xt7dz02z5v1n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7dz02z5v1n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680408  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  8, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  8, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7dz02z5v1n section xt7dz02z5v1n r

What's SDS About? 'Football' TellsThe Tale
By DARRELL RICE
to their National Council meeting at UK last
weekend, some Students for a Democrat if Society members played
a name of football among themselves on campus.
Refore t lie name could begin, the first problem arose: how to
divide up for teams.
There was the possibility of having the
faction vs.
the anarchists. Or the "beards" vs. the "nonbeauls." Or the
"barefeet" vs. the "sandals."
When the basis for team formation was finally decided on,
another discussion arose: what "Ixmrgeois institutions" should
lx done away with such as centering the ball, keeping score or
even having teams.
After the game's format was set, the teams, with one woman
included, began play. A pass was thrown to the woman player,
and the men on the other team gentlemanly allowed her to catch
it without any defensive efforts.
Another discussion arose at once. The participants decided they
had been guilty of "male chauvinism" and that if the women's
liberation movement were to succeed, there could be no protective
nude chauvinism.

They agreed not to do that any more.
As a result of the SDS National Council's
nutting here last
weekend, many UK students hav e been asking vv hats SDS is all
alxnit. The "football" game is as good a start on an explanation
as any.
SDS is made up of many factions rangingliom liberal capitalists
(there are very few of these, though) to admirers of Chinese Communism. This makes the group's general philosophy difficult, if
not impossible, to describe.

As a sidelight

neo-Mari- st

1

And there are many differences in the individual chapters,
which makes description even more difficult. The UK SDS chapter
would probably be comparatively conservative in relcieme to manv
chapters across the nation.

For an "official" definition, one could take the preamble to
the SDS national constitution, which was written a few years
ago when the group originated in Michigan. The preamble reads:
"The SDS is an association of young people of the left. It
seeks to create a sustained community of educational and political
Continued on Page

7, Col.

1

THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL
A

Monday, April 8,

The Sotith's Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky, Lexington

19G8

Vol.

LIX, No.

131

Focus '68: Forum On Social Inequities

M inns Sen.

Kennedy,
Focns Still 'Sncceeds'
better understanding of the sysBy JO WARREN
Focus '68 was an attempt tem, a willingness to abide by
to bring men, leaders in their the rules, and an interest on the
fields, to speak at UK on "social inequities," and in that it

succeeded.
But Focus was a victim of
circumstances; it suffered from
cancellation by two major speakers, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and
Muhammed Ali, both declining
after Dr. Martin Luther King

Jr.'s assassination.
Filling in for Muhammed Ali
at the lively Friday night session, Bill Turner offered a UK
black student's reaction to the
assassination: "I am enraged."
The text of Turner's address ap-

Urban Crisis
Committee
...

The Urban Crisis Committee will meet 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Second Presbyterian Church, 4 GO East Main
Street, to "mobilize all concerned citizens of our community over our civil disorders." The Lexington Black
Coalition Croup will present
a statement to the committee.
The public is invited.

of Look magazine, said "the ultimate social inequity is helplessness, the inability of people to
change the environment in which
they live."
Connecting the Vietnam war
with urban crises, Mr. Harris
surmised that money used to
conduct the war could
the ghettos" and "imprison" residents there indefinite- "air-conditi-

ly.

He said Negroes may one day
"thank you for the war" because it offers an indirect stimulus to leave ghetto life.
He called present welfare programs "scandalous" and suggested a rethinking of federal
pears on page five.
urban programs.
One of the scheduled speak- part of community leaders who
Kentucky's Sen. Thruston B.
ers who did appear, F. Lee Bailey dodge jury duty."
Morton said "we're looking at a
spoke against American "legal
T. George Harris, senior editor
Continued on Pare 8, Col. 1

inequities."
The famed defense attorney
remarked that "in theory, the
American criminal jury system
is good, but in practice it is not
so good."
Mr. Bailey said the idea that
one is innocent until proved
guilty "only exists on the books.
If you are indicted under the system, you are probably ruined,
because

of lack of respect for

the system."

lie suggested as solutions "a

say

!

