xt7ffb4wht35 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ffb4wht35/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky. Libraries Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1981 journals  English University of Kentucky Alumni Association Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky alumnus Kentucky Alumnus, vol. 51, no. 3, Fall 1981 text images Kentucky Alumnus, vol. 51, no. 3, Fall 1981 1981 2012 true xt7ffb4wht35 section xt7ffb4wht35   I W I .
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‘ `   Sunday, September 20 The Cincinnati Orchestra with Andre Watts For ticket information, write  
Saturday, October 31 juilliard String Quartet to University Artist Series, UK ef
Tuesday, November 10 Garrick Ohlsson, piano Center for the Arif, L9xmg¢0”, il
Friday, February 26 St. Paul Chamber Orchestra with Pinchas Zuckerman KY 40506 0241 or call (606)  
Monday, March 8 Itzhak Perlman, violin 257-2645. Season tickets for the
. . I
Classic Collection are $52 pp; |
T _ P for Tops in Pops, $49, plus 50 1
OPS In OPS cents per order for postage and ·
- /2 d in . Indi idnal concert ¥
Wednesday, October 14 New England Ragtime Ensemble fm I g V _ l
Friday December 4 Pearl Bailey tickets where available, are on ,
· - e e e tember 10. 1
Tuesday, March 30 The Swmgle Singers ml b gmnmg S P z,
Tuesday, April 13 Count Basie Y
ii
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Front cover  
To .· Itzhak Perlman uilliard Strin artet Michael i
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Middle: The Swingle Singers, New England Ragtime V
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Bottom: Pearl Bailey _  
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 . Fall l98l Vol.5l No.3
y Alumm Pros/ 2 I
The fortunes of a professional football player can change with the sunrise,
, but when the pre-season began UK had I5 alumni reporting for action.
l
  History m Sou11d/ 6
  Modern methods of communication and information storage are altering the way archivists
  record events so historians can write their histories.
i
i The Dean of I“I1SIZ01'l3I1S/ 8
I UK’s history department has been greatly blessed with its professional talent. Dr. Thomas D. Clark ’29, ’69,
{ professor emeritus, is o sterling example.
1 Hard Tunes, D€C1S10HS/ 10
A university researcher investigates the child custody issue—how do parents and/or courts
l reach a decision during the traumatic process of divorcing?
I
Cl2lSS1C or Pops/ 12
The Center for the Arts presents its first subscription concert series featuring
I reat names in classical and 'azz m s`c` sh' . . .
jr g l U I lun lp University Archives
I — .
I Sonic     Margaret l. King Library - Norlh
· . . . 'versit of l\entuck
l Wickliffe B. Moore says there are no tricks to the top, lust hard work. Um Y Y
I Lexington, Kentucky 40506
l This Lady/ 16
T A skilled artist in stained glass, Johnnie Miller ’6l could easily turn her hobby into a full-time iob.
I UKIT ticket sales, a gift from William B. Sturgill ’46 and new heights of achievement for_Bonita Black ’8l.
l
. 2
l Peck s Puzzler/24
( The challenge this issue comes from the contemporaries of Elizabeth the Great.
l  
i The Kentucky Alumnus (USPS 292-840) is published quarterly by the University of l9B`l OFFICERS: PRESIDENT Richard M. Womack ’53, Birmingham, Ala.; PRESIDENT-
{ Kentucky Alumni Association, 400 Rose Street, Lexington, Kentucky 40506, for its ELECT Morris Beebe '48, Lexington, Kentucky; TREASURER Mrs. Joe F. Morris '38, Lex-
; dues-paying members. Individual dues are $l5 annually with $2.00 of that amount ington, Kentucky; SECRETARY Jay Brumfield '4B, Lexington, Kentucky. ASSOCIATION
I used in publication of the magazine. Second class postage paid at Lexington, Ken- STAFF: DIRECTOR Jay Brumfield '4B; ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR Bob C. Whitaker '58;
  tucky and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send changes of address to The EDITOR Liz Howard Demoran ’68; MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR Ada D. Refbard '39;
I KentuckyAIumnus, UK Alumni Association, Lexington KY 40506. Brenda Bain, Julia Brothers, Linda Brumfield, Ruth Elliott, Amelia Gano, Ruby
l Opinions expressed in The Kentucky Alumnus are not necessarily those of the Uni- Hardin, Ennis Johnson, Debbie Mallory, and Tom Wise ’73. ART DIRECTOR Elaine
I versity of Kentucky or the UK Alumni Association. A member of the Council for Ad- Golob Weber. Magazine typesetting by Caro|yn’s Typesetting, Inc., Lexington,
vancementand Support of Education (CASE)and Kentucky—CASE. Kentucky, and UK Printing Services; Printing by Gateway Press, Inc., Louisville.
