xt7dv40jwm95 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dv40jwm95/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670220  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 20, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 20, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7dv40jwm95 section xt7dv40jwm95 Inside Today's Kernel
The

Civil

asks
balance:

Commission

Rights

legislation requiring
Page Three.

racial

tditorial comments on Romney's esser-Hoabout youth awareness: Page Four.

n

There is a crisis of confidence in
Washington, James Reston writts:
Page Five.

The Cats win another
stars: Page Six.

and Dampier

Former NSA presidents say there was
no CIA coercion: Page Seven.
A UK

student was elected the state's

of Kentucky
University MONDAY,
LEXINGTON,

Young Republican president Saturday:

Vol. 58, No.

Page Eight.

101

FEU. 20, 19G7

KV.,

State Schools
Said To Comply
With Guidelines

conceivable" that members of
the National Student Association
who disclosed their secret relationship with the CIA would
be prosecuted for their unauthorized revelations.
Lawrence R. Houston, general counsel of the CIA, said in
a telephone interview that "we
have talked about that and there
is to be no retribution, no prosecution."
"Of course, wedon'tlikewhat
has happened," Mr. Houston
said. "And we certainly don t
mean that the decision not to
prosecute gives these people carte

Southern States, however, than
border region,
according to the Southern Education Reporting Service. As a
whole, the SERS said, the South
has over half of its desegregated
Negroes in schools with less than
percent Negro enrollment In
the border area, most of the de
segregated Negroes attend mostly
Negro schools. An exception, it
pointed out, is Kentucky, where
more than half the total Negro
enrollment is in mostly white
schools. For example, about 62.5
percent of Negro students in Lexington attend integrated schools.
That is progress, local civil
rights leaders concede, but not
enough. The Lexington chapter
of the Congress of Racial Equality
is trying to block the Lexington
Board of Education's request for
a
delay in takingthe next
step in its desegregation plan.
The board originally proposed
to discontinue its "freedom of
choice plan and establish geo- graphic zones to determine which
schools students attend. Early in

Continued On Page

Continued On Page 3

commented Galen Martin,

execu- -

ClA Planning
iVo

Prosecution

Of NSA Meil
(c) N'ew York Time

WASHINGTON

New

Service

- A spokes-

man of the Central Intelligence

Agency said Sunday it was "in-

7

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The officers of the Student Party for Equal Representation chaired
a meeting Sunday that drew 50 people to hear about the group.
Ann Stallard, left is treasurer; Rick Bryant, standing, party coordinator; Brint Milward, organizational chairman; and Ralph
Wesley, vice chairman.

SPER's First Meet
Draws 50 Students
Some 50 students showed up Sunday for the first open caucus
of the Student Party for Equal Representation (SPER).
A policy statement read to the
AWS was originally included un-

group stated that "Student Govder the housing area but a heated
ernment representatives must debate resulted in a motion by
know whom they represent and Rick Bryant to include WRH in
the people must know clearly who the housing division and place
represents them. This is not the AWS in the Interest Group area
case at Kentucky."
under the Program Council.
The statement went on, "Too
The interest group area would
often in the past the only reason be divided into five brackets infor election was popularity rather cluding the Academic Council,
than practical programs the can- Service groups, Programming
didate was pledged to iniate." Council, Athletics Council, and
"We feel that a solid party the Political Council.
structure with its candidates
Bryant's motion was succespledged to a specific platform is sful. The principle campus ormuch fairer to the electorate as ganizations would be placed unwell as being the only effective der the appropriate brackets. The
asway to initiate needed reform," plan now calls for a
the statement concluded.
sembly with 30 members coming
Brint Milward, organizational from the housing district syschairman of SPER, read the
tem, 20 from the interest group
planks in the party's platmethod, and 10 being elected
form but pointed out that "nothfrom the campus at large.
The second plank in the plating is final and these will be
discussed in future party meetform involves a "roving representative responsible to no campus
ings and added to."
The first plank deals with the
Continued On Page 8
party's plan for representation in
Student Government. Milward
stated that "the present plan calls
for a
ratio based on the
three criteria of housingdistricts,
interest groups, and the campus
at large system."
The housing system would be
composed of IFC. Panhellenic
Council, Men's and Women's
Residence Halls, and the Off
Campus Student Association.
60-se- at

