xt7dv40jtv5n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dv40jtv5n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19410722  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 22, 1941 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 22, 1941 1941 2013 true xt7dv40jtv5n section xt7dv40jtv5n The

OUT EVERY

TUESDAY

VOLUME XXXI

Julv
Julv

2'

Julv

30

Julv

r

Hoi

26

p.m.
p.m.
9 a.m.

31

:30 p.m.

Aug.
Aug.

8.30 p.m.
p.m.

Aug.
Aug.

4 p.m.

Aug.
Aug.

8:30 p.m.
p.m.

Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.

Lvlm
Dame and raid parry, Bluegrass Room.
Student Union
Evening church service. Memorial Hall
Amphitheater.
Convocation in Memoiial Hall The Cotter
Miller Playeiv

--

Sports Program
t

Days
M.W.

(Men
Women) 2:30-3:3Badmintn (Men & Women) 1:30-3:3T.Th.
Go!! (Men)
1:30 3:30 M.
1:30-3:3Goll (Women)
M.W.
3:00-4:0Games lor School and
T.TIi.
Gommunii v
0

0

Bldg. Instructor
G.A. Robbins
G.A. Russell
G.A. Russell
G.A. Robbins
W.G. Smith &
Nieiuan

Shuffle board

Folk Dancing, beginning

folk Dancing, beginning
Folk Dam ing. advanced
Inn annual Skiis (Men)
Women)

2:bO-b:o-

T.Th.

W.G. Rus,cll

3:304.30

T.Th.

W.G.

4:t05:00

T.Th.

.

"Pag-liacci-

Botany Field Trip,
Coaching School
Highlight Schedule
More than 300 courses by approximately 100 faculty members will be
of the summer session, including
offered during the second semester
work in all college in the University and most departments.
Short courses in agriculture and
education, extending for two and
one-ha- lf
weeks, will begin today
and August 7. Also scheduled as
highlights of the term's curriculm
are the annual coach school from
August 11 to August 16, a botany
field trip at Cumberland falls, and
courses for county health officers
to begin August 11.
BOTANY FIELD TRIP
Five courses in botany will be ofk
field trip at
fered at the
Cumberland falls in Whitley County
the first in the history of the summer session under the supervision
of Dr. Frank T. McFarland. head
of the botany department and curator of the University herbarium.
Students will stay at the Cumberland Falls hotel during the course.
The region aroung the falls was
selected for the trip because it offers both northern and southern
flora, being on the "borderline" of
the two regions. Dr. MrFarland explained.
The coaching school, which an- nuauy attracts nign scnuoi cuauira
from all parts of Kentucky and sev- eral neighboring states .will be con
ducted this year with Frank Leahy,
head coach at Notre Dame, and Ab
grid mentor.
Kirwan. University

7:?0-y:3-

M.W.F.

W.G.

4:M.-3H- I

M.W.

8:00 9:30
7:30 9:30

1 h.
I

.

Dail

I

W.G.
W.G.
W.G.
I

M

Field
L'M) 3:K

T.Th.

Tennis

Thursday Last Day
Thursday. July 25 is the last
dav on which seniors and graduate student, expecting to receive degrees in August may
make application for such degrees. No student will be considered for graduation who has not
filed an application.
These applications should be
trade in Room 9 of he Admin- i;tintifm hnilrimu
LEO M. CHAMBERLAIN

ai ren X:
Niemitii
Karsner
Karsner
Karsnei
Smith &
Nienian
I'iuiIdiii

Is

,

;

i

!
t

j
i

Miss Willie Stivander, a graduate
student at the University, has been
named as the head of the depart
ment of education and psychology
at Campbellsville junior college in
an announcement from the Board
of Trustees of the college.

j

Farnley Draft erf
Keith Farnsley. former

h-

eastern forward and high scoring
UK basketball star, lues been induct
,nto tne Arm' as draftee, ac- to reports from Fort
cording
Thomas this week.

