xt7dv40jwm6d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dv40jwm6d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690415  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 15, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 15, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7dv40jwm6d section xt7dv40jwm6d Haggin Hall More Than Just Pranks -- Why?
By DANIEL GOSSETT

Kernel Staff Writer
A tradition of
spring at the University
is for
lads to herald the
coming of fair weather by pulling harmless pranks and getting into frivolous
light-hearte-

d

Ncics Analysis
mischief. They stage panty raids, have
shaving cream battles, throw water on
one another and generally let off a little
steam.
This year,
mischief turned
into lighted bottles of kerosene and the
d

light-hearte-

harmless pranks became flaming garbage
receptacles (Dempster Dumpsters) in the
Haggin Hall courtyard.
Why? Were the residents of Haggin
Hall, all of whom are freshmen, Just
letting off steam in typical spring fever
fashion? Was the disturbance a planned
incident initiated by a small core of people who had personal axes to grind with
the head resident or the corridor advisers? Or was it a wholesale protest
against living conditions in Haggin Hall
or the University housing regulations in
generaP

Two Defeated
SAR Candidates

Contest Election
By LARRY DALE KEELING

Assistant Managing Editor
For the second year in a row, the Student Government
spring
elections are being contested.
Robert Duncan and Barbra Ries, both unsuccessful candidates
for SG representative on the Students for Action and
Responsibility
(SAR) slate, filed their appeal Monday. The election results would
have been declared official if no one had filed an appeal by 5
p.m. Monday.
In their letter of appeal, Dun
be for the SG assembly to amend
can and Miss Ries stated, as the the constitution in some way to
reasons for contesting the elecallow a quicker election. This
tion, that:
majority
requires a
"Numerous irregularities apvote of the entire assembly.
A
peared concerning the solicitamajority of the
tion of votes near the polling assembly is 22 votes and the asplaces.
sembly has had trouble getting
"Members of the appointed
that many representatives to
Board of Elections were found to show up at the past few meetbe negligent in providing for the ings.
There is also the possibility
impartiality of both the election
ar themselves personally.
that the election would be de"Proper representation of layed until next fall.
'
candidates was not present at the
The contest of the election has
of ballots early in the delayed the swearing-iof Tim
counting
Futrell and Jim Gwinn (winners
evening.
"A number of qualified stuof last week's election for presdents were denied their rights ident and vice president respecto vote because of negligence
tively) and of all the newly elected
by the aforementioned Board of representatives.
Elections."
Richmond said no one would
If Duncan and Miss Ries sucbe swom in because the election
ceed in having the election results cannot be declared ofthrown out, a new election probmakes a
ficial until the
ably could not be held before decision on the appeal.
finals week.
Futrell and Gwinn could have
The matter first has to go bebeen sworn in anytime after 5
fore the University Judicial
p.m. Monday had there been no
Board. According to Scott Richappeal. The new representatives
mond, chairman of the elections were scheduled to be sworn in
committee, no date has been set at the assembly meetingWednes-da- y
yet for the appeal to be heard.
night, but Speaker of the Aswould
Richmond said the
sembly Steve Bright cancelled the.
probably meet sometime late this meeting and said there would
week.
be no move meetings until the
throws the elecIf the
reiches its decision.
tion out, a new filing' deadline
Robert Duncan, one of the
must be set and the candidates
two candidates contesting the
must file for office again. Folelection, said that if the appeal
lowing this, the SG constitution
goes through and the election
k
provides for a mandatory
is overthrown, he would not run
waiting period before the again.
election takes place. This would
Duncan already holds one seat
put the election sometime durin the assembly which will not
ing finals week.
until next
come up for
Amend Constitution
on Page 8, Col. 1
The only alternative would
two-thir-

two-thir-

Actually all of the above conditions,
and other incident s precip itat cd the"
riots" of April 3 and April 7. In a
Kernel article of April 10, Haggin head
resident Jay Allan White, was quoted
as saying that the causes of the disturbances were spring fever and a simple
revolt against authority.
Sick Of This Hole
One of the residents of Haggin, however, disagreed with that rationale. "We're
Just sick of this hole. Everyone is hacked
off and everyone in this dorm was involved. It's the lousy atmosphere that
11

ag-gi- n

A great number of the men in Haggin
are complaining about conditions in the
dorm. Keith Brubaker, a member of the
Haggin Council, said, "The main thing
is that there is no place whatsoever to
study in this dormitory. It's Just too
noisy in the rooms or in the lower lounge.
The regulations about noise and quiet
hours aren't enforced at all. You used
to be able to study in the upper TV
lounge after they turned off the television,
but now they lock it at 11 p.m."
Continued on Face 3, Col. 1

