xt7fqz22fs45 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7fqz22fs45/data/mets.xml  United States Housing Authority 1940 v.: ill.; 29-40 cm. UK holds archival copy for ASERL Collaborative Federal Depository Library Program libraries and the Federal Information Preservation Network. Call Number FW 3.7: 1/29 journals English Washington, D.C.: Federal Works Agency, U.S. Housing Authority: For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Works Progress Administration Housing Publications United States Housing Authority -- Periodicals Public housing -- United States -- Periodicals Public Housing: Weekly News from American Communities Abolishing Slums and Building Low-Rent Housing February 27, 1940 text Public Housing: Weekly News from American Communities Abolishing Slums and Building Low-Rent Housing February 27, 1940 1940 2019 true xt7fqz22fs45 section xt7fqz22fs45 enema “trite
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—____—____—_—___—___—._—.———————
-. Vol. 1, No. 29 Federal Works Agency, U. S. Housing Authority—Nathan Straus, Administrator February 27, 1940
—___—___—___—___—_————_
' ‘ ' o o o o o -
HOUSlng 013101315 Housmg Authoritles 111 4 Cities
Confer at Cap”*” 8 1111' t L T L 113 d
Delegates From One Hundred Cities 6 11.8 ong- erm oca on S
Discuss USHA Policy and Procedure _______—__..__ Interest Rates on Test Issue Cut
, .anhe largest Igroup (if local housing Of'fil Slums Are Extravagant, 2/5 of 1 Percent Under USHA Rate
' (21::yevsgsgiloiilgintaiidiiifgtgftrlelleaiitsigrecijr Says “New York Times” Private funds totaling $1,681,000 were
' . ‘ . . . ~ brought into the public housing program
an intermal discussmn 0f policy and proce— “- - - The City Planning Commission recently when the housing authorities of
dure 1n the low—rental public housmg pro- has approved a 1,100—family munic1pal S r. ) . -
. . . , _ yracuse, N. 1., Allentown, 1a., Utica,
’ - gram Called by the Natl‘ma} ASSOCIath“ PI‘OJect 1n the Redford-Stuyvesant 566- N. Y.; and St. Petersburg Fla. issuedlong—
. of Housmg Officmls, the meeting was held tion of Brooklyn, which will be built with r ’ ’ _
, . . term (15 to 2/ years) bonds for the financ
at the Hotel Washington February 13-14, the aid of the United States Housmg ing of part of their local programs
and was attended by 210 local authority Authority. Subsidies . . . will come, of Th f th . . h
chairmen and executives, representing well course, from the taxpayers’ pockets. Yet h' l? .‘filr aufprities g3; t 631 mgnehy,
over 100 cities in all parts of the country. if they are economically as well as de- W 1c W1 pay 10m 0 to ' percent 0 t e
centl ‘ constructed and well mana ed it development cost of their projects, at about
Coleman Woodbury 0f NAHO: Ernest J~ . y ,. g ’. '-’/~, of 1 percent less than USHA is required
Bohn of Cleveland, and Ray 0. Edwards of IS doubtful that they Wlll cost much in to charge for its 60-year serial loans.
Jacksonville presided at the various sessions. the 1011.9,” run. From all points 0f VleW: . .
. _ . . - - f t x er th re is Under the United States Housmg Act,
F kdr td f d' ‘t t’ including thato a apay , e .. _
_ dracn h ‘lc elc 1155118551011 (haa “€111.15 Ea if) nothing more extravagant than a slum, local authorlties inust raise at least 10 per—
:1: t' ec mnad sp bot irtiislc rac eriz: . S no investment safer than one which cuts cent 0f the capital COSt 0f the” PTOJECtS
9'3 111g, '3 u 5 an a progress 9W4” the costs of police, fire, and health pro- from sources other than the Federal Gov—
compromise on many COntrOVerSlal issues teCthI’l.” ernfnent. The Syracuse and Allentown au-
' l was rgporged. l h d' f LSHA New York Times, February 2, 1940. glffitiestfl‘etmizsfiing 20 pel’fifntétagdt the
