xt7fxp6v1092 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7fxp6v1092/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19701029  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 29, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 29, 1970 1970 2015 true xt7fxp6v1092 section xt7fxp6v1092 Tie

Kemtocecy

Thursday, Oct. 29, 1970

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

ZPG Quizzes Candidates
The Lexington chapter of Zero
Population Crowth (ZPG) issued
yesterday a "political orientation" newsletter which sounds
Kentucky's congressional candidates on their views on population growth and control.
The newsletter was compiled
from a letter and survey sent to
candidates in the third through
seventh congressional districts,
said Doug Hennig, student coordinator for ZPG.
"Since the newsletters came
out, we haven't had the time to
mail them, so we're just going
to make them available on campus and try to get press releases
to the Lexington and Louisville
people," he said.
ZPG's letter to the candidates
said in part, "The astute politician should recognize the opportunity to make political mileage
by coming out strongly in favor
of population control, for now we
have public support and sympathy." The survey asked candidates if they favored a list of
population control measures, including:
Setting a national goal of
stopping population growth within ten years,
Repeal of all state laws restricting abortion.
Federal or state income tax
deductions for the cost of birth
control devices, abortions and
sterilization,
A constitutional amendment
prohibiting discrimination on the
basis of sex, ;
,,
..,.
The answers receive by ZPG
range from "enthusiastic" to
"comical," said Hennig. Here
are some excerpts from the newsletter's survey of the candidates:
Third district Democrat Romano L. Mazzoli favored a national birth control aid program,

t

1

,

,

Weather
Forecast today: Cool with per-rioof rain ending tonight. Partly cloudy and cool Friday. High
temperature today, low 60's; tonight, mid 40's; tomorrow, mid
50's. Tomorrow's forecast: tunny
and a little warmer Saturday.
Precipitation probabilities: today, 80 percent; tonight and tomorrow, 20 percent.

emmeil

E

but said he believed that
Perkins, a Democrat, did not reof people in urban ply to the questionnaire, but his
areas," not overpopulation, was opponent, Herbert E. Myers,
the biggest problem. Mazzoli also questioned ZPG's "sincerity in
supported the repeal of abortion America ' and the American way
laws, and tax deductions for birth of life."
control devices.
"So many communist,
fascist and such orRepublican William O. Cow-ge- r
did not reply to the questganizations have sent me quesionnaire, but American party tionnaires during this campaign
candidate Ronald VV. Watson that I have a hard time estabstated that his main environlishing their true identity. Of
mental concern was "to get rid course I always check my list
of the hysterical press agents, of communist financed or front
bearded college professors, and organizations."
federal bureaucrats." He ans"It might be a good idea for
wered all questions on the ZPG you to consider the above quessurvey negatively, without ela- tions if you do not know too much
about the parent organization (of
boration.
Sixth district
Republican ZPG)," Myers said.
Despite the lack of replies
Gerald G. Gregory claimed that
from candidates, Hennig said
ZPG's contention that population growth was the nation's ZPG would "definitely" prepare
most serious problem was "too new, more complete questionnaires for the upcoming election
strong to give complete support,"
and he favored population control for governor.
While ZPG has endorsed no
by "moral persuasion" rather
than by law. Gregory also said candidates for the Nov. 3 elecconstitutional amendments on tion, Hennig said that "if there's
sex discrimination and environone person in the state we'd
ment protection were unneeded definitely support, it's Tim Lee
because "present laws adeCarter (fifth district incumbent).
quately cover most if not all in"He sponsored a population
stances." Incumbent John C. and family planning bill that was
Watts did not reply to the survery important to ZPG. He's very
concerned with the same things
vey.
Seventh distric- t- Rep. Carl D. we are," he said.

Vol. LXII, No. 40

An Example?
Crossen Says Abortion Stand

Contributed to His Arrest
By JEAN RENAKER

Managing Editor
Dr. Phillip Crossen said last night that the recent rock
festival held on his farm "wasn't worth" being convicted

for.

