xt7f7m041h0t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7f7m041h0t/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650915  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 15, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 15, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7f7m041h0t section xt7f7m041h0t Inside Today's Kernel

Vol. LVII, No. 9

LEXINGTON, KY WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 15,

Somerset Center
Joins University;
Ceremonies Held
JOIINZEII

By

Kernel Staff Writer
Somerset Community College,
long time a dream of Pulaski
Countians, officially joined the
University family yesterday.
At dedication ceremonies carried out by Lexington Centennial
celebrants and Somerset suphigher
porters of
education, the $812,000 facility
and
campus was tagged
"the single greatest achievement
for the community."
easily-accessib-

le

75-ac- re

UK May Get
$5.4 Million
VA Hospital
A

new

Veterans

370-be- d

J

University of Kentucky
1965

UK President JohnW. Oswald
headed the campus delegation
made up of faculty and administration representatives of the
various colleges and a group of
delegates from other community
branches.
U.S. Senator John Sherman
Cooper, Somerset's favorite son,
was unable to attend the festivities because of Congressional
commitments in Washington.
indusSomerset
Another
trialist, Louis Ware, made the
dedicatory address.
A

1917 mining

engineering

graduate of the University, Mr.
Ware heads the nation's largest
producer of minerals and chemicals for food production, International Mineral and Chemical
Corp., Skokie, 111. He was a
recipient of a Centennial Cold
Medallion.
Ad-

ministration Hospital may be
Ware said he was proud to
located at the University Med- have been invited to the dedi-

ical Center.
According to a Medical Center
spokesman, there is a site available and UK has talked with the
VA about locating the facility
there. But studies are still under
way by the VA and the UK site
is not definite.
The
hospital will
have 280 beds for medical and
surgical patients and 90 beds for
neuropsychiatric
patients, according to present plans.
VA
The present 1,176-be-d
hospital on the Leestown Road
is affiliated with the Medical
Center, helping train students,
interns and residents.
Construction is expected to
start in February, 1968, and be
completed in March, 1970.
James F. Harrington, associate director of information for
the VA in Washington, said
studies are being made by a site
survey team which "operates
under wraps." The VA, he said,
has a policy of building "adjacent or as close as possible to
a medical school."
$5.4-milli-

cation because "the University
of Kentucky has been good to

me."

He praised the choosing of
Somerset for a community college:
Ware worked his way through ,
school at the University, and
was so poor he had to ride freight
trains home on vacations. "His
story is truly an Horatio Alger
story." Dr. Oswald said introducing him.
"Young people with a desire
for higher education for the first
time will have the opportunity to
go to school here."
Mr. Ware spoke to several
hundred area residents assembled
at the front entrance to the
y
modern,
structure,
located off US 27 just south of
Somerset.
President Oswald, Dr. Ellis
Hartford, dean of the community
college system, Dr. Lawerence
Davenport, head of the Somerset center, and Mr. Ware cemented the cornerstone in place.
one-stor-

;

.

Eight Pages

::

:

Typical college woman discussed
society writer: Poge Three.

Iditor discusses accreditation of

by

Sports writer soys fewer athletes en
ter physical education field: Poge Siv

students work ot Kentucky
lage: Poge Seven.

Vil-

versity organization: Page Four.

Students participate in

Community

enrollment

in-

in

tl

Dorado:

Uni-

Low

creases

Poge Five.

41

L

l

rCN.-- C

Colleges

percent: Poge Eight

y

.,v.r

ml

X

u

Smoothing cement around the cornerstone at the Dr. Lawrence Davenport,
new Somerset Community College are Louis Ware, branch, looks on.
left, dedicatory speaker, and Dr. John W. Oswald.

director

of the

UK

Photo by John Zeh

Visiting SDS Chairman Views
Cairo Project And Strategies
Five workers from the SDS
Community Project in Cairo, 111.
spoke td the UK chapter of Students for a Democratic Society
last night at the Student Center.
Ceorge Craham, chairman of
the Cairo project, led a general
discussion of the role of the Community Project and what its strategies might be.
"We're working for the poor
class of people," explained Mrs.
Carrie Rush, a Negro worker in
Cairo.
"Things we're taking we don't
have to take anymore," Mrs.
Rush said she tells lower class
residents when she visits them.
"Let the peoples know that you
as flesh and blood stand up and
say what you want."
Craham explained the relationship between SDS and the
'
Community Project as a "loose
one." The Economic Research
and Action Project, ERAP, the
headquarters for SDS, provides
assistance to local community
projects.
Craham is a staff worker for
ERAP.

