xt7f4q7qr856 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7f4q7qr856/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670215  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 15, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 15, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7f4q7qr856 section xt7f4q7qr856 Inside Today's Kernel
James Raton looks at the effects of
aid to university and student
groups: Page Two.

HKIEIRKriE
Vol. 58, No. 98

University of Kentucky
WEDNESDAY, FEH.
LEXINGTON,'

15, 1907

KY.,

CIA

CM

The

Eight ligcs

has wound

a web of aid

Editorial charges Senate members with
'0'''n9
duty: Pogc Four.

'J

Being Black Hurts: a personal enperi
cnce jfory. poge pivc
Rupp

bounces Tollcnt from the bos

Spindletop's

chief

is

leaving:

Page

Seven.

COB VOTE DEL A YED
AS QUORUM MISSING

TRUSTEES CAN'T ACT
Only 45
J

l

::

It it

o

Committee

Present
For Call

tl

Some secret signsters, or perhaps a whole group of them, have
been decorating the campus trees and bulletin boards with signs
lately that could only serve to turn the hair grey of the Vice President for Public Trust and Savory Image.

Johnson Says CIA
Must End NSA Aid
By NEIL SHEEHAN

c) New York Tlmri News Service

WASHINGTON President Johnson, intervening Tuesday in a
controversy over Central Intelligence Agency subsidization of the
National Student Association, instructed the CIA to close out all
secret programs of aid to student groups, government officials said.
The officials said the Presi tacks that it was an instrument
dent also called for a review of of the U.S.
government. Comall other programs designed to
munist student fronts do not
combat Communist activities in
acknowledge their government
private organizations, but he did financing.
not order that they be ended.
Knowledge of the relationship
with the CIA was limited to
The State Department acknowledged Tuesday that the two senior NSA officers each
Central Intelligence Agency had year, the State Department
partially financed the overseas spokesman said. Officials denied
that the subsidy had limited
activities of the National Student Association since the early the freedom of the organization
1950' s.
or influenced its policies.
But department officials priThey conceded, liovvever, that
vately defended the subsidy as the existence of the subsidy had
necessary to offset the influence raised this question.
in international student circles
Eugene Groves, president of
of heavily financed and conNSA, said Tuesday that the subtrolled Communist student sidy had continued until last
groups.

spokesman also con- firmed that the association's
leaders had worked for the last
two years to terminate the relationship. "Even prior to that
time the degree of governmental
support for those activities had
been tapering off sharply," he
said.
Officials said privately that
the CIA subsidy to NSA, the
largest college student organization in the country, had been in
effect since 1952 with the knowledge and approval of "high levels
of government." The officials
would not elaborate on this,
but presumably that meant the
White House.
The subsidy was approved,
officials said, in order to allow
American students to compete in
The

international student affairs
against Communist student

fronts of the 1950's. Private funds
for overseas activities by NSA
were not available at that time.
The subsidy was made "covert" rather than open because
it was derided that public disclosure of government financing
of NSA would have opened the
organization to Communist at- -

Continued on Page

3

Will Meet

f

In

By TERENCE HUNT
Kernel Managing Editor
Challenged to prove a quorum, the University SenateTues-dadropped discussion of the
student rights and discipline report and turned on itself.
Less than 45 of 174 faculty
members appeared to continue
Monday's discussion on the
third, and final portion of the
rights and discipline report. The
obvious lack of a quorum seemingly was not going to be challenged, and since the meeting
Monday was recessed, not adjourned, it was assumed that
a quorum was present.
However, when a consensus
vote on an amendment to section
three was asked, a call for a
quorum was made by Dr.
Norman H. Franke, associate
professor of pharmacy. Without
a quorum, the meeting officially
ended.
A special meeting requested
by petition will be called later
this month to continue discussion of the last remaining portion of the report not yet passed.
While action on the rights
and discipline report was impossible, and the meeting officially over, a number of Senate
members spoke up in favor of
an internal house cleaning, possibly purging members with a
record of flagrant absences.
Russian specialist Dr. Stan-Zyzniewski, obviously irritated at the lack of a quorum,
said, "We are the body designated to make the rules for the
University, and if we won't do
y