Speaking before Louisville's professional chapter of
Sigma Delta Chi, a national journalistic society, he added
that "there is good to come out of it (rock festivals)."
Crossen contended that his favorable stand on abortion
and his previous connection with the Lexington-Fayett- e
County Human Rights Commission contributed to his
arrest.
He added that he became a "symbol" of someone
who "listens to the younger generation" when he furnished his farm to student. He contends that his arrest
"supposedly effectively stops anyone" from involvement
with young people.
He described the festival, occurring on the weekend of
Sept. 18, as "beautiful" and "full of love." The doctor
commented that the community is "in bad shape if they
can't allow kids to have festivals like this." "
Responding to a question from the audience, Crossen
said he felt he had grounds for an appeal, but said he
didn't appeal because he "also has to practice medicine."
He added that he saw "no point in providing a political
circus" for E. Lawson King, Fayette County's prosecuting
attorney. He later added that King and Vice President
SpiroT. Agnew are "in the same camp."

For Early December

Mobe Sets Meeting on War, Poverty
JANICE S. FRANCIS
Kernel Staff Writer
Members of the Student

Mo-

bilization Committee

(SMC)
plans last night for

announced
convention on the
a three-da- y
Vietnam war, poverty, repression
and other topics for the first
week in December.
Tentativly

set for Dec.

the convention will hopefully

4-- 6,

in-

clude representative from local
and statewide groups including
SMC, VISTA, Lexington Peace
Council, Black Student Union,
Zero Population Crowth, EnvirAwareness Society,
onmental
Civil Liberties Union, UK Draft
Counseling Service, Women's
Liberation and the Pike County
Citizen's Association.

According to Dan Mohn, SMC
steering committee member, the
convention will serve as a means
of setting up contacts between

"issue

-

concerned"

groups

throughout the state.
"It will help them to pull together and work more strongly,"
stated Mohn.
Each group will set up a workshop, including a speaker and
a question and answer period.
People attending the convention

would attend approximately

three workshops, discussing problems and solutions to particular
problems.
Mohn stressed his desire that
n
the convention reflect a
of interests from throughout the state, not just those of
UK students.
cross-sectio-

A coordinating committee including a representative from
each interested group is expected
to be set up within the next week,
Steve Dunifer, Transylvania
SMC representative, announced
that a similar conference is being
planned at 2 p.m. Wednesday in
the Mitchell Fine Arts Building
on the Transylvania campus.
Speakers from the NAACP,
The Young Democrats and Young
Republicans, Student Coalition
and the Lexington Peace Council
will present views and goals of
their organizations.
Mark Paster, SMC member,
announced the printing of 8,000
to 10,000 leaflets to be distributed Saturday at the
Carolina State football game and
the Lettermen concert. The leaf
UK-Nor- th

lets will carry a general anti-wa- r
message, stressing financial and
moral aspects of the Vietnam war.
Paster cautioned leafleting
volunteers to conduct the leafleting in a "calm, polite way."
"If people don't want the
leaflets, don't give one to them,"
he said. "If someone wants to
argue, it's up to you. If you
think you can defend your position, OK."
Paster suggested that if the
money and manpower can be
arranged, leafleting could continue throughout the remaining
football games and be carried
over into basketball season.
"SMC needs to make its presence known on this campus,"
urged Mohn. "We really haven't
done much lately."

A

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Within You, Without You

Potato Band" sponsored an "event" Wednesday night in the Reynolds
The "All-Sta- r
Building. Small plastic tubes lead into larger ones while lights, strobe and otherwise, added to the environment. In the. end, as participants became "overly inKernel Photo By Bob Brewer
volved," all was destroyed.

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Oct. 29,

1970

Book Review

Government Ignores Harmful Food Additives

"The domical Feast," by James
Turner, is published by Crossman
Publishers and is available in
hardcover at $5.95 or paperback
at 95 cents.
By JEAN CARPER
Dispatch News Service.
Could there be any more insidious violence to individuals
than the institutionalized
of our food supply with
the government's knowledge and
approval?
That's what this book is
about. And in it James Turner
brilliantly documents the corruption of purpose that has beset
the FDA which is supposed to
protect our food supply. As Turner proves, the FDA is much more
concerned about the economic
position of the food industry than
the health of 200 million Americans that is jeopardized by the
reckless use of untested and patently harmful food chemicals that
can cause a range of hazards,
including cancer, heart damage,
birth defects, undesirable mutations.
Cyclamates
In an especially timely chapter, which gives valuable insight
into the FDA's philosophy of operation, Turner dissects the cy- poi-sioni-

E

d,

soft-drink- s.