ten-ati-

It Was A Real Blowout
Up front no one could hear. In the back, only
the tallest could see. But hardly anyone anywhere
there cared. Wilson Pickett was on stage, but
the real show was in the packed audience. Hell
was being raised.
Overexuberant Creek Week celebrants turned
their annual dance into an event variously desan orgy, misbehavior but
cribed as a near-rio- t,
no real problems and a "damned nuisance."
The revelry raised by the some 2,500 people
in attendance harped the 11 Student Center staff
members and volunteers from the Student Center
Board, all of whom were on hand to try to maintain order. They admit they were not very successful.
Drinking, in defiance of the boards "dry
policy, really got out of hand, night supervisor
Dave Powell said, and from the whiskey bottles
flowed trouble.
Powell's report tobuildingdirector Frank Harris
today showed this damage to the building: broken
light fixture in the ballroom, site of the dance;
tile torn out of the ceiling on the third floor;
broken glass in a fire extinguisher compartnvent,
basins and
flooded restroom due to plugged-u- p
fire alarm bell, two
turned-o- n
faucets, damaged
fire extinguishers partially discharged, and six
fire alarms pulled. The Creek Week Steering

P.tgcN

Fralernilies

DyJOIINZEII

Kernel Associate Editor
The State Department of Education says all school districts
in Kentucky are complying with the new federal desegregation
guidelines, but civil rights leaders are not completely satisfied.
Hv
rl.Wtnr nf tVw KW..f.lr,
laiutuidiiyuiueAUiKiuiiiiave
complaints of token integration Commission on Human Rights.
and stalling been voiced.
He noted that half the state's
The new directives, declared 100 school districts did
not have
legally binding by federal court to show proof of their progress
in December, require progress in this
year because they had filed
desegregation at the student level plans under the old guidelines.
and a start in faculty desegra-tio- n
Mr. Martin said there is little
before the schools can reor no "legal" segregation in Kenceive federal aid.
but de facto segregation
Legally, all Kentucky districts tucky,
have met the requirements, but does exist. "The rub comes in
geographical district
12 schools in seven districts still drawing
have
student bodies, ac- lines" in a manner that leads to
discrimination.
cording to Sam Taylor, coThe pace of school segregaordinator of civil rights in edution in the South under the fedcation for the state's schools.
eral guidelines has been called
All 12, though, have integrated
"shameful" by the Southern Refaculties, he pointed out.
"We still have a long way gional Council. More Negroes are
to go for genuine integration," attending biracial schools in the

Eight

Committee is liable for the damages, Harris said.
Dale Simpson, a Student Center employe said,
"the administration tells us to enforce the rules
of the Student Center and then they come over
here and keep us from doing it."
Ken Brandenburgh, assistant dean of men, had
"no comment" on Simpson's allegation that the
administration prevented Student Center employes
from enforcing the rules.
Mr. Brandenburgh did say that he thought
the disciplinary problems at the event were due
to an unexpected large crowd. "I and Mrs. (Betty
.Jo) Palmer (assistant dean of women) and those
involved just didn't expect that many people
to stay that long," he stated.
Several observers reported that Brandenburgh
asked the Campus Police to leave but Brandenburgh declined to comment on that also. Brandenburgh was critical of Wilson Pickett's invitation
to several couples to come up on the stage and
dance with his entourage. "When you do something like that you may as well invite everyone
to come up there because they are anyway,"
he said.
The dance, open only to all UK students
and their dates, was the first "trouble" at the
Student Center this year, Harris noted.
Continued On Page

2

Concern

By LEE BECKER
Although the student enrollment continues to grow, UK's
fraternities seem to be remaining
behind. This is true even though
100 more men went out for nish
this year than last.
Ten more men pledged fraternities in the Spring of 1965
than did this semester, but there
are 2,500 more students enrolled
on campus now than then.
Kenneth Brandenburgh, assistant dean of men, giv es sev eral
reasons for the situation.
the fraternities
"Possibly
haven't adjusted to their competition," he said, rcfering to new
dormitories. These offer many of
the conveniences
that were
formerly sought
through fraternities.
Also, in the future, a large
portion of the enrollment will be
made up of upperclassmen and
graduate students due to the
community college program, he
said, and thefratemities aregoing
to have to recognize this.
"They have got to provide
programs and other incentives
that will appeal to the community
college student when he comes
to the University," Mr. Brandenburgh said.
There is one less fraternity on
campus now than there was in
1965 because of the lose of Sigma
Nu, and Mr. Brandenburgh
thinks this may have effected
the number of pledges.
In January 1965, Theta Xi
was accepted as a colony, but
it did not return last year.
Theta Chi is now recognized
as a colony, and is expected to

Continued On Page

X rT

w

?.

