xt7fxp6v1133 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7fxp6v1133/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690310  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7fxp6v1133 section xt7fxp6v1133 rm

MIS EC EMTOKY

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Vol. LX, No. 112

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Monday Evening, March 10, 1969

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Workshop Seeks
M ore Sensitive
Human Relations

ii

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,

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1
1

By DANA EWELL
Assistant Managing Editor
exThe Human Relations Workshop began Saturday with an
one which
the
of man's five basic
ploration of one
com- is usually overlooked and underworked in most interpersonal
senses-touch--

lliuiiivaiiuiut
It was this early morning
warm-u- p
session led by Dr. David
Denton, a professor in the College of Education, which impressed the workshop's guest
speaker, Dean Clarence Shelley,
the black assistant dean of students at the University of Illinois and director of Project 500,
recruiting program for black
students.
"I am happy to see that you
are able to touch each other,"
Dean Shelley said to the 55 students, faculty members and
guests from the community who
Kernel Photo by Howard Mason
by this time had settled themselves on the floor and in folding
for Saturday's Human Rechairs in one of the large meetDean Clarence Shelley, guest speaker
lations Workshop, did not remain behind his lectern but joined his ing rooms at Camahan House.
audience on the floor in the large meeting room at Camahan House.
am always disturbed by
of Illinois, our"I
Shelley, assistant dean of students at the University
ability to reduce human relafocused his attention on the black student and the problems he tions to a dialogue. So I'm glad
faces on predominantly white university campuses.
to see that UK has been dragged
kicking and screaming into the
20th Century," Dean Shelley
said.
The tactile experience began
with each person closing his eyes
and exploring the envelope of
Project coordinator Norma
clothing at the Lexington-Fayett- e
space around him. With eyes
Johnson, a member of BSU and
County Clothing Bank.
still closed everyone moved to the
for
SWITCH, said the reason
UK Housing authorities have
center of the room and explored
conducting the drive this week
endorsed the drive and have althe group space.
is to catch students who are
lowed the placement of collecCarrying the exploration a
all residence halls.
sorting through their old clothes
tion boxes in
vacastep further, the group split up
Boxes also will be placed at in preparation for spring
into pairs (two people who did
tion.
other strategic points on campus.
not know each other) and carried on
conversations with their hands,
at first playfully, then gently
and then angrily.
The couples then went off to
explore Camahan House, each
person making half of the trip
f

Human
Relations

,

Campus Clothing Drive Begins
By KATHY ARNOLD

Kernel Staff Writer
clothing drive for the benefit of the Lexington-Fayett- e
Clothing Bank and poor high
school students in rural Mississippi will be in progress on
campus all this week.
The drive is a result of requests from the local clothing
bank and from Mrs. Fannie Lou
Hamer, the grassroots political
organizer who spoke at UK earlier
this semester in the colloquium
A

SeriMrZe?apPea.ed

o

,he

students to help clothe rural
youths in Mississippi who are
forced to drop out of high school
because of inadequate clothing.

non-visu- al

non-verb-

Focus:

Kunstler, 'Playboy'Official, Others
To Speak At March Program
.