THE KENTUCKY

KE KN

University of Kentucky, Lexington

Tuesday April 15, 1969

v

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Vol. LX, No. 131

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Brad Evans (left), state chairman for the Young Americans For
Freedom, spoke to UK chapter members Monday, assuring them
lhat lhey were ..not ,osing yardagc.. lQ lhc Iibcrals At lhe front
Wiltl Evans are Bil1 Dawson, local YAF vice chairman, and Rusty
Booth, local member. See Story on page 7. Kernel Photo By Bob Brewer

Five Suspended After Drug Arrests
By BILL MATTHEWS

Names of the suspended students were withheldby Dr. Forth,
but he indicated that the suspensions were given to the students accused of the most serious
offenses.

rules against the suspended students or if Dr. Forth overrides
a favorable decision, the- - students will be suspended until
their trials are over.
The basis for the action taken
Lexington police arrested the against the students is a portion
10 students Sunday on charges
of the Student Code which states:
from the illegal sale of
ranging
"In the event that a student
narcotics to disorderly conduct.
has been accused of an offense
All 10 were released on bail.
against the University ancVor
Arraigned in court Monday, against the city, state, or federal
the 10 students appeared en masse government, the nature of which
before a Judge who told them may present a clear and present
to return on May 2 for a hearing danger or serious physicalor mento decide whether their cases tal harm to the student or to any
should be turned over to a grand other member of the University
jury for trial.
community or to University propthe committee: "The proposed mechanical device that has
erty, the Vice President for Sturoved to be unwieldy for
Meeting separately with Dr. dent Affairs, after consultation
changes are designed to improve S
advisers and deans.
Forth Monday, the students were
advising, simplify and reduce
with the University Appeals
told what action the University
record keeping, make more effecWe are impressed by would take
Board, may impose such temportive use of administrative personagainst them. Some ary sanctions on the student as
for the principle of
of the students took advantage
nel and to reduce impersonality the support
are reasonably necessary to prothe Ceneral Studies Program that of the
to have adresulting from size and centralizatect the student, the University
has been manifested in the var- visers opportunity
tion."
present during what were
ious colleges and by the fact that described as "confidential councommunity aruVor University
The report answered the arguproperty from such danger."
the colleges outside have sub- seling sessions."
ment, expressed by several sena- reduced the number o(
According totheStudentCod
tors, that the change would re- stantially 200 level courses that
The five suspended students such
10O and
temporary sanctions may
sult irv a deterioration of the'
We hope were told that they could appeal continue until the case has been
they are offering
. spirit of the New Academic Plait
that the proposed change iu their cases to the University Ap- settled by the properly constie
and, mote specifically;
peals Board Dr. Forth indituted authorities.
Ceneral Studies Program, insti- registration of freshmen and soph- cated that the board
omores will make the Ceneral
probably
Oswald's
tuted during Dr. John
Asked if undercover police
Studies Program and the entire would meet later this week.
presidency pf the University.
agents had worked with the UniDr. Forth said the final de- versity in making the arrests, Dr.
"We do not regard the A 6c S undergraduate program function
as better by giving students abetter cision lies with him and he de- Forth replied, "I have no knowlrequirement
registration
scribed the appeals board as an edge of that."
fundamental to the New Aca- chance to get prompt, accurate,
demic Plan, but rather as a
Continued on Page 3, Col. 1 "advisory body." If the board
Continued on Pate 7, CoL 3
Kernel Staff Writer
Temporary suspensions were
given Monday to five of 10 UK
students arrested by Lexington
police Sunday in drug raids.
Dr. Stuart Forth, acting vice
president for student affairs, said
the five students were temporarily
suspended under provisions of the
Student Code. He declined comment on what action would be
taken against the other five