7

1

lionnie Lindner Is Miss

11

UK

Bonnie Lindner was chosen Miss University of Kentucky Friday
night. She is shown above with Becky Snyder, Miss Kentucky of
1965, who was mistress of ceremonies. Miss Lindner was sponsored
by Kappa Kappa Canuna. Story on Page Three.

* 'J

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Ecl.

20, l!l7-

-

Greek Week Finishes
Willi Real Blowout
Contimird From 1'agp

thought the situation was
handled as well as could be

1

One observer said the trouble
started when Pickett pulled
"some guy up on the stage."
After that 35 or 40 people got
into the act.
One highlight of the evening
occurcd when a student "dived
off the stage into a crowd of
people." Acting Dean of Men
Jack Hall could not be reached
for comment but some persons
who were close to the pair stated
that Brandcnburgh and Hall were
at odds on how to handle the
situation.
Other persons stated that they

expected.

attired in
was
Pickett
"bright tight" orange suit and
gave two forty minute performances with an hour and fifteen minute intermission during
which a band played. One student stated, "I think they made
the intermission that long in order
to calm people down."
Most observers agreed that a
riot almost started when the
campus police tried to "force-ably- "
remove several students
from the stage. The performance
was then halted and the lengthy
intermission was instituted.
Some participants felt that
Pickett was obscene in his gestures before the crowd. Others
felt this contributed to the disorder and damage.
One UK official stated that
"the Campus Police don't usually come to Student Center
a

GinSEBS
ZEROAVOSTtL'PHlLSlLVERS

wAFUNNVTrilNG

nn

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01041

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Anton Chekhov

A FOUNDER'S WEEK PRODUCTION

February 22, 23, 24, 25, 26
Curtain 8:30 p.m., THE GUIGNOL THEATRE

3 43

Plain

right.
functions. I don't know who ing Committee had agreed with
the Student Center manager and
called them tonight."
said he thought the board that the rules would
Brandenburgh
"it was a dirty shame that a be enforced prior to the event.
decent sound system couldn't
As one Greek put it, "people
have been set up. That is why were
drinking from bottles. I
everyone came, to hear Wilson mean they were just pouring it
Pickett."
down straight. Bottles were rolled
Pickett responded to the across the floor and hell was
crowd's enthusiam by taking off raised in general."
his tic and throwing it into the
crowd. Brandenburgh stated that
he thought "it was going to be
necessary to cut the thing off
Continued From Page 1
at 11 o'clock but things started
have enough men to become an
to quiet down."
The dance was finally halted active chapter this semester.
at 12:10 a.m. when "no semblance
According to DavcRatterman,
IFC rush chairman, severalother
of order could be maintained,"
national fraternities also have
a student reported.
The Student Center Board expressed an interest in estabdrinking rules were not enforced lishing colonies here.
Mr. Brandenburgh feels that
though the employes tried to do
so at first. Brandenburgh said some of the blame should go to
that the Greek Activities Steer- - IFC.
"I don't think the IFC as a
whole, and the rush program
it has developed, has been as well
organized or effective as it may
have been in the past," he said.
"There has not been a fraternity adviser, as such, in this
office for two years," he said,
and this could have been the
reason for the problems of the
rush program.
The deferred rush that is used

Frat Pledge Percentage Drops

THE DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE ARTS

By

Wilson Pickett, above, was supposidly the focus of action Saturday
at the Greek Week Dance. But the action was really in the audience
and before the people cleared considerable damage was done the
Student Center. One example is the hole in the ballroom ceiling,

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On The 1967-6Kernel Staff
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or certain chapters on the basis
of activities before he goes out
for rush."
Mr. Brandenburgh feels that
the less rules that are made for
rush, the better it will be, and the
rules that are made, should be
more functional than in thepast.