i

 i l
  .
. i
by Bob Whitaker
(
he University of Kentucky found end at UK for three years (1967-69). He    
itself well represented by its wasn’t especially big, as defensive ends ii » . ‘
alumni in the professional go, but he compensated with quickness, ll IS Strange to be   Gnd l
football ranks, when it came time intelligence and desire. Now he is huge by In search of Gl'lOll`\€l"
to report to training camp. Seventeen ex- real world standards, Gfoot-2 frame, 248 CG I-·99r_"_V¤n NO1-9
Wildcats have entered the National Foot- pounds. In 1980 his peers selected him as  
ball League after spending many of their the 1980 National Conference Lineman   j
Bluegrass fall weekends on Stoll Field of the Year. were the real fun and meaningful years of ,
and/or Commonwealth Stadium. He came to UK with expectations of football for me, because it was such an I
The oldest alumnus, at 55 enjoying the being a lawyer and never thought he ever-changing time of my life. I learned
twilight of a successful pro career, is jeff would be a lineman in the NFL. the real fundamentals of my profession,
Vtuz Nolo, starting center and captain for "There is no doubt in my mind that the and obtained the ability to deal with
the Atlanta Falcons. He was drafted by basis of my success in the pro game was adversities constantly dealt you in life, as
the Falcons in the llth round in 1969. A instilled in me during my five years at the well as keeping in perspective the good
quarterback at St. joseph`s Prep in University," Van Note explained. "Even times that came with athletics," he said.
Bardstown, Van Note was a defensive though we were losing on the field, those Van Note remembers UK`s unique x
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Jeff Vun Note/Allcntq Fulcons Ari Still/Kcnsus City Chiefs W¤i-ren Bryum/Atlanta Fqleons _ , Jéiry Blanton/Kdnsds City Chiefs  

 1
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l atmosphere. Ulf is 21 Cify l0CHf€ lineman on our team. lf he keeps playing Spgrfggqgfgr Hgwq rd
Vim N0f€`5 Pli1¤S f0f fh€ fUfUY€ ¤Y€ UM like this, he`ll be reco nized b the end of ·
€l€¤Y· Ulf is $FF¤¤g€‘ F0 be $5 and U1 Search his career as one of tie great;/st linemen QOSGII proclulmed Thu?
of another career," he said. "At this point, to ever play the game." Jlm Kovuch would be
1 don t know what 1 want todo with my Sti1l`s teammate at Kentucky on the Hone Of The Outstanding
l1fe.1do know thatlwilldoitin Kentucky ](yl regm or 1977, jeriy B/,4;;:0;;, re- _ ,
(he and his family reside in Louisville played rhe highly regarded W/hitney Paul mlddlemen In the league
dllflfig [lk? Off $@15001 and l look Wifli at inside linebacker and started the {Or ygqrs ‘lQ CQ|T]9_H `
great anticipation to the crisp autumn Chiefs last three games during lastyear`s Q `
days Iknow we will spend in Lexington," qrimpaigrr `   l
he Silid. This year, the left inside position is ' A \ _
His linemate at right tackle, Warren being contested between Frank Manu- ` Q
Brywz! has started for the Falcons since muleugu and BlQl['[[()[']_ · ~.
he was the team`s first-round draft choice Ahorhey eX.\5(/jldeag fh-5;-yeM ljng- f` A "
in 1977. All-NFC honors could be in store backer Ke//y 1v  
. ·i    ~ i   - 5..     · »-   s =<  v   · ‘ · .