Craham outlined three steps
the local SDS member could take:
1. Quit school. Go work full
time in the depressed part of the
community.
2. Just go into the area and
"get your feet wet."
3. Operate as a student concerning yourself with foreign issues.
"You as students can raise
money for those working in the
field," Craham told the SDS
chapter.
"Or get in the dorms to protest the fact that the college president is a lackey for the corporation of the state which he probably is."
In reference to starting a Community Project locally, Craham
said, "I don't know anything
about Lexington, so that makes
it easier to talk about."
"The basic problem," he said,
"is they either don't have jobs

or if they do, they are
What strategy might the Project worker take?
"If you have a strike to pull
out all the low payed out of
low-payed- ."

work, you could crumple the local
economy." Graham's second suggestion was to aid the 'War on'
Poverty programs.
Speaking of the Job Corps
specifically, Craham said "these
are people really hung up because first of all the Job Corps
is a bad scene."
Asked what the student should
do when he quit school considering the draft question, Craham
posed another question:
"You either grease the wheels
of the establishment, or if you
decide that the whole establishment is working in a way that
cripples and kills, then you stop
the machine and then hope to
get a better machine."
The business meeting scheduled for last night was cut short
except for finalizing an invitation
for Rev. James Bevel to speak at
the University Oct. 21. Bevel has
worked with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and
with Dr. Martin Luther King.
Further business will be discussed in a meeting at 8 p.m.
Thursday in the Student Center.
--

UK Students Live. Work With Colombians
By SAMABELL
University students from two countries met
this summer in a forgotten village on the slopes
,
ft J of the Andes mountains.
The people of the village-w- ith
the improbable
mA k
V.
name of El Dorado had been forgotten by their
government, by their neighbors and by the pace
of progress in South America.
But they will never be forgotten by students
from UK and Colombian universities who lived
m
.
i
and worked there this summer.
In a program Jointly sponsored by the YMCA
chapters at UK and in Colombia, 13 University
i
.
4
i
undergraduates volunteered to participate in a
"work camp" in a village near Bogata, Colombia.
Following semester long briefings last year, the
group left Washington D.C. on July 10 for South
America.
Before the summer's work was completed,!
the students had participated in activities never
Simone, a
youth of the barrio El Dorado, lifts a thought possible, including reading about the
brick into place for Charles Webb, a UK senior who participated politics and culture in South America.
This was possible because the students made
in the YMCA South American project this summer. Eric Abbott,
a student from the State University of Iowa, also participated one fundamental and important decision at the
right,
outset: to live and work with the underprivileged
in the project.

L.I

ri

r

'"SH?" r,

seven-year-ol-

d

and poor people of El Dorado on their physical

level.
This meant housing the coed group in two
tiny houses, neither of which had running water,
adequate plumbing and space, or any heat.
The last point is important because El Dorado was slashed out of the side of the Andes
mountains at an elevation of 10,000 feet. Moreover, immediately above was a pass in the mountains through which daily came cool rain clouds
that turned the entire village into a cold muddy
quagmire.
After initial adjustments to the high altitude
and the new "standard of living" the students
began their work project.
The work was three pronged with the primary
goal the construction of a brick school. Secondly
they led recreation for the children and later in
the day, taught literacy and English classes in the
tiny, two room school that could serve only
ten per cent of the village children.
As they participated in recreation and taught
classes the students sensed more and more the
immediate need for the new scliool. Lack of
education was keeping the adults from progress- -

* 2

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PERKINS PANCAKE HOUSE

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LEXINGTON
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Tie stotrent irxLcated the

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THURSDAY SPECIAL

and tie Latin Ameri- tiea tie f r.al speech
rca EJ Dorado.

accsTtsd

PKsr.c

E.

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M. Elsasser, of
Princeton
University, is the
speaker. Open to the public, the
Theoretical Biology Seminar
series is sponsored by the Department of Physiology and

Complete Automotive Service

400

Orn-rrjer-

T, L'riivfrv.ty rj Kentucky
Patterson School of D.pivmacy
and Intematioral Cocrmerce wiil
hold its first luncheon rreetmg
at 12.25 p m, on Thursday in
Boom 24Sof the St'ier.t Center.
Center.