Dr. Hose

1

half-ma-

st

State's Student Editors
Hear 'Politics' Warning

Kentucky Collegiate Press Service
rs
attending a Kentucky Intercollegiate
Press Association convention here last weekend were told they
should be "eternally vigilant" against exertion of too much political
pressure on universities.
Dr. Raymond Cibson, head of the higher education department
at Indiana University, warned
that too much authority by the
state and other outside groups
can weaken or destroy institutions of higher learning.
But as more people gathered round, Dr. Rose
"If we are going to reflect
loosened up.
the spirit of the times, we have
He said the rumors of his being considered foi
to be unafraid to debate any
the UK presidency were "typical speculation that
issue, any ism," he said. "If
goes on from time to time. I'm sure there will be
we exclude analysis or debate
many other people who will be mentioned."
of one group today, tomorrow
"I have my hands full in Alabama," Dr. it
may be another. Eventually
Rose said. He said Alabama is in a $75 million
we could degenerate to the point
dollar development program."
Continued on Pare 3, CoL 1
Asked if he would accept the position at UK
if it were offered tohim, hcsaid"that's a question
a person can't answer. I've just launched this
campaign in Alabama and I've got a real problem
vetting it going in the next few months."
Dr. Rose said he had not been contacted by
.
,
the University. He said he would return to Kenretire."
tucky someday "to
Both Sen. Morton and Dr. Rose had praise for
Dr. Oswald, who is leaving UK for the executive
vice presidency of the University of California
syst em.
"Dr. Oswald is recognized as one of the outstanding educators we have in our country," Dr.
Rose said. "All of us who have worked with him
have the highest regard for him."
v
O"
Sen. Morton cited the growth of the University
during Dr. Oswald's term of office. "From a
qualitative standpoint, it has certainly risen under
LOUISVILLE-Edito-

2 Deny Interest In UK Job

By GUY MENDES
Since University President John W. Oswald
resigned last Tuesday, there has been a lot of
speculation about who will succeed him.
Two of the people prominently mentioned
as successors Kentucky Sen. Thruston B. Morton
and University of Alabama President Frank Rose-w- ere
on campus Saturday to speak at the Focus
'68 program, a symposium on social inequities.
A few weeks ago, Sen. Morton voiced an urge
to get into the "academic community," as he put
it, when he announced his decision to retire
from politics and not run for reelection to the
Senate in the fall.
Saturday Sen. Morton said he had no thoughts
whatsoever of assuming the presidency here.
"Absolutely not," he said. "What they need
at the University of Kentucky is a man far younger
than I, and a man with an academic background
which I don't have, and a man who can give 10
vigorous years to the administration of this great

institution.
"If I had enough energy in me to be president
of the University, 1 assure you I would be running
for my seat in the United States Senate," Sen.
Morton told the Kernel.
He said he is "not in any way qualified"
I don't
to be the president of a university
know anymore about running a university than
my grandson's dog."
Dr. Rose, formerly president at Transylvania
College said he did not want to comment when
first asked alxnit the pros(ect of his succeeding
Dr. Oswald. He briefly mentioned his 10 years
at the University of Alabama and said, "That's
all I have to say."

...

v

In Memoriam

With flag lowered to
and many of the crowd wearing
black armbands, UK students and faculty and some townspeople,
black and white, met in front of the Administration Building
Friday at noon in a vigil in memory of the Rev. Dr. Martin
Luther King.

--

President Oswald's administration. The University has taken long strides forward in the last few
years."
Sen. Morton said he knew ol no political pressures behind Dr. Oswald's leaving and that the
resignation "came as a great surprise."

,w

L

Sen. Morton.

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April 8,

19G8

14 15th Century Music

I

--

Featured In Concert

Music spanning the 14th and
15th centuries will be featured
in a concert spon sored jointly
by the Pro Musica of the UK
Department of Music and the
Christ Episcopal Church Choir
of Men and Boys 7:00 p.m. April
9 at Christ Church Episcopal.
Presented as the first part of
the program will be Cuillaume

de Machaut V'Hoquctus David"
and "Messe de Notre Dame."
Featured in the "Hoquetus