`· { P    . _ if ,_ `  i " • if `   _.  i ,*5; _ ` ·. r• \
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l Dove Roller/Minnesota Vikings Dcnny Neal/Chicago Bears - A Doug Kotcir/New York Gionts ~ ‘ ` A

 "Meeting my wife and the general ex- Giants game (11). The man they call and team that brought to the University
perience needed for a continuing educa- "Kokomo" in the pros still is in the UK national recognition and a sixth place C
tional process, not only in education, but record books, for his 98-yard kickoff ranking in the country (10- 1)." C
social life also, is what I remember most return for a touchdown against Clemson Grant said, "I hope to make my home F
about UK," Roller said. in 1971. It was the first time he touched in Central Kentucky which is where I C
the ball in his college career since it was now live in the off-season (Bourbon Y
_ _ the opening game of the season. _ County). During my off-season condi- S
K0f¤r l$ `ll`\€ 'flhh l€C|d||"|Q Derrick Rummy, Oakland Raiders,has tioning I try to pass on the things I’ve [
[-Usher in Gi¤n·jS’ history. established himself as one of the fine learned to younger boys now traveling   -
young tight ends in the league. Third on the path I walked while at UK. And, i
  the Oakland Raiders depth chart when hopefully, direct them in a way so they   l
After his pro career, Roller plans to the 1980 season began, Ramsey`s play- avoid some of the mistakes I made at . C
pursue the field of energy. "My Associa- ing time increased dramatically after the their age," the Bills’ center explained. 1 I
tion with the Mobil Oil Company has Raiders dealt All-Pro Dave Casper to Special teams have been home for f
given me a new outlook on 1ife," he said. Houston at mid-season. another Kentucky gridder. Offensive E
Roller hopes to contribute to the Uni- 'Ihe former UK quarterback, remem- lineman T/00m Dornbrook has chased
versity by assisting in the area of recruit- bered by Wildcat fans for leading punts and kickoffs as well as backed-up C
ing and public relations — someday Kentucky to the Peach Bowl in 1976and veterans. He is now with the Miami  
possibly being the head football coach. 10-1 season in 1977, split time with Dolphins. Dornbrook has also spent time ‘
Center Danny Neal (`72) has veteran Raymond Chester and caught with the Pittsburgh Steelers. f
Cnmplered three years as the Chicago four passes for 100 years.   C
Bears starting snapper. The Corbin 1%// Grant, of the Buffalo Bills, was l
native has not missed a game since one of the most surprising starters on one "Thg Univer-Sify of  
`oinin > the Bears as a free agent in 1975 of the NFL`s most surprising teams in 1;
iifter lije was released by Baltimore. The 6- 1980. Coming off a 7-9record in 1979and Kentucky Gnd foglbq  _ Z
/1, 255-pounder is one of the primary considered at best an also-ran in the pre- QGVG mé ITTOFG CllI`€Cl'lOI'\ In
blockers who clears the way for all-time season, Buffalo spurted to five straight life, Gnd G SOCEGI l
great Walter Payton, who came to victories en route to their first playoff d . _ ,   b l
Chicago the same year Neal did. Dan appearance since 1974 G Ucchon Unchcmq 9 Y S
spends his off-season at his five acre plot Grant '77, likewise, was the third other I'T\€C|l`\S."—-—GI'OITl' E
on the Kentucky River near Frankfort. center when training camp opened last P
Doug Komr (75) was the New York year but he quickly moved into the   E
Giants’ leading rusher during the starting hole. He started every game. He The New Orleans Saints have two 3
seventies as he gained 5,224 yards and a experienced much of the same story at former Kentucky stars on its roster, both
3.8 average over his six seasons. That UK when he becameastarteron the 10-1 of them linebackers. V
made it quite a bargain when the Giants team after David Hopewell suffered an ]0e Federspiel '71 has been considered I
acquired Kotar in a 1974 trade with Pitts- injury early in the season. one of the top middle linebackers in the C
burgh. Grant said about his days at UK, "the NFL since he was drafted by the Saints in
He spent 1980 on the injured reserve University of Kentucky and football gave 1972. The Louisville native lives in Lex- Y
list after suffering a pre-season injury. me more direction in life, and a social ington during the off-season and works g
Kotar is the fifth leading rusher in education unattainable by other means. out at UK`s Shively Sportscenter. C
Giants history and is co-holder of their "My most memorable experience Ironically, Federspiel was hardpressed d
record for most passes caught during a while there was being part of a program much of the 1980 season by another 1
t
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Thom Dornbrook/Plmburgh Stoolers if Joe Federspiel/Newbnzl ns Sqlhvs ’    Jini Kavgch/New  rlqd sSqjpE<;“2»·»:r ,"¤iiB¤B-W§nkelZNev(iYqrltglétsI ,’_’     si
·l

 former UK star, jim Kooach. Sports- well as other ailments which limited his
caster Howard Cosell said it all when he playing time.
