xt7fj678w50r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7fj678w50r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19691104  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  4, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  4, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7fj678w50r section xt7fj678w50r President Won't Be Swayed By War Protestors

Nixon Says He Follows A 'Silent Majority9
By BOB BROWN

.

Editorial Page Editor
While addressing "the great
silent majority of my fellow Americans" last night, President Nixon
explained why the United States
was involved in theVietnamWar
and what course he would pursue
to Vietnamize the conflict.
A large portion of the
much-anticipate-

address
at the nation's young
have led the anti-wa- r
Nixon stressed that

d

was aimed
people who
movement.
he would

TBI E

IKE
Tuesday, November 4, 1969

not be swayed by any actions
taken by war protestors. The
r
President faulted the
demonstrators with lack of
and advocating a cause
contrary to the will of the Amer-

its cause, prevails over reason
itself out of the war. The "orand the will of the majority, derly, scheduled timetable" to
this nation has no future as a which Nixon referred was ap:
free society."
proved by the South Vietnamese
government
prior to Nixon's
President Nixon announced a
speech.
secret program of gradual withican people.
No Progress In Paris
drawal of American troops from
Vietnam. The progress of this
Nixon conceded that in Paris
News Analysis
withdrawal would depend on the "No progress whatever has been
actions of the North Vietnamese. made except agreement on the
In addition he implied the As the enemy decreased its initiashape of the bargaining table."
peace movement was not in the tive and the South Vietnamese However, the chief executive reAmerican interest. He stated, "if built up their army, the United fused to make the
troop witha vocal minority, however fervent States would be able to phase drawal timetable
public because
it would dissuade the enemy
from continuing serious negotiation in Paris.
While refusing to elaborate
on the size and speed of troop
withdrawals Nixon did say they
would definitely take place unless
the enemy stepped up action.
If this were the case the President promised to use "strong
and effective measures" to halt
Vol. LXI, No. 50 such action.
University of Kentucky, Lexington
Even as he spoke, reports
anti-Wa-

res-soni-

KENTUCKY

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By JEANNIE LEEDOM
Assistant Managing Editor
Members x( the University
Senate concluded a
discussion Monday on the Code
of Student Conduct by approving
the appointment of an academic
ombudsman and by proposing
new authority for the University
Appeals Board in cases of student
rights.
The proposals were partly a
: reaction to the Code of Student
Conduct which was approved by
the Board of Trustees in July.
Any changes in the present code,
however, must be approved by
the Board, following senate recommendation, before becoming
legitimate University regula-

tions.

The appointment of an

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Kernel Photo by Mimi Fuller

Members of the Inter Community College Student Council discuss
problems during the Community College Conference held in
'in&on
P85 weekend. Among other things, the group demanded
community college student representation on the UK Board of
Trustees. See Conference pictures and story on Page 6.
--

CailCUS

J

plan.
price as the
The option plan would entitle
the student to eat any two meals
he chose each day.
There ar two options under
the present meal plan. The three-meplan costs a student $460
for two semesters, which provides
every meal except Sunday dinner.
The
would be retained.
plan costs $356
Food Services would offer a for two semesters and consists
of breakfast and dinner every
breakfast dinner plan.
Food Services would offer a day, except for Sunday, when
option plan at the same breakfast and lunch are served
By TOM HALL

lunch-dinn-

Kernel Staff Writer
The Student Services Committee met Monday night and
agreed to urge the approval of
a new meal plan for students
dining in UK residence halls.
The proposal states that:
The regular three-meplan

al

al

two-me-

al

--

two-me-

aca-

demic ombudsman was initiated
by the University Senate Advisory
Committee for Student Affairs
and was recommended to be included in the academic concerns
section of the University Senate
Rules.
The section of the revisions

Meal Plan Endorsed

Lunch-Dinne- r

al

to those on the
option.
Committee chairman Steve
Bright reported that Robert
Blakeman, director of auxiliary
services, says a
plan
will be offered in the fall of
1970. The cost increase will be
$56 over the cost of the present
plan, and there will be
no breakfast-dinne- r
plan next
year, according to Bright.
"I think the University has
responded to student requests
two-me-

lunch-dinn-

two-me-

al

al

r
plan," said
Bright, "but it has turned Its
back on students who like the
breakfast-dinne- r
plan. Both plans
should be available."
When the new plan goes Into
effect, there will be a difference
of $50 between the two and three-meplans. The difference between the present two and three-meplans is $104 and the Board
of Trustees is expected to raise
the over-al- l room and board rates

for a

lunch-dinne-

al

al

Continued on Page 5, Col.