Li i

i,
V

David" will be the Pro Musica
Brass Ensemble with Tommy
Johns, trombone; Linda Ramer,
trombone; Frank Merritt, French
Horn, and Dan Moonitz, trumpet.
Soloists for the "Messe de
Notre Dame" are Caroline Dees,
soprano; Naomi Armstrong,
Dr. John Lienhard,
tenor, and Norrie Wake, baritone. Accompanists for the work
will be Robert Burton, choirmaster and organist for Christ
Church, and the Pro Musica Brass
Ensemble.
The second half of the program will feature the 15th century Spanish Villancicos and Romances sung by the UK Pro
Musica Chamber Ensemble with
Caroline Dees, Ann Dunbar, Pat
Franco, sopranos; Sandra Egbert,
Patricia Griffin, altos; Lee Egbert, Kenneth Jones, Dr. John
Lienhard, tenors, and Ralph
Henry Lackey, and
Cherry,
Franklin Zimmerman, basses.
o;

k

:li

Jr

u

i.

-

sj'j

Y

(

.

v

iSf

..a

'

...

I

1

.

LEXINGTON
YELLOW CAB
Inc.
Radio Equipped
DIAL
252-22- 30

WATCH BANDS
JEWELRY

WATCHES
DIAMONDS

OPEN EVERY NIGHT

DODSON
WATCH SHOP

Just a short drive South on U.S. 27
NOW SHOWING!

OTTO

PBtMIMGtW

Fine Watch Repairing
110 N. UPPER ST.

-.

Phone

mwm.

pammouni

6

UPI Telephoto

And forms a cloud of dust not settling down
-- Joe Hinds
Until the minority group is out of town.

Bonn Presents Piano Recital
UK pianist James Bonn will
present a recital 8:15 p.m. April
Science
10 in the Agricultural
Auditorium.
His program will include
Bach's "French Suite No. 5 in
G major"; Beethoven's "Sonata
in C major, Opus 53"; Proko-fiefF- s
"Sonata No. 3, Opus 28";
Ravel's "Ondine", and Chopin's
"Ballade in F minor, Opus 52".
Bonn received the BA Degree
from the University of Minnesota

and a Master of Music Degree
from the Manhattan School of
Music in New York City. He has
been the recipient of numerous
awards including the St. Paul
Schubert Club Scholarship, the
Minneapolis Star and Tribune
Tanglewood Scholarship, and the
Minneapolis Symphony
Artist Award.

Young

Forest fires
burn holes
in the South's

O

economy

rcw

i

FRttENT
FOREST FIRES

Complete Automotive Service
Phone
254-64- 64

also
svm

254-126-

I am what I am and that's all I ever can be.
But a fiery dragon rolls in from the sea

mm

"24-Ho-

Emergency Road Service"

ur

TAYLOR TIRE CO.
400
TECHNICOLOR

A

E.

VINE ST.

paramount picture

For a delightful, relaxing, carefree weekend, a
pleasant evening, or when parents and guests
come to Lexington, visit the Imperiol House,
Lexington's most elegont motel where gourmet
foods, wines, and fine service prevail. Entertainment ond dancing nightly for your pleasure. Our
rooms are spacious, elegantly appointed and
supremely comfortable.
STANLEY DEMOS. Manager

STARTS WED.
H.
'MhOmury-Fu-

i

A MASTERPIECE"
HlWt tOITOK'AL

r Dll

pfrwim

THE D1NO DE LAL'RENTllS

ihiKii
C

i4.

LEXINGTON, KY.

Jumper! alJJoUSe

mi

ly U

WAILS

Uillt

HAMODSWHG

Ky
'

OA0

rrrt

IffEiiBEIIIIlt.

ill

AVENUE

of Lexington,

II

Haul Miff

K

(III

-

Graduating Nurses
The career

DICK

...

you worked so hard for is yours

...

at the beautiful, modern Stamford Hospital where you
will work with dedicated professionals and where your
opportunity for specialization and advancement is greater.
And the salary trend is up beginning salaries are between
$6,656 and $7,000. Differentials and benefits are extra.
. . . and in exciting New England you are only minutes away
from great universities, outstanding music and drama, ski
areas, lakes and ocean and glamorous New York.
Send the coupon below for full Information on a rewarding
career at Stamford Hospital.