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"The fraternities may tend
to discount certain individuals
on the basis of their first semester
grades. In the past they didn't
do this, and some men that were
pledged did not stay."
"Also," he said, "the potential rushec now has one semester
to observe objectively the Creek
system before he rushes, and
"he tends to discount the system

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The Kentucky Kernel
The

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.

* TIIK

Ki:Mt'(

K

Auditions for theTrouncrs will
he held at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Hoom 107 of the Alumni Gym.

u

-

Bonnie Lindner

is introduced to the Memorial Hall audience as a
Miss UK finalist, the title she later won.

Henry Clay High School, only
percent Negro; and Morton
Junior, 8.2 percent.
The school board, in the words,
of acting superintendent John VV.
Ambrose, says it has taken "very
tem.
substantial steps to eliminate all
The CORE chapter has asked forms of segregation . . . and has
the U.S. Office of Education, made remarkable
progress at the
which issued the guidelines, to staff and teacher level."
deny the request, charging the
have
boafdis trying to "perpetuate for "We most accomplished this
the
part in an atmossegregation.'
phere of community amnity, and
from the DepartInvestigators
ment of Health, Education, and we believe that the further transition period (the year's delay)
Welfare have studied the situaand are expected to make is essential to a workable merger
tion,
and that the end result . . . will
a recommendation on the rebe furtherance of the ends of the
soon.
quest
Civil Rights Act."
CORE contends "Lexington
Title VI of the 1964 act prohas not accomplished any substantial amount of integration, vides that "no person in the
pointing to Dunbar High School United States shall, on the
which still is all Negro, and grounds of race, color, or na- 6.2

Rights Group Wants
Racial Balance Laws
(c) New York Tlmei Newt Service
A federal commission Sunday

WASHINGTON

urged Congress
to enact legislation that would require racial balance in all public
schools of the United States.
In a report that could have school and its staff, as well as
the cultural, social and economic
major consequences for the future
circumstances of the students
of American education, the U.S.
themselves, are important and
Commission on Civil Rights declared that Negro children have measurable influences on academic achievement.
been largely untouched by "comBut it concluded without hesin their own
pensatory programs"
itation that racial isolation is
sufschools and will continue to
itself a strong deterrent to stufer academically unless they are

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9:00 p.m. 'til 1:00 a.m.

Student Center

For That

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C fa re ncc IflJoorc

P.

com-petion- s.

tional origin, be excluded from
participation in, be denied the
benefits of, or be subjected to
discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance."
school year was
The 1965-6the first in which the government could withhold money under Title VI. The OE guidelines
required only a start in student
desegregation. A hornets nest of
criticism resulted, but by the
end of the year the number of
Negroes attendingbiracial schools
tripled. The year ended without
one district suffering a complete
loss of federal aid.
The stricter guidelines of 1966-6brought about swelling criticism by Southern schoolmen and
politicians, who said they were
unconstitutional, arbitrary, capricious, and unlawful. Commissioner of Education Harold Howe
II was called the "Commisar of
Integration."
The wave of protest continued,
until on Dec. 29, a federal appeals court at New Orleans issued the landmark opinion accepting the controversial guidelines as the legal standard.
"The clock has ticked the last
tick for tokenism and delay in
the name of 'deliberate speed,' "
said the court.

dent achievement and ambition.

l-

Hairstyle for the
Grand Rail . . . Call

1

CHANDLER
A 5 foot 4,
Kappa with frosted hair sang and smiled
her way to the Miss University of Kentucky title Friday night.
"I was thrilled, hannv. and
When interviewed as a finalist
very surprised . . ," was the on stage at the contest, she drew
only comment Bonnie Lindner, the
question "Who has had the
22, could muster after the congreatest influence on your life."
test. "I just cried," she said.
Her answer: "My parents."
And in that she had many of Mr.
and Mrs. Paul Lindner were
her Kappa Kappa Gamma sor- in the audience.
ority sisters to help her. Scattered throughout the Memorial
Hall audience, they danced in
the aisles and ran to the stage
when Bonnie was announced as
the winner.
Being a UK queen is not new
to the senior from Western
Springs, 111. She was Little Kentucky Derby queen as a freshman. A speech and drama major
with a minor in English, Bonnie
is student teaching at Henry Clay
High School this semester.
Her talent was singing, both
in the Miss UK and LKD
Friday she sang "We
Kiss In A Shadow" from the
"King and I." She was in the
Glee Club five semesters.
She isalso interest edin sports,
. and "rock
plays, musicals
and roll like everyone else." She
loves animals and has a big
Persian cat named Charlie.
A native of Chicago, she likes
Kentucky because it doesn's snow
much here. "Someday I want
to live in California," she says,
"but its only a dream.
She has no steady date but
goes out with several people . . .
"people I like," she says. "If I
a man's intelligent and fun as
well then anything you do is Bonnie Lindner, the new Miss
right," she says. "Anything from UK, is shown as she hears her
J.D. Crow at Martin's to the question during the interview
Founder's Ball."
portion of the contest.