The Secret Signsters

IK

Ml
I

;AV

W. Garrett Flickinger, chairman
of the Senate Advisory Committee on Student Affairs, presents
the third and final section of
the student rights report Tuesday only to sink into frustration moments later when a quorum call revealed only 45 of
the 174 senators were present

it, let's turn it back over to the
Administration."
Dr. Zyzniewski offered to read
to the Senate a list of 25 members who have not attended one
meeting during this academic
year; he also had a list of 25
members who have attended only
Continued On Page

7

E-To-

wn

By GENE CLABES
Kernel Associate Editor
The failure of the Faculty
Senate to get a quorum Tuesday will delay by at least a
month final passage of the student rights proposal which was
expected to have been presented
the University Trustees Executive Committee Friday.
The group, which will meet
in Elizabethtown, is expected
to give final approval for UK
to establish an agricultural research center in northeast Thailand.
The Trustees are now expected
to get and approve the student
rights proposal in March when
the full board will meet here.
The Board is also expected
to act upon the reorganization
of the student affairs area, which
is under thejurisdiction of Robert
Johnson, vice president for Student Affairs. Proposed changes
in the area have not been publicly outlined, however it is anticipated that this will involve
reorganization of the Dean of
Men and Women offices.
Board approval of a UK contract to develop a research center
in Thailand will end nearly a
year of negotiations between the
University and AID which began
in March 1966. At that time
two University officials, Dr. William Jansen, former Coordinator
of Overseas Programs and Dr.
William Seay, dean of the College of Agriculture and Home
Economics, were sent to Thailand to survey the countries
Continued On Page

7

AWS To Hear Experimental Plans
By HELEN MCCLOY

Kernel Staff Writer
A committee will report to the Senate
of Associated Women Students next Tuesday on possible experimental hours plans
for the month of March in selected women's
living units.
The committee Beth Brandenburg, chairman, Vicki Knight, Winnie Jo Perry, and
Jonell Tobin will consider a number of
plans. One suggested by AWS President
Connie Mullins would institute, in one unit,
hours as they are during final examinations:
10:30 as usual would be the closing hour
for sororities and residence halls, but women
could stay out until midnight by signing
a separate
t
sheet.
Most juniors and seniors already have
r
this right with
privileges.
Miss Mullins said another unit might
remain open until midnight.
Her suggestion that "sophomore hours"
might be instituted experimentally was voted
down unanimously.
Miss Tobin first suggested an "experi-- '
ment" in Tuesday's regular AWS Senate
meeting, following a summary of the opin
sign-ou-

junior-senio-

7

ions women expressed in a November AWS
poll on hours which the Senate is now

evaluating.
Senate members asked for the summary
rather than going over the hours requests
made by each class, as proposed at last
week's meeting.
Miss Knight, whose committee compiled the figures from the hours survey to
which 1,800 women responded, said campus' women except for freshmen, want midnight closing hours on weekdays;
would like the 1 a.m. weekend
closing extended at least until 2 a.m.; women want midnight-or-late- r
privileges on
Sundays, and while sentiment favors extended hours for sophomores almost
it goes against a system of no hours
Although the largest number of freshmen 75 said they wanted 10:30 hours on
weekdays, 164 asked for later hours, up to
midnight. In comparison, they ov erw helmingly voted to keep the present weekend dossing: 20 asked for hours after 1 a.m.
Some senators suggested changes not be
considered "at this time," when housemothers and head residents have said the
present hours system is heavily abuse
n

upper-classme-

2--

6-- 1.

1

Miss

Knight

questioned

hesitation.

"What's stopping us?" she asked. "We know

campus women want changes, Dean of
Women Seward mentioned experimentations
as a good idea . . . apparently the only
people who don't want changes are the
housemothers, and that's a staff problem."
Dean Seward has said her office would
handle "staff problems."
Another senator said the matter was not
"just a staff problem. It concerns the whole
University when a system is not working."
Asked about hours programs at other
universities, Miss Mullins said that 9 out
of every 10 AWS representatives she had
talked to in the
AWS region UK
is in "could not believe we are so liberal." She said she knew of extended hours
for seniors but none for juniors.
Senator Julia Kurtz said there were other
colleges with "more advanced hours programs, though maybe not in our region,"
to which Miss Mullins agreed.
The Senate is not obligated to make
any hours changes. The survey was proposed as a guideline for AWS and the administration "in review teg cloifc hours."