Musical Entertainers!
I

am interested in auditioning young talented

listening ballads, folk, Glen Campbell and Johnny
Cash arrangements etc. Instrumentation could be
5 organ, or guitar, or piano, or combination. Vocal
E harmony should be a strong point. This would be
E entertainment for young adult crowds for listening
3; more than dancing.

E
E

1

GROUP WOULD START THREE NIGHTS (Tue., Wed.,
Thur.) 9:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. AND POSSIBLY EXPAND

70

j
2

S

e

E
E

s

3
5

Interested parties contact:

I

PHIL COLLINS

I

SOUTHLAND LANES
205 Southland Drive

REBEL

ROOM

Phone

277-574-

bbiidi(bU
prior to the flrit
la this mImi.
U

TODAY
The Yeanr Democrats will hold a
meeting Thursday. Oct. 29, at 7:00
p.m. in room 245 at the Student
-'
.
Center.
Dr. Richard LaBreeqne Will, speak
on "The Relevance of Marcuse to
Human Development"
at the Colloquium on Issues and Methods in the
Social and Philosophical
Study of
Education, to be held Oct. 20 at 1:30
p.m. in room 57, Dickey Hall.
Two rooms in the Classroom Buildhalls.
ing are open for use as
Rooms 304 and 346 are study from
open
p.m. on week . "nights and . .
p.m. on weekends." . .
Tickets for UK'S first student production of the 1970-7- 1
year, "The
of Innocence,"
are on
Ceremony
noon
sale
from
to 4:30 'p.m.
daily at the Laboratory Theatre,
Fine Arts Building. The play will run
1
Oct.
and Nov. 1. Curtain for
all performances will be 8:30 with an
added 2:30 matinee performance
on
Oct. 31. Admission is $2.00, $1.00 for
students.
Student Government Representative
Jim Futrell will be available every
day from 3:00 p.m. -- 4:30 p.m. in Student Center Room 204 (SG Office)
to answer questions or Just rap about
Student Government. Come by or call

,"..--

or

8.

TOMORROW
6

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In other areas, Turner tells
how, unknown to consumers, caffeine is loaded into soft drinks,
and how essential foods, such as
bread, are stripped of most of their
nutrients during manufacture
with no replacements. Food is
contaminated in the factory with
g
bacteria and inedible filth; for example, in soft
drinks consumers have found "decomposing mice, maggots, used
condoms, cigarette butts." And
the FDA makes only pathetic
attempts to halt it.
illness-producin-

FDA Against Individuals
But if the FDA is reluctant
to pursue the big economic interests Turner points out, their
abuse of power against a hapless
individual they dislike can be
frightening. As in the FDA's persecution of Dr. Wilhelm Reich,
n
avant-gard- e
the
psychoanalyst, who also had some
published beliefs that certain devices could improve health.
well-know-

er,

"For 13 years," writes Turn"FDA conducted a vicious

campaign to discredit him and
his ideas, distorting facts in its
possession to achieve that goal."
Finally the FDA succeeded in
obtaining a ban on the sale of
all Reich's books, a destruction
of all the documents of his research foundation, and a burning
of his books, Turner says, adding
that because Reich would not
repudiate his views to suit the
FDA, he was forced into federal
prison w here he died.
Turner is a man w ho thoroughly knows his subject and has done
a masterful job of searching out
the incriminating facts from long-secr-

et

FDA files, and suggesting
remedies. After reading this book,
one feels that the most needed
response is a public uprising to
halt this incredible constant assault we are being subjected to
from our contaminated food supply through FDA negligence.

TODAY and TOMORROW

The doadllno for

LATER!

WEEK-END- S

X
pnbllcatleB of IWnu

I

5 duos or trios featuring vocals, including attractive
3 female singers. Contemporary, but not rock. Easy,

decision, rightly predicts Turner,
"must be viewed as the beginning, not the end of public concern about chemicals in the food
supply." For thousands of additives that have never been safety-teste- d
at all are willy-nill- y
dumped into our food supply.
Many are contained on theFDA's
GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list which Turner
charges is unscientific and illegal.
Manufacturers, we find out, are
even free to get up their own
CRAS lists, using chemicals indiscriminately, without even informing the FDA of what they
are using. Thus, the law which
requires additives to be tested
prior to marketing is openly
flouted by the FDA and industry.
And the mistakes of FDA are repeated over and over with ourselves as the losers. Now, for
example, with saccharin, which
is also dangerous and possibly
carcinogenic; but FDA continues
to keep it on the CRAS list.