dent Government meeting in which Carver will present
HAZEL COLOSIMO
the basic findings of the committee.
Kernel Staff Writer
'
"The University Book Store lost over $43,000 last,
Report Not Complete
serThe report to the Student Government will not
year. Since the book store is part of the auxiliary
vices which includes housing and dining, this means comprise the full findings of the committee these will
every student that lived in the residence halls last come with the completion of open hearings which begin at S p.m. Monday night.
year lost approximately $8.50."
In that mood, Student Government book store comExplaining the purpose of the open hearings. Carver
mittee chairman Bruce Carver launched a formal In- .commented, "They are to give University officials a
vestigation of the University Book Store at a meeting chance to explain why the University Rook Store is doing
so poorly and what they intend to do about it."
of the committee Monday night.
Administrative officials from the auxiliary services
"From the research the committee has done so far, we
in the whole book system have been invited to the open hearing and all
Ifeel that only an extensive shake-u- p
to the students,
students and faculty are urged to attend, since at its
store operation can rectify this
conclusion "the book store investigation committee will
Carver declared.
faculty and staff,"
Carver, however, generally reviewed facts and figures air the complaints and suggestions gathered in three
months of extensive research," Carver said.
with his committee in preparation for Thursday's Stu
mis-servi-

j

,

from

some

5,000

enemy

troops.
In an effort to convince the
American

people of his efforts

to end the war, the President
revealed a number of previously
unknown peace initiatives spon-

sored by his office.
Among these peace feelers was
a letter sent by Nixon to Ho
Chi Minh expressing the United
States' hope that it would be possible to effect "an early resolu-

tion to this tragic war."
Nixon Initiative Rejected

Nixon said a reply received

three days before Ho's death
"simply reiterated the public position North Vietnam had taken
In the Paris talks and flatly rejected my initiative."
The chief executive seemed
slightly bewildered that his nation could not appreciate his
Continued on Pare 8, Col. 1

pertaining to the academic ombudsman stipulated:
"The academic ombudsman
shall be a tenured faculty member. He shall be nominated by
the Senate Council, subject to
the approval of the Student Government, and then the approval
of the president of the University.
His nomination shall be subject
to approval by the senate and
his appointment made by the
president of the senate.
"The academic ombudsman
shall be appointed for a term of
12 months, and subject to the
approval of the president, lie will
be assigned to this position
full-tim-

e.

"All student grievances involving violations of rights stated
herein shall be reported to the
academic ombudsman within 30
days of their occurrence. Grievances which are reported after
this period or which otherwise
come to the attention of the
academic ombudsman may be
acted on according to his determination of the circumstances."
Ombudsman's Investigating
Procedures

1

Committee Recommends Extensive Bookstore
By

sure

Senate Backs
Ombudsman
four-wee- k

:

from the central highlands of
Vietnam told of increased pres-

The academic ombudsman's
procedures for investigating the
merit of each student grievance
were stated as follows:
If he decides that the complaint is justified, he will use
moral persuasion, negotiation,

personal appeal and the prestige
of his office to settle the case
to his satisfaction and that of
the student.
When he is unable to remedy the grievance to the satisfaction of the student or when he
has notified the student that the
Continued on Page 8, Col.

1

'Shake-u- p'

Questionnaires were handed to committee members
to be distributed throughout the campus, with particular emphasis on housing units and classes.
Which Visited Most

Information gained from the questionnaires will help
determine the book stores most frequented by students
and faculty, those offering the best service, largest
selection of supplies and lowest prices.
In Carver's opinion, "this questionnaire will give
students the opportunity to suggest changes in the University Book Store operation so that instead of losing
money, they could conceivably be paying less to the
housing and dining system."
After the questionnaires are collected and information
is assimilated from them and from the open hearings,
the book store committee will tabulate the findings and
present its full formal report to Student Government.

* !

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Nor.
You're Come A Long Way, Baby?
2

4, 1909
Advertisement

A Single GirPs Double Dilemma
I know a few girls wlio still value
being a virgin on their wedding
night, but they are the exception
instead of the rule."
The usual comment, however,
was indifference. "The double
standard is still very much alive
at UK. But I don't think it concerns me," said one coed. "Because of the training I have had,
I'm not going to sleep with every
guy I go out with and I don't
want to. But I don't really care
what the guys do. It doesn't
bother me one way or the other."