ol the Univei'siiy aie available for your use. We are glad
to extend to von all ol the
(unit li's
pi ivi leges and
which vour Mile university
has to oiler to you.' We trust
that vour stav on the campus
will Ik- - a pleasant one. M;i
we suggest that you get some
recreation while here. A summer' school should oiler Ixiih
ai: oppoi tunity to sludv and
;il so to enjoy some phvsiial

ooi

Committee In Charge
Of Affairs Listed
In charge of social activities is
a committee headed by Mrs. P. K.
Holmes, summer dean of women and
composed of Miss Rebecca Van
Meter, Miss Margaret Lester. Miss
Alberta Limbach. Miss Chloe Gifford.
Miss Margaret King Koons. Profes- sors R. D. Mclntyre. Alexander Ca- purso, Thomas Hankins. L. J. Hor- lacher. O. T. Koppius. Morris Scher- ago. Jesse E. Adams. Bart Peak ana
M. G. Karsner.

relaxation.
While on the campus we
hope that you will make a
numlier of new fiieuds. We
trust that you will get acquainted ImiiIi with fatuity

Recreational activities in fourteen
courses offered by the
physical education department will
get under way mis weeK, wim eigni.
'
graduate Instructors in charge.
Headlining the list is the "Games
for School and Commuity" group.
which will meet from 3 to 4 p. m.
every Tuesday and Thursday. In- eluded in the class will be partici-- j
pat ion in shuffleboard, box hockey.!
ping pong, and other games popu- lar in schools and communities and
which reuire a minimum of equip- ment. The clas.s will be climaxed by
a series of tournaments in each of
the sports offered.
The regular .summer softball lea
irne will ept. under wav Wednesday.
Ju,y 23 wnen captains of prospec- tjve teams will meet in the gym
annex to draw for places in the
tournament. It is hoped that at
least four teams will be organized.

Training In War
To Be Offered

'

m

lf

.

aZ"

alf

i

OOLr COrRSES
Also expected to draw many iar- -

llcipauts are the men's and women's

golf courses. These are designed for
the beginning players, and will in- rlude instruction in use of the dif- -

,,.,,,,,,

'

"".

Radio Studios
Call For Actors
And Announcers

SYMPHONY PLANS
CONCERT SERIES

ferent clubs Practice on the Uni- versify grounds will be followed by
Lexington course, in- -'
piav on
structors ol ine class announced.
The women s course will be con- clu t,'d f,om 1:30 to 3:3" on Mon- davs and Wednesdays, while the
nlpn.s colllse is slat,d for , ;30 to 3:3o

,

--

.

1

IIJ'S

j

j

,

IUO

ir:Vct Tprm
th-jl- l
I aKUe

yjn

Cf

IO I

Winner of the intramural
softball tournament last semester wos the Physical Education
club, who walloped the Buildings
and Grounds temn 9 to 3 in the
finals.
The two teams had been running neck to neck all year, with
the final game deciding the winner.
Members of the winninH team
wire Kllinijton. Ihivis. H'lssell,
Tarro. I.inrier. Hill.- Soi'pnson.
Smith. Soper and Kdney.
-

'

.'
j

j

"r

memlMTs and oilier stiuieuis.
We shall dccin it a privilege
to In'Iouic .11 ipiainled with
tiinitv
mmi il there is an
lor us to meet.
II. I.. DONOVAN