T:M p.m. two days

llllllCailllllllllllEailllllllllllCailllllllllllCSIIIIIII

iJIIIIIII!C3IIIIIIIIIllIC3IIIIIII!IIIl3l

I

clamate incident. He shows that
since 1931 the FDA had evidence
that cyclamates caused cancer,
but the information was suppressed and even distorted to
prove the "safety" of cyclamates,
enabling manufacturers to use it
with no restrictions at all in general foods, such as Kool-Aivitamins, bacon, fruits and vegetables, as well as
Even when FDA scientists
warned of the danger, they were
ignored or reprimanded by their
superiors. Altogether it was a
disgraceful performance up to the
very end when the FDA was
finally forced to ban all cyclamates as of Sept. 1, 1970, after
their illegal maneuvering to
brand it a marketable "drug"
was publically exposed in ConActually
gressional hearings.
Turner's group The Center for
the Study of Responsive Law
headed by Ralph Nader filed
a petition with FDA demanding
a complete ban. Three days later
the FDA in a hastily called news
conference announced the total
prohibition on cyclamates, and
tried to save face by saying the
decision was based on new evidence. Of course, there was no
new evidence.
Unfortunately, the cyclamate

An Oletlme Mountain Moslc Show
will be presented at 8:00 p.m. Friday, Oct. 30, in the Student Center

Ballroom. Tickets cost $1.50 and are
available In the Student Center Lower Lounge from 12:00 p.m. to 5:00
p.m. A free workshop will be held
Friday at 3:00 p.m. in the ballroom.
Dr. Paal H. Stelson of Oak Ridge
Oak
NaUonal
Ridge,
Laboratory,
Tenn., will speak on "Coulomb Exat the Physics Colloquium,
citation"
Oct. 30 at 4:00 p.m. in room 153 of
Building.
the Chemistry-Physic- s

COMING UP
Kentucky artists will exhibit works
at the Shakertown Autumn Art Show
from
and Sale, Oct. 31 and Nov.
0
9:30
p.m. at Pleasant Hill, on
1

a.m.-5:0-

U.S. 68 between Lexington and
Is $2.00
Ky. Admission
adults, $1.00 students, and Includes
outdoor art show and village tour.
For lunch and, dinner reservations call
(606)

734-ill- L

The India Association is celebrating "Diwali" festival Sunday, Nov. 1
at 6:30 p.m. at the Baptist Student
Union, 371 S. Limestone. There will
be a potluck supper. Please bring a
dish, sweets, or any other home made
Soft drinks will be
confectionary.
provided. There will be short cultural performances after the supper.
Ilillel will hold its Nov. 1 meeting
at Temple Adath Israel, 124 N. Ashland Ave., at 6:30 p.m. Rides are
available from the Student Center
parking lot or from Haggln Field at
6:15 p.m. The guest will be Rabbi
Oscar Groner, - Asst. National Director of Hlllel. Jewish students, faculty
and staff are welcome.
The Newman Center, 320 Rose Lane,
will sponsor a spaghetti supper at
6:30 p.m., Sunday. Nov. 1. Spaghetti
is 50 cents a plate. The public is invited.

PWTY

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HOSE

Dr. John Abrshamson will speak on
"Manpower Planning: Some Implications for Education" at the Colloquium on. Issues and Methods In the
Studies In
Social and Philosophical
Education, Nov. S at 1:30 p.m. In
room 57, Dickey Hall.
Sorority Open Rash extends until
December. All Interested girls wishing
to sign up are asked to go to the
Office Tower Room 561. Go Greek
Become Involved!
will meet WednesThe Food Co-o- p
day, Nov. 4, in room 245 of the Student Center at 7:30 p.m. to approve
the articles of incorporation and bylaws.

