xt7fj678tc99 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7fj678tc99/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581111  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7fj678tc99 section xt7fj678tc99 Coliseum. Memorial Hall Dedicated To War Dead
Men will march and bands will
play on Main Mreet today Veterans Day
but on campus,
may well turn toward the
thoughts
names of thousands of Kentuckl-nn- s
and UK students Inscribed
in two memorials to war dead.
In the halls of Memorial Coliseum are listed the names of mort
than 9.000 Kentuckians and UK
students who died in World War

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II. It. is unlikely that any campus
organization or proup is without
representation
in the lines of
bronze stars.
For example, the Kernel staff
needs only to turn to its 1911-1- !
staff for shocking confirmation.
Four top executives from that staff
died in the war.
In Memorial Hall are listed the
dead from World War I. This hall
was dedicated at solemn ceremonies
on May 30. 1929.
The Hall also carries some commemoration of World War II dead
in the carillon bells in the clock
.
tower, dedicated to the memory
Alexander Bonnyman Jr., who
was killed in action, Nov. 23. 1943.
The bells were given by Lt. Bonny-man- 's
father, an 1888 UK engineerof-Lt-

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These stars, hung, on the walls in Memorial Coliseum. serve as
a constant reminder of the supreme sacrifice made by thousands
of Kenturkians and UK men in World War II so that we, who walk
those halls, may do so free from fear and political oppression.

ing graduate.
The dedicatory speaker at the
ceremony for Memorial Hall was
of War, Pat
the Under-Secretary

Cooperstown Elects
Governing Council

self-sacrific-

erect and strong and free. TTerU
War II. UMI-4They shall grow not old. as w
that are left to grow old Ae shall
not weary them, nor the yearn
condemn At the going down of the)
sun and in the mortutw. we will
remember them."
At the first baccalaureate exercises held in the new Memorial
Caliseum for the class of 13r3,
President H I Donovan pledged
the building to the service of tho
S.

people.

"The youth of our generation

hate purchased this building witli
their lites that the youth of later

generations might enjoy it to the
enrichment of their lives." he de- -(
larrd.
"To the citizens of Kentucky
who have erected this magnificent
structure we solemnly pledge that
it will be so used a.. to return
to your sons and daughters great
dividends."
Today's parade on Main Street
will move out at 10:45 a.m. In
general charge is the Man O' War
Post No. 8 of the American Legion.
The Tershing Rifles unit from
I'K will be in the line of march.
The parade will move from third
.and Broadway south to Maia
Street, east on Main to Kastera
and Midland Avenues.

TT

H

attempting to function under a Stratton.

Approximately ' 546 votes were Vol. L
cast by Cooperstown's 650 residents.
Cooperstown last had a governing body in 1956, but at the end
of that year all but one councilman
graduated and no attempt was
made to form another council.
Dave Ravencraft, serving for the
University as organizer of the community residents, said the first
council meeting will be held this
week. The meeting date will be
announced later.
The newly elected mayor and
council men take office immediately.

LEXINGTON, KY., TUESDAY, NOV. II. I0'8

The UK debate tear.i will meet,
tht' Ou'out Ui iw::ty debate team
Tht ..tit

May, 1959.

Early indications show some interesting races shaping up, not
only for the general election, but
for the primary next week as well.
As of Friday, the Students Tarty
had four applicants- for the one
Arts and Science seat now held by
Whayne Priest, SC elections chairman. Priest Is not seeking
to his representative post.
Another development last week
was the entrance of Terry Kuester
into the Ncv: 19 primary. Kuester
served fcr cne term and part of a
second during 1955 and 1957 as
representative from the College of
Commerce.
-

on

YOUNG DEMOCRATS
The Ycung Democrats Club
group picture for the Kentuckian
will be taken tonight ia Room
211 of the Journalism Building.

bility of opposition for Stepp in
the Nov. 19 primary.
Besides Stepp's Commerce seat,
the Campus Party presently holds
the two Engineering seats which
are at stake this fall. The Students' Party holds the seats in Ag
and Home Ec. Arts and Science,
Education and Graduate School.
The eighth seat up for election
in December, Law School representative, is presently held by a
neutral.
Filing for the primary will close
tomorrow. Botii parties will be
taking applications from 5 p m.
in the SC office, Room 127, SUB.
Last month Student Congress
authorized Nov. 19 as the date for
a primary election for the two
parties. This is the first year that
UK student government has set
up a regulated primary.
Last year the Students' Party
held a primary in April, but this
election was regulated by the party
and not the elections committee
of the old SO A.
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years.