ARNSPIGER

Attention:
MARRIED
STUDENTS
(Ages 21 to 24)
WITH GOOD DRIVING RECORDS
no accident or violations Ut 3 yrt

Special Auto Liability

Insurance, just

Accredited by J.C.A.H.

Dpt

CR-6- 8

for 4 months
Also BIG SPECIAL DISCOUNTS
you havt a 3 0 standing.

R.

1750 ALEXANDRIA

Addraaa

DRIVE

277-615- 5

City

Stat

.ZIP

if

Arnspiger Agency
INSURANCE

Nam

MiinnfiiirinuniiiiniiiiniiiiMMiii

$25.00

THE STAMFORD HOSPITAL
190 West Broad St. Stamford, Conn. 06902
Tel. 3271234
Miss Beatrice Stanley, R.N., Director of Nursing

sto9wmAhMnMiin

...

Gardtntld

frofekklonal Bldf.

To Tattoo or Not To
Beach party designs a suit that is intriguing enough alone but add a matching tattoo and you have more command
of the beach than a sailor.
All cotton, sizes
$15.
3-1-

Across

3.

from

Holmes

Hall

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April 8,

State's Student Editors
Hear IU's Dr. Gibson
Continued From Page 1
that there would be no freedom
except freedom of deadly conformitythe slavery of deadly

The future will be better "only
if we are free to change," Dr.

Gibson asserted.
He also argued that students
should play a large role in decisconformity."
"At a time when
Too much authority from ion-making.
within a university can also be leaders are saying that
make good soldiers, it
destructive, he noted.
doesn't make sense to say young
"The spirit of freedom has as people should not be involved
its manual consequence great uni- as active citizens."
versities," he told the student
"The academic community
will not yield to war as. a solujournalists.
About 70 delegates from 16 tion to man's problems," he said.
Dr. Gibson predicted that
schools attended the two-daheld at Kentucky South-e- within 20 years public money
meeting
'ouldbe appropriated to private
College, according to KIPi
president John A. Zeh, a Uni- colleges because of the desire
to maintain "an infinite variety"
versity senior.
in higher education.
"You and I must accept the
He said there is a need to
possibility that the present is "reconstruct liberal education rebetter than the past and that quirements to reflect the spirit
we should make the future bet- of the times."
ter than the present," he said.
"We require students to study
literature with the hope this will
create a continuing interest" in it,
with the exact opposite effect,
Dr. Gibson said.
'.

m

Free Film
On Vietnam

kaaTA

David Shoenbrun's film
"Vietnam: How Did We Get In?
How Can We Get Out?" will
be shown at 2, 3 and 4 p.m.
Tuesday in the Student Center
Theatre.
Mr. Shoenbnin has been an
eyewitness to the history of Viet-

nam since World War II when
Ho Chi Minh was an ally of the
United States.
The only American correspondent to witness the defeat of the
French at Dien Bien Phu, Mr.
Shoenbrun is presently teaching
the first course to be offered on
Vietnam at Columbia University
Graduate School.

Super
Mother Superior
VS. Groovy

Sister George

OA

CAMPUS NEWS BRIEFS
On April 3rd the ground work
a new organization at the
University was laid. About 20
interested students met with Dr.
Thomas Ford and other interested Professors with the intent
of organizing an undergraduate
Sociology club. The club will
have many goals. Among these
will be: Offering the student in
Sociology a series of national
speakers, offering an outlet for
the talents of the Sociology stufor

allowances toTKose living more
100 miles from Lexington.
Applications for the fellowships must be received by June
15, and will be considered from
students who have an undergraduate degree with an average of
2.5 on a 4.0 scale, and an average of B or higher on graduate
work.