UK Placement Service
Students- - may register for appointments .with representatives of the following corporations by contacting the
Placement Service, 201 Old Agriculture Building, at least two days in
advance of the date specified. Tele(ext.
phone
Nov. 2. Chicago Pneumatic Tool
Co. Civil E., Mining E., Electrical E.,
Mechanical E. (BS). Locations: United
States. December, May, August graduates. Citizenship.
Nov. 2. Eaton, Yale and Towne
Inc. Check schedule book for late
information.
Nov. x. Goodyear Atomic Corp.
Check schedule book for late Information. '
Nov. 2. Alexander Grant Ac Co. Accounting (BS. MS). Locations: United
States. December, May graduates.
AcNov. 2. The Kendall Co.
counting, Mechanical E., Chemistry,
Science. Mathematics (BS),
Computer
Business Administration IBS, MS).
Locations;
Franklin, Ky.; Chicago,
111. December,
May graduates. Citizenship.
Nov." 3. American
Oil Co. Check
schedule book for late information.
Nov. 3. The Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co. Accounting, Civil E..
Mechanical E., Chemistry (Hfi); Electrical E. (BS. MS). Location: Cleveland, Ohio. December, May graduates. Citizenship.
Nov. 3. Firestone Tire and Rubber
Co.
Accounting, Business Administration (with a minimum of 12 hours
in accounting. BS). Locations: United
States. December, May graduates. Citizenship.
Nov. 3. Indiana University Graduate School of Business Check schedule book for late information.
Nov. 4.
Humble Oil & Refining
Co. Business
Administration, Economics (BS, MS). Locations: United
States. Citizenship.
Nov. 4. Fayette County Schools.
Check schedule book for late Information.
Nov. 4. H. J. Heinx Co. Candidates
Interested in sales positions (BS). Locations:
United SUk. December,
May graduates.
aJ?Y
.TMriscon Lines Business
Administration, Economics (BS). Locations: United States. May,
August

graduates.
Nov.
schedule

Ford Motor Co.
Check
book for late Information.

The Kentucky Kernel

Kentucky Kernel, University

..O

WOOLS

t

BUNOS

PANT SUITS

PANTS

'

station. University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
pottage paid at Lexington. Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 49tt.
Begun as the Cadet in lov4 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising
herein la Intended to helppublished
the reader buy. Any
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Oct. 29,

1970- -3

Pollution Controls Lacking, State Official S avs
-

FRANK FORT ( AP) Abou 1 90 director of the state Water Pollupercent of tlie counties in Kention Control Commission, made
the comment to the Joint legislatucky do not have adequate county-wide
disposal systems for solid tive subcommittee on
waste, a pollution control offimcnt. The subcommittee, holdcial said Wednesday.
ing its first meeting, elected Rep.
VVoodrow Smither, assistant
as
John Swinford,

Speaker Blacklist Prohibited
WASHINGTON (AP)
an official House report
on campus speakers was issued
"solely for the sake of exposure
or intimidation," a federal judge
Wednesday prohibited its public
distribution by the government.
U.S. District Judge Cerhard
A. Cesell, in a landmark confrontation between the courts and
Congress, ruled the list of 65
militant, radical or
Communist - oriented speakers
serves no valid legislative pur-De- claring

pose-

Cesell permanently' enjoined

the U.S. public printer from print-

ing the report at "public expense.
But he specifically refused to prohibit individual congressmen
from distributing it on their own.
"There are undoubtedly individuals who would destroy our
institutions and form of government," Cesell said in his order.
"If any of them are listed in
this report, our Constitution

nevertheless preserves their right
to speak even though their acts
may be restrained."
Cesell's court order appears
to be the first ever to prohibit
Congress from publicly distributing an official report. And Cesell
said it was the first to be based
on the doctrine of valid legislative purpose.
Chairman Richard II . Ichord,
of the House Internal
Security Committee which prepared the report concluding that
the campus speaking circuit helps
finance "promoters of disorderly
and revolutionary activity among
students" said he will appeal
Cesell's order.
Cesell said the
report
itself states it is not related to
any legislation but it intended
instead to alert university presidents, alumni and parents "to
the extent of campus speaking
in promoting the radical revolutionary movement."
25-pa-

SIMq

nn?

its chairman
Rcichert,
chairman.

and Sen. Walter
as vice

Members of the subcommittee
agreed they needed to come up
with some legislation on pollution control before the 1972 General Assembly. But no suggestions were offered Wednesday.
Smither also noted that the
most logical method to dispose
of solid waste would be a landfill. In that method, six inches

of soil are spread over the waste
each night and two feet are spread
over the top when the landfill
is closed.
But a population of about
20,000 is needed to support the
cost of maintaining a landfill,
including the necessary equipment, he said.
Cities and counties are allowed to combine to operate a
landfill, he said, but few have
done so. However, some progress
along this line is being made in

USAC Recognizes

a
demonstration project in Eastern Kentucky, h"
added.
A major problem in coni
with landfills is getting i!
public to accept them, Smither
said.
Smither and Kenes Bowling,
deputy commissioner of natural
resources, both exhibited a lack
of enthusiasm for placing all
agencies involving pollution or
environment into a new, single
department.

