE  



NIAS TERa



A MEMORIAL TO JOEL T.

     THE KENTUCKY SCULPTOR

             FROM1



THE WOMEN



OF THE



BLUE GRASS



  SELECTED AND ARRANGED BY
ISSA DESHA BRECKINRIDGE
       AND
    MARY DESH A



    CINCINNATI
PRESS OF ROBERT CLARKE  CO
      1884



HART

 






OFFICERS OF THE H. M. A.



        OF LEXINGTON KENTUCKY.




              PR1ESIDEN.T.
      MRS. WM. C. P. BRECKINRIDGE.


           VICE-PR-ESID-ENTS.



MRS. ROSA VERTNER JEFFREY,



MRS. RICHARD S. SPURR.



   R-ECORDING SECRETARY.

   Miss CARRIE LEWINSKIE.


CORRESPONDING S:ECR:ETARIES.



Miss MARY DESHA,
MRS. A. E. HENTON,



MRS. J. HULL DAVIDSON,
Miss ANNA DIDLAKE.



TREASURERS.



MRS. M. T. SCOTT,



J. WILL SAYRE.



BOARD OF DIRECTORS.



MRS. W. 0. SWEENEY,
MRS. W. V. CROMWELL,
MRS. THOMAS MITCHELL,
MRS. MAT. WALTON,
MISS MARY DESHA,
MRS. J. T. SHELBY,
MRS. J. 0. HODGES,
MISS MARIA B. HUNT,
MRS. J. H. DAVIDSON,
MRS. RANSOM,



MRS. A. S. WINSTON,  MRS. WILLr, MILWARD,
MRS. DR. COLEMAN,    MRS. ROBT. BULLOCK,
MRS. L. B. TOOD,     MRS. E. D. SAYRE,
MRS. T. N. ALLEN,    MRS. ALEX. PIERSON,
MRS. FLETCHER JOHNSON, MRS. C. H. MORGAN,
MiSS ANNA DIDLAKE,  MRS. LAURA HAWKINS,
Miss BESSIE FRAZIER,  MISS MARY BULLOCK,
Miss ROSA JOHNSON,   MRS. M. T. SCOTT,
MISS CARRIE LEWINSKIE, MRS. SAM CLAY,
MRS. W. C. P. BRECKINRIDGE.



  EXECUTIVE COMMITT:E3E.
MRS. W. 0. SWEENEY, Chairman.



MRS. A. S. WINSTON,
MRS. DR. COLEMAN,
MRS. L. B. TODD,
MRS. ALEX. PIERSON,



MRS. WILL MILWARD,
MRS. ROB. BULLOCK,
MRS. E. D. SAYRE,
MRS. T. N. ALLEN,



MRS. W. V. CROMWELL,
MRS. THOS. MITCHELL,
MRS. MAT. WALTON,
MRS.W. P. C. BRECKINRIDGE.


 








           MEMOIR OF JOEL T. HART.


                          BY
                 EDWARD J. M'DERMOTT.


  Kentucky is, in many respects, a noteworthy State, hav-
ing a striking individuality, that attracts attention and
gives promise of a remarkable future. Her soldiers, ora-
tors, and fair women, her rich minerals, fast horses, and
dangerous, but exhilarating, whiskies, have long been well
known and.highly praised; but Kentuckians can not boast
much of their achievements in the fine arts. The number,
skill, and influence of artists here are gradually increasing,
and a few painters like Brenner, Botto, and Boyd, have
lately done some very valuable work with their brushes,
but, if we except Jouett, whose portraits are very fine, Joel
T. Hart is the only Kentucky artist that can truly be called
great. He has had no superior in America, and is well
entitled to rank among the few eminent sculptors of mod-
ern times. His life was beautiful in its simplicity and vir-
tue, heart and mind being devoted entirely to his high
calling. His only aim was to do something great, and to
leave an honorable name. The marble was his chief and
best medium for the expression of his strong feelings arid
his exalted ideas. Through his living works he hoped to
speak to the men and women of future times, and he lived
to see assured the fruition of that bright dream and trusted
mainstay of his long life.
  Mr. Hart was born in Clark county in 1810, and died in
Florence, Italy, in 1877. His remains are now in Florence,
but they will soon be removed to Kentucky, the legislature
having appropriated twelve hundred dollars for that pur-
                                              (13)

 


MEMOIR OF JOEL T. HART.