than

tive contribution to studies of
Southern lalx)r," says Princeton
University's Industrial Relations
section, referring to a recent lxok
by Dr. Ray Marshall chairman

of the Department of Economics.
The book, "Lalx)r in the
South," is considered by the
Princeton group as one of "the
outstanding lxoks in Industrial
Relations."
Dr. Marshall
was named
Dr. Thomas L. Riley, direcAlumni Professor of Economics
tor of Hopkinsville Community
dents, making available informaby the UK Board of Trustees
1968-6president last
about graduate schools and College, is the
tion
year. He has gained a naof the Kentucky Association of
tional reputation for his research
job opportunities, offering sug- Junior Colleges.
gestions to the Sociology Faculty
The Kentucky Association of on employment problems of mion the improvement of the courses
and disadvantaged groups,
Junior Colleges is made up of 19 nority research
in the department, and many
and his
activities have
others. The club will meet in junior and community colleges covered a numberof foreign counthe state. They have
Room 245 in the Student Center throughout
tries.
a total enrollment of 9,377.
Monday, April 8, at 7:00 p.m.
Elections of the officers will be
Dr. Maurice A. Clay, a direcA textbook, laboratory manual
held at that time. All interested
tor of professional curriculum at and instructor's manual on elecUndergraduate Sociology Majors
are urged to attend.
UK, has been honored by the tronics written by two University
e
e
s
American Association of Health,
in the ColThe UK" School of Library Physical Education and Research. lege of Engineering is scheduled
The citation noted Dr. Clay's to be published in May.
Science has received $43,680 for
'
seven fellowships to students
book; .entitled,
Mexico aiid 'Colombia "Introduction. to Electronics," is
for a master's degree in
studying
and credited him with substan- an enlargement and partial relibrary science.
Each fellowship, awarded un- tially aiding the cultural and vision of a text by Dr. H. Alex
der the Higher Education Act, moral life of his own Lexington Romanovvitz, UK professor of
'
electrical engineering. Russell E.
provides a stipend of $2,200 for community.
academic year, and
the 1968-6Puckett, research engineer of elec"An important and authorita tronics, is
$430 for summer study, plus travel
9

researcher-scientist-

9

i

I

Wild.

I

(i

I.

.
P

I

a

-

3- -

m

I

1

J

V- -'

i

i

jl.

O

A Wii

AND

r

..Ik

If it

;

F

(color)

i

1

J

I
H

!

I
I

Russell

j

Mi

H

JOS.5-

Y

L

j2S7ose the

1958- -3

c

B (COLOR)

E

Stevens
PROOUC'KJ

1AM

Angeis Go...

Trouble Fbixows1
Starts Wednesday!
MILTON BERLE
VAN

ARTHUR GODFREY
TAYLOR

JOHNSON-ROBER-

Show Time

2, 4, 6, 8, 10

t

A&1MAN

COkOft

QJn

presenting the posters of Wingate Paine
with a special free offer
Personally selected by Wingate Paine and magnificently printed in the finest lithography under the supervision of
the photographer himself these
posters (approximately 30" by 40") have been especially chosen
from the more than 100 hauntingly provocative photographs in his book, Mirror of Venus.
award-winnin-

TUES. Lost timet for "PIRECREEK"

The Kentucky Kernel
The

Kernel,

University

Kentucky
SUUon, University ot Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky 4030. Second cUu
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.

Mailed five timet weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer

Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box and
Begun as the Cadet in 1W
publlbhed continuously as the Kernel
.
since 1815.
inAdvertising published herein is Any
tended to help the reader buy.should
false or misleading advertising
be reported to The Editor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Yearly, by mall
W
Per copy, from file

KERNEL TELEPHONES
tS2l
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Pag Editor,
?
Associate Editors, Sport
News Desk
if'VUJiZ Kii
Advertising, Business, Circulation

g

"Mirror of Venus,' said Camera magazine'is a superb expression of the eternal, subtle woman, the nuances of

seduction, the hostility of intimacy and the glories of love ... an exploration of the schizophrenic female in her double
role of earthy, erotic animal and soft, sensitive, perfumed woman."

You may purchase posters from this special selection now, by mail, for $1.95 each. Or, if you prefer and you may
indicate your choice on the order form below you may purchase the book itself, with text by Franchise Sagan and
Federico Fellini for $15, and receive three posters free.

MIRROR OF VENUS

FREE OFFER
(Limited

time only)

Three free potters

(indicate your choice)
with esch purchsse of
"Mirror of Venus"
SIS per copy.
O I enclose $15 for the
book "Mirror of Venus"
lus 60 for handling
end postage.

C

I

East 39th Street, New York 10016

M

Plesse send me the following posters. (Indicate
quantity In boxes.)