Stephenson, Blues

As Outstanding
Two professors have recently
been honored as outstanding academic advisers. Drs. Thomas O.
Blues, associate professor of English, and John B. Stephenson,
newly appointed dean of undergraduate studies, were presented
$250 checks as tokens of appreciation for their work as counselors and consultants with students.
Terry McCarty, chairman of
the subcommittee of the University Student Advisory Committee
(USAC) which selected the two
professors for the honor last spring, made the presentation.

"In presenting this symbolic academic advising, availability
award, we as students wish to to students, and making their
role of adviser an active one.
emphasize the importance of academic advising and to express
Dr. Blues, a native of Deour gratitude to the many professors who are willing to go troit, is associate professor of
beyond a regular advising role English specializing in American
and take a real interest in stu- literature. Dr. Stephenson, a native of Staunton, Va., joined UK
dents." Miss McCarty said.
in September 1966 as an assisAmong the standards singled tant professor of sociology with
out by Miss McCarty as a basis a
joint appointment in the Colfor the selection of the two faclege of Medicine Department of
ulty members were quality of Behavioral Science.

MMi Q& effih

The "In Thing" for the campus

wear these long chained swingers

all the time
O
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anywhere.

PEACE SYMBOL on
18 Inch chain

Regular 5.00
14 Kf. COLD CROSS
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Regular 10.00
14 Kt. HEART with
PINE DIAMOND

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Regular 22.95
14 Kt. GOLD BELL
with DIAMOND
Regular 19.95

O 3 DIAMOND
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STUDENT
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1495

O GOLD SIGNET
RING 12.95

for every College Girl.

Trie S brink

Checks

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Our famous ribbed-up- ,
turtle sweater the
shrink takes a liking to our
corduroy pants. Shrink, $14; pants, $16.
no-wa- le

Do Your Own Things with
Account of Your Own ot LROY'
on

Undr 21?

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O Turfland Mall
O Eastland Plaxa
26 N. Main
in Winchester
O Eastwood Plaza
in Frankfort

THIRD FLOOR DOWNTOWN
also at SOUTHLAND and TURFLAND

* Mazzoli. Above the Crowd
Voters in the upcoming Con
gressional election are faced with
the old "slim or none" dilemma
that plagued them during the presidential election of 1968.

action. In the sixth district, where
incumbent John C. Watts opposes
Gerald Gregory, the voters seem
to have been forgotten. Gregory
has youth on his side, but has yet
to take a stand on a major issue.
In Kentucky's seven congresveteran of the
Watts, a
sional districts, there just aren't
House, appears to believe that he
many choices to be made. Two
will be elected by force of habit.
congressmen are running for reThe same is true of fifth and
election unopposed. To make matseventh district races. In both conters worse, only one of the remainvoters or candiing five races, the third district tests, nobody care who is elected.
dates seems to
contest between incumbent WilThat leaves the third district,
liam O. Cowger and State SenaMazzoli-Cowgbattle
tor Romano L. Mazzoli, has the where the
national attention as a
earmarks of a responsible political has drawn
politically significant contest. Sucampaign.
the candidates both
In the rest of the races, voters perficially,
share the "moderate" tag, but Mazhave two choices slim and none. zoli has
adopted a slightly more
The contests have fallen victim to liberal stance and has won support
mudslinging, innuendo, or apathy. from
prominent liberal organizaThe fourth district battle be- tions.
tween Republican M. G. "Gene"
Despite that support, the bigSnyder and Democrat CharlesVVeb-ste- r gest difference between Mazzoli
has quickly deteriorated into and Cowger is their political phian exchange of accusation, inveslosophies. Cowger is a Republican
and insinuations from representative, dedicated to uptigations,
Snyder's charge that Webster has holding a Republican president as
misused political advertising to much as the rights and interests
Webster's call for "complete disof his constituents. Mazzoli, we
closure" of Snyder's alleged con- believe, is a congressman first. For
flict of interests.
that, if nothing else, he should be
But at least that race has some chosen over Cowger Nov. 3.
19-ye- ar