The clays when a man would (Just don't do. Especially if you're student, "but it's the girls who
gladly throw his best cloak over in a sorority. There's all sorts of have the advantage, not us. They
the nearest mud puddle so the rules, pressure from the other are constantly invading areas that
damsel in distress could cross members, about what 'good' girls used to be considered
to females. They say they have
without Retting her shoes muddy can do."
as much right to do everything
are, alas, long gone.
Another coed describes the that we do.
I say alas because, while the
Yet, anytime some-- 1
double standard as a "double
movement for equal rights for
thing comes up that they don't
dilemma."
want to do, or if there's somewomen continues to grow, most
"You go on a date and the
women at UK like the special
thing they want a guy to do,
is always pushing. Like you the first
treatment they get because guy
thing they say is 'But
;owe him something for taking I'm a
girl.'"
they're "girls."
One student recalls a survey
Not only do they like it, they you out. If you give in, your
as an 'easy make' taken in his
it. Lighting cigarettes, reputation
sociology class. "The
expect
spreads all over campus. Boys
opening doors, pulling out chairs are the biggest gossips. If you survey showed that 60 percent
of the boys expect their wives to
all these little courtesies are
don't
what distinguishes a gentleman and give in, you're a prude be virgins when they get married.
that's your last date with Yet 90
from a bumpkin.
percent of the girls want
that guy. Finding a middle their husbands to have had
Most UK coeds think of the
predouble standard only as existing ground, where you can keep your marital sex. That's what the douand the guy, is really ble standard is
in sex. As one girl put ft, "It's reputation
really all abut."
hard."
Another male views the douOK for guys at UK to 'mess
The male viewpoint of the ble standard. as "not necessarily
around.' It's more acceptable.
!bad. If women are really interCirls have a lot of social pres- double standard is entrely
"Yes, the double standard ested in a single standard then
sure on them to behave in certain ways. Certain things you exists at UK," said one male they should be aware of the masoff-limi- ts

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they don't usually think about."
Not everyone believes the dou-- !
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there really a double standard
today?" questions one coed. "I
sex is
It's not so much what you don't think so.
wear, but what you wear with it becoming the accepted thing
that counts.
now, with girls as well as boys.

Accessories Change
Last Year's Clothes
Into This Year's Look
j

j

By GWENDOLYNE RANNEY
Coeds have been getting out
the old winter wardrobe from

amongst the mothballs and plas-- j
tic bags as cold rains fall and tem-- !
perrtures drop.
This means hem-uhangtime for their
up and dress-u- p
fashion favorites from last year
the ones that survived the an- nual
cam- paign.
The majority of these "oldies
but goodies" are still stylish since
the '69 fashions rely heavily on

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Chicago republisher
ports there is a simple technique
of rapid reading which should
enable you to increase your reading speed and yet retain much
more. Most people do not realize
how much they could increase
their pleasure, success and income by reading faster and more
accurately.
According to this publisher,
many people, regardless of their
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To acquaint the readers of
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dresses, suits and pants
k
are basically the same the
look is fashion's emphasis.
Chunky is still the word for.
A-li-

long-slee-

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shoes.

Hem lengths haven't changed
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In short, time to play dress-up- s
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last year's wardrobe.

The solution? Accent with accessories. The initial accessories
for shoes are monogram buckles.
Knee socks are finally back
in the fashion picture.
necklaces'and
The chain-gan- g
belts have linked hardware to
delicate
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chains

ornamenting

necks, bosoms and waist-line- s
fitting firmly to female forms.
Cirls (and guys) are still getting wrapped up with scarves,
theA-- 1 accent accessory. Scarves
can be found in any size, shape,
color and design. They're every-- !
where! They're everywhere
around Paul Revere hair styles,
tab collars,
cardigans,
plain necklines, dirndl waistlines, and foreheads.

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wide-brimme- d,

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer

session.

Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box ilMtf.
Begun as the Cadet in IBM and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

RATES

Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files

$9.4
$.10

KERNEL TELEPHONES

1331
Editor, Managing Editor
fcditorUl Page xTdltor,
130
Associate Editors, Sports
244T
News Desk
Advertising. Business, Circulation lilt

The college you carft get into without a job.
is
The college oursWestern Electric's Corporate Education
Center in Hopewell, New Jersey.
Like your college, ours has a campus with dorms, dining halls,
labs and a library. Unlike yours, you can't get into ours without a job.
A job at Western Electric.
rs,
Our
managers and other professionals
develop and expand their skills through a variety of courses, from
corporate operations to computer electronics. To help bring better
telephone service and equipment, through the Bell System.
For information contact your placement office. Or write: College
Relations Manager, Western Electric Co., Room 2500, 222 Broadway,
New York, New York 10038. An equal opportunity employer.
students-enginee-

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Stem
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The Kentucky Kjernel

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, TucmUj, Nor. i,

Courts Too Slow, Says Combs
By RON HAWKINS

Kernel Staff Writer
In a speech delivered to the
UK Law School Forum yesterday, federal judge Bert Combs
spoke out against judicial delay.
A former governor of Kentucky, Combs expressed a desire to see more efficiency in the
courts. He declared that courts
"have not kept up with other
fields of human endeavor."