n er e genera ea ing 0 “ Y - ica au ori y, percent. e . e ers-
Local Authority Relations” the agenda for burg bond issue covered only the required
the first day included: Simplification of . 10 percent.
Application Form and Procedure; Respfim- NaSthlle Development The Syracuse loan of $993,000 maturing
Siblhty 0? Regional Units; _More Objective serially over a period of 26 years was ob-
and Elex1ble l’hySical Requirements; O.V€_31" Named for Local Negro tained at a net interest rate of 2.4798 per—
all BldS; Equ1valent Elimination; Adminis- _ , . cent as compared with 3 percent for the
trative Expenses; Legal SerVices and Re- . In naming 5} NilShVéuiqPWJeCt 50011 t? S1310 USHA loan.
quirements; Payments in Lieu of Taxes. No IMO construction ‘J- - apier Homes,’ t e - . .
b f h USHA fi‘ Nashville Housing Authority honors one of Allentown’s bond issue 0f. $342000 for 26
mem ers o t e sta attended the ears s 1d t n t t r t r t f
.7 1 - the outstanding Negroes of our time. y wa so a a e m e es a e 0
first day s sess1on, in order to encourage the . . _ 2.5727 percent, and Utica’s 27-year bonds
fullest possible freedom 0f diSCUSSiOH- Born near Nashvflle, John C' Napier. at- for $242,000 were sold at a net interest rate
The second day was devoted to “The Basis teIfideC} the {210931. publitc iii-112,01? and ficgwed 0f 2-7951 percent. USHA “ADP-6% in bOth
. . . , co egiae raining a 1 er orce niver- t 3 t th 60- ' 1
For and the Effect of Reducmg SubSidies. ’ sity in Ohio. He was graduated from How- E23355: COS S percen 011 e year seria
DiscusSion centered around seven selected ard University Law School in 1872. The St Petersburg bonds totaling $104 _
questions, deSigned to cover the salient D . 1 d f 1 h h d ' . . Il ’ ’
. ts of subsid reduction uring a ong' an use 11 career e as 000 an maturing seria y over 15 years,
pom y ' filled many public ofiices: County Commis- Wlll pay 2.6655 percent interest. The inter-
———; sioner, Davidson County, Tenn.; officer in est on USHA’s 60-year loan to St. Peters-
ter L ak IS X e i e the Bureau of Internal Revenue; member of burg is 3.25 percent.
HOt Wa 8 age E P ns V the Nashville City Council; Register of the In every case local private capital pur-
The Management Review Division of the United States Treasury; President of the chased the maximum amount offered. These
. nited States Housin Authorit advises YMCA, Negro branch, Nashville; lecturer were the first lon -term local authorit
U g .V . . . . g y
that, under average conditions, a leak of one on medical Jurisprudence at Meharry Medi- bonds to be sold publicly.
drop of water per second from one hot water cal College; member 0f the Board Of Trus- Previously, private investments in the 10-
faucet in each of 600 dwelling units will gees (ff tPquearies F11; (11%,. iiiembderHof thg 031 programs had consisted 0f two issues 0f
_ oar S 0 irec ors ° 15' an owar short-term loans 6 months totalin 85—
wast: eltloing: hit to 't Universities and of the Meharry Medical 000,000. ( ) g $ ’
. ea 1 hvze 112g utni4sé (gr '1. Cellege; and, until lately,_a member of the By financing their projects with short-
suppy ° wa er 0 ami ies, or NaShVIHe Housmg Authority. term loans during the early development
pay the COS" 0f the shelter rent for one Dr Napier (he was awarded the honorar t f ' t d el m t d th ‘ —
dwelling unit for the period of time ' ~ . . y S ages 0 progec ev op en ’ an en ls
th 1 k t' degree of doctor of laws by Fisk UniverSit-y suing long-term notes to cover as much of
_ e ea S (£011 glue# d d h m 1935) wafs Ian effectiveband efithuSIastic the remaining cost as possible, local au-
so watch your p um ing an atten to t e supporter o ousing in ashvi e despite thorities should be aide to e 93 '
leaks. his great age. savings. ' L.-- WQEP many
- , ,UK LIBWE$