ihi

Defense Fire College
To Open Nexl Monday

lrartincr thp football classes and vision of special education of the
Fire-Fightin- g
Adolph Rupp. UK basketball coach. state department of education. Meet- the basketball classes. These in-- ( ing at second and third hours daily.
structors will be assisted by other ' this course will give students three
members of the University coaching credits.
The Kentucky Fire college, conand physical education staff.
Two short courses in agriculture
De- Classes in advanced basketball will . and four in education are sched ducted by the Kentucky Civil
meet from 3:30 to 4:30 p. m. and uie(j to begin today two in educa-friwith the army, the University, and
8 to 9 p. m. daily, and will t,jon beginning August 7.
the state . fire marshal's office,.. will
Advanced
credit.
offer one-haBeginning today and continuing
,
,
Mci
football classes will meet from 9:30 to August 6 are:
day Ju,y 2g at the University
a.m. to noon and from 1:30 to 3 p.
Home Economics 129. "Food Ag- -i
m.. and will also be worth one-hricultural Entomology." meeting first
credit.
hlchf
daily, of-- 1
Highlight of the first iwo and one second, and third hours
fering three credits;
7,"
weeks in the college of educahalf
Education 287d, "Directing Farm au fteniucity nre ueparuiiems, win
tion will be a short course by Ho- Practice." offering three credits;
"
Nichols, director of the di- mer W.
9R7
"TMphin. Farm lnc proiective dpvices de,iEnpd fo,
fihnn ' thrp rredits!
id"le l
Education 165b, "Problems in Vo- Educa- - tinguishing of flames, and the chem-- I
eational Education-Ad- ult
corn- tion." meeting second and fourth ical and mechanical means of
bating tires
hours daily, three credits;
The meetings will be opened Mon- Education 264, "Modern Tenden- cies in Home Economics Education." day afternoon in Memorial Hall by
meeting second and fourth hours 'a talk by Gov. Keen Johnson on
Anyone interested In trying
daily, three credits;
("Why We Should Prepare."
out for dramatic parts on the
Edu- 175g. "Modern
Education
The purpose of the training course
program "From Kentucky Mounof will be set forth at that meeting by
cational
Problems Education
University studios
tains", at the
Handicapped Children." second and g. H. Parker, assistant director of
should see Mrs. Lolo Robinson
third hours daily, three credits.
the commission, in a speech titled
at the studios on the third floor
"Why We Are Here."
TO BEG I.V AUGUST 7
of McVey hall. This program
British films with
Scheduled to begin August 7 are: Technicolor
throughout the
will continue
sound will show how fires start in
these:
summer.
Education 287c. "Evening Schools." industry and the extinguishing of
There are openings for ancredits;
nouncers, operators, and script
Education 261. "Home Economics
writers who will be here in the
Supervision." three credits.
fall. Those interested are reCourses fofr county health officers
'
quested to register with Mrs.
to begin August 11 are these:
Robinson now so as to be able
Public Health 225a August 11 to!
to start work at the opening of
September 6). three credits;
the fall term, it was announced.
Public Health (August 11 to August 23 1, two credits.

non-cre-

At Campbellsville

i

that wi:
welcome von to the second
SmnmiT Si hool ol the l.'nivei
sitv ol Keiitui ky. The lai ilitics
It is with pleasure

j

Capurso Calls For
Summer Musicians

Recreational
14
Courses In Phrs Ed Slated

Graduate Named

To File Applications
For August Degrees

."

Late Registrations
Expected To Raise
Total This Week

Students Welcomed

Campus vesper services will be
conducted at 6:30 Sunday evening.
July 26. in Memorial Hall amphitheater. Dr. Robert Miles of the First
Presbyterian church will speak and
Lucille Haney will present a pro-- 1
gram of special music. Bart Peak.
in charge of the worship program,
emphasized that every summer stu-- !
dent is invited.

Under the direction of Dr. Alex-- ,
ander Capurso. executive director

Non-Cred- it

Russell

69

OpeilRegistratioil Total 734
At End Of Initial Day;
J
Smaller Decrease Seen

More Than 300 Courses
Offered For Second Term

W.G.

emu

neiristrar

2k

five-wee-

Including:
Box Hockev
Ping Pong
Games, etc.
(Men and Women)
Tap Dancing (beginners')
(Men and Women)
lap Dancing, advanced
(Men and Women)
Social Darning.
(Men and Women)
Social Dane ing lot all

II

will

be "night club style," according to
Miss Rebecca Van Meter, director of
I.I
Union social activities. Tables for
games will be set up on the
card
Holms?
Mrs. StiRtw 8. PCPier rvon
terrace outside the ballroom, and
the "Collegiates" orchestra will play
ChtiiDiutn i nun imllrf jlnn-niiij- i
for dancing inside.
inl m tn'itifs.
siiiHWrr
Chaperones for the dance will be
Mrs. Capurso, Mr. and Mrs.
Dr. and
The presentation that evening will
Donald Allton, Dr. and Mrs. Jesse
E. Adams, Mrs. P. K. Holmes. Miss be "Cavalleria Rusticana" and
It is usual for these two
Margaret Lester and Miss Adele
Oensemer. Admission of 25 cents operas to be given on the same
program.
per person will be charged.
Reservations must be made at
Doctor Capurso 's office in the Music
Trip To Onera
Center by July 28. it was stated.
Set For August 1
Ticket prices run from 50 cents to
The first of two second summer $2.50.
Plans are being made to leave
session trips to the Cincinnati Opera
in the Music Center at 3 p.m.. Aug- is scheduled for August 1. Dr. Alexander Capurso of the music de- ust 1. Persons desiring transporta- tion in private cars should con-- 1
partment announced yesterday.