V

'r
'

!

t,

t

f

?

Judicial Speed Lacking
While elaborating his point
on lack of judicial speed, Combs
pointed to the issued of capital
punishment. He said the Supreme
Court is preparing to rule on whether the death sentence is "cruel

:

?

and unusual punishment."
Combs said, however, he felt
that it is cruel and inhumane
to keep "condemned men in
'cages' in a state of limbo between life and death."
Combs added that although
lawyers generally felt Innocent

I

Judge Bert Combs

of any guilt in Judicial delay,
"there is enough blame to go
around for every body."
Mixing his speech with anecdotes, dry humor and advice.
Combs' speech was devoted, generally, to procedures lawyers
should follow and the qualities
needed to become a successful
lawyer.

-

In a brief question and answer period following his speech.
Combs said he thought it was
wrong "to turn down a Supreme
Court nominee because of his
philosophy" unless it was"Com-munist.- "
Combs said he could not comment on rumors that he may return to politics.

-

CLASSIFIED

advertising will b acp-U- 4
baili nly. A4s mar
la
Mndkf taraafa
pl4td
r bj mall, payment IneUted,
Friday
U THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Been
111, JaarnalUm Bldf.
Katei are fl.SS for 10 wards, $1.00
far three eontecatlre Ineertlenc el tka
tame ad af 20 warda, and I3.1S per
week, X0 warda.
Tba deadline la 11 a.m. the day
prlar to publication. Na advertisement
may cite race, rellflaa ar national
orlfta aa a qaallfleatlen far renting
reams ar far employment.
CUmIW4

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b

WANTED

pre-pai- d

prin

FOB SALE
1963 CUTLASS

Phone

coupe,

V-- 8,

automatic.
t9Q4N

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1968 VOLKSWAGEN

Sedan(unroof

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FEMALE

apartment

oommatefsha

very nice
other girl. Ver- -

wltMfii

sallies Rd . 2Vl680.

2904N

Talent for the ElrTgletoad
Resort Coffee House at Transylvania.
Folk and Jazz: InruprtfntA lists, singers, readings. CaCirJtlt Thompson,

NEEDED

3N7

MOTHER needs babysitter,
at my
preferably with car to
home M., W., F., 1:3030 at $1.00
4Nlt
hour. Call
per

STUDENT

wanted to share apartmale atuderlt, age 23.
.
N10
after

ROOMMATE

ment with
Call

253-30-

4Vi-m-

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Excellent condition. SUtt has 6,000
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30ON5

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TYPEWRITER,

characters,
floor length

Olympia jwtth foreign
$40., Dr&fJerles,
white,

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KARMANN

1959

offer. Must sell

310N4

complete Rogers DruraSet,
black pearl finish, lncludlnkvitands
and traps. Also 2 sllvep Ludwlg
snares with stands; 1 ljin. Avedls
1 18 lnyZildJian symZildjian
bol; 2 20 in. ZildjiaiaVgymbols; worth
over $1,000. Will take $629. Call

V

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31QN8

$20.

GHtX $200 or best
uick. CaU Carlos

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DRUMS

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PIANO SERVICE Reasonable price.
All work guaranteed: Trained by
Steinway U Sonal lrNew York. Mr.
Davles.
24S-N-

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VIVIAN

WOODARD

26nsulUnt)
Ext. 3267 or Georgetown,
nights. Order rouf Christmas gifts
30O8N
early.
ATTENTION Graduate Students
Did
you know that Quick Cepy Service,
located at Wallace's EVeJok Store will
give you the fastssttervice available
on your thesis art- dissertations 7 4N10
863-08-

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LOST

4N6

9.