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to be debited

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"Rev lwl: Further Development
ct Nuclear Weapons ?h"ukl be
Prohibited by International Agreement." The affirmative will be
aiuued by the Ox!' rd t am and the

V

relative side of tl'.f a:4'ir:;tnt will

le

t;i ken by the UK team.
a pre-laKiiliard
Huberts.
rnior from Paducah, lu been a
member of the I'K debute tram
for four years. He has been selected as the outstanding collegiate
db it r in Kentucky for three
w

preparation lor the primary by interviewing candidates lor the;
f' Unfix
eijht openings in SC.

Commerce.. As of now he is unopposed for his renomination bid,
but a high Campus Party source
indicated there was a good possi-

.

tea:ii

slates tli is week lor the Nov. 11) primary.
Last v.eek the two parties began to pick up activity in

Kuester has at least one opponent in the primary next week,
The only present incumbent
seeking another term is Merle
Stepp (C), representative from

toiujit

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The Campus and Students xirties both will annoume their

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No. 2

UK Debate Team Meets
Touring Oxford Tonight

Both Parties Prepare
For Nov. 19 Primary
This fall's SC general election
will be-iDecember with botli
party's candidates being: nominated
in the primary on Nov. 19.
The election this fall will find
two seats at stake in Engineering
and one in all other colleges except Pharmacy. The Pharmacy
seat is presently held by Jerry
Johnson whose term expires in

JJJ

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

House, Joe Rich; Johnston House,
Cooperstown, UK married
dents' community, is once again Jim Swann; Cobb House, Lucille
stu-

governing council.
Friday, Cooperstown residents,
in &n effort to establish a community council, elected Jerry Noe
as mayor with one councilman
representing each of the married
students' residence units.
C'ouncilroen and their represen-- ;
tative units are O'Hara House,
John Arnett; Rice House, Ray
Cashen; Roberts House, Jim Ridley; Cawein House, Arthur Teter;
Noe Houe, Joe Justice and W. K.
Steele; AHfn House, Kash Cala-ha- n
and Mildred Throckmorton;
Fcx Houc, Kuth Freeman; Knight

rick J. Hurley. Dr. Frank J. Me Vey.
president of the University pre- -,
sided, and the memorial was accepted for the state by Gov. Flem
I). Sampson.
'This beautiful memorial is not
n monument to war." Mr. Hurley
declared. "It is a monument to the
unselfish valor of Kentuckians
who gae their lives to insure the
liberty and happiness of their
It is a monument to
strength and Justice of Amerithe
can institutions and ideals, in defense of it these soldiers died, lt
i
a tribute to the noble inn'hers
of noble sons, whom they inspired
with the sublime attributes of courage, fidelity, and
The cornerstone for Memorial
Colieum was laid on a rainy Feb.
22 in 1949. Participating
in the
event were Gov. Earle Clements,
President H. L. Donovan. Coaches
A. F. Rupp. Paul Bryant. Athletic
Director Bernie - Shively. Wallace
Jones for the basketball squad and
Doc Ferrell, representing the Wildcat football players.
On the cornerstone is the following inscription:
"Here In stone and steel is raised
a memorial to more than 9,000 sons
and daughters of the State of Kentucky who gave their lives in
battle that we might live in peace,

jears.

Roberts is president of the National Council of Tau Kappa
Alpha, honorary debate' society;
a member of ODK: a vice president of the We.slcyan Foundation
and president of the Interfaith.

The Oxford University debate team will compete against the I'K
debaters in the Guignol Theatre tonight. The two English debaters
are (left) Brian Walden and (right) Stuart Griffiths. The Oxford
team is presently touring the United States and will compete
against some 40 American debate teams. The
Debate
UK-Oxfo-

Council.

rd

will begin at 7:30. p. m.