 5 fl: 4 . 7 , . _ 4 ,. . r .
HOIISlng Need Shown In Health 311d Livill Fiom A010 York Post, Febiualy o, 1940
Three Annual Reports Conditions g Housmg PrOJect

Three annual reports for the year 1939 . EVlctS Dellnquellcy
submitted by the housing authorities of A Public Health Doctor
Daytona Beach, Fla.; Fort Worth ,Tex.; Interprets School Records Only One Case in 3 Years . ‘
and Peoria, 111" have. been made “31131.le Bl] FRITZ J. EINSTEIN, M. D., of Williainshurg Houses
recently. Each contains a report of activ1— Former Public Health Officer . . .
ties, including a description of local proj— H mbur German ’ During the years 1937 to 193.9,. juvenile
ects, a resume of local housing conditions, a g, y delinquency increased in the Williamsburg
and a financial statement. “Before and _ section of Brooklyn.
after” photographs, maps, architectural But there was one 12—block area in that
drawings, site views, and floor plans sup- For several years‘before 1933’ I was a section, occupied by 1,622 families, where,
pleinent the text material. DUth health officer 1h Hamburg, Germany, the Police Department’s records show, delin-

The report of the Daytona Beach au— where it was my duty to supervise the health quency almost disappeared.
thority reveals that out of 2,046 Negro of school children. Being interested in the This impeccable community is Williams-
families in the city, “all but 65” were living hOUSihg problem, which was a Di‘eSSing One burg Houses, the first large low—rental hous—
in substandard dwellings. The report adds in Germany at that time, 1 made a study of ing project built here by the United States
that ”271 single Negro dwelling units are the relationship between housing and health. Housing Authority.
housing more than ’one‘ family." Plhe Iwill give you a brief report of my findings. In the 3 years it has been in existence,
Haven, the authoritys 1“.le project, W111 Shortly after the war, a new section was there has been just one case of juvenile
prov1de homes for 167 families. developed in the outskirts of Hamburg delinquency.

Commenting on the need for the 1.0023'1 called the “Dulsberg” district. This project During the 3 years 1933 to 1935, before
program in Fort Worth, the local authority 5 grew out of a dire need for new dwellings the slum buildings there were torn down, ,_
report states that m the areas surveyed be— (the result of the scarcity of building ma— the same area produced 20 cases of juvenile
fore USHA aSSIStf-mce was Obtallied’ approx— terials and labor during and after the war), delinquency.
l‘llatel-V 13800 Whlte’ and 4’000 Negro fam— similar to that which we face iii many dis— The police say that a juvenile delinquency
11.1925 earning less than $1900 per year were tricts in the United States today. record of one case in 3 years in a commu‘
liVing in substandard, insanitary, unsafe In the Dulsberg area a new school was nity of 1,622 families is extraordinary.
dwellings, and that about 30’000 persons built, a public school with a capacity for Several parents there admitted that their
(Whlte and Negro) were forced to live .1111 1,200 children. After the school had been children, who had been getting into bad
slum homes because no others were avai _ in operation for 3 years,Ibecame the super— habits in the slums, had changed for the
able at rents they could afford to pay. . vising physician. It was then that I began better in their new environment.
ecghahli‘flitw‘iilloggdvidldhlfd‘irizs1:): 2‘37; filiiii this study. I did not examine the children For example, there is Leon M. When his

. ' under slum conditions myself. Nor were family lived in one of the old tenements on
lies. BUt these hortiies, t3: repgrihstztisi the records 0f the fiTSt 3 years in the new the site of Williamsburg Houses, he used to
W111 barely scratc g}? su. ace 0 k te 0 a district my own. Therefore the results mix with a crowd of little toughs on the
Fort Worth'low—rent ousmg mar e '11 f WhiCh I obtained were purely objective. street. Now, his mother said, he has given

The Peoria. program at present ca .Sd. or And, furthermore, the study was under- up the gang entirely; he is attending Alex- . ‘
the constructlg‘n 011' two prejeciEs, Bio“ ”If taken WithOUt the previous knowledge 0f ander Hamilton High School and is studying
illigfigr girdlflsemowasovfhiznigrlrdiatiirhudfssolne doctors hitherto in charge. hard, hoping to become a newspaper man.

. . . . . Out of 1,200 records I selected about 700 Louis D,, 25, who used to live in a cold-
$335 §:?11i%:::::p$:sgeggplgé‘géegitfiliiesé which were suited for the survey; 3 years in water flat on Ten Eyck Street, which also
months.’ ’ $161 (gid 51111}? 51¢ng 3 ¥ea§§d 11h Eh: haw wasI torn (down {fr the ptroject, said: h

' - us erg SC 00- 0 ony 1 S 11 Y e “ spell muc more ime in e ouse
is fiheethildirdlogestgfethte tylgaizogcatifiige: health conditions of these children as shown how, because it’s pleasant. In the old place
ivin ever im ortant date in the progress on the records, but I made certaln that they it was so crummy you didn’t like to stay
if thegprogrl'lam p were now really livmg under improved con— home and all the young fellows used to
' __ ditions. For example, I correlated the num— hang out on street corners.
. . ber of members in each child’s family with “There used to be a lot of rough Stuff
The Moral ReSPOHSIbhtY 0f the size and number of their rooms: I in- here in the old neighborhood, like there will
Local Housing Authorities insets?“ a Bonitaaisles“sciatica:
- . , . _
Excerpt from Memorandum of January 26 Upon making this survey, I found that clubs at the project now and have parties
from Mr. C(erody (Federal Works Agencg only 300 records out of the 700 which I and lectures and things like that.”
lilrlministrutor) to Mr. Straws (USHA A - originally selected fulfilled all the require—
' minis-traitor) on the Subject of Purchase of ments needed to make a reliable study. . _ .
Paint in Chicago, Ill. And these I classified according to physical Mov1e Popular 111 Baltimore