Wednesday in Room lo3 of the
Chemistry-Physic- s
Building. The
final lecture in the series is to
be given at the same time on

.i

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The third of a series of four

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Dr. Walter
ruvU cf tietn.
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Honorary, will hold it annual
picnic .VfotirLny, Trjt. 20 at

a tie
iArr.i'.Jtu.

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technical irr.pro'ver.'r.f .
Stuart HaJVx.l. cha;rrr-a-n of
the UK
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broadcast from 2 p.m. until 11
p.m. seven days each
WBKVs r.ew fall program
gukle will y avaIahle in October, t which ti.T? the station
will offer several rsn prcrams.

21.

and the
lectures on
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of Organismic
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is to be given at 4 p.m.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, VcIncsday, Sept,

15, J9fi5

-3

Poll Finds 'Norms' For Typical College Woman
By CAKOLYN WILLIAMS

Kernel Staff Writer
She's the casual-sport- y
type
with medium length brown hair
and a complexion that's pale and
on the slightly oily side.
She uses soap and water to
cleanse her skin, likes a pressed
powder in makeup and probably
uses a little rouge. She's quite
conscious of the accent on eyes-s- he
uses eye shadow, eye liner
and mascara to emphasise them.
Hair spray and nail polish
are a "must" on her cosmetic
list, also. And to smell good for
her man, she'll use a Ousting
powder or perfume.
Clamour, Mademoiselle and
Vogue are her favorite fashion
magazines and she reads them
avidly. She'll read Harper's
Bazaar and Seventeen also, but
doesn't frequently
patronize
McCall's or Redbook.
Who is she? She's the stereotype of the typical American coed,
and she's on campuses from
Maine to California.
A recent survey conducted by
Charles of the Ilitz revealed this
assortment of interesting conclusions about what the average
college girl is like.
The poll was taken to seek
out what the young women are
like and what they want in cosmetics. The data was gathered
to develop new products in their
upcoming "youthful" cosmetic
line, Miss Hitz, which will be
inaugurated next spring.
Practically every one of almost
700 coeds from the colleges across
the country was in agreement
that "a good fashion look stresses
simplicity, is understated, appropriate to the occasion and above

year while the pale look goes
out. Almost every girl (only two
percent said "no") uses a lipstick
and half of them use lip gloss.
The accent is again on the
eyes and the coeds have taken
heed. The no eyebrow craze (if
it really ever began) doesn't make
a hit with them. A total of 95
percent use mascara; 91 percent
use eye shadow and 89 percent
use some variety of eye liner.
About 92 percent of the college
students use hand lotion and
hand cream is used by 80 percent
of them. Bath oil is used by 77
percent and 59 percent use bath
skin refreshers.
cate"
In the
gory, perfume is a thing not to
be caught without. And 92
percent of the coeds agreed to
this. Cologne is used frequently

Soap and water is still one
of the best ways to cleanse skin,
as shown by the 83 percent who
use it.
The survey indicated that a
majority of coeds have pale skin
followed by 23
(42 percent)
percent who have rosy highlights;
21 percent, beige; 10 percent,
olive; and 2 percent, dark.
Pressed powder is still the
device.
most popular make-u- p
(75 percent use it.) But the use
of liquid foundation is close
behind with a total of 73 percent
of the coeds using this type.
Most girls said they use rouge,
and 72 percent prefer to be
"blushing beauties," using the
new blushers with the brush on
effect.
And it looks as if lipstick will
be around on the campuses this

"sweet-smelling-

also (89 percent use it) and 90
percent like dusting powder.
the
pacesetter
Joining
casual-sport- y
type (55 percent)
are the camclion (the girl who
changes with her mood), 25 percent; the
14 percent; four percent, nonconformist-trendsetter,
and the
three percent.
The poll also disclosed tnat
many of the college girls were
using skin treatments and makeup incorrectly. The coordinator
of the questionnaire offered these
suggestions:
Dry skin: use a night cream
and also a moisturizer under
makeup, especially if you wear
only powder and no foundation.
moisturizer
without
Powder
under it can look flaky because
it's "sitting" on dry skin and
hasn't anything to adhere to.
You should also stay away from
soap because it's drying. Use a
soap substitute or a gentle cleanser (soap substitute for washing
your face, cleanser for removing
makeup).
Oily skin: Don't use a night
cream (a blemish cream is all
right). Most are the lubricating
kind, and you . hould stay away
from them. Pancake makeup is
to; heavy for you because it
has an oil base. Use a medicated
makeup or an astringent foundation that isn't heavy and will
control the excess oil on your
face.
tailored-conservativ-