proclaimed Kovach would be one of the joining Burke on the Colts will be de-
outstanding middlemen in the league for fensive lineman and 'rookie’ Tim Gooc/J,
years to come. Unfortunately, Kovach the most recent addition by Kentucky to
sufferedashoulder injury that forced him the pro program when he was drafted
` to miss the Saints’ final three games in this year by Baltimore.
  l980.
The New York jets ex-Wildcat is Bob
l UWnkel‘76,adefensive tackle. During the LgMq51·gr, q gfqrfgr gincg
f off-season Winkel s ends his time in · ’ · · ·
l Florida and the Blulegrass. He was a lolnlng The   In  
familiar fan at the UK basketball road hos DGVGF fT\|SS€Cl G QGTUG
gemee leee Yeee in his pro career.
Linebacker Frank Le/l/latter ’74 is one '
of the rocks that anchor the Philadelphia  
Eag;€Sl1.[Ol;-fired d€i€.ns€‘ glfqafing an The fortune; of football are ever-
msl C ml? ac ef POSIUOU Wit Veteran changing. Since the writing of thir story
Au`PfO BIH B€rg€y’ LEMQSIH has bee“ and ity printing, Dave Roller har retired;
Ov€[1OOk€d bY many because Of the man Bob Winkel war cut from the New York
he Plays beside` But P€°Plf“’ who kn9W ]et: and ]oe Federrpiel war taken off the
football will tell you the Lexington native New Orjglmf Saint; roger
is at least equally important to the Eagles` '
3--4 defense.
An Eagles’ 4th round draft choice in
1974, L€M35f€f h&5· lS>€‘€`¤ 21 S€P1ff€f Sll'1C€ Bob C. Whitaker ir atrociate director of the ,.
1975, including all l6 regular season UK Alumni Arrociation. He war graduated   _
games last year. I-Ie has never missed a ffvm the UK $#900] vflvurnaliim in 1958    
game in his pro career and enjoyed $3,;-{ i \
possibly his finest season last year with ig V .