3)

Nl'MBER

ion

Dr. Miles To Speak
At Campus Vespers

'Collejriafes' To Play
At First Dance
dance-bridg- e

22.

The Coffer Miller Players, of Chi- cago, will present a three-ac- t
play.
"The Maid's Stratagem" at convoca- tion July 30 at 9 a.m. The play is
a story about a French theatrical
troup in the time of Louis XIV and
is said to be a laughable comecy.
The Coffer Miller Players, veterans"
of stage and radio, are touring fifty university and college summer
sessions.

s,

Saturday night's

H'l.V

KERNEL

Coffer Miller Players
At Convocation

s

.

Time

Y.

ERNEL

SUMMER

suit Doctor Capurso when making
reservations, it was announced.

f

s

Affairs Planned

COURSES DROPPED
History 134 History of Canada.
History 331 Seminar in Modern British History.
Home Economics 142p-- 2 Home Management Lab.
Hygiene Sib Community Health Problems.
,
COI'RSES ADDED
Education 222 Methodology of Educational Research 3 credits,
fourth hour daily. Room 122 Education Building, instructor Taylor.
This course will be offered, tf there is sufficient demand for It.
The student should see Dean Taylor about his schedule before signing up for this class.!
Hygiene 100a Public Health J credits, third hour daily. Room
102 Health Building, instructors Hamilton and Chambers.
CHANGES IN INSTRUCTORS
Commerce 13b Instructor, Gentry instead of Smith.
Commerce 17b Instructor. Lucas instead of Farris.
Commerce 135 Instructor. Mclntyre instead of Moore.
English lb Instructor. Boyd Instead of Ward.
German For all courses. Bigge instead of Whitaker.
Home Economics C121a (meets from August
Instructor,
Newman Instead of Grundmeier.
Home Economics 129 (meets July II August 6) Instructor, Newman instead of Bark ley.
Physical Educatiop 129 Instructor, Terry instead of Campbell.
Physical Education C131 Instructor, Rupp.
Physical Education C142 Instructors. Leahy. Kirwan and Shively
Political Science 177b Instructor. Shannon Instead of Manning.
Political Science 206 Instructor, Shannon instead of Manning.

Tennis (Men

ar

extra-curricul- ar

Blue-gras-

p.m.
7:30 p.m.

Archery

'I i"K.SH

to be
Slimmer
hool Syniphonv concert. Memor
held in the Union ballroom Saturial Hall.
day night. July 26. from 9 to 12. will
Movie. Great Hall of Student Union.
open a series of
Dame and card parly,
Room. activities to continue through the
second semester of the summer ses
Student Union.
sion.
Tea hour. Student Union, Music Room.
free moving
Pour
Summer ShooI Symphony concert. Memor- picture shows, informal dances in
gym, concerts by the
ial Hall. Prof. Alexander Capurso, director. the women's symphony orchestra,
summer school
Movie, Great Hall of Student Union.
tea hours at the Union building and
Dance and card party, Bluegrass Room. a convocation head the list.

Schedule Changes

,

KLMICKV,

A dance and brioge party,

4

Activity

ON.

I

Full Program Of

S

Student Union.
Tea hour. Student Union. Music Room.
14
Summer School Symphony concert. Memorial Hall, Prof. Alexander Capurso. director.
15
8.30 p.m. Movie, Student Union. Gieat Hall.
16
p.m. Dance and card party, Bluegrass Room.
Student Union.
18
6.30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi initiation and dinner on
Rool of Jewell Hall.
20 7:30 p.m. Summer School Symphony concert, Memor
ial Hall. Prof. Alexander Capinvi. director.
21
7 p.m.
Commencement dinner.
22 4 p.m.
Commencement tea, Student Union.
22 7:30 p.m. Commencement.
(T wo trips to the Cincinnati Gtand Opera are being
planned by the Music Department)
13

OF KENTUCKY

UNIVERSITY

Dance, Bridge Parly To
Summer Social Activities
Extra-Curricul-

Tlr

ENTUCKY
I.KXI(.

bridge-dance-

7:30 p.m.