c,

is

style
preference.
h
of the girls
next with
favoring it. The real, real long
look is not as popular (except
perhaps among the "beat"
crowd). Only 14 percent confessed
having a long hair style.
Hair coloring is another area
where some of the statistics may
be
Seventy-on- e
surprising.
percent of the female students
have brown hair; 22 percent
blond; 5 percent black; and 2
percent red. Only 39 percent use
some form of rinsing, streaking,
tipping, or dying.
Skin type showed 38 percent
having oily skin; 21 percent, dry;
25 percent, normal; and 13 percent
with a combination of skin types.
Over half of the girls are using
some form of blemish treatment
(55 percent) while 58 percent are
using cleanser.

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* The Right To Be Heard

The Sept. 8 acceptance by the
Faculty Senate of Students for a
Democratic Society and Young
Americans for Freedom as campus
organizations, and the subsequent
complaint by two professors this
week about SDS has raised interesting points.
One who has seen nothing more
politically motivated than the voter
registration drives of the campus
Young Republicans and Young
Democrats is encouraged to see
left and right wing groups sprouting on the campus.
As if all the years of political
uninterest and inactivity at UK
weren't sufficient reason alone to
encourage both SDS and YAF, two
professors have exhumed an ancient
ban on free speech and expression
and sought to shove it off on the
faculty as reason why SDS should
not be allowed on the campus.
It is significant, we think, that
one of these professors is also the
faculty adviser to YAF.
It is unfortunate, certainly, that
a group which enjoys all of the
democratic protections of free
speech and assembly in carrying out
its right-win- g
activity should encourage suspension of this protecg
tion when it comes to its
counterpart.
Perhaps the local YAF organization has naively been taken in
by the propaganda of Fulton Lewis
Jr. and other gods of the extreme
right and actually believe SDS is
a "subversive" group that takes
g
and other
training in
skills.
Or perhaps our friends of the
right see in SDS, as they have seen
in many other organizations, a
"Communist-Jewish- "
plot to take
over everything from the U.S. government to the corner game of
chance.
Or it just may be that YAF
wants the stage to itself when it
comes to political groups operating
on and around the campus.
But whatever the reason, it
seems a poor excuse to deny the
same rights to one group and grant
them to another. If YAF is to be
"official," then their seems little
argument why SDS should not be.
The main justification for encouraging the existence of both the
YAF and the SDS seems to us to
lie in these words of Justice William O. Douglas:
left-win-

bomb-makin-

The founding fathers believed
that the antidote to advocacy was
counter-advocacThey believed
that if a subversive idea was presented from a platform or a soap
box (or, the court has so held, in a
handbill) the remedy was not to
jail the speaker, but to expose the
fallacy or evil in his cause, to submit his ideas to pitiless analysis,
to explode his thesis in rebuttal.
What the Faculty Senate was
asked to do, in effect, was to endorse one group over the other with
political philosophy being the only
grounds on which a differentiation
can be made.
The members of the Senate did
not allow themselves to be maneuvered into this position because it
could only have led to an extremely
dangerous precedent.
But perhaps this controversy
will do some good after all. Perhaps
the Faculty Senate will see in the
business of YAF and SDS the danger and the difficulty involved in the
endorsement of student groups, particularly student political groups.
A more reasonable plan would
seem to allow any local student
group to have its meetings published and be able to use campus
meeting halls by simply furnishing
the necessary information with
some appropriate place like the
Student Center program office.
As for YAF and their protest,
perhaps they are unaware of the
basic nature of a university community when they try to close the
ears of the campus to an opposite
point of view.
Perhaps they do not believe a
university is a place of free comment
and inquiry. Perhaps they do not
know students cannot be expected
to think if they cannot question, or
to decide if they cannot act. Perhaps they are too uncertain of their
brand of philosophy to allow it to
compete freely and openly with
differing points of view.
We suspect, however, that in
good, if naive, faith, YAF is trying
to save the campus, and the world,
from all things "subversive."
Perhaps YAF, like other right-win- g
groups, has found the "truth"
and wishes the world to accept it
. . . without question. Hopefully at
the University, if no place else in
the world, we are all free to find
our own brand of "truth" in our
own way.
y.