99 total tackles, 38 of them initial hits 0 -,
against the run. gi
LeMaster works as a real estate in- ` •,
vestment counselor and operates ,i,_  
LeMaster’s Racquetball and Conditioning .;_  
Spa in Westtown, Pa. in the off-season. '    
Randy Burke was the third wide I,
receiver in the Baltimore Colts’ passing 4 K `
game and finished last year with ll `
catches for l-48 yards and two touch-
downs. The first-round draft choice in
1977 missed four weeks in the middle of ` W
the season with a severe thigh bruise, as
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  Frank.LéM¤ster/Philcidslphic E¤§|es` Tim Gooch/Baltimore Colts — V Derrick Ramsey/O¤k|¤nd Raiders `   " ` `
*1*

 • 1  
story on ape  
by Margaret B. Allen 1
l
1
l
ll a
ou have been given the is as good as any, excluding Berkley, * man accepted his diploma from McVey l f
responsibility of choosing UCLA, and Columbia" Kentucky is to the accompaniment of a "thunderous r
i materials for a time capsule to also the only state with a state-wide ovation. Everything stopped for five {
be placed in the cornerstone oral history commission. minutes while they thumped and r
of the newest building on campus. This commission has funded two thundered for this boy." ‘
Other than a copy of A History of outstanding projects; the Blacks in When the ovation subsided, McVey l
Barkezlmll at UK and a picture of Coach Lexington project and The Black turned and said, "And they say there is i a
joe B. Hall, what will you choose? Church in Kentucky. Eighty interviews more rejoicing in heaven over one V
Remember, archivists have a have supplemented the few written sinner that repented." President McVey
tremendous responsibility. It is they accounts of black history in the state. then received his own five minute ,5
who decide what is saved so that Another source of funding has been "thunderous ovation." f
historians can write their histories. the UK Alumni Association which has The depression years at UK brought d
Terry L. Birdwhistell, coordinator of supported a project on the history of less pleasant memories for Dr. Brady. t
Audio-Visual Archives at the Margaret the University. One hundred and On April 1, 1952, President McVey i_
l. King Library on the UK campus, twenty interviews with former announced to the assembled employees F
constantly faces the archivist`s· students, faculty members, and that as of that time the University was P
dilemma administrators have provided oral broke. "Each person was to get a check C
As coordinator of the Kentucky Oral histories from every decade in the for $100 for May and june," recalled I
History Project which began in 1973, twentieth century. Brady. [
he has witnessed the tremendous A 1976 interview with Dr. George Such comments not only breathe life
growth of materials on Kentucky K. Brady, professor of English from into the history of the University, but P
history. The collection includes 1925 to 1963, provides interesting and into the history of the country as well. {
priceless manuscripts, rare books, diverse observations about UK in the Who, then, uses these fecordings and {
audio—visual materials, and a second quarter of the century. Dr. transcripts of the oral history I
photographic archives. Birdwhistell Brady fondly remembers Dr. Frank collection? People writing histories of
also considers the 1,000 taped McVey, president of UK from 1917 to Lexington, people writing dissertations a
interviews to be exceptional. 1940. and books, or people from Washington \
"Historians in the past often relied McVey was very tall and looked stare, Georgia and Tennessee l V
on diaries and letters for research. "sour as an old owl. I-Ie said it wasn`t researching Robert Penn Warren. }
People today seldom keep diaries or his fault. God gave him that expressior TO assure easy user access, Ms_ Allen , C
write letters, so the taped information and he couldn't help it." Brady offered rries rg organize inrerviews areund a V
we have is unique." an example of McVey`s "undying sense Parrieulrir subjeer and [hen earalegues S
Susan E. Allen, oral history editor, of humor." and indexes rhe rapes Tihjg js an i
relates the story of a prominent McVey’s disciplining of a football advantage re users, bu[ glgg is a
Kentucky political figure who remarked player created a "state-wide hullabaloo. ljmiratied Rarely a day Passes {har C
to   lD[€l`Vl€‘W€[` 11f[€I` L1 (.llSCL15SlO[T, Ul We COl.lld have ClTZ1Ug€d the WlT()l€ Someone dogsnig I·n€¤[jO[] an  
haven't thought about this for 20 or 50 curriculum. The University could have jnrgrgsrjyjgv werrhwhile imei-View "We {
y€211‘S.n gOI`1€ broke 211"ld DO ODE WOL1lCl l’]2V€ said {yy [O Cgmpgnggrg   dgjng Pfesenf  
"The state of Kentucky has an a thing. But to discipline a football Prdjeers jn suffieiem breadrh and S
excellent reputation in oral history," player !" depth," says Ms. Allen. (
says Birdwhistell. "Our program at UK McVey reconsidered and the football [
player graduated with his class. At the a
commencement exercises the young
(u

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, These tapes are an investment in the Farrell sees this project as an effort For those who have studied
i future. Allen quotes the president of at preserving a part of Kentucky`s Warren's and Cleanth Brooks's
the oral history program at Duke heritage which has national Understanding Fiction and
University, "Oral history is not just significance. Understanding Poetry, it is surprising
talking to old people." Warren, born in Guthrie, Kentucky, to hear Warren dismiss these
i Birdwhistell supports this. "Oral is a novelist, dramatist, essayist, publications so casually. "They were
history tries to round out the picture teacher, and winner of two Pulitzer class notes literally. And only because
. and bring into focus things that Prizes, one for nonfiction, another for somebody came and saw the notes and
written materials can't." poetry. "We have a national treasure in asked forthe books, do they exist."