11

Z2

Social Calendar
Date

TV"

if th

rrnivir

r.r

(OnriM-lc-

music

department, the University summer

school symphony will make its in- itial appearance at 7:30 o'clock
Thursday night. Julv 31. in Memor- ial hall' Weekly Thursday night
concerts will be plaved throughout
on Mondays.
the remainder of the second term
Informal social danrine for all of summer school.
student will h hclri thrpp niphtnl Tjist summer the orchestra com-- .
per week in the Women's gym. ' posed of 55 instrumentalists, pre- These periods were popular with sen ted works of the great masters.
summer session students last se- - including symphonies, concerti. ori- k hM oi,ai mmmKiiinns fmm lmal mm.
informal
mHI
each Mond v ' Wednesday and Fri- -' posers, and excerpts from operas as
well as modern and novelty selec
dav night from 7:30 to 9:30.
tions.
INSTRUCTORS LISTED
The community sing will be led
Graduate instructors who will be
In charge of the various activities by Miss Adele Gensemer a grad- are these:
uate of the University.
Dr. Capurso stated that any sum
Helen Margaret Robbins.
University. Abilene. Texas; mer session stulent possessin or- experience was welcome to
Allan D. Russell. Millikin Uni- versity. Decatur. 111., and the Uni- (artieipate in the organization. The
versity of Minnesota;
first rehearsal will be held at the
Charles E. Smith. Millikin Uni- - Music building (Art fenterl at
p. m. Tuesday. Weekly rehearsals,
versity;
Elmer Nieman. Southeastern Mis-- i are scheduled at 7:30 o'clock ln- souri State Teachers College, Cape day nights and 3 o'clock Thursday
and Friday afternoons,
Girardeau. Mo.;
It i.s planned to have a guest so- Amanda Purdnm, Centre college,
loist appear with the orchestra
Danville:
Mrs. Eloise Keener Russell, Unl-- : riuitug the Thursday night per- formances. The artists will be se- versity of Alabama:
letted from talented vocal or in
Maifcjunt Wuireii ..f Hie univeras performing music leaders in the
sity of Kentucky:
M. G. Karsner, University of Ken- - ' strumental music students as well
rommnnity. if was said
tnekv
Hardin-Simmo-

Enrollment for the second term
of the summer session stood at
734 when registration closed at 4
O'clock yesterday afternoon.
With late registrations expee'ed
to swell the total todav and later
this week, indications were yesterday that enrollment tor the second
term would not see as grei a
drop as the first term.
Dr. Jesse E. Adams, director of
the summer session, pointed out
yesterday that where the total at
this time last year was 9s. approximately 150 students in the adult
education courses were regi f Ted on
the first day. This group will not
register until later this term. thii5
accounting for a great portion of
the decrease.
to increase the
Also expected
term's total is the annual coaching
school to be conducted from August
11 to August 16.
Last year's seeono. semester enrollment of approximately l.WO Included registrations for all short
courses and the coaching school.
At the end of the reguiar enrollment period last semester 1.571 students had signed for classes, in
comparison with 2.117 the year before.
This year is the first in the past
eight in which there has been a
decrease in enrollment. Defense jobs
and the draft are listed as most important factors in the drop. Dr.
Adams said.
period the UniOver an eight-yeversity's summer session has shown
a 96 percent increase, while the
average for 30 other universities
m 13 percent.
ar

magnesium
fires and incendiary
bombs. The latter film was lent by
the British government and shows,
the details of the last big air raid
on London.
Forest protection will be discussed
bv H. L Borden, supervisor in the
United States Forestry service, and
K G. McConnell. director of the
Kentucky Division of Forestry. W.
M. Horn, engineer in the Kentucky
Actuarial bureau will discuss the
n of buildings to do away
with fire hazards.
The actual extinguishing of flames
will be discussed bv Prof. J. R. Mit- chell of the University chemistry
department in his speech "Chem- istry of Fires." and by G. L. Wolff!
Laboratories,
from Underwriters'
Inc.. in the use of chemicals to fight