,

anA hree renresentatives of nationally
be featured speakers in the Focus Symknown publications will
posium on Social Morality, to be held March
Scheduled are:
T. Ceorge Harris, former asWilliam M. Kunstler, whose
The Black Student Union and
sociate editor of Look magazine
activities include his role as speSocial Workers Involvement
of and editor of Careers Today.
in Contemporary Happening cial counsel for the Congress coAnson Mount, public affairs'
Racial Equality (CORE) and
(SWITCH), who are
Amermanager of Playboy magazine.
the drive, hope to replenish operating attorney for the
John Sigenthaler, editor of
rlv denleted SUDDlv of ican Civil Liberties Union.
the Nashville Tennesseean.
Kunstler
currently is enin a congressional commitgaged
study of conditee
American prisons, and
tions in
has been involved in numerous
civil rights cases. He is repreMcSpecial to the Kernel
senting Alan and Margaret
and Margaret McSurely, controversial Eastern Kentucky Surely in Senate subcommittee
Alan
deadline set by a
antipoverty workers, ignored the Friday noon
hearings on their antipoverty acfor delivery of a set of subpoenaed
U.S. Senate subcommittee
tivities in Eastern Kentucky.
Mount has worked as editor
personal papers.
books of
to present the subpoenaed documents-lette- rs,
By failing
Playboy's "Playboy Forum,"
the deadline, the McSurelys have created the handles the magazine's "diaand records-- by
possibility of contempt of Congress action being brought against
logue" with the clergy, and has
them by the Senate permanent subcommittee on Investigations.
spoken often on the "Playboy
The subcommittee had ordered the McSurelys to have the papers Philosophy." He Is writing a book
with them when they appeared before the group last Tuesday. The on contemporary attitudes tountil ward
McSurelys appeared without the documents and were given
religion and sexual moralthem.
Friday noon to present
ity.
In their Tuesday appearance the McSurelys, field organizers in
The Nashville Tennessean,
Southern Conference Educational Fund(SCEF),
Pike County for the
which Sigenthaler edits, is an
refused to answer any questions.
liberal newspaper.
The subpoenaed papers were among the personal items seized outspoken
Harris spoke here last year during
in an August 1967 raid on the McSurelys home by Pike County Focus activities.
The two-dasymposium Is
TheSMcSurelys were called before the subcominitiee for questionscheduled for Memorinvolvement In events that preceded rioting tentatively
ing about their alleged
ial Coliseum.
Nashville,' Tenn., in April 1967.
In
.

,

with his eyes closed, irusung nis
partner to lead him safely around
and "seeing" the house and its
furnishings with his hands.
Relations
Although the workshop, sponsored by the Human Relations
Office, was designed to focus on
four main areas of human
s-campus
race relations,
n
relations in the new
social and moral patterns,
t-faculty
relations, and student activism and the campus
status quo a major portion of the
seven-hosession was devoted
e
to the
question.
of the 41 demands
In speaking
University of Illinois Blacks made
to the administration, Shelley
said, "Everything they asked for
we planned to do one day, either
in the spring or the fall some
spring or some fall.
"the University just sits
there like Camelot, very antiseptic with nothing going on and
that's why the kids are raising
hell.
"A confrontation is being
forced bythe black students and it
is bringing the white students
to a realization of themselves.
"Black kids only think racism'
is bad. White kids know it because they are part of it. They
know how their parents talk when
they go home."
A lively discussion broke out
which took Shelley all around the
room and even to the floor as he
knelt while making a point in
Black-Whit-

e

relation-

men-wome-

studen-

ur

black-whit-

Continued on Page

2, Col. 1

flttftmpv

McSurelys Fail To Meet
Subcommittee's Deadline

28-2-9.

fact-findin-

.

:
?

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y

.. II

r
In

.

it'

f

v.r
i
I

Awards Nitiht

Lyn Branson, left, is all smiles after being
Board
tPPd or membership into Mortar for by
Burcham. See page 3
story.
Jennifer

* f--

TIIE

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, March 10,

19

More Sensitivity Sought In Human Relations

Continued from rage One
for the Fayette County school
an argument over the roles Whites system, voiced their opinions.
and Blacks can play in finding
The workshop finally did
a solution to the race problem. break up into smaller groups
The wide variety of people to discuss student activism,
relations and
attending the workshop was evident during the discussion as
relations.
These small groups were led
foreign students, black and white
students, professors and such by Dr. Denton, Dr. Stephen
community leaders as Mrs. Janie Langston, Mathematics, Dr.
Maurice Voland, Sociology and
Tinsley, Human Rights Commission field worker, and Reedjohn-son- , Rev. Ed Miller, United Campus
director of urban education Ministry.
Following lunch at Holiday
Inn North and another warm-u- p
session, involving
conversations this time, the workOct WltXS
shop participants were left to
hLJJZ
do what they wanted to express
stude-