3

* j -- Tin: Kentucky kernel.

i7

WuIiumIiv. ivi. ir.

CIA Aid Discredits

;

Legitimate Work

J

By JAMES RESTON

(

New York Tlmm Nfwi Srrvlce

WASIIINGTON-T- he
United States government's efforts to
counter communist influence in the universities, press and trade
unions of the world have been seriously hampered by the disclosure that the Central Intelligence Agency has been helping
to finance the National Student Association since 1952.
It is understood that Presi- the CIA and nrivate foun- dent Johnson has instructed the dations that served as a cover
CIA to liquidate all secret aid for the CIA funds. It involves
other foundations, such as the
News Analysis
Ford Foundation, which also
gave money to NSA. It places
programs to student groups and in jeopardy CIA programs to
and Richard G. Stearns,
to review all other programs deEugene Groves, left, president of die National Student Association,
publications,
in Washington Tuesday how NSA was
signed to combat communist acradio and television stations, and international affairs vice president, told newsmen
NSA-C1con- tivities in other private organilabor unions. And it embarrasses breaking off its secret relationship with the Central Intelligent Agency. The
zations.
a number of former officials of
ncction dates to 1932.
The controversy goes beyond the student
association, who officials who were privy to the world rallies, conferences and however, created a problem for
the CIA's financial help to the knew about the secret funds to
President Johnson. The need for
financial arrangements
forums, and regional conferences.
National Student Association. It NSA and are now
continued American participaserving in when they were students are
Against this sort of compeinvolves the relationship be- important positions in the govnow likely to be identified witli
tition, the American student tion in the world student moveernment.
ment still exists; Communist efleaders were in trouble. Ironithe CIA by the Communists, even
The history of the CIA's aid though they no longer have anyforts to influence the student
cally, though they were opposed
to the association helps to exSTARTL:3?f'lif!'!La1-to do with the agency.
the Communist leaders of leaders of the developing world
by
thing
plain both the policy and its
the IUS as being maliciously
continue; Communist aid to laAmong the former NSA ofbor union leaders and newsembarrassing consequences. The ficials now with government are conservative, they were opposed
first CIA aid to NSA was negoat home as being too far to
Ralph A. Dungan, U.S. ambaspaper and radio and television
tiated in 1932 by William Dcn-sosador to Chile and former spethe left. They were able to raise
organizations goes on; but secret
P
BM46-UHANG-UPthen president of the student cial assistant to Presidents Ken!
CIA aid to these organizations,
very little money for organizaorganization. He is now U.S. nedy and Johnson; Robert Smith, tion or transportation, though particularly to university stuAID director in Peru.
American students, creates political difficulspecial assistant to the director somehow
This is one of the awkward of the agency for International
dents managed to get funds to ties for the President.
problems of the current contro- Development; Assistant Postattend student meetings abroad.
He is already under severe
versy. For present government master General Richard James
It was against this backcriticism among some elements
vvw.-iharfl""
on the nation's campuses. UniMurphy; and Douglass Cater, ground that NSA officials apspecial assistant to President proached the U.S. government
versities have been criticized for
in 1952 and received some fiJohnson. Mr. Cater was an ofaccepting special research grants
ficial of NSA before the CIA
nancial help from the CIA, then from the CIA. Rep. Wright
under President Truman.
program started.
has been threaten::
J )J ZERO AVOSTfeL
The reason for establishing
In the last seven or eight
ing to investigate the foundations
nun ciutDc
CIA help to the student associyears, the CIA is understood of the country' for years, and
JACK GILFORD
ation, howev er, is perfectly clear. to have put up an average of these latest disclosures are not
BUSTeRKEATON
In the years immediately after $200,000 a year for NSA, which
likely to discourage his efforts
Prnoutt'on
World War II, the Soviet Union
amounts to about 25 percent in this field.
WA FUNNY THING
of its annual budget. This was,
took the lead in trying to orgaIt is understood that Michael
HAPPENED
nize and propagandize the world of course, known to Presidents
v.
y
Wood, a fund raiser for the NSA
student movement.
THE WAY TO
and JohnON
Eisenhower, Kennedy
v
last year, who was subsequentson. The Senate committee that
In 1946 when the first World
ly fired, wrote a long memoran'
COLOR by DcLuit
Student Congress met in Prague oversees the CIA was informed
N
iirtm- UNITED ARTISTS
dum for Ramparts magazine on
PIPTIIRFS
the Communist delegations about the program. And other
Presents
the CIA connection.
gained control of several key agencies also helped NSA in
'
and imposed the MosThe program, however, rethem the
special projects, among
positions,
cow delegation's agenda on the Department of Health, Educamains. The battle to influence
the student leaders of the world
tion, and Welfare, the Office
meeting.
of Economic Opportunity, the
The first Soviet vice presicontinues, and there are no prident of the International Union Department of State, and the vate institutions available to fiof Students, for example, was Agency for International Develnance the American leaders. This
Aleksandr Shelepin, who later opment.
was the problem that started the
became chairman of the Soviet
The disclosure by Ramparts CIA program in the first place,
State Security Organization magazine of the CIA aid to NSA, and it still exists.
(KGB). The American delegates
to the first meetings of the International Union of Students
rJU
first opposed any open break
with the Communists, but after
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IM7