UK Receives $39,645

In Gifts, Research Grants
UK trustees accepted gifts and
grants of money totaling $39,643
Saturday at a meeting of the executive committee of the Board
of Trustees.
The Kentucky Department of
Economic Development gave $12.-50- 0
to the UK Agricultural Experiment Station for the completion
of a public swine testing station
on UK's Coldstream Farm.
A contribution
of $3,000 was
made last year to begin work on
the project. The purpose of the
station is to help swine breeders
evaluated their stock and to prohogs in Kentucky.
mote meat-typ- e
and their gifts include:
Donors
National Association of Artificial
Breeders, $l,2'J0; Southern States

'

Tex Fitzgerald, the second member of the UK team. Ls a sopho
more from Lexington. During his
freshman year he won a place on
the University debate team. He is
a member of the band and a mem
ber of the Interfaith Council.
The Oxford team H composed of

Cooperative, Richmond. Va., $303; Stuart Griffiths and Brian Waldea.
A. C. Ransom. Toronto. Ontario. Griffiths served as a lieutenant
in the British army. He is a for$1,700.
Portland . Cement Association. mer president of the Oxford
Continued on Page 2
Louisville, $300; Torn Products
Co. Chicago, $30; Algernon Sydney Sullivan Foundation,
New
York, $3,000; Joseph and Helen
Exams
Kegeastein Foundation, Chicago.
$2,500.
The foreign language baaio
achievement examinations for
Smith Kline and French Laboratories. Philadelphia, $4,000; Col- t Arts and Sciences students wh
onial Foods Co., Sheitjyville, $50; entered the University before
General ..Motors ..Corp., ..$3,8JJ; February, 1958. will be given at
3 p. m. Friday. Students plan- Western Kentucky Manufacturing
Milk ..Improvement ..Association. ning to take this examination
must sign up for It In Deaa
$200; American Dairy Association.
Whites office, McVey Hall 12$.
Louisville. $400.
no later than Wednesday.
Maon County Farm bureau,
Continued on Page 3

Laii:ua:t

* U--

KF.NTrCKY KERNEL. Tucvl.iy, Nov. II,

Tlir,

I0.VS

Debate

di:lta sk;ma pi PR Pledge Candidates
Sigma Ti, rnnimrrrr
Drlta

honorary, will mrrt tonight at
in Itoom 201 of the St R

And Queen Named Al Ball

7

Tan Bcltr Pi
Names New
Pledge Clasi-23

pledge-elect-

d,

UKltoiindlnhlc:
To Discuss Civics

s.

Those elected are: VV. K. Alvcr-.-oLexington; B. L. Ball. Lancaster; D. F. Bittle. Paducah; J.
,V. Calvert. Lexington; N. Y. Cravens, Otftnisboro; L. Faris. Brooklyn. N. Y.; P. R. Francis. Monti-cellH. C. Godsey, Somerset.
J. B. Greene. London; S. R. Hal-ter- t.
Langley; C. S. Harlan, Lexington; R. L. Henderson. Auburn;
n. E. Hoskins. Corbin; R. S. Howe.
Carbondale, 111.
K. C. Johnson, Georgetown; D.
V. Pearson, Brllevue; J. I). Reams,
Itichmcnrl; S. J. Riehl. Louisville;
O. J. Schumacher, Berea; C. Vincent, Lexington; B. L. Welch,
Nortonville; and J. M. Yowcll.
Rowling Green.
Nominated for advisors are: A.
L. Chambers, L. E. Gregg and O.
W; Stewart, all of Lexington.

The University of Kentucky
Roundtable will present a discussion. "Home Rule for Municipalities." this week. John Breckcn-ridsFayette County representative in the Kentucky General Assembly, will be the moderator.
Panelists will be Roy Owsley,
Louisville city consultant: John
Moloney, former mayor of Covington, and present city commissioner; and Dr. Kenneth Vanland-inghaassociate professor of
political science at UK.
The program may be heard over
WHAS at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday,
and ..over ..WBKY ..at ..6:30 ..p.m.
Thursday.

The. pledges will serve a week of
pledge duty", doing odd jobs around

CLASSIFIED ADS

the engineering building and carrying sledgehammers.
Initiation will be at a banquet
November 20th in the Lafayette
Hotel. Dr. K. O. Lange, Director of
the Wenner-Gre- n
Aeronautical
Lab, will be the principal speaker.