On Caging Of Women
With two years of successful
operation of the "senior hours"
plan under their belt, members of
AWS should consider extending late
night privileges to other students.
It is somehow incongruous that
a University which stresses individual choice and responsibility of
coeds in most matters still insists
on setting absolute "lock up" times
for its women.
The University trusts a woman
student to choose where she will
go, what she will do, whom her
companions will be, but refuses to
let her set her own curfew, a privilege many parents grant to
aged daughters.
The Dean of Women's staff has
granted permission for some stu
high-scho-

ol

Nuclear Uoulette

dwelldents to live in
them completely out
ings, putting
of the realm of University authority,
but it still clings to the stringent
bedtime rule for students living in
the dormitory.
AWS, a constant touter of the
growing maturity and equality of
women, have been rather prudish
about granting women rights
shared by her male classmates.
One cannot assume per se that
seniors are more "responsible" and
therefore more worthy of these privileges. Certain other students deserve the hours far more than some
seniors.
AWS now must prove by its
actions that it puts faith in its own
doctrine of individual responsibility
for UK women.
off-camp-

Progress In
"We must shed the illusion that
there is a war against poverty.
There is merely a BB shot agUnst
poverty," Herbert Hill, an official
of the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
told his organization's convention
the other day.
A program costing $784 million
in the current fiscal year must obviously be the most expensive BB
shot in history. The bill for the
coming year which the House is
considering this week would more
than double that amount. But there
is a basis of truth for Mr. Hill's
overly harsh judgment. When the
present program is measured against
the enormous sums needed to break
the cycle of poverty for several
million families, it does seem relatively small. Yet it could not be
otherwise.
The war against poverty has to
e
be a
enterprise. It is the
task of a generation, not of a few
months or years. Time is needed to
effort.
organize such a large-scal- e
Moreover, Sargent Shriver and his
assistants have recognized that dollars alone cannot do the job. It is
also necessary to arouse impoverished people from apathy and
defeatism.
The community action programs
which represent the Government's
chief effort to stimulate new attitudes among the poor, have been
the object of the heaviest criticism.
The antipoverty agency has tried to
long-rang-

Anti-Povert- y

find a middle way between the
bureaucracies in the social welfare
field, both governmental and private, and the newer volunteer
groups that sometimes want to use
Federal funds to finance demonstrations and protests against Government itself. Neither the established welfare organizations nor the
community action groups in all
their bewildering variety take kindly to the effort to evolve flexible
procedures and diverse organizational arrangements.
Because the war on poverty is
it has suffered from the
Johnson Administration's tendency
to oversell the program's early
achievements. Because the poverty
program involves a steadily rising
rate of Government spending, it
has attracted politicians hoping to
exploit it for their own ends. Because there is no precedent for an
d
attack on poverty,
the program has had to experiment.
Not withstanding the propaganda, the political pressures and the
inevitable mistakes and confusion
that accompany experimentation,
the antipoverty program has made
encouraging progress in its first
year. With experience, it will both
increase its firepower and the acWith
curacy of its range-findefrom Congress, the
proper backing
antipoverty agency may over the
coming decade begin to master its
assignment and confound the pessimism of its critics.
long-rang-

e,

across-the-boar-

r.

The Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED

The South's Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

1894

WEDNESDAY,

Walteh Chant,

Editor-in-Chie-

Linda Mills, Executive Editor

Sally Stvll. Neus Editor

Kenneth Cheen,

Amu-ta-

Kenneth Hoskins,

t

SEPT.

15, 1965

f

e Editor
jCUy Chisham,

Managing

Editor

Amn-iatSfU't Editor
Hekhy Rosenthal, Sport Editor
Cay Cish. Wwwn'i Page Editor
Mamcahet Hailey. Art Editor

* 1.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday. .Sept. 15;

1965- -5

Colombian Pictorial Perspective

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A Colombian woman pauses at her work in a brick factory

A summer spent working in South America is
many things. Impinging on the eye at once is the
grandure of the new, strange scenery. This is
superfluous though and yields to the human element
of the Latin American. This in itself is many
things and refining and learning from it are endless tasks. Perhaps easiest to learn from are the
bouyant children who brim with vitality and
inquiry.
learning
Teaching or playing is a two-wa- y
involvement they hurtf. of you and you of them.
4i .v
Stage t