CIA Wound Tight Web Of Aid Around NSA

parent organization for the group, said
that USYC receives alxnit $150 thousand
a year from FYSA. This accounts for
y)
WASHINGTON-Sources
within the 93 percent of USYC's budget.
U.S. National Student Association which
USYC Executive Secretary Recti MarMonday admitted to having carried on a tin said he had no knowledge of any
covert relationship with the Central Inconnection between the Youth Council
and the CIA. Martin also claimed he
telligence Agency have named the Foundation for Youth and Student Affairs (FYS A) knew of no relationship between the
of New York as a major source of CIA CIA and the foundation.
originated funds.
University of Michigan administrator
FYSA Executive Secretary Harry Lunn David Baad, who has been associated
denied that the foundation had main- with FYSA for about two years, also said
tained a relationship with the CIA. NSA he had no knowledge of any FYSA-CIclaimed, however, that sums in the range relationships.
of $200 thousand yearly had been reMr. Baad said the foundation, which
ceived from FYSA with the knowledge provides major financial aid to the Inthat the foundation had CIA connections. ternational Student Conference (ISC) and
Several NSA staffmcmbers and officers, the World Assembly of Youth (WAY),
until this year, signed security agreements had a "long historical relationship" with
with the intelligence agency. NSA sources international student groups.
said that some former employes of the
The Michigan official total The ColNSA International
Commission had legiate Press Service the relationship becounterparts in the CIA to whom they tween FYSA, the ISC, and WAY had
reported regularly. The security agree- developed when both student organizament required that no information ob- tions had financial difficulty during the
tained from the CIA be made public. 1950' s.
An NSA staffer said the CIA conHe said that Americans associated with
s
bethe two student groups attempted to raise
nections created a
cause of the source of the information money in the United States, and the
that went into decision making."
relationship began at that time. Mr. Baad
In addition to NSA, FYSA is the claimed that WAY and the ISC continued
major supporter of the United States to receive funds from FYSA because of the
Youth Council (USYC). USYC, with more foundation's belief that they "have done
than 30 student organizations as mem- a very good job of programming."
The ISC, headquartered in Leiden,
bers, carries on an extensive international
relations program.
Holland, is an association of national
William H. Fox, an accountant for students unions from Western and neuthe National Social Welfare Assembly, tral nations.
By STEVE DOOKSH ESTER