“It occurs to me that we might need in Standards PreVi9“51y.Set and coniisntnfly The Housing Authority of Baltimore City
every case, as these bodies are organized, to used by doctors in this and other districts: (Md.) is a leader in the work of telling the
explain to them that,while audits ordinarily Azbetter than average; B—average; 0— members of its community about slum clear—
take care of the manner in which mone is un er average. _ '
expended, they must realize that there yare I found that 31301113 35 percent 0f the ancce and. tow-rig housmlg Vgth Elle U,,SHA
certain Government regulations that have children had gained in general health in one m9 ion p10 ure ous1ng n ur .ime.
grOWn up over the years, because citizens way or another and that the school doctor Since January 5, a 16~mm. print 0f the
frequently are constitutionally distrustful who examined them during the pa_St 3 years fiéthgs‘ been 118 almilllstdcogistant 1356' ‘3:
of public officials of all sorts, to which all in the new school had raised their class1fi— 0‘ e iuary . y it a 9911 5_ 0WD
of us must conform. The safest thing for cation either from C to B 01. from B to A. times to 22 different groups totaling about
them to do in connection with their contrac- Knowing that a certain amount of health 8,100 persons. Included are SChOOIS and
tual relations is to appreciate this situation improvement is found as children grow churches, labor organizations, fraternal 01"
and to be sure that their transactions will older, I tested records of other schools where ders, .and 9th“ community organizationsd.
stand the spotlight of public inquiry, not there was no fluctuation of population— Showings W111 go on as long as the deman . ‘
only on the basis of honesty in handling where children lived in the same neighbor— continues. . . .
funds, but on the basis of assuring the pub— hood for at least 6 years. I never found a The Baltimore. Authority has obtaineda
lie that there are no insiders, and that ev— higher number of constitutional improve- total 0f 3? showmgs 0f the 35—mm. film In
erybody dealing with the Authority will get ments than 10 percent in any section of the three leadlng theaters, Wlth a total attend-
precisely the same treatment.” city—good or bad. ance of about 41,000 persons.

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 ::::—:L:- W l---- a;
0 u e on .— — . — ‘
Weekly Constructlon Report Charlotte (N. 0.34—
A) 108 3—20—40
Frederick (Md.—3—2)..... 50 3~19—40
Item Week ended Week ended Percentage
February 16,1940 February 9, 1940 change Lexington (Ky.—4—l)i_,_ 86 3_23_40

M! —‘——— '——— ——’ Lexington (Ky.—-4—2)__.- 206 3—23—40

Number of projects under construction____,.______,.r. 178 173 +2.89 McComb (MlSS-_3_2)»-- 90 3’20““)

Number of dwellings under construction....____,...__ 69,588 67,878 +2.52 New Orleans (La.—1-—8).. 746 3t 7‘40

Total estimated over-all cost 1 of new housing“... $311,507,000 $304,240,000 +2.39 Savannah (Ga.—2—3)..-_. 330 3— 5‘40

Average over-all cost lof new housing per unit.._,.. $4,476 $4,482 —0.13

Average net construction cost 2 per unit_____..____,.,,. $2,812 $2,816 —0.14 Tampa (Fla.—3—2)..______ 320 3‘19_40

West Palm Beach

——————————————————— (Fla.—9—2),-_____________. 120 3—19—40

1 Includes: (a) Building the house, including structural costs and plumbing, heating, and electrical installation; (b) dwelling

equipment, architects’ fees, local administrative expenses, financial charges during construction, and contingency expenses; ———————————

(c) land for present development; ((1) nondwelling facilities. I There is usually a 30-day period between bid advertising .

1 The cost of building the house, including structural, plumbing, heating, and electrical costs. and bid opening.

______________________—___————————————

Publication is approved by the Director, Bureau of the Budget, as reqired by rule 42 of the Joint Committee an Printing.
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington. D. C. Subscription price $1 domestic, foreign $1.80 per year. Single copies, 5 cents.
Material for PUBLIC HOUSING should be addressed to Informational Service Division, U. S. Housing Authority, Washington, D. C.

4 —