pose, on the motion of the lion. Thomas G. Stewart. The
sculptor's parents were poor, plain, respectable persons,
that bequeathed him no petty fortune or silly family pride,
but good principles, a vigorous mind, and a true heart.
Men of his stamp do not usually inherit a great name;
they make one. Prosperity and social rank help only a
mediocre person; genius needs no such stilts. Mr. Hart
went to school only three months, but, by persistent effort,
educated himself, and toward the end of his life was able
to write some creditable poetry. In order to fit himself
for his art-work, he studied anatomy, with success, in
Transylvania University, in Lexingtbn. He was always
frugal, temperate, laborious, genial, and devoted to his
friends. Of little children he was very fond, often kissing
them on the street, even when they were unknown to him.
Everything beautiful or innocent touched his heart. His
figure was a little above the medium size; his features in-
dicated a strong will and a sunny disposition, but he was
not handsome. A full beard covered his face. Though
he was often very poor, having barely the necessaries of
life, he never complained or sought help. As long as he
had any money he worked on his ideal pieces. When his
little store was exhausted he made a few busts for his
patrons, and on the profits lived while he turned again
with new zest to the darling creatures of his imagination.
In early youth he worked as a stone-mason, and at twenty
began to carve letters on tomb-stones and to make models
in a marble yard. In the course of the next sixteen years
he made a large number of good busts of such men as
Andrew Jackson, Cassius M. Clay, and John J. Crittenden.
In 1849 he went to Florence, Italy, to put into marble his
model of Clay's statue that he made for the "Ladies' Clay
Association," of Richmond, Virginia. On this model and
statue he worked, with intermissions, for thirteen years.
In the beautiful grounds surrounding Richmond's capitol
this marble likerkss of the orator stood for years, but, hav-
ing been slightly damaged from constant exposure to the
changes in the atmosphere and to the mischievousness of



14

 


MEMOIR OF JOEL T. HART.



boys, it has been placed in a niche in the rotunda of the
capitol, and looks down upon the senators and representa-
tives of Virginia as they pass to and from the post of honor
and duty, reminding them constantly, I hope, that a public
man should always so live and act that he might, with
truth and propriety, have inscribed upon his tomb words
like those that adorn the sarcophagus of the Sage of Ash-
land: "I can, with unshaken confidence, appeal to the
Divine Arbiter for the truth of the declaration that I have
been influenced by no impure purpose, no personal motive-
have sought no personal aggrandizement, but that, in all
my public acts, I have bad a sole and single eye and a warm,
devoted heart, directed and dedicated to what, in my best
judgment, I believe to be the true interests of my country."
  In 1867 Mr. Hart completed the statue of' Clay now in
the Court House of Louisville. I do not believe that this
work, all things considered, has ever been surpassed. Cer-
tain it is that no existing antique statues of Demosthenes,
Caesar, or Augustus give us conceptions of them so true
and vivid as the conception we get of Clay from this
statue. In this piece of marble we see not only an exact
likeness of the form and features of the man, but the
faithful presentment of the dignified, lofty, powerful ora-
tdr, and the intellectual, strong-willed statesman. Grace,
majestic force, and an exalted mind are at once apparent
in the lineaments of the face and in the pose of the figure.
He stands like a firmly-fixed rock. He looks like a great
orator, speaking weighty, stirring words, on a grand occa-
sion, to a vast audience. Mr. Hart was excelled by none
in appreciation of Henry Clay. The sculptor had, for
years, watched and studied the form, the conduct, and the
achievements of the statesman. They lived side by side;
their aims were high and glorious; their ideas ran in the
same lofty channels; the one genius recognized and clung
to the other. Now they are indissolubly linked together
for all time, aiding each other in the race for immortality.
Future ages will remember the sculptor through the orator,
and the orator through the sculptor.



15

 


MEMOIR OF JOEL T. HART.



   Mr. Hart's other important works are a fine copy of
the "Venus de Medici ;" a bust called "II Penseroso,"
representing a handsome woMan with downcast eyes;
"The Morning-glory," a beautiful little child holding
a morning-glory in one hand, and her scant flower-filled
gown in the 'other; an exquisite, hand resting on an
outstretched glove; a colossal bronze statue of Clay,
made for New Orleans; and "Woman Triumphant," a
group that I shall describe at length.  All of these
are great, and will ever be highly esteemed, but his fame
must chiefly rest on "Woman Triumphant." Of this he
felt assured, and, with pleasure and confidence, he staked
all his meed of praise on that great work, making it the
chief effort of his genius, the bright dream and solace of
his laborious life. It may be fairly called a poem in marble.
  Just ten years ago, while in that beautiful city on the
Arno, sweet Florence, I made a visit to his studio. Though
a young student and a stranger, I was welcome, simply
because I was from Kentucky. To his native State and
its people his heart was always devoted. For all Ken-
tuckians he had a lavish fund of kindness and affection.
It is fit, therefore, that they should love and honor him.
  On that beautiful May morning in 1874 he was working
cheerfully and zealously in his plain, unadorned studio.
Its bare floor, scant furniture, and confused array of mod-
els showed how little the artist cared for comfort or os-
tentation. In fact, the place was not inviting to visitors
until they learned to know the genius that presided there-
until they felt the influence of the great intellect and the
cheerful heart that turned this somber shop into a sanctu-
ary. On a bench in this room stood several models of
statues of Henry Clay, one of those models being the
original of that fine, living, speaking statue that has stood
in the Court House at Louisville since 1867.
  On the walls, in the corners, and on the floor were a
great many plaster casts of hands, arms, feet, and legs.
The artist wore a snmoking-cap and a big apron. In his
hand he held an instrument very like a putty-knife. In