and

LAVVRIE NICKERSON
The C'ollrf iat? Prm Service

"built-in-bia-

free by the National Student Association, and provided funds to furnish
the building.
Others recipients of funds from the
Independent Foundation were W. Dennis
Shaul, a former NSA president, and
Robert Francis, a former employe of NS A s
International Commission.
Additionally, the Intcpcndcnt Foundation gave $145 tliousand to the Independent Research Service of Washington
during 1962 and 1963. The research group
information at the
presented
Helsinki World Youth
Festival in 1962.
Eugene Thoreau, an officer of Independent Research Service, refused to reveal the source of his organization's finances. In a Collegiate Press Service
interview Mr. Tlioreau said he had no
knowledge that the research service had
received money from the Independent
Foundation.
He said sources of funds could not
be made public because tliose sources
would then not feel free to give money.
Thoreau claimed he had only been working with the research group since 1965,
and said his service had not obtained
any grants between 1965 and 1967.
Independent Foundation Trustee Paul
F. Hellmuth, who is a Boston attorney
with the firm of Hale and Dorr, was
not available for comment.
Founded in 1959, the Independent
Foundation has also given funds to such
diverse recipients as the University of
Virginia Graduate School of Business and
the New England Aquariam.
rent

There are no public tax records available for the Foundation for Youth and
Student Affairs. Internal Revenue Service officials (IRS) told The Collegiate
Press Service that FYSA does not file
the yearly tax exemption form usually
required of private foundations. That form,
which is available to the public, would
list the groups to which it gives funds.
Revenue statutes state that if an organization is "supported in wliole or in
part by funds of the United States government" or state and county governments, or if an organization is suptxirted
by hinds from "the general public" it
does not have to file a yearly form.
Under Internal Revenue regulations,
"the general public" necessarily needs
more than "a few contributors." FYSA
Executive Secretary Lunn told CPS that
the main contributors to FYSA were its
directors and officials. FYSA has two
officers and seven directors.
The president of FYSA, Arthur A.
Houghton Jr., president of the Steuben
Class Company, was not available for
comment. Also unavailable for comment
was board member Amory Houghton,
president of Corning Glass Works.
FYSA official Lunn claimed the
Houghton family was the major contributor to his foundation.
Garvey received a $3,000 scholarship
in 1962 from the Independent Foundation of Boston, also alleged to be a
CIA related foundation. In 1965, the Independent Foundation purchased the
Washington building currently occupied

rn

Soviet-organize-

d

CIA Wanted NSA To Conceal

Facts Of Their Relationship
Continued From Page 1
year. He said that as of this
year the association was no longer receiving CIA funds, to his
knowledge.
Other officers of the association said Tuesday, how ever, that
they believed the CIA was still
paying the rent for the organization's offices here through a foun-

dation called the Independence
Foundation of Boston.
Groves' s acknowledgment of
the CIA subsidy camein response
to inquiries about a forthcoming
article in the March issue of
Ramparts magazine. The article,
according to Ramparts representatives, discloses details of the
relationship between the intelligence agency and the student
organization.
Richard Stearns, international
affairs vice president of the association, said Tuesday that the
CIA had not attempted to prevent the organization from terminating the subsidy when intelligence officials were informed that
the student leaders wanted to
end the relationship.
Other officials of NSA said,
however, that CIA officials did
attempt to persuade the student
leaders not to publicly acknowl

edge the subsidy after it was
learned that the Ramparts article would appear.
said CIA

NSA officers

offi-

cials believed the organization
would be best able to survive
whatever public protest was created by the Ramparts article
by simply denying the relationship.
But NSA leaders decided, association officers said, that they
would now have to publicly ad-

mit the relationship.
CIA officials would not comment on the matter.
Despite the State Department's explanation of the subsidy, NSA leaders said Tuesday
they believed the disclosure of
their relationship with the CIA
had jeopardized the future of
their organization and would destroy its credibility as an independent and liberal student
group with students both at home
and abroad.
They said they also were
afraid that foreign students who
had worked with the association would be hurt by the news.
"This has become a nightmare for us," one NSA leader
said. "Our whole credibility has
been based on the image that

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we are independent and left liberals. Now everything we do
or have done will be tainted

whether we're guilty or not."
The majority of the staff first
learned of the CIA subsidy a
few weeks ago when senior officers told them of it because
of the forthcoming Ramparts

tide.