LOST
FOB BINT

last seen between SAdU Field and
Fine Arts Bldg. If 'found please call
after 11 p.m. Needed as soon as possible for a course. Call
4N10
1

for rent
girls;
utilities paid. Ten mihjKes walk from
after 5 p.m.
campus. Call

APARTMENT

My brown looseleaKnotebook,

far-tw-

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available
2. Next to
immediately, for one
150 per month.
St Joseph's Hospital
Inquire
regarding apt 4.
APARTMENT

FURNISHED

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278-23-

4N10

asked for was a cuddly warm
snuggly muffler and beret, set from

All

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return of women's cluster ring, lost in Classroom Bldg.,
Tuesday, Oct 28. Ptease'return. Symbolic wedding baidT Call
310N6
after 4 p.m.

REWARD for

Italy in 90 wool, 10 nylon. Looking
great in Forest green, navy, white or
red. Of course, they had it at

oum aw
214

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OR FEMALE help wanted
Weekdays from 11:30 a.m.-l:3- 0
p.m.
Starting salary, $2.00 per hour.
2321 Versailles
McDonald's Drive-IRd.
23Sti
week-daNIGHT MANAGERw'anted
from 4 p.nVto 12 p.m. Phone
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Small brown wirbound notebook; vocabulary liptrot foreign student Name on tper: Martine Gulg-nie- r.
Reward offered. Call

LOST

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Allegheny Airlines
helps you beat
the waiting game...
And saves you up to 33 Vb

Men's Hair Styling
By

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Allegheny's Young Adult Card lets you fly
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and still get advance reservations.
If

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3

* Kernel Forum: the readers write

torn

7 Ji a

233KUfl

Dateline Belgium

'a

To the Editor of the Kernel:
living there for a time can
easily come to feel, if not perhaps to think,
that the world's center is Lexington, and
more specifically the University of Kentucky. Or, without really trying, one can
even personalize the center!
A person

1 UfffycWfiWtf

But my world of a few weeks ago has
been partially shatteredl The newspapers
here, whether in French, Flemish, or
German, must not keep up because not
one item has appeared on the Commonwealth, its most widely recognized uni-

versity, or the State's best residential
city. The International Herald Tribune
did print the
score, along with
five hundred other Saturday results but
the' paper didn't mention a coach, a
player, or how many spectators there
were. And since TV here carries no commercial in any language, it is difficult
to keep up with those latest and important things for the hair, constipation,
and poor blood. One can't tell here whether
the toothpaste has anything to do with
UK-V-

Pisacano No
The Office for Student Affairs sliould
constantly concern itself with the welfare
of UK students and should provide them
with a strong advocacy within the administration. One of the most depressing
features of the "Acting University" has
been the unwillingness of Dr. Stuart
Forth and Dean Jack Hall to, as is sometimes necessary, go out on a limb for students. Dr. Forth, despite his obvious
desire to be
by students, gets
nasty when decisions are to be made
and Dean Hall, although much in evidence at Greek Orgies and other important gaities, can be shifty too, parrying with ease questions about such trifles
as city police on campus, the Student
Code, or the mystifying actions of his
well-like- d

superiors.
So, as the "Acting University" fades
with the advent of Otis Singletary, it is
probable, (I am told) that Dr. Forth's
successor is to be Dr. Nicholas Pisacano.
The dream of every Hayakawa Society,
whose
Pisacano is a good right-wingwith students is sufficient to
popularity
sex or not.
the "moderates" and
allow him to co-oMoreover, it may not be surprising to deal harshly with longhairs or other else
anyone at home, but it was to me, that whom the jolly administration might deem
not very many people here including a clear and present danger.
those in government and the universities
Furthermore, Dr. Pisacano has adknow anything about any of the fine
mitted to knowing little of those instances
things UK has accomplished or has un- in which students have in the last two
derway. And that's not the least of it. years confronted the campus administraThey didn't know of my personal ac- tion.

complishments either. Initially, an attempt was made to correct this injustice
of an information gap but somehow my
methods weren't very effective. No means
were available or open to get mass attention without seriously imperiling my

Wliatsamatter? I cut out the part
you didn't like, didn't I?

The Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

Iernel

safety.