Continued from Page 1
I'nion Society, debating fraternity
of the school.
Griffiths is also news editor of
the periodical Isis and is editor
of the Conservative Association
Magazine. He also takes part in
dramatics and reading law.
Walden is a former pilot in the
Royal Air Force. He has a state
scholarship for post graduate research. A former president of the
Oxford Union Society, he is chair- man of the student committee of
the Socialist International.
During the past five years the
UK tram has debated about 2.000
0
times, and has win from
percent of its engagements. UK
debaters won five first places in
the Tau Kappa Alpha regional
tournament w hich was held in
Cincinnati Nov. 8.
The Oxford team Is on an an-- 1
nual debating tour of the United
States. During the tour, the group!
will debate more than 40 other

are Larry
candidates
Ansell, Louis
A. Akers. Fenton L.
N. Barresl. John Brennan, Charles
A. Brothers.
Garland B. Bays,
Claude Buzzard. Win f red Campbell. Adrian B. Cherry. Garland
W. Clark.
Cox. Albert
Arthur
Crespo. George E. Dean. Albert G.
Dempsey. MacDonald R. Drane.
Buddy
FisUr. Karem George,
L. Gossett. Gary E. Gsch-winRobevt
Darrell Hayes, Franklin D.
House. Charles H. Kelly. Bennie J.
Jacobs, Duane Lathram. Dale W.
E.
Loar. Millard Lakin. Philip
Lunncy. William T. May, William
C. McDaniels, William R. .McCray.
Michael L.
Meuth. William D.
Montgomery, Donald E. Niestrath,
Huelet Ockcrman, Allen T. Pardon,
Joseph H. Pecno, Charles S. Riley,
'
William W. Ramsey. Jimmy D.
Robinson, William E. Seale, John
P. Spath.
Talbert M. Strange.
David A. Stith. Joseph E. Sturgill.
Marshall Turner. Gordon W. Tur-le- schools.
Lowell S. Thomas, Nelson A.
Thomas. Louis E. Tinnell, Barry
Wyle and Julian E. Witt.
Pledge

Pershint; Rifles pledge candidates and queen contest winners
were announced at the Coronation
Ball Saturday night.
The queen and her two attendants will serve as honorary Pershing Rifles officers. Queen Katie
Maddux received the rank of
captain. Attendants Pat Humphrey
i
and Darlene Schcibel were made
honorary first and second lieuHonTan Brta Pi, EiiKinorrinK
orary and UK's oldest greek letter tenants.
society, had its annual tapping
ceremony last Friday. Three men
in black robes toured t lie classrooms in Anderson Hall, and

'tapped'

NEWMAN CLUP.
Newman Club
The weekly
meeting will be held at 7:30 in
the. Social Itoom of the SUB.
John Bonno will lead a student
panel of three in a discussion of
the fifth commandment, "Thou
shall not kill." A social hour
will precede the meeting.
A review course of Catholic
doctrine will be held in the Newman Club Chapel at 3 p. in.
Wednesday.

65-7-

OPEN

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STUDENTS Who are capable of teach- ing tap and ballet, call
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Price

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foreign car. 60 miles to gallon. Original
owner. Best possible shape. Has heater,
defroster, electric wipers, turn signals.
Wonderful runabout. Kelson for selling:
have two other cars and cannot drive
all three. Priced at $900.00 (below book).
CjII John Mjrcum.

ext

1st. Run.)

Dick

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* Appointments Stale ArtartMeeting Held ;nHere
Announced
fnul'v
ait
By UK Board painter