NAME
ADDRESS

check or money order for
have enclosed
01
SI 93 each plus
posteia
and postsge. Totsl t
handling
I

'

CITY

STATE

ZIP CODE

* Dr. King
When the American morality function of the individual s mental
includes justice, then we truly shall and physical feelings of inability
he free. When the American conto rationally eomiK'te; therefore,
sciousness includes compassion, refuse to compete.
then we truly shall have gained
There is no doubt that the murder of Dr. King will solidify Black
democracy.
Hut we now live in an age resentment of the white culture.
where hate blinds men to take Even more frightening is who is
another's life, in vain. There are left to take Dr. King's place. He
those anions us who reject their was the
d
force behind
fellowman because of his class, the fight for survival for Blacks,
his home, yes, even his color, all his was the moderating consciousin vain.
ness between the Rap Browns and
For to reject another because the George Wallaces. His was the
he is different is to admit your most influential intellect for civil
own inferiority. Sociologists hy- rights in this century. And now
pothesize that racial prejudice is a he is a martyr.

J

'J

icvcl-hcade-

Profiles
in
Courage
Vol.

II

I Have a Dream
By MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.
EDITOR'S NOTE: (A speech delivered before the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, August
28, 1963.)
1. Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand
today, signed the Emancipation Procla- niation. This momentous decree came as
a great beacon of light of hope to millions
of Negro slaves who had been seared
in the flames of withering injustice. It
came as a joyous daybreak to end the long
night of their captivity.
2. But one hundred years later, the
Negro still is not free. One hundred
years later, the life of the Negro is still
sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination.
3. One hundred years later, the Negro
lives on a lonely island of poverty in
the midst of a vast ocean of material
prosperity. One hundred years later, the
Negro is still languished in the corners
of American society and finds himself an
exile in his own land. So we have come
here today to dramatize a shameful condition.
4. In a sense we have come to our
nation's capital to cash a check. When
the architects of our republic wrote the
magnificent words of theGmstitutionand
the Declaration of Independence, they
were signing a promissory note to which
every American was to fall heir. This
note was a promise that all men, yes,
black men as well as white men, would
be granted the unalienable rights of life,
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
5. It is obvious today that America
has defaulted on this promissory note
insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred
obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check; which has come
back marked "insufficient funds."
(i. But we refuse to believe that the
bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse
to beliec that there are insufficient funds
in the great vaults of opportunity of
this nation. So we have come to cash
this check a check that will give us
upon demand the riches of freedom and
the security of justice.
7. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the
fierce urgency of now. This is no time
to engage in the luxury of cooling off
or to take the traiKiuiliing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real
the promises of democracy. Now is the

.

time to rise from the dark and desolate
valley of segregation to the sunlit path
of racial justice. Now is the time to lift
our nation from the quicksands of racial
injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice
a reality for all of God's children.
- 8.
It would be fatal for the nation
to overlook the urgency of the movement and to underestimate the determination of the Negro. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent
will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality.
1963 is not an end but a beginning.
Those who hope that the Negro needed
to blow off steam and will now be content will have a nide awakening if the
nation returns to business as usual.
9. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is
granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake

the foundations of our nation until the
bright day of justice emerges.
10. But there is something that I must
say to my people who stand on the warm
threshold which leads into the palace of
justice. In the process of gaining our
rightful place we must not be guilty of
wrongful deeds.
11. Let us not seek to satisfy our
thirst for freedom by drinking from the
cup of bitterness and hatred. We must
forever conduct our stniggle on the liigh
plane of dignity and discipline. We must
not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and
again w e must rise to the majestic heights
of meeting physical force with soul force.
12. The marv elous new militancy vvlach
has engulfed the Negro community must
not lead us to a distrust of all white
people, for many of our white brothers,
as ev idenced by their presence here today,
have come to realize that their freedom is
inextricably hound to our freedom. This
offense we share mounted to storm the
battlements of injustice must be carried
forth by a
army. We cannot
walk alone.
13. And as we vyalk, we must make
the pledge that we shall always march
ahead. We cannot turn back. There are
those v ho are asking the devotees of civil
rights, "When will you be satisfied?"
We can never be satisfied as long as the
Negro is the victim of the unspeakable
horrors of police brutality.
11. We can never be satisfied as long
as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue

By

If it is difficult

to comprehend

the

death of Martin Luther King, merely
contemplate what was necessary: get a
rifle, rent a room in a cheap rooming
house, wait until the proper moment,
sight in, pull the trigger, hesitate only
a moment to make sure no second shot
is needed, and then nin. This is all that

would be necessary to kill any public
figure or a number of anonymous private
citizens who happen to be chosen as
targets. All that is needed is a motive.