schools.
Accordingly, the commission
asked the administration and
Congress to give "immediate"

schools become.
The commission clearly favored the latter view. It acknow
edged that the quality of the

907

r.

.

State Says All Schools Comply

consideration to measures that
would eliminate racial isolation
in public schools.
The report includes exhaustive documentation. It strikes
at the continuing controversy between those who would focus
federal resources on improving
the quality of the ghetto schools
and those who insist that a large
share of federal revenue be used
to create integrated schools-- no
matter how good the ghetto

1

blue-eye- d

254-283- 2.

permitted to attend integrated

IVI). 20,

By LINDA

The Student Branch of the
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., willmeet
at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the EE
conference
room (Engineering
Building). Guest speaker for the
open meeting will be Mr. Malcolm McGregor from Kentucky
Utilities.

Continued From Tage 1
December, it asked for the delay,
citing problems which would result if the change comes the same
year as its pending merger with
the Fayette County School Sys-

Mond.i,

Is New Miss UK

Applications for Omicron Delta Kappa, National Leadership
Honorary for Junior and Senior
0)llee Men, may be obtained
at the Office of the Dean of
Men or from Dr. Maurice Clay,
Alumni Gym, through Tuesday.

Any campus group interested
in applications for theLittleKen-tuck- y
Derby bicycle races sliould
call Rich Robbins,

I..

Kappa

Blue-Eye- d

Bulletin Board

All-Importa- nt

MUNI

83.00 student couple;

$5.00, other

lieu
Dawahare's, Graves-Cox- ,
Snyder (Eastland), liloomfield's, Student Center Central Information Desk.

Tickets:

U-Sho-

p,

"N

PERSON"
The Fabulous
JIMMY DORSEY ORCHESTRA
with
IEE CASTLE

Spoulding's will be available for photographs.

252-106- 5

SsSJRU

r,

I

)

* The Kentucky Kernel
The South' Outstanding College Daily
Univi hsity of Kentucky

ESTABLISHED

MONDAY,

1894

FEB.

20. 1967

Editorial represent the ojnnions of the Editors, not of t)c University.
Stkvk Hk:c:o,

Waltkk
Editorial rage Editor

M.

Chant,

Editor-in-Chi-

William Knati',

Business Manager

Youth's Awareness
When Presidential possibility
George Romney came to Kentucky
recently to commemorate Abraham
Lincoln's birth, he chose youth
as the focus of his keynote speech.
He suggested that the GOP establish a "political trade school" for
young people who plan careers in
elective public office, "for our Republican party must reflect what
America is, and America is young."
Romney is right. More than
half this nation's people are not
yet 30 years old. By 1968, the average age will be 25 years old.
The Democrats are obviously
not oblivious to the fact either,
and the two parties apparently
agree as to its' significance. They
have formed a Young Americans
Division, and appointed former
Rep. Charles Weltner of Georgia

its director. He is the
lawyer who left the House of Representatives last fall rather than run
on a segregation ticket, and an excellent choice to head the party's
youth.
Young people, Romney said in
his speech, want to serve, communicate, and get involved now.
The Republican and Democrat
leadership wants to provide them
the chance. The parties' awareness of youth's potential is good
both for young people and for the
y
future of a strong
system.
This is particularly apparent
in the Commonwealth, where the
legislature has wisely set forth
a minimum voting age of 18 years.
We are fortunate to be pioneers
of youth's role in American
two-part-

"Seems To Have Been Shot From Two Directions"

Letters To The Editor:

Charge Concert, Lecture Series Piano Rental Fee
To the

Editor of the Kernel:

Need

How noble are those intellectual giants of the Central Kentucky Concert and Lecture series
y
who have bravely saved their
pure pianoforte from the
defiling touch of Peter Nero. Such
valor should not go unrecognized
and unrewarded. I suggest that
their names be inscribed on tablets of a material of suitable perpris-tinel-

manencemud,

for

instance.