Senate Changes A&S Registration

By DANA EWELL
Assistant Managing Editor
Beginning with registration
for the fall semester, freshmen
ans sophomores will be allowed to
register in the college in which
they intend to take their major,
rather than having to enroll in
the College of Arts and Sciences.
The University Senate approved this move Monday after
noon when James K. Cri swell,
agricultural economic, chairman
of the senate's rules committee,
presented the proposal to eliminate mass registration in the A
6c S College.
Reasons for the registration
change were summarized by Associate A 6c S Dean Heibert
Dreimon in a written report from

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* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April 15, 1900

John Braden Combines Folk, Western, Gospel Music
John Braden, by John Braden,
A& M Rcctmls.
By LEE B. BECKER
Editor-in-Chie-

Charleston, Lancaster, Pa., goes
on to Florida, Wchawkcn, N.J.,
N.Y.C. where
and eventually
it ends in the Village.
Or rather it stops in the Village. The release is open ended.
"Sing us a song of your tomorrows, John."
While the album does not
force unity upon the release (and
the release does not give complete unity to the album), the
album and release seem to create
the whole that neither achieves
itself.
Album Loose
The album is loose, changing rather drastically from cut
to cut. At first it is soft, but
twangy, moving, but controlled.
While the control is a constant,
the other factors are not present
in all the cuts.
Braden has combined the
smoothness of modem folk, the
twang of Western, and the words
of Southern Church singing in at
least two of the cuts, the best
of which is "What A Friend I
Have In Jesus."
The news release leaves hope

f

Records included a
e
news release with their
review copy of John Braden s
first album. The release should
be included with every album.
A rather exciting package in
itself, the record is meaningful
background for the news release,
which is quite a bit different
from the ordinary bio sent out
by the producers.
Titled "A Fable," the release, in modem, poetic, lyric,
style, begins with a seemingly
unrelated (to anything) event involving John Braden, jumpsback
into somewhere, picks up another
anecdote, Jumps again, another
anecdote, and on into the present.
Dirty Rooms
It tells of dirty rooms, weeping women, unfulfilled dreams,
a forgotten, forgetting, father, a
mother of sorts, travel and more
dreams.
It starts somewhere, drops
back to Atlanta, then hits
A& M

nine-pag-

I
1

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JOHN BRADEN

Draden is evolving, and more
will follow this first.
"John Braden goes to New
York to leave himself behind,"
the release says. "He has no idea
what he will find there."
Do us a favor, A & M. With
his next album, include the
release, if that recent college
grad, a frustrated poet, is still
with your PB department.

Correction

Last Thursday's Kernel erroneously reported that the Jacques Loussicr Trio Concert would
be Thursday, April 10. The concert will be this Thursday, April
17, at 7:33 p.m. in Memorial
Coliseum. The program is presented by the UK Student Center
Board. Tickets arc $1.50 in advance, $2.00 at the door and arc
available at the Student Center,
Barney Miller's, and Shack leton's
Downtown.

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The Kentucky
iX

Of all the ways America can grow, one way is by
learning from others.
There are things you can learn in the Peace
Corps you can't learn anywhere else.
You could start an irrigation program. And
find that crabgrass and front lawns look a little
ridiculous. When there isn't enough wheat to go
around in Nepal.

You could be the outsider who helps bring a
Jamaican fishing village to life, for the first time
in three hundred years. And you cou!-- wonder if
your country has outsiders enough. In Watts. In
Detroit. In Appalachia. On its Indian reservations.
Last year, for the first time, Peace Corps
alumni outnumbered Volunteers who are now out
at work overseas.

"M'

By 1980, 200,000 Peace Corps alumni will
be living their lives in every part of America.

There are those who think you can't change
the world in the Peace Corps.
On the other hand, maybe it's not just what
you do in the Peace Corps that counts.
But what you do when you get back.
The Peace Corps, Washington, D.C. 20525.