Of course the motive may Ix purely
personal. Dr. King's assasin may have
felt a personal animosity because of some
action of King's. It may have been an
id of personal retribution for what was

in Alabama, little black lxys and black
girls will be able to join hands with little
white lxys and white girls as sisters
cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as
and brothers. I have a dream today!
the Negro's basic mobility is from a
23. I have a dream that one day every
smaller ghetto to a larger one.
15. We can never be satisfied as long
valley shall be exalted, every hill and
mountain shall be made low, the rough
as our children are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs
places shall be made plain, and the crooked
stating "for whites only." We cannot places shall be made straight and the glory
of the lord will be revealed and all flesh
be satisfied, and we will not be satisfied
until justice rolls down like waters and shall see it together.
21. This is our hope. This is the faith
righteousness like a mighty stream.
that I go back to the South with.
16. I am not unmindful that some of
25. With this faith we will be able
you have come here out of excessive
to hew out of the mountain of despair a
trials and tribulation. Some of you have
stone of hope. With this faith we will be
come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some
able to transform the jangling discords
of you have come from areas w here your
of our nation into a beautiful symphony
quest for freedom left you battered by
of brotherhood.
the storms of persecution and staggered
26. With this faith we will be able
by the winds of police brutality. You
to work together, to pray together, to
have been the veterans of creative sufstruggle together, to go to jail together,
fering. Continue to work with the faith
to stand up for freedom together, knowing
that unearned suffering is redemptive.
that we will be free one day . This will be
17. Co back to Mississippi; go back
the day when all of God s children will be
to Alabama; go back to South Carolina;
able to sing with new meaning "my
go back to Georgia; go back to Louisiana; go back to the slums and ghettos country 'tis of thee; sweet land of liberty ;
of the Northern cities, knowing that some-bo- w of thee I sing; land where my fathers
this situation can, and will be died, land of the pilgrim's pride; from
every mountain side, let freedom ring"
changed. Let us not wallow in the valley
and if America is to be a great nation,
of despair.
this must become true.
18. So I say to you, my friends, that
27. So let freedom ring from the proeven though we must face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have digious hilltops of New Hampshire.
2S. Let freedom ring from the mighty
a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in
the American dream that one day this mountains of New York.
29. Let freedom ring from the heightennation will rise up and live out the
true meaning of its creed we hold these ing Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.
30. Let freedom ring from the snowtruths to be self evident, that all men
are created equal.
capped Rockies of G)lorado.
19. I have a dream that one day on
31. Let freedom ring from the curthe red hills of Georgia, sons of former vaceous slopes of California.
32. But not only that.
slaves and sons of former slave-owne33. Let freedom ring from Stone Mounwill be able to sit down together at the
table of brotherhood.
tain of Georgia.
31. Let freedom ring from Lookout
20. 1 have a dream that one day,
even the state of Mississippi, a state Mountain of Tennessee.
35. Let freedom ring from every hill
sweltering with the heat of injustice,
and molehill of Mississippi, from every
sweltering with the heat of oppression,
will be transformed into an oasis of mountainside, let freedom ring.
freedom and justice.
3(i. And when we allow freedom to
21. I have a dream my four little
ring, when ve let it ring from every
children will one day live in a nation
village and hamlet, from every state and
where they will not be judged by the color city, we will be able to speed up that
of their skin but by content of their day when all of God's children black
character. I have a dream today !
men and white men, Jews and Gentiles,
22. I have a dream that one day,
Catholics and Protestants will be able
down in Alabama, with its vicious rato join hands and to sing in the words
cists, with its governor having his lips of the old Negro spiritual. "Free at last,
dripping with the words of interposition free at last; thank Cod Almighty, we
and nullification, that one day, right there are lice at last."

of travel, cannot gain lodgingin the motels
of the highways and the hotels of the

r