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

The state $48.3 million bond
issue has been a victim of the
general malaise affecting nearly
every contest in this Tuesday's
election. That is, a lack of rational
discussion.
The Nunn administration,
which sponsored the measure, has
seen fit to campaign for it quietly, ostensibly to avoid partisanship. This campaign has been so
quiet, in fact, that only those who
were favorably inclined toward the
issue were contacted. The result,
of course, has been to keep
uninformed.

ently 300 mentally ill children in
Kentucky awaiting admission to
state facilities. Only 23 can be
cared for, and these in buildings
which were built before the advent
of elevators, electricity and indoor
plumbing.
At present, Kentucky is housing
2,900 inmates at Eddyville and
in institutions designed for
only 1,900. If the crime rate is to
be reduced, these facilities have to
be expanded to provide a decent
rehabilitation program.
The money allocated to the Department of Education would proinvide for a vocational-technicDespite this, we feel the bond stitute. If approved, this would be
issue should be approved. The a step in reducing the number of
.money generated by those bonds people on the welfare rolls.
would provide much needed imIf approved, this bond issue
in facilities for the de- would cost the state about $3 milprovements
partments of mental health, educa- lion annually. This payment can be
tion, corrections and child welfare, handled comfortably within the
as well as the Kentucky School for existing tax revenues and should
the Blind and the Kentucky School not cause a rise in taxes.
for the Deaf. It would also provide
If Kentuckians are sincere about
a guaranteed loan fund for small their cries of "law and order" and
farmers.
their wish to reduce the welfare
All of these facilities are terribly rolls, they will surely approve this
overcrowded now. There are pres measure Nov. 3.
Ken-tuckia-

La-Gran- ge

THURSDAY, OCT. 29, 1970

Editorial represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Frank S. Coots III,
Bob Brown, Editorial Fage Editor
Jean Rcnakcr, Managing Editor
Dahlia Hays, Copy Editor
Mike Ticrncy, Sports Editor
Don Kosa, Cartoonist
David King, Business Manager
Jane Brown, Ron Hawkins, Bradley Jeffries, Jerry Lewis, Mike Wines.
Assistant Managing Editors
Editor-in-Chi-

Kernel Soapbox

A Black's Reply to Junot

er

The Dire Need for Bond Issue

1894

By ANDREW JOHNSON

Junot's article serve to epitomize
Ron Hale's assertion: "we haven't survived because of white people, we have
survived despite them . . . ", and the as- -,
sertion:
you're probably saying'UK
love it or leave it,' and we're saying 'fix
Mr.

"...

it...!"'

My concern about being "set straight"
demands I reply to the very well organized
and tactfully presented bit of tripe appearing in the Oct. 19th Kernel. Although
I deplore his choice of words, I think
Mr. Junot is right about the "white skin
guilt" tactic the Black Student Union is
trying to capitalize on.
Now about the BSU pushing this "All
us black radicals are cool, mean, militant,
and together" that's not right. That
sounds more like the Black Panther Party
(excluding the meanness). "All white students, and especially radicals, ain't for
shit except for what they can do for us
blacks." How the devil did you get that
out of " . . .we're fed up with the unmitigated hypocrisy of the white man"
(the only time in the article that particular
phrase (white man) is used) when ninety-eigpercent of the article is pointed
towards the administration and coach
Rupp?
Hey! How do you know about the alleged "seducing of white freak chicks?")
Did all of this go on in the Student;
Center Grille? In any case, and probably-contrarto popular opinion I do notj
think that particular faction of social intercourse is any of your damn business.'
On the reparations issue. Well, I certainly can not show you a 400 year old
black man. But I can show you people,

who are still fighting the Civil War, and
people suffering because of it. You know,
their is something to that "like father,'
like son" idea. Do a little adding and
subtracting and checking-upo- n
your black
history. My father's father would be 80,
his father would be about 110. That means
the latter here would have been born in
1860. The Civil War ended about five
years later, and tnie reconstruction did
not start until some time after that. Do
you see my point?
Now about that "come