CAPT. JOHNSTONE
TO REPLACE SMEE
Chauncey
S Johnstone
Capt
graduate of the University in the
1929.
will replace Lieu;.
C. Smee with the University
ROTC unit this fall. Col. Howard
o f military
Donnelly, professor

class of

James

science and tactics, announced yes- teroay.
Captain Johnstone will report for
duty about August 13. Colonel
nelly said.
Lieutenant Smee asked to bn
transferred from the ROTC unit to
the foreign service,
Captain
Johnstone served six
months at West Point in 1923 and is
nrt on duty at present at Camp Wol- ..
l

.

fire.

DEMONSTRATIONS
Demonstrations in hvrir..lir
relaying of water and the care and
operation of pumpers will be given
at the drill tower at Scott and South
Limestone streets.
Other demonstrations in which the
representatives may take part are
the ladcied drills.' fire department
maneuvers in the dark, hose drills,
rescue work, and salvage.
Electrical hazards will be explain-thre- e
ed bv E. H. Tichenor. engineer in
the Kentucky Actuarial bureau, and
Capt. H. A. Ellington of the Louis- vine nre aeparimeni wii ihik on ven- tilation.
A. J. Lemaire. special agent from
the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
will speak on "Prevention of Sabo-- j
tage" on the third day to open dis-- I
cussions bearing directly on sabo- tage and war fires. Other points to
presemed ale .sabotage in water- works and m jndustrJal plants
EXPLOSIVE
A discussion of explosives and in- cendiaritjs used in war will be pre- sentea oy rroi. r. c. tjnrarn ot tne
University mining department. This
will be followed by talks on first aid.
particularly for victims of war gases.
and on incendiary wxiibs. gas war- fare, and decontamination.
Approximately 1S5 representatives
are expected to register Monday
morning at the drill tower. In case
of rain all classes scheduled for the
tower will be held in the gvmnasmm
pf the Teacher's Training buildins.

Publication Issued
For School Hoards
A
method is
utilized in "A Manual for School
Board Members." issued by the Bu- reau of School Service. University
of Kentucky, in the presentaTion of
for the guidance of
information
Kentucky .school boards.
The publication contains sections
devoted to the scope and import- ance of American education, tunc- tions and relationship of local school
boards, budgets, meetings, proced- ures and Ken'ui ky law.
i he
i oinpiiatiou
n.i..iDr Leonard F.. Meere. assistant pro- lessor of education administration
at the University
question-and-answ-

er

oHrlra
'

xSi.

'

Virginia.

"

Graduate Named
Piano Instructor
Alice Robertson.
received a degree
Science in Music at.
ment, has received
structor in piano at
,ina gfat. TpsrnPrs

Lexing'on who
Bachelor of

of

June

commence-

a position as in
the North Caro- college. Boone

m

Miss Robertson has appeared many
times before Lexington audiences
as piano soloist.

Fred Hill Called
Fred Hill, former sports editor of
The Kernel and athletic publicity
director, nas oeen caueo 10 amy as
second lieutenant in the First Arm- ored Division at Fort Knox. He will
report for outy September 1

KAMITS

What Goes
On Here-- KERNELS
TI'KSI.V. JILY Z2
.

7:30 p. m
First rehear3al of
summer symphony, at Music Center.
WF.nNESD.tT. JVLV 33
3:00 p. m. Meeting of captair.s
of football teams gym annex.
7 to 9 p. m
Informal dancing ?n
women s gym.
THURSDAY. JULY 14
La1 day on which a student may
register for second terms work
Last day for filing of applications
for degrees to be received at Au- gust commencement.
FRIDAY. JI'I.Y ?.
7 to 9 p. m
Informal cfnnciT-in Women's gym.
SATURDAY. JULY I
p. m
Bridge parry and daiv
m t'nion uallrooir,.
SUNDAY.
JULY J7
p m. vesper services in Mem
2

nrtl

Wall

amphiThrer.