University of Kentucky
1894

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

4, 1959

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
James W. Miller, Editor-in-ChiBob Brown, Editorial Page Editor
George II. Jepson, Managing Editor
Robert Duncan, Advertising Manager
Dottie Bean, Associate Editor
v
Chip Hutcheson, Sports Editor
Dan Gossett, Arts Editor
s
Carolyn Dunnavan, Features Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Frank Coots,
Mike Herndon,
Jeannie Leedom, ' Bill Matthews, Jean Renaker
Assistant Managing Editors

r

Another blow fell also. After covering
most of this ancient city of about 100,000
people, there was an inescapable observation: these people somehow hadn't heard
or discovered that it is possible to have
slums.
Given a little time, a few
bandaids and a return home and the
earlier world can be put back in shape,
not quite the same but operational.
A.D.ALBRIGHT
Belgium Correspondent
skin-color-

Kernel Soapbox

By WAYNE H. DAVIS
Associate Professor of Zoology
California! The Golden State of sunshine and health. Magnetic Utopia, attracting ever more people to that great
land of opportunity with the promise of
a better life.
Within a period of 10 years California
will have established two major milestones in our nation's history. First was
when she overtook New York as our most
populous state. With her population growing by 50 percent per decade, the second
is now imminent. This nation within a
nation, once the world's greatest agricultural region, will soon join the 130 countries and territories which have more
people than they can feed, and are absolutely dependent upon our Great Midwest for their survival.
This miserable mass of humanity, collectively reproducing at a rate which
would double their numbers in less than
25 years, could provide a valuable lesson
to the people of California. It includes
Haiti, once the wealthiest and most productive of all agricultural regions of Latin
America. Haiti is now the most densely
populated, most miserable, and has the
lowest per capita income to be found
throughout that now wretched region of
squalor.
It also includes India, once the envy
of the world because of its great wealth.
The Jewel of the Orient was the inspiration for Christopher Columbus and other
European adventurers. Now India, with
her 540 million people, is a nation of
stupefying destitution, unable either to
produce or to pay for the foxl she needs.
Like a blotter she regularly absorbs one
fourth of our annual wheat production of
1.2 billion bushels, and "pays" for it in
the "funny money" program by which
we now own three fourths of all the
rupees in India.
But whereas the overpopulation of

the New World), California stands poised
hopelessly to overshoot the mark within
a minute piece of human history. Orange
County, which had 61,375 people when
Richard Nixon was a boy there, holds
1,300,000 today.

Never before in the history of man
has a people rushed in so furiously to
bite the hand that feeds it. The fabulous
agricultural regions of California are being subdivided and made into homes,
parking lots and industrial sites at the
rate of 375 acres a day. Even if this rate
vcre to remain constant (it is accelerating), half the productive farm land now
in the state would be destroyed within
30 years.

In an attempt to "solve" the water
problem of southern California, the voters,
outnumbering the bitterly opposed northerners, approved a $4 billion bond issue
for the Feather River Project to divert
water from the north. The smell of water
provided at taxpayer expense attracted
land speculators. Deserts previously unsuitable for homes were subdivided with
such a rush that the new water supply
was gobbled up before it got started.
A similar problem here in Lexington found
the promised four lanes on Tates Creek
Pike inducing such a building boom that
the road will soon be overcrowded again.
California's great agriculture lies pri,
marily in the Imperial and San Joaquin
valleys. Both are now in such serious
trouble that they might as well be covered
with asphalt.
Imperial County, along with Fayette
Co., Ky., is consistently among the nation's top three in per capita farm income. It was being irrigated by Colorado
River water 30 years ago when Tucson
and Phoenix were little desert tow towns.
Tucson now has 250,000 people and
Phoenix 500,000. For water supply they
mine the ground for
Haiti and other unfortunate reIndia,
gions was a gradual process built up Pleistocene deposits. Tucson goes down
over the centuries (Haiti, discovered by an additional 13 feet per year; Phoenix
liinl)us, was the first land settled in 41. Soon the water will be gone.

After 12 years of litagation the Supreme Court has decided that Arizona,
as well as California and Mexico, is entitled to its share of the Colorado River.
Tucson and Phoenix are to be saved
vhile the Imperial Valley dies. Since
Arizonans (fewer people than in Kentucky)
cannot afford the cost, their well known
senator led the fight to allow the nation's
taxpayers to fund the Central Arizona
Project to bring their water to them.

Dr. Pisacano's appointment, while a
regrettable one, would be predictable
enough. The committee appointed to recommend Dr. Forth's succession is headed
by Dr. Alvin Morris and is composed
largely with those close to or indebted
to Dr. Pisacano and is filled out with
such as Our Dynamic Executive whose
primary interest is in unity and stability
and such.
The railroad conspiracy seems more
probable when one considers that such
popular men as Dr. Michael Adelstein
(English), Dr. Donald Nugent (History),
and Dr. J.W. Patterson (Speech) have
not even been interviewed by the Morris
committee. These men would in my opinion be far preferable to Dr. Pisacano as
Vice President, and I am sure that each
of these men woul