xt7ftt4fnn5b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ftt4fnn5b/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 1897 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, Volume 4 (Session ending 1897 June 3) text Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, Volume 4 (Session ending 1897 June 3) 1897 2012 true xt7ftt4fnn5b section xt7ftt4fnn5b Q ' 1V
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   CATALOGUE
·   OF THE
 ,· OFFICERS, STUDIES, AND STUDENTS l
I
E OF THE `
 
5 STATE COLLEGE OE KENTUCKY,
» LEXINGTON, ,
i TOGETHER WITH THE REGULATIONS,
A SESSION ENDING JUNE 3,1897.
LOUISVILLE:
V JOHN P. MORTON & COMPANY.
' 1897

 t
Y .
D
I
U ' _ · V zi? $3*

 f.
' CONTENTS.
THE STATE CoL1.Ec;E or KENTuc1H HOEING KASTLE, PH. D.,
‘ Professor of Chemistry. .
RURIC NEVILLE R0ARR, PH. D.,
Princzfal of the Normal School.
JOSEPH WILLIAM PRYDR, M. D.,
Professor of Anatomy and Physiology.
FREDERIC PAUL ANDERSON, M. E.,
Professor of Mec/za1zz'cal Engineering.
JAMES POYNTZ NELSON, C. E., M. E.,
Professor of C i·oz`l Engineering.
~ CLARENCE WENTWDRTH MATHE\\'S, B. S.,
Professor of Botany, Horticulture, and Agriculture.
ARTHUR IWCQUISTON NIILLER, A. M.,
Professor of Geology and Zoology.
MERRY LEw1s PENcE, M. S.,
Professor of Physics. ·
SAMUEL MILLER SWIGERT, CAPT. 2D CAV., U. S. A.,
Commandaizt and Professor of lrlilitaagy Sczence.
PAUL VVERNICKE,
Professor of 1‘[Ude’l'7l Languages.

 E
INSTRUCTOR5.
]0I~IN LEWIS LOGAN, A. B.,
First .·issz`sla2zt in the Academy. Su
]0IaN WESLEY NEWMAN, B. S., ‘
Assistant in the Normal School.
ROBERT LEE BLAN1·0N, M. LIT., A
Assistarzt in Greek and Latin. .
JOSEPH M0R1·0N DAVIS, A. B., B. S.,
Second Assistant in the Acad/·my.
VICTOR EMANUEL IWUNCY, B. S.,
Third Assistant in the Academy.
JAMES HENRY WELLS, M. E., ·
_ Assz'sIam' in Alec/za¢zz'cal .E7lg'1-?1Ee77"1-7lé,’.
JAMES RICHARD JOHNSON, B. M. E., ·
Assistant in Sho[>—wor/c and Drawiwtg.
ERNEST FRANK BROWN, A. B.,
Izzstruotor in Elocutfon.
WILLIAM JOHN KEARNEY, B. M. E.,
Laboratory Assistant in Exporimcntal E1zgz`ueer1'ng.
OTHER OFFICERS.
MISS LUcY BERRY BLACKBURN,
11[ozIz`tr@ss.
JAMES GARRARD WRITE,
Business [Manager.
]0sEI¤II \rVILLI.~\I\I PRY0R, M. D.,
Surgeon of t/Ic I?attr1l1`o2t. H
MISS NIARY HODGES,
Stcztograp/mr.
VICTOR EMANUEL 1\IIuxcY,
Szcrrtaxy of the Faculty.

 #4
§‘¢
5* THE KENTUCKY EXPERIMENT STATION. I
BOARD OF CONTROL.
i
HoN. A. P. GOODING, Chaz`rma¢z .................. Mason County.
HoN. HART BoswEI.I. ........................... Fayette County.
JOHN B. KENNEDY, Esg. ......................... Bourbon County.
PRESIDENT JAMES K. PATTERSON, Ex-0_/jizz}; ......... Lexington.
DIRECTOR M. A. SCOVELL, Ex-ajicio .............. Lexington.
OFFICERS OF THE STATION.
MEI.vII.I.E AMASA ScovEI.I.,
r Director.
ALFRED MEREDITII PETER,
First C/zemist. I
HENRY ERNEST CURTIS,
Second Clzcmisl.
HARRISON GARMAN,
` Ent0m0l0gz`sz' and Balanixl.
CLARENCE WENTWORTI-I MAT!-{EWS,
HU}'tT-C14ll1l7’l..Y[.
VIcToR EMANUEI. MUNCY,
Mzlc0r0l0gz'st.
I Mxss ALICE MCDOWELL SIIELEY,
Slcnugraphcr.
DR. RICHARD JAMES SRURR,
" Su/>er1`11tendenl 0f Field Experiment:. I
]0sEPI»I NELSON HARPER,
Dairyman.