16


 


































































IL PENSEROSO.



"'L'.\9t.

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MEMOIR OF JOEL T. HART.



the middle of the floor, on a revolving pedestal, stood two
figures in clay, one Venus and the other Cupid. The
patient, thoughtful artist was continually scanning and re-
modeling these figures.
  This was his great life effort-the dream and hope of his
manhood. He was striving to reach perfection in this
work, that it might be an enduring monument of his fame.
The Venus, a beautiful woman, held in her hand an arrow,
the last that came from Cupid's bow. All the rest of his
quiver lay broken at her feet. This last one she had taken,
and now held it above him, far beyond his grasp. On tip-
toe, pleadingly, he stretched forth his hand for his weapon,
hoping for one more chance to reach her heart, which was
impregnable to force, but might be gained by entreaty.
  These figures were in soft clay, and the sculptor was
continually adding a little bit here, and shaving away the
least bit there, with the utmost care and nicety, meanwhile
revolving the pedestal about from side to side, and viewing
his beloved creatures from every possible point of view.
In a few weeks, or in a few months at the most, he hoped
to have his model complete and ready to be copied in mar-
ble; but, in fact, many months passed before he felt sure
that his task was done. Then the figures of perishable
clay were turned into statues of imperishable marble. To
see the enthusiasm of this old, gray-haired man as he
gazed lovingly on his artistic creation-the fit embodiment
of a fine conception-was a rare pleasure, making one
realize how great is art, how ennobling its influence, and
how faithful its real devotees.
  " I have been working on this model for twelve years,"
said he. "The idea has been in my mind even longer
than that. One leg of this woman has cost me more
trouble, thought, and labor than the whole of Henry Clay's
statue. I have worked and toiled to make my model per-
fect in design and execution-to make these figures ana-
tomically and artistically perfect. I have had more than
one hundred and fifty originals to study from."
  "What is the main idea you wish to convey " I asked.



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MEMOIR OF JOEL T. HART.



  "This Venus," said he, "is intended to represent the
highest type of womanhood; to represent a woman not
only faultless and beautiful in form, but full of mind, of
refined intellect, of pure but strong emotions. The Venus
de Medici is a voluptuous, sensuous woman-the embodi-
ment of physical beauty that is not illumined and elevated
by intelligence. My Venus has been assailed by Cupid,
this bright fellow on tip-toe. He has shot all his arrows
at her without effect. All but one lie broken at her feet;
that last one she holds aloft above him. On tip-toe he vainly
tries to reach it, and is begging for its return. Force has
thus far failed, and he must plead for his last dart, now his
only means of reaching her heart. Woman must be
wooed, not conquered. That is the moral of it."
  This being the sculptor's explanation of his conception
and its representation, I could never understand why the
work has sometimes been called the " Triumph of Chas-
tity." Such a name is unsatisfactory, for many reasons.
  " I see you have a good many plaster casts of limbs here,
Mr. Hart," said I, pointing to those hanging on the walls
and lying about the floor of the studio.
  "Yes, I am making them all the time. It is very hard
to find good models among women, for their forms are
usually ruined by the vicious customs of pinching and
squeezing, and tightly binding what nature intended to be
free. I knew one lady here who would have made a good
model had she not injured her figure by kneeling too
much at prayers. The peasants, whose figures have never
been injured by any artificial restraints, are our best
models."
  "But don't you have trouble in getting these models "
I asked.
  "No, not much; some ladies, with the consent and in
the presence of their parents, will, for the sake of art and
to gratify their vanity, allow us to make plaster casts of
them."
"What is this strange apparatus like a mask, with all
these big blunt needles pointing inward "



20

 


MEMOIR OF JOEL T. HART.



. " That is an instrument I invented to measure faces for
busts. By it I can get the exact outline of the head, and
reproduce the features of the face exactly, and in one-third
of the time used by a sculptor that has no such measure;
but I can not patent and sell my invention here, for the
Italians are opposed to labor-saving machines that tend