* Student Government Gives Training
In The Principles Of Democracy
SMOKE RINGS ll
In an cailici column. I iih ill ioiit'd liiil nl
one of ilic Ix-- agc-n- ie
t'livonniit iil as
r,ov in exisic-n- c tor teaching voting i lc 10
te eoocl iiicns. 1 would like lo s.iv a Jittlr
more alvMii uli;ii I think il ought 10 In- .tnd ln
(o fulfill that aird ii oilier functions.
Resides Ixing an educational pro jo i ol the
IiIl'Iksi value lo democratic lile, student government is the most effective means lv which
student interests tan lr centralized and :u
rercsented on lit average imixcrsitx
campus. Ii is of the utmost initortanie lo the
pond and efficient administration of an educational insiiiiuion that these interests all Ik
i
re res n i el. Ohvinuslv, the jktsoiis
qualified tft sav what lliev are ami lo push iheiu to
adf(Kiu fulfillment are the students themselves.
It is sad Imii true thai college leathers and
administrators do not always Lnow what students want. In fact. I will even venture to sav
thai in some rases the students ate in a I teller
mi ii m than the faculiv or the administration
j
sav what is Ix'si for iheni. The vojie of such
ijses is ol course subject to some tmiurovcrsv,
but it is lieginning tit lie generally admitted
that vxial aU.iirs. extracurricular activities, and
campus londurt are proTly the attic em ol
Mudi in governing Imdies. At tin's univetsiiv.
dwiing the winter session, ihe student govcrn-i.un- i
has laiih complete jurisdiction over these
phases of student, life.
Retenilv, hire and elsewhere, student governing Ixtdics have Itegttn lo take an interest in
oUier things; matters which concern ihe general
vdlare and educational pMM i unii its of ilieir
constituents lxli on and otf ihe tainpus. Thev
die interested, tor instance, in housing conditions, and in manv places have lcen instru-menta- l
in having active housuig agencies estal- c

h--

-

Ik-s-

1 1.

Riht About

It

Rhhxki.

under the auspices and control
puiiose ol
iaisingand maimaining the standards ol student
lished.

ii si i.i

nl ihe Mean of Men's Offices, for the

houses, organized and otherwise. In a few cases
also, thev have liccn successful in improving
woi king standards ol students who have to earn
part or all of their college exjienses. Most active
student governments have concerned themselves
in aiding and expanding the NYA progiams on
their rcscctivc campuses.
On our own campus in the year jusi past, the
student government succeeded, after consider-alildel. iv and contusion, in passing a hill which
csiahllshcs a student loan fund out of student
monevs and administered partlv In students
elected lo a joint lacuh
committee. II
this arrangement proves worthwhile, it may Income the nucleus lor a verv vital and effective
,
fulfilling one ol
program for student
the most imMiriant functions of anv government
helping its citizens, in this case the students, to live mote comfortable, decent and
profitable lives. I or if students must work long
Ivours outside class for wages thai are, in most
cases, far from opulent, they are not in a
lo take the best advantage of the oporlun-itwhich the school should provide lor their
advancement in education and good citizenship.
Aside from ihe direc t lene-fitof the program,
there is the training in administration and in
government participation that il gives, not only
lo the students who hold office, hut to their
student constituents as well. And even more
jxili.ips. is the liaining il gives in the
all iniMi lant democratic ixu'nl of view the
notion that governments are responsible lo the
coplc thev govern, and thai ihe conduct of the
government is the concern and the dutv of
everv voting citizen.

Ijt. H. L. Donovan, new president
the University of Kentucky,
intks out as complete a case as we
ever heard in as few words as wt
ever knew used to cinch an argument when he says that the Univer-Fit- y
c5

of Kentucky is now receiving
less than it received more
than ten years ago.
1 lie new University President is
f Imi right in saying that a larger
snicmni for building, maintenance
Br.1 ojerations must be appropri-fclf$KK).000

1.