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Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel. Univerilty
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40500. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed live times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box UtS.
Begun as the Cadet In lbW and
as the Kernel
published
since 1913. continuously
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading
should
be reported to The advertising
Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
mail
Yearly,
$tf 27

Per copy, by
from files

9. 10

KERNEL TELEPHONES
2321
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
2320
News Desk
2447
Advertising. Business, Circulation 2319

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Turwlay, April

15,

l9-- 3

Haggin Conflict Centers Around Personalities
be placed on us would be that
Jay Allan (White) would have

Continued from Page One
Several other of the residents
complained that Haggin has no
facilities for entertaining women visitors. One disgruntled resident commented, "You can't
take a girl into the upper lounge,
there's so much horsing around
up there that a girl would be
Immediately grossed out. And
the lower lounge Is Just as bad.
There are so many people passing through, or playing
or messing with the vending machines, that nobody would
want to go down there, with or
without a girl."
Personality conflicts between
certain residents, certain corridor
advisers and the head resident,
do appear to contribute, in some
degree, to the general aura of
unrest in Haggin Hall. Keith
Brubaker, Jeff Gumer and Patrick Morrison related to the Kernel an incident involving an
attempt by head resident White
to establish a Haggin Hall newspaper. They said
"Two of the corridor advisers
approached the three of us and
four other guys to organize and
run a newspaper for the dorm.
We were told that the only stipulation or regulation that would
ping-pon-

the privilege of writing editorials
for the paper any time he wanted

to."

Haggin Newspaper A Problem
"Later on, during a council
meeting White threatened to
freeze all of the Council's funds
if the paper was not voted in.
That is when we first became
suspicious of the whole deal and
started stalling on the whole
thing. Later still, one of the corridor advisers brought a mimeograph master and a whole stack
of paper that he said came from
White. He told us that we should
type something up and have it
run off in the Student Center
and have something distributed
right away."
White later denied the charges, saying, "It's true that I tried
to get a newspaper started. There
is Just too much misunderstanding in the communications I try
to get to the students via the
corridor advisers. It is also true
that I froze funds for the dorm
council, but the two things are
in no way connected. The funds
were cut for an entirely different

g,

reason."

Another source of friction in

Haggin
from

Hall

seemingly

arises

corridor advisers going into students' rooms when theoccupants
are not there. Gumer and Morrison reported that one adviser
had opened their room whilethey
were out and allowed another
resident to take popcorn from
their room.
White said, "I have never
heard of such an incident, but
the only reason I can think of for
a staff member to enter a resident's room is if there is a health
hazard and the place stinks to
high heaven."
The basic issue in all this remains the question whether the
disturbances of April 3 and April
7 were planned, and if so why
the staff did not know about
them and try to stop them.
The first incident started out
as a water battle between two
of the floor units and ended up
with hundreds of men in the
courtyard yelling, "Lynch White,
Lynch White."
It is doubtful perhaps that
that incident was the result of
advance planning. More likely,
it was the result of" spring fever."
Second Incident Planned
The more destructive incident,

tion of their schedules at the opening of the fall 1969 semester.

There was some concern expressed that elimination of the
A & S registration requirement
would increase students' difficulties in transferring colleges, but
Dr. Criswell said there are no
written barriers to a student
transferring colleges and any such
barriers would have to be approved by the senate.
On this point the registration
change states: "Students eligible
to attend the University may
transfer
from
one
college
to another, including professional
colleges, at times specified by the
college deans and the registrar.
In every instance the entrance
requirements of the college to
which the student is transferring
must be satisfied."
The senate also heard the annual reports of its various committees, but no immediate action

and deans."

Dr. Criswell said the rules
committee had solicited the views
of all the colleges and had talked
to the University provost and registrar as well as Dean Drennon
before deciding to back the rules
change.
Dean Drennon was the initiator of the plan and received the
endorsement of the administrative and faculty councils of the
A & S College.
The details of implementation
of the registration change include:
Assignment of new freshmen,
transfer students and returning
former students to the college
of their major during the early
registration programs in July.
Assignment of all other students to the proper college at
the time they report for confirma

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however, was planned, at least
in some degree. One resident who
was involved in the making of
Molotov cocktails, said, "There
is no doubt but that the whole
thing was planned. Everyone
knew about it by 8 p.m. Guys
had bottles and cans and toilet
paper and gasoline ready to go
hours before anything started.
Gasoline was even placed in the
Dempster Dumpster hours before
anything was thrown."
A corridor adviser admitted
that he knew something was going to happen but that the advisers were instructed to "let
the thing ride" and try to contain the residents on their floors..