David F. Farrell, head of collection Warren," states Farrell. Oral history Farrell asks, "Are you a poet more
development at the King Library, also projects have permitted videotaping than a novelist?"
feels that oral history lends an added and recording of the 75 year old "l feel closer to poetry, I do. And it`s
dimension to scholarship," . . . it has Warren. a more personal thing. No question
the advantage of letting you hear When listening to the tapes of about that, and I'm inclined to think it
inflections, to hear the emphasis a Farrell's October, 1977 interview with was better than the fiction, maybe not.
person gives a certain word." Farrell Robert Penn Warren, one feels less an 1 don't know. And l don’t even care.
points out that print may take on a eavesdropper than a participant. lf (laugh)"
certain artificiality when speakers Warren and Farrell are sitting on a low Also interviewed in the Kentucky
revise words and thoughts after seeing sofa facing the fireplace in Warren’s Writers Oral History project were
them in black and white. Fairfield, Connecticut home, then the Gurney Norman and Elizabeth
While this fact seems obvious for listener is sitting in a chair close by, Hardwick. Dr. Norman, novelist and
political and historical figures, it is also actually nodding in understanding, short story writer, teaches creative
true for the literary figures recorded in smiling in amusement, and leaning writing at the University of Kentucky.
the Kentucky Writers Oral History forward to grasp meaning from Hardwick, an alumna of UK, is
Project. Warren`s husky, breathy, machine gun founder and advisory editor of the New
Farrell is now directing this project, cadenced speech. York Review of Books.
an outgrowth of two Robert Penn Warren’s great pride in his family is Oral history projects such as this
Warren projects. These three projects evident in his early remembrancesj provide materials that may be seen and
were funded by the Kentucky Oral Both grandfathers were Confederate heard as well as read at the King
History Commission. "We are creating soldiers. His maternal grandfather, Library. This unique dimension to
it original resource material in libraries with whom Warren spent several scholarship is available in King North.
which are primarily thought of as childhood summers, became a captain All alumni are welcome to walk in and
storehouses, sorters, or purveyors of at Shiloh. press the security button. When the
information," says Farrell. Warren`s maternal ancestors may door opens, you`ll enter the three
This recent project will expand have owned the cabin in which Mark dimensional world of UK`s special
existing interviews with Robert Penn Twain was born. Twain`s "father was a collections.
Warren and selected colleagues and Virginian and came to Kentucky and
friends. Biographical and literary married the most beautiful girl in
information will also be collected on Kentucky. She was supposed to have Margaret B. Allen ’81 is a graduate student
six Kentucky writers: Wendell Berry, been a very witty woman." in the College of Communications and an
Gurney Nofm`a¤’ Cleanth Brooks, lnléfn dl Z/78   R€.|`€d7`C]f7 FOI¢nddli07l.
Elizabeth Hardwick, Sallie Bingham,
and Marsha Norman.
7

 Dr: (lurk  
i ' r. Thomas D. Clark '29, `69, who i ‘
·, '   _4 ·   ,__,;.. , ,,, e ,_ first came to Kentucky in 1928, (
in   ’ ---·~·—·*   has been a leading force in the ;
,_,,|;m· l lniV€f5iiY _ A ii     ,   `  ·  ,_ _ development, teaching and pre- Q
      f . "   _   servation of Kentucky history