 I DEPARTIVIENTS.
The studies of the State College are distributed into fifteen
Departments, each in charge of a responsible head, the heads
constituting the Faculty. Chronologically the Departments are:
I. History, Political Economy, and Metaphysics.
II. Botany, Horticulture, and Agriculture. A
III. The English Language and Literature.
· IV. Military Science.
V. Chemistry.
VI. Mathematics and Astronomy.
VII. Modern Languages.
VIII. Greek and Latin.
IX. The Academy.
X. Pedagogy, or the Normal School.
XI. Civil Engineering.
XII. Mechanical Engineering.
XIII. Anatomy and Physiology.
XIV. Geology and Zoology.
XV. Physics. ~

 X COURSES OF STUDY.
i'
I I. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY, POLITICAL ECONOMY, AND I
METAPHYSICS.
PRESIDENT PATTERSON.
(
The course of instruction in this Department includes an
outline of Ancient, Mediaeval, and Modern History. Attention is
given to the various forms of government, their characteristic
features and points of diiference, to the progress of civilization,
the origin and development of parliamentary government, the
rights and duties of citizenship.
In the period covered, Modern History and the History of
England and the United States occupy the most prominent place.
Walker’s Science of Wealth is made the basis of instruction
A in Political Economy. Students are, however, made familiar ..
with the principles upon which rest the rival doctrines of Pro-
tection and Free Trade. ·
The study of Mental and Moral Philosophy extends through
one year. Sir William Hamilton is used as the basis of instruc-
tion in Metaphysics, and janet in Morals. Concurrently with
recitations from these authorities, the pupil is made familiar
with the principles upon which rival systems of philosophy and
morals are based and the arguments by which they are main-
tained. Ancient and modern systems are thus brought under
review, and the necessary data furnished upon which to ground
intelligent opinions.
* II. DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY, HORTICULTURE, AND
AGRICULTURE.
PROFESSOR MATHEWS.
. This Department occupies rooms for class instruction on the _
basement floor of the Experiment Station building. The main
room or general laboratory is suitably equipped with the custom-
ary furnishings of laboratory tables, water and gas fixtures,
charts, etc. The further equipment both for elementary work
and for the use of advanced students is new and of the best

 I2 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
quality, and includes an ample supply of compound and dissect-
ing microscopes for the individual use of each student, several .
hrst-class microtomes, ovens and sterilizing apparatus, together  
with delicate balances and other apparatus for the study of plant i `
physiology.
l Among other facilities for study, the Department possesses a -
greenhouse (2OX5O feet), giving an opportunity for the con- q
, tinuous study of living plants throughout the winter months
and for experimental work in plant physiology.
The herbarium contains a nearly complete representation of
the flora of Kentucky, with a considerable number of foreign
exchanges. It was primarily due to the efforts of Dr. Robert
Peter, who made a quite extensive collection of Kentucky plants
about sixty years ago, and also exchanged specimens with the
prominent botanists of that day, thus forming the nucleus of the
present collection, which therefore possesses considerable his-
torical value. Constant additions are now being made to the
herbarium by collecting excursions over the State and by ex-
changes with other institutions.
The Department Library is receiving constant accessions of
carefully selected books, and already contains the most important
botanical and horticultural works of reference, and these, as well
as the best current literature upon these subjects, are freely
available to students during college hours.
For the study of horticulture and agriculture, many of the
appliances already mentioned are again utilized, and in addition
the very complete equipment of the Experiment Station inci-
dentally affords superior opportunities for the instruction of
students. ‘
The Horticultural Department of the Station (which is also -¤
under the charge of the Professor of Botany and Horticulture)
has an excellent forcing and greenhouse plant upon the college
grounds, consisting of four glass houses of the most approved
methods of construction, containing 4,ooo feet of glass, in -
addition to hot-beds and cold frames outside. These houses
are run to their full capacity through the winter months in the
conduct of experiments upon the culture of lettuce, radishes,
tomatoes, cauliflower, and other vegetables, and upon the various
methods of plant propagation.