Stearns said neither he nor
Groves were planning to submit resignations and that they
had so far not receiv ed any resignations from the staff.
At the moment, he said, the
NSA leadership hoped to somehow weather the storm and preserve the organization.
Groves said Monday that the
CIA funds wereobtained through
foundations which acted as conduits for the intelligence agency
and that the funds were spent
to send NSA

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i

now, ask for Don
FOR UK STUDENTS

UK STUDENTS

"The House That Dial Built
Armour Grocery Products Company will be
interviewing applicants for
positions on campus WEDNESDAY FEB. 22
Sales-Marketi-

ng

division has created many
Exceptional growth of our
opportunities for qualified applicants (willing to put minds and
bodies to work) in sales and marketing of Armour's Branded
Consumer products through the food distribution industry. . . .
Dial Soap . . . Princess Soap . . . Dial Shampoo . . . Criffon
detergents . . . Magic Spray Sizing . . . Bruce Floor Care Products . . . Parsons' Ammonia . . . Dash Dog Food . . . Armour
Star Canned Meats . . . Appian Way Pizza.

Contact the Placement Office to make your appointment with
Bill Smith of Armour Grocery Products Company.

HERE

* The Kentucky Kernel
The Soutli's Outstanding College Daily
Univk.hsity of Kr.Ni rcKY

RSTADLISHED

WEDNESDAY, FEB.

1894

15, 19G7

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

Wai.tkh

M.

Chant,

Si km: llocco, Editorial Vane Editor

-

Editor-in-Chi-

Wii.mam Knait, Business Manager

1

m'Xm

m miin a

Does The Faculty Care?
Members of the Faculty Senate
who failed to attend Tuesday's
special meeting should receive the
full censure of the University community for failure to finish consideration of the student rights
proposal now before it for simple
lack of a quorum.
Scarcely more than 40 people
were at the Tueaday meeting of
the Senate at which final but necessary touches were to be placed on
what is undoubtedly one of the
most important bills to come before any University faculty group.
That is less than half the number

required for a quorum. The action
of those who failed to come can
be called nothing less than reprehensible.
Nor is it the first time this
student rights legislation has been
left dangling from the precipice of
apathy. At its first meeting to
discuss the code Jan. 9, the Senate
was forced to go home after enough
faculty members left, thereby losing
a thinly held quorum.
The issue here is not whether
the student rights legislation offers

SPRINGTIME
It has been a mild winter. To
be sure, we've had cold and snowy
days, but at least until now, they've
been few.
Now warm weather has come
once again to the Commonwealth.
A few brave bushes are getting
tiny spots of green leaves on their
weathered branches. They're also
getting pungent fertilizer from the
Physical Plant Division.
Suddenly, the air is filled with
the fragrance of springtime. Can't
you tell? Just take a deep breath.
That's right inhale deeply.
Ah, yes, the fragrance of spring.
Oh, thank you, PPD!

a good program or is even valid.
Something far more important is
at stake. That is the right, indeed

the absolute necessity, that a
faculty worth its salt give careful
and conscientious thought to the
issues of all higher education, and
most especially to the crucial issues happening on this campus.
Obviously, this Faculty Senate fails
to understand its role, or at least
a high percentage of the body does.
What is so ironic is that such
an irresponsible display should
come at a time when signs were
so promising that the University
might pull out of the rot of the
Southern Academic Orchard. Were
one inclined to cynicism, he might
call for such a referendum as is
before UK students as to the worth
and value of Student Government.
But asking the validity of the
University's Faculty Senate would
accomplish little more than an unfair criticism of the body's leaders.
What should be done is the initiation of a suggestion for a
purge made by Rep. Douglas
Schwartz, professor of anthropology, after the January Sen ate meetDr.
Schwartz suggested
ing.
members be dropped after too many
absences.
For an organization of 174
members, it is inexcusable that
just half that many could not be
gathered to a meeting crystalizing
the relationship which every student must hold toward the University. It is so inexcusable that
the purge should begin immediately, reaching back to the start
of the 1966-6- 7
academic year and
not hesitating to drop those members who have neither a conception of their job nor of the meaning of a University. Seemingly,
full-sca-

le

the majority represents just these
kinds of members.

jin i ypfs
'Sorry Hoys, hut

we must jjet

ill wfM

our heauty rest!'

Forgotten Bill Of Rights
The construction gets special
"I wouldn't sign that because
various organizations its leftist. You college students
emphasis by
during February, an