was suggested by the committee
chairmen, except for the committee on community colleges which
asked that its recommendations
for improving the academic relations between the Lexington campus and the community colleges
be first referred to the Senate
Council, the senate's rules committee, and the Community ColWhite explained that rationlege Council before they are
ale:
brought to the senate floor.
"You've got to realize that the
Prof. Paul Oberst, law, announced his successor as one of majority of the staff has never
g
the two
faculty trus- dealt with anything like this before. Instead of having corridor
tees on the Board of Trustees
Dr. Paul Sears, chemistry, former advisers act as policemen, we
chairman
of the University intended to contain any disturbance on a
basis.
Senate.
floor-by-flo-

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On of tht largest and most popular
fottiwal wants . . . faaturos "nam"
sports fifuras and awarding of Silver
Horsashoe Award.

SPEAKS
YOUR LANGUAGE
Tell it to the oracle

APR. 29

RIVERFRONT

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Chemistry-Physic-

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The discussion will give
undergraduates an opportunity
to evaluate the content and
teaching of chemistry courses.
Dr. R. W. Kiser, chairman of
the Chemistry Department, and
Dr. E. M. Hammaker, assistant
chairman, will represent the department.

Phone

269-23- 42

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Discuss the classics
communicate!

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Half Hour Delivery!

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Students To Rate
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We had no idea that the thing
would get out of hand or become
acitywide issue."

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BASEBALL AND
FIREWORKS PAGEANT

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Frosh, Sophs In College Of Own Choice
Continued from Page One
personal assistance from advisers

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* A

Nationwide Statement Against ROTC
The following editorial originated by The Michigan Daily, is being run simultaneously today by 29
college ncwsjMjwrs. About half a million students across the nation make up the combined readership of these ncwsjmjycrs. Although all of the arguments against ROTC made in this editorial may
not apply on this camjms, they are valid at many colleges and universities, and the Kernel endorses
the general thrust of the statement.

One of the unintended domestic consequences of the war in Vietnam
has been the growing awareness of the dangers of intimate connections
between the military and academia.
Perhaps the most blatant example of colleges and universities willingly performing functions that are rightly the exclusive concern of the
military is the Reserve Officer Training Corps ( ROTC).
After many years of relatively tranquil existence on the nation's campuses, ROTC has come under fire of late from those who believe that
philosophically and pedagogically, military training has no place in an
academic institution.
In recent months such leading institutions as Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, Harvard and Stanford have all taken steps toward revoking
academic credit from their ROTC programs. Currently, many other
the status of their own
colleges and universities are also
ROTC programs.
The Stanford decision is especially significant because it was premised
on philosophic rather than pragmatic grounds. As a member of the committee which prepared the report explained, "We began with a definition
of the university and found an essential conflict between this and the
concept of ROTC."
Academia' s traditional function is to inspire critical thinking about
man and his society aloof from partisan or superficial considerations. Rut
it is impossible for colleges and universities even to pretend to perform
this unique role if they are also subsidizing the brutual militarism of the
outside world.
Some have argued that academic institutions, especially those which
are publicly sponsored, have an obligation to be politically neutral and
that this neutrality requires the continued support of ROTC programs on
campus.
At a time when the military is an integral element in an expansionist
foreign policy opposed by a sizable segment of the population both
inside and outside academia, it is clear that the ROTC program is as
partisan in its own way as Students for a Democratic Society.
Thus, in a modern context colleges and universities are only politically
neutral when they as institutions stand between the government and
its critics. Clearly, continued academic support for ROTC would be
'"
the height of political partisanship.
Hans Morganthau wrote recently that one of the key lessons of the
Vietnam War was the danger of too intimate a relationship between
the campus and the government. For already, he noted, large segments
of the academic community have been transformed "into a mere extension of the government bureaucracy, defending and implementing
policies regardless of their objective merits."
ROTC is not only antithetical to the ultimate purposes of higher
education, but contrary to basic pedagogical principles as well.
While the development of critical thinking is an integral part of
a liberal education, the teaching methods employed in ROTC programs
tend to emphasize rote learning and deference to authority. This is far
from surprising as critical thinking has never been a highly prized military virtue. Consequently, the ROTC program is geared to produce
intellectually stunted martinets.
DAILY CALIFORNIAN, University of California, Berkeley
THE DAILY BRUIN, UCLA
EL CAUCHO, University of California, Santa Barbara
THE COLORADO DAILY, University of Colorado, Boulder
DAILY ILLINI, University of Illinois, Champaign
THE PURDUE EXPONENT, Purdue University, Lafayette
TULANE HULLABALOO, Tulanc University, New Orleans
THE DIAMONDBACK, University of Maryland, College Park
BOSTON UNIVERSITY NEWS, Boston University, Boston
AMHERST DAILY, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
THE MICHIGAN DAILY,- - University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
THE STATE NEWS, Michigan State University, East Lansing
THE MINESOTA DAILY, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
THE REFLECTOR, Mississippi State University, State College
STUDENT LIFE, Washington University, St. Louis
GATEWAY, University of Nebraska, Omaha