Seriously, it is rather exasperating to encounter these
who look down on Peter
Nero but have evidently never
learned that one does not applaud
between movements of a symphony.
They cannot claim to be devoted soldly to "serious" music,
since one of the artists in this
year's concert was Mantovani,
whose sugary confections are much
less "serious" than Nero's ingenious and technically demanding
arrangements. I also remember that
the high point of Arthur Fiedler's
concert last year came when the
Maestro conducted Want to Hold
Your Hand or at least this number was the most loudly applauded.
pseudo-intellectua- ls

Quarter System

The semester system is unnatural for a cooperative program.
This is especially true at UK when
summer offerings are negligible.
Most engineering schools are on
the quarter system and operate
year 'round. Under such conditions a student can make use of
100 percent of his time. At UK,
which operates essentially only
eight months of the year, a student can make use of only about
70 percent of his time.
Of course, the student can p
in the sense of working in the
summer, but employers object to
this because they operate year
'round and cannot fit their needs
stuto such a schedule (the p
dents do fulfill a need for employers and are not merely tax

Students, possibly good ones,
are someinterested in the p
advised to go to Louisville
times
where they are set up for it.
No wonder only four students
ly).

co-o-

in our engineering college
Those four must be nuts. Our
p
system imsystem makes a
co-o-

co-o-

practical.
Jon Petway
Asst. Prof,
Electrical Engineering
of

deductions).

On our two semester per year
system, if a student misses two
semesters of instruction while dop
work it adds not the
ing
months which the two seeight
mesters occupy, but 12 months
which is the length of time required to add two semesters of
instruction to his college days.
In summary, for a p
On the same occasion, Fiedler
proconducted an emasculated version gram to be successful, it must
of Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet be possible for students to alternate work and study periods of
overture which omitted the development. This is serious music?
equal length throughout the year.
to be sure, This last requirement is because
It is their piano,
students must be
but it is also the University's Col- half the co-o-p
iseum. I suggest that the rent working at a given time to satisfy
which the University (presumably)
employer needs.
A school which operates only
amount
charges be raised by the
that the Student Center Hoard had eight months per year is a real
to spend to bring the piano from challenge (?) to anyone interested
p
in u
Cincinnati.
program (which may
be the only way a student can
Hank Davis
make it through school financial
A te S Senior
co-o-

co-o-

co-o-

order. The Kernel is no longer a
student paper. It no longer provides the students with the news
and information which they need.
To be specific, the Kernel was
very incompetent in its handling
of information on Homecoming,
Founders' Day, the Quiz Bowl,
Golddiggers, etc. The student paper
should work on its own house
before it tries to clean the campus.

John Southard

Enjoys The Kernel

co-o-

co-o-

p.

It appears that it is about time
the Kernel set its own house in

We frequently receive clippings
from your fine paper from our
daughter, Miss Jo Bryan, in Keene-lan- d
Hall and always enjoy the
n
editorials as well as
news features.
the timely
Thank you so much for the
part you are playing in making
college life a most worthwhile and
happy experience for our daughter
and all students at UK.
Mrs. John F. Bryan
Pascagoula, Miss.
P.S. We are having trouble with
a local ditchdigging project in front
of our house; there are trucks parked
on the street obstructing our driveway. Do you know if PPD at UK
is available for consultation by
correspondence?

well-writte-

No

Student Paper

It has come to my attention
that in the past few months the
Kernel has been spending a great
deal cf time criticizing the Student Congress and Student Center
Board. These are two organizations that do their best to serve
the student body in their respective fields.

Sophomore
Chemistry Major

Poor Elimination
I have heard much of late, in
the Kernel and out, of the mismanagement of the UK Quiz Bowl.
A more crucial concern than those
usually noted is that the "winners" of the Quiz Bowl are to
represent the University on the
G.E. College Bowl.
This seems to me to be a serious mistake. I would think that
the University would want to put
its most able undergraduate competitors (not necessarily its most
able stude