Approximately 70
teachers
attended the Kentucky Art Education Association meeting held at
UK Friday and Saturday.
Friday night. Frederic Thursz,
and UK instructor, spoke
on trends in modern American and
Major University of Kentucky
approved by the European painting.
j4 pointments
inmeeting opened Friday
Board of Trustees Saturday
The
lecture by
with a
cluded an associate professor and afternoon
two assistant professors.
Julian II. Harris, Atlanta sculp'cr.
Robert O. Weiss was appointed
professor of modern
associate
F.
languages. George
loreiRii
Crewe was made assistant professor of chemical engineering and
Dean E. Knavel was named
Element three, Flight C of the
horticulturist and assistant Cadet Police Squadron won in the
'
pofessor of horticulture.
finals of the AFROTC Element
professor of applied competion.
Assistant
mechanics Charles 15. Vooldritl?e
The Band Squadron took second
v.as promoted to associate profes- place and Element two. Flight C,
sor. Howard D. Lusk was promoted Squadron took third place in the
from instructor to assistant profes- competition.
sor of education.
The winning element was awardrom Nov. ed a Streamer of Guidon
A leave of absence
and
1 through Oct. 31, lDGO.Was grant -- each memberof the elVmenLJ'v-- .
J
"Yd to Gilbert Tauffner, director of celved a ribbon for their uniform.
fi'.idio-visuservices,
Extended
The finals of the competition
Programs Division.
was judged by .Major Palmer, CaThe trustees also approved the det Colonel K. W. Walker, Cadet
following ranks for. persons serv Lt. Colonel W. R. Piatt, Cadet
ing in the UK program at the Colonel D. P. Klaibcr, and Cadet
University of Indonesia:
Colonel P. A. Brawncr.
Trofessor of mechanical
The winning clement was com- James 15. T. Downs; John posed of D. E. Niestrath. element
A. Feyk, associate professor
of leader; R. M. Abell. S. D. Say lor.
1 eat,
transfer and thermody- W. R. Dailey, G. R. Williams, R. J.
namics; Walter R. Hunziker, as- Ramsey and W. S. Pierce.
sistant professor of architecture
and city planning.
Harry E. Nelson, professor of
F. L. Underwood,
mathematics;,
professor of agricultural economics; Lewis S. Salter, associate
rrofessor of physics; and Milo M.
Wolff,
professor of
assistant

and

panel

ri;-r-

u

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n

o:rr:vj-perar-

Harris Charles
Graxes. member of the UK College of FiKinerri:..'
a:u!
Robert Wiags. sculptor and
in.otnutor. made up the panel.
Saturday's srhtdule included a
problem session at the Ait Gallery,
with Clara Eagle, chairman of the
art department at Murray Slate
College, presiding.
Prof. E. W. Raniu Is of the UK
art department, spoke on '"Problem
of the Literature for Art Education." at the session Saturday.
Daniel Shmdelbower, art supervisor in the office of Kentucky's
supeiintendent of pu'ihc instruction, disoused, "Problem.-- , in the

Continued from Page
$17a; Ktntiuky
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'taste!

1955.

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Purchasing Moved
To Service Building
The Purchasing Department, a
division of Maintenance and Operation, has been relocated. Last

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v--

v.cek, the department was moved
to the second floor of the northwest wing of the Service Building

en Limestone Street.
'Formerly, it was located in the
basement of the Administration
Euilding.

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GET SATISFYING FLAVOR...

The trustees also named the new
inoperative house at 635 Maxwel-to- n
Court the Myrtle Weldon CoHouse in
operative
honor of
Kentucky's former home demonstration leader who served for 31
in
j ears. Miss Weldon retired

.

Have them recapped in ONE DAY at

Southern Political Scieiue
nucting m Gallinburg,
Ter.n., Nov. ti. 7. and 8.
The conference was built around
topics on political theory, political
partie, foreign affairs and metropolitan areas.
Dr. Amry Vandenbosch, director
of UK's School of Diplomacy and
International Commerce is a member of the Council of the

o

fal-e-

DON'T LET WINTER CATCH
YOU WITH SLICK TIRES

Five members of the UK

11

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Tovilfc it Ovrr. urvter. QrtXKxJ (Xvl
iyS ltj!l Mjils f'rm tuLoovo'

and thoy are Mild!
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All tenet ah.' tt ions ;ue
hh!uu tin one

Lexington

nulu.le:

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Jotntial

cilt.s aecep'ed h

Miscellaneous
1

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i

Kentucky. $t0.
.rmeo I oumUtion, .Middlrtow n.
Ohio. S!.::0; Krntucky ll.wikrM

1

il of

lh Women, fuinituie for the t
ci ptj( n loom of the Auli..l"
11. inc.
alued at a ppi ur.a
$4oi). and .lames II Kellry. pr
fessor of .ui ii ult ural elKUieei ir
h set ol
ali.ii t nuts of tin- Alta i
cm SH'.it of AwMcultur.il
witierinoj and a set of the AwM
cultural I'.i;..inertir.w
al .et at approMinatelv fcl'M

uiui Trust Co. LrxiiKtoii.
S1.0OO;
Kh Lilly and Co. Indianapolis. JJ.onO; Aubrey IVcd Mills.
IouisMlle.
Columbia Gas uf

Political Scientists
Attend Area Meet

engi-rocrin- ?,

chapter. Nation.il Count

1

Broaic.trrs
Firt National

Hank

Schools."