For ii.diiv years the University of

self-help-

osi-lio- n

s

of Kentucky

Opinion

Columns

Shorts
The best opinion you can have
is that your opinions are merely
your opinions.
We still don't think that Congress
argues over a bill as long as some
husbands.
A
Illinois baby has
a vocabulary of 1.038 words. You're
wrong it's a boy.
A man who contends he descended from apes usually virtually proves
his point by making a monkey cf
himself.
ld

Universities

Getting Canirlit In Draft Can Be Profitable
'a
If Yon Use Some Foresight And Initiative
P.v

So you are getting caught in the

draft!
This

is a fact that faces thousands
of college men this summer, not a
few of whom will come from this
University.
But the draft can be a fairly profitable proposition for those with
a little foresight and initiative.
In the first place, you don't have
to go into the army at all. At least
many of you con't. There are several other branches of the service
with very attractive offers.
The best on the block and consequently the most
right now is the U. S. Marine Corps'
officer candidate training. Every
graduate unversity man is eligible,
if unmarried and over twenty. The
attraction of this offer is that in
six months you become a second lieutenant with pay at $183 per month.
Length of service is for the duration of the emergency, whereas the
army officially asks only a year.
But there are plenty of indications
that the army isn't going to release
the first crop of draftees at the
end of their year.
COMMISSION
After three months' work the men
who stick with the course are commissioned second lieutenants In the
Marine Reserve. They continue the
training course for three months
more, and if they pass the final tests
they go into active service wi'h
troops for the duration of the emergency.
Lt. Col. Shaler Ladd. Marine liaison officer with the Selective Service
office, gave this correspondent an
impressive description of life on active duty. Unlike the army, which
ships you to the nearest camp, the
Marine Corps scatters its men all
over this hemisphere. About the closest you can get is South Carolina.
The last class was sent to Cuba.
Other possible destinations are Panama, Columbia, several Central
American republics, about half the
islands in the Caribbean, California
and one young officer has got as far
as Honolulu, Colone Ladd reports
over-crowd-

HAVNF.S

MAHONEV.

GroRc.r W'vshinc.ion

However, the school is authorised
for only four hndred men. Six hundred of whom will wait as alternate
candidates for the next class to be
taken In early fall. All of these
men have been deferred by their
draft boards at the request of the
Marine Corps.
NOTE: Colonel Ladd tipped
privately that with the present increase in the Marine enlisted personnel more officers are sure to be
needed than those provided for at
present. He predicted the school
would be opened again next summer, and it was his private advice
that graduates of the class of '4!
should apply right away if they
wish to take advantage of this
offer.
The Navy announces this week
that it is now taking applications
for ensign's training, a course similar to that of the Marines. Service
here is also for the duration of the
emergency.
Students with two years of college behind them, unmarried, over
twenty and under 28 are eligible
shore training
for a
course at the end of which they
will attain an ensign rank and be
shipped to sea. An ensign's pay is
$125 per month clear over room,
board, uniforms, launory, etc.
Most popular and toughest branch
of the Navy is the air service. The
seme requirements are necessary
for this as for ensign training. Applicants spend their first month
learning to fly at Anacostia. If they
pass this successfully they are sent
to either Pensacola or Jacksonville
air bases for flight training. This
course requires a good deal of signalling and navigation besides plenty of
-flying ability and there are wash
for hopeful cadets at every
outs"
step.
At best, however, for those not
interested in the military life these
branches of the service are gambles.
Maybe the emergency will last ten
years and you will be stuck for the
whole of it, while you might get out
of the Army at the end of a year.
Then, again, you may be turned
four-mon-

th

officer-candida-

will

take

a

te

th

training

course, and come up for
commissions.
These courses are available to
men, crafted or enlisted, who have
been in the Army for six months.
A limited quota is taken from the
different branches of the Army, and
applicants must be recommended
by their commanding officers. The
Selective Service Chief said that at
first they were authorized to train
10.000 such officers.
"However, we need 20.000 and I
expect the quotas to be increased before long." he acided
second-lieutenan-

t's

Of'Brnin-Triis-

Two tiny organisms living in

cul-

said that these
schools offered
good opportunities for college men.
Of course, you're going lo find a
lot of old enlisted men, who have
been in the Army for years out for
those jobs, too," he said, "but bright,
young college fellows, wi