example of the type of educational thinking behind the ROTC
program at many universities is provided by a solemn pronouncement
last year by an ROTC officer at the University of Minnesota. In a
frighteningly serious echo of Catch-2- 2 he declared, "Marching is the
basic leadership program for every officer."
Equally alien to the ends of a liberal education is the unquestioning
submissiveness endemic in the rigidly hierarchical structure of military
education. It is hard to develop any spontaneity much less dialogue-wit- hin
the classroom when the professor is not just a teacher, but a
superior officer as well.
For those congenitally unimpressed by philosophical arguments
predicated on the goals of higher education, there are some equally
potent pragmatic reasons why ROTC is in no way a valid academic
An

offering.

faculty curriculum committee at the University of Michigan
stated the case clearly when it charged that ROTC course materials
used in Ann Arbor were "conjectural,
cheaply moralistic
and often blatantly propagandistic."
The bulk of the ROTC program consists of technical courses often
less rigorous than similar courses offered in the math, science and
engineering programs of most colleges and universities.
Typical of those ROTC programs not duplicated elsewhere is an
Air Force ROTC course entitled, "The history of the role of the Air
Force in U. S. military history." Designed primarily to inculcate
institutional loyalty, rather than to develop critical thinking, courses like
this are clearly not history. They are not even valid military history since
inter-servirivalry results in an inflation of the role of the Air Force.
The intellectual vacuity of many ROTC courses is directly related to
the rather limited educational backgrounds of the preponderance of
ROTC faculty.
Despite education which normally does not exceed a bachelor' s degree,
ROTC instructors are accorded a status comparable to professors in more
rigorous disciplines. And due to the high degree of autonomy of the
ROTC program, colleges and universities have little direct control over
the hiring, firing or promotion of these ROTC instructors.
Rut objections such as these spring primarily from the form rather
than the underlying substance of ROTC. On a substantive level, it
is difficult to avoid the blunt assertion that training soldiers whose
ultimate aim is to kill is totally hostile to the principles of academia.
It was the simplistic "my country right or wrong" patriotism of
the First World War which spawned the original ROTC program. Rut
one of the clearest lessons of the Vietnam tragedy is that such unquestioning support of government policy is not only morally bankrupt,
but counter to the long-rang- e
interests of the nation as well as the campus.
In order to reassert the sanctity of academia as a morally and
educationally autonomous institution, it is necessary to end the universities' role as the unquestioning servant of government and military. The abolition of ROTC as a sanctioned course offering would be
a major step in this direction.
A

non-analytic- al,

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THE DUKE CHRONICLE, Duke University, Durliam
THE TARGUM, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
THE NEW MEXICO LOBO, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
THE COLONIAL NEWS, JIarpur College, State University of New
York, Binghamton
THE SPECTRUM, State University of New York, Buffalo
.
THE STATESMAN, State University of New York, Stony Brook
THE ANTIOCH RECORD, Antioch College, Yellow Springs
THE POST, Ohio University, Athens
THE DAILY PENNSYLVANI AN, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
CAVALIER DAILY, University, of Virginia, Chadottesville
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, DAILY, University of Washington,
Seattle
THE DAILY CARDINAI,, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Tie Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

, ESTABLISHED

1894

TUESDAY, APRIL 15,

1969

Editorials represent tlte opinions of the E