;

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as-j-ist-

pr.s--

UK Receives $39.6 1 ;

(!cm:u.,

Winners Named
In Drill Contest

al

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Tin: KiMK kv kikm i. ti.m!.,. No, ii.

is our

miJJU namt

-

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* The Kentucky Kernel
Entr4

thr

rot

Puhluhrd

The Readers' Forum

Univfrsity of Kfniucky

mutter nnArr n Art r.f March 3, 1879.
tmpC holidays and eiama.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Office at Lfiineton, Krnturky
fcnir

limei

ttrik during the

worn) cU

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chi-

Ann Roberts, Society Editor
Norman McMullin, Advertising Manager
TimuT Armlet, Business Manager
John Mitchell, Stajf Photographer
Marilyn Lyvcrs and Judy IVnncbakcr, Proofreaders
TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF
At.icr. RrooiNC, Associate Editor

Millott,

Editor

Faul Scott,

Sports Editor

The Cardinal Chirps
game that the hostility often erupted
into fights and even carried into the
Legislature was not a valid reason.
Such statements, they maintain, are
applicable only to the "dark ages ot

Some two weeks ago the Kernel
carried an editorial which said that
the University, as a matter of policy
in athletic events, was opposed to
scheduling the University of Louisville in basketball.
This editorial was written alter the
Kernel's sports editor received a letter
from the sports editor of ihe Cardinal,
the U. of L. student newspaper, and
the editorial was merely a reiteration
of what has been UK athletic policy
for some '2d years.
In Friday's issue, the U. ol I., paper
called the Kernel to task for opposing
a University U. of L. schedule. Some
of the Cardinals criticism was justified; the majority of it, however,
was neither .'logical, ..justifiable nor

athletic history."

To this we would reply: What
about the riot following the

The Cardinal editorial said they
had not suggested a game, but merely
that the two sports editors get together and discuss the possibilities.
Following this discussion, the U. of L.
paper proposeil that the Kernel and
the Cardinal would support a University U. of L. contest with a joint
editorial campaign.
There is nothing to prevent the
two sports editors from discussing
such a possibility, but it would be
We
little more than a discussion.
are opposed to intrastate athletics
because past experience has shown
created far exceeds
that the
which might be gainany advantages
does
not dicate
ed. The Kernel
it ours, but we
University policy, nor
are in agreement in this instance and
ill-wi- ll

we will not advocate this move.
The Cardinal goes on to say that
one of our reasons for opposing the

.Tennessee-

game in

-Chattanooga

correc t.

Knox-vill- e

last Saturday? What is to prevent the same thiiig from happening
here?
The U. of L. paper goes on to ask
this timeless question: "Is UK afraid
to schedule the University ol Louis-- ,
ville lwr tjie lear of getting beat?"
There is always a possibility that
this might happen, but we doubt
that the danger of getting "beat" has
much beating on this policy.
In sum, the Cardinal attacks as
invalid the University's reasons for
not competing with the. University of
Louisville in athletics. They re use to
belieye that the policy exists because
of rather unsayory experiences in the
past, and they maintain that reasons
existing '20 years ago are not valid
reasons today.
there would be a
Undoubtedly
great deal of interest in a game between the two schools, and probably
every contest would be played before
a packed house. Hut the University
would be in the unenviable position
it once held when it played Transylvania and Outre:
If we win, we did so because we
are bigger and weie expected to win.
1

.

A

II we lose, there's the attitude that
Day id has just slain Goliath.