 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. I3
‘ The extensive list of varieties of vegetables and fruits grow-
. ing upon the Experiment Farm gives an opportunity for a com-
»  parative study of varieties rarely if ever found upon the ordi- V
T ` nary farm.
The College campus contains a large number of ornamental
. trees and shrubs, and these with numerous varieties of annual
; and perennial flowering plants give the pupil a good opportunity V
to study ornamental horticulture.
In the distinctively agricultural studies the operations of the
farm department of the Experiment Station furnish an excellent
opportunity for the study of the effects of various fertilizers,
varieties of wheat, corn, and other field crops, and the many
problems of dairying.
In order to give special attention to dairy experiments a
building has recently been erected upon the Station Farm, and
fully equipped with the most modern appliances for the care of
milk and the manufacture of butter and cheese. .
All these facilities for the experiment work of the Station,
while primarily designed for that purpose, can not fail to be of
the greatest value as object lessons in connection with the
studies of this department.
The general subjects of study comprised within the scope of
this department are subdivided as follows:
r. 1N‘rRo¤ucToRv BOTANY.
This study is required of all Sophomores in the General
Scientific, Agricultural, Biological, Chemical, and Normal courses.
Beginning in September, the subject is pursued through the
entire college year, and for all students is a prerequisite for
-, admission to subsequent courses in botany. V
The work of the year comprises a general suryey of the plant
world, and is designed to give the student who goes no further
with the subject, a comprehensive view of the entire vegetable
E- kingdom, while for the student who will continue his botanical V_
study, it is intended to afford a substantial basis for more
exhaustive special studies.
The laboratory method is the form of instruction principally
used, and from the very beginning of his work the pupil is
directed to a study of plants themselves, using the text-book as an
2

 I4 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.  
aid to correct his mistakes and to enlarge his field of view. The i
student is early instructed in the use of the compound and dis-
secting microscopes, and with their aid he begins in the Fall t
term the study of the vegetable cell and its various modiiica-  
tions, together with types of the lower forms of plant life, pro- °
H ceeding from the simpler to the more complex, until at the ‘
beginning of the second half year the ferns are reached. From a
· this time until the close of the year the student is given practice
in the description and determination of species of ferns, grasses,
and other flowering plants, in addition to a study of their
structures.
In the course of the year class excursions are arranged to the
Kentucky River and other points of botanical interest—some—
times in connection with the other departments of natural
history,——for the purpose of collecting and studying the interest-
ing flora of these various localities.
Text-books: Bessey’s Botany in the first, and Gray’s Field, Forest, and .
Garden Botany in the second term.
u. H|sToLoGY, AND (lll.} PLANT PHYSIOLOGY.
These two studies are designed to form a continuous course
running through the junior year, and are required of all juniors
in the Agricultural and Biological courses.
In Histology the student is given instruction and training in
the methods of preparing vegetable tissues for microscopic
study, and is encouraged to make a large number of permanent
slides, which he can retain for his own future use.
Text-book: Dudley and Thomas' Manual of Plant Histology.
The study of the tissues and organs of the plant under the
microscope gives the pupil a preliminary knowledge which is ,
important for the proper understanding of the functions of these
plant parts, or Plant Physiology, which immediately follows
Histology. This requires two afternoons of each week in the
Spring term for laboratory experiments, in which the pupil .
follows McDougal’s Manual of Plant Physiology, and is expected
in addition to do considerable collateral reading.
In both of these studies constant references are made to such standard
works as Strasburger’s Practical Botany; the text-books ou Plant Physi-
ology of Goodale, Sachs, and Vines; De Bary’s Comparative Anatomy of
the Phanerogams and Ferns; Behren’s Guide to the Microscope in Bot-
any, etc.

  
  STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. I5
%
iv. cRYPToGAM|c BoTANY.
g Required of juniors in the Biological course. Like the pre-
  ceding subject, this study is arranged primarily as a laboratory I
ii course. It embraces the study of representatives, so far as
· practicable, of each of the lower classes of plants.
an Works of reference: Bennett and Murray’s Cryptogamic Botany; De
Bary’s Fungi, Mycetozoa, and Bacteria; Goebel’s Outlines of Classification
and Special Morphology; the Manuals of Bacteriology of Sternberg and
others; Wolle’s Algae, etc. ; Lesquereux and ]ames’ Mosses; Underw0od’s
Ferns and their Allies; Atkinson’s Biology of Ferns, etc.
v. Economic BoTANY.
This study is required of Seniors in the Agricultural Course,
and is for the first half of the term parallel in part with the
preceding study, being concerned with injurious Fungi and
methods of combating them. The remainder of the term is
» occupied with the study of the botany of cultivated plants, ‘
particular attention being given to the grasses.
vi. SPECIAL ADVANCED BoTANY.
Provision is here made for Seniors in the Biological Course to
pursue some advanced line of study, assigned with reference to
their individual tastes and requirements, and is intended to be a
continuation of some