No matter how the score of
name, came out, UK would lose.

the

To The Editor:

about
to lose )our subscribers to air "up
and coming" college daily.
At least, that's the impression we
got when we read "Name Withheld's"
letter in Wednesday's Kernel. We imsearched
mediately
through the
Kernel and discovered the following'
screamingly funny liller:
Little Boy Blue come blow your

wish to
comment on a statement made in Dan
Millott's fine article orr Homecoming
in which he
itr Thursday's Kernel
states that SuKy feels the present

ak)V out Netu Yorker! You're

nose.
We all broke into hysterical laughter when the sophisticated wit of this
gem struck us. Although there is no
"doubt that," as engineers, we miss
some of the delicate nuances ol the
'
'
inherent humor of this.
You're right, Mr. "Name Withheld." These humorous fillers do give
a lilt (a badly needed one). However,
we lound your letter to be infinitely
more hilarious than the best of the
lillcrs. Keep the anonymous letters
coming.
And as for voir, Mr. Editor, let's
have some pudding "to go with this
spice we hear so much about.

Ronald

The Legislatures

Election Aftermath
EDMOND Le BRENTON

DemocraWASHINGTON (AP)-T- he
tide that flooded Congress
tic election
also swept Democrats into control of 12

itate lawmaking bodies formerly Republican dominated.
The sea of ballots, however, vyashed
shore problems as well as prizes lor the
new Democratic state senators and representatives.
The trouble most widely reported was
an old lamiliar headache: money how
to raise state revenues with least pain to"
Kate voters.
At least si new legislatures haye big
contend with. Others
Mate deficits to
face demands for costly programs. Nearly all hae some sort of budget won ies.
Among other issues popping up in one
or more state houses were reappjor tino-inen- t
ol legislatiues espec iallv in places
wheie Democrats
complained o past
gerrymanders at their expense; attempts
to enact oi lepeal l ight to woik laws;
nate prohibition repeal. In the South
SCiine ol the legislators weic looking or
ways to bolster the legal delciiscs
ol
segregation.
A Minty.hy the AsMitiatid Press in 31
ttatts w li it h held elections lor legisla

In 10 Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Oregon, Rhode Island, South
Dakota, Utah. Wisconsin and Wyoming
Democrats took over one house formerly
in one, Michigan, they
Republican-held;- '
achieed a tie in a formerly Republican
house. There were rro shifts of control
that layout! the Republicans.
Kveryyvhcrc outside the already 100 per
cent Democratic staichouses in the South,
the Democrats scored gains, whether or
not these gave them numerical control.
They kept 13 already Democratic legislatures, in Alabama, Colorado, Florida,
Gcirgia. Maryland, New Mexico. North
Oklahoma, South Carolina,
Carolina,
Texas,
Tennessee,
Washington, West
Virginia.
'1 he Republicans held on to control in
lour

Iowa,

Kansas,

New

York,

and

Noiih Dakota.

In

Minnesota and
split lontiol continued.

two states

One Mate Ne braka has
tisan legislature.

a

Peiuisy-yam'- a

t

some changes will haye to be made
to prevent them lrom recur ling.
Though those dilliculties and situations were unfortunate to say the
least, I feel that they were inevitable
and that present criticism yvill insure
will make lor a
corrections that
stronger Homecoming for the entire
student body next year and in the far

lutuie.
Gould

SuKy

(Frr.nkly, gentlemen, we've been
so busy digging a moat around the
Journalism liuilding to fend off Mr.
Stewart's previously threatened slide-rul- e
Hogging that we've had little
time lor culinary efforts. We're
now building a catapult to toss great
vats of pudding into the quadrangle
next door. Haye you any particular
flavor prefer cnceP-T- HE
EDITOR-- )

(We hope so. -- THE EDITOR)

Kernels:
We continue to be- impiesed wit!) t lie
plolc-Nvwho .spends the liist hall oi the
semester telling students wjrat the course
yvill cover and the last hall telling what
you didn't coyer because there wasn't
-

time.

A Look Into The
By KALril DIGIITON

PASADENA, Calil. (AP)-Wit- hin
two
to lour years matt may be able to see
back to the beginning ol time.
Or at h ast Ij.uk to the days yvhen the
universe was yeiy young.
Astronomers of the Palomar-Moun- t
Wilson oboenatot it s believe that improved seeing conditions out itr space
yill til. ike this possible.
The 200 inch lf.de telescope atop
Mountain has taken photographs ol
stars 10 billion liht years ayvav. That
means, the light that inadc-tht- fphotoa distant star 10 billion years
graph

ar

Dr. Allan R. Sandage of