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t

Thurmond,
Rights9 Lawyer
To Speak Here
Two prominent speakers will
be in Lexington tomorrow.
Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-C.) will speak at 8 p.m. Tuesday
in the Student Center Grand
Ballroom.
He servesontheSenateArmed
Services, Judiciary and Defense
Appropriation Committees and is
a national adviser to the Young
Americans for Freedom.
Sen. Thurmond was elected
to the U. S. Senate in 1954.
Also speaking Tuesday night
will be Howard A. Clickstein, a
civil rights lawyer.
Clickstein will be honored
guest at the Annual American
Civil Liberties Union dinner,
which will be held at the Continental Inn, Room E, at 7 p.m.
His speech on "The New Meaning of Equality of Educational
Opportunity" will follow at 8:15
p.m.
He has been a member of the
bar of the state of New York
since 1954, and was staff attorney, Civil Rights Division, U.S.
Justice Department, from 1960
to 1965.

hanging above the fireplace in the
meeting room a picture of a
woman st niggling to turn a stubborn cow in the right direction.
"The most important thing to
all of us is the dignity of the individual," Shelley said, and although he expressed his own
doubts that the world was making much progress in this direction, the group decided that they
had to keep on trying, to keep
on looking for this kind of humanitarian world.

ses
The workshop's wrap-usion led by Shelley began on
a rather distressing as well as
depressing note Do these kind
of talk sessions ever result in any
positive action? Have we made
any progress in the area of race
relations since 1865? Will we in
our lifetime ever see the world
we are working for, or will our
children ever see it?
The mood created by these
questions seemed to be symbolized by a large oil painting
p

-

-

CLASSIFIED

Classified advertising will b. accepd
ted n a
basis enly. Ads mar
be placed In person Monday threath
or by mall, payment Inclosed,
Friday
t. THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Ream
111. Journalism Bide.
Rates are $1.S!5 for tO ward, 13.00
far thre. consecntire Insertions of the
sam. ad of 20 wards, and 3.75 per
week, 20 words.
The deadline Is 11 a.m. the day
prior to publication. No advertisement
may cite race, rellflon or national
origin as a qualification for rentlnf
rooms or for employment.

TTMNO

pre-pai-

MANUSCRIFTS TYPEDXiBM, Pica,
Carbon Ribbon. Fastccurate. Minor
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Will also type mmillth, mimeograph,
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GIRLS NEEDED to selUfnew product.
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FOR SALE Baldwinr 2 amplifier.
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Two 12 Inch speakers. Solid-statai
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FOR SALE
guitar plus case,
less than 6ira6nths old. with very
little use, f ljyT Caiy
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1966 HONDA 50. Low milage, good
condition; excellent campus transportation. Best offer. Helmet included.

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to UK. Applications yriow being accepted for summer arid winter boarding. Call
additional information.
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PERSONAL'

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Even more if it has
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, MarcJi

10,

Hundreds Watch Distribution Of Awards
outstanding work in English, and
to Kathleen Walker, for outstandKernel Staff Writer
Awards Night was held Sun- ing mathematics work.
Mrs. A. D. Kirwan was the
day to honor outstanding members of the student body, faculty recipient of the Outstanding Woman Award. Judy Schroeder reand residents of Kentucky.
Associated Women Students ceived the Outstanding Unafpresented its nine outstanding filiated Freshman Woman
women from the state at large,
Lynn Betzler, the Grace
Mrs. Lucy Winchester, Mrs. Jerry C. Pride Award as outstanding
l,
Johnson and Mrs. William S. Junior woman; and Carolyn
the Pattie LeBus Berryman
Taylor; from the faculty, Sara
Holroyd, Dr. Margaret Jones and Award as outstanding unaffiliatDr. Doris Wilkin son; and from the ed senior woman.
Charles Edward Glasscock restudent body, Beverly Benton,
ceived the Outstanding Student
Kelly K urtz and M ary Lou S wope.
Departmental awards were Award, presented by the Student
presented to Karen Kemper for
By FRANCES DYE

f

Pur-cel-

Center Board. Jane Pouw was
named Outstanding International Woman Student. Cretchen
Marcum received the Creative
Arts Award.
In addition, honoraries for
sophomore, junior and senior men
and women presented new members.
New members of Omicron Delta Kappa, senior men's honorary,
include John Adams, Robert
Brown, Michael Buchanan, Lawrence Catlett, Robert Fears, Brian
Correll, Joe Jacobs, Douglas
Overhults, George Rice Jr., Steven Short, Larry Wells andjames

Wood.
Those tapped for Mortar
Board, senior women's honorary,
are Lyn Branson, Diane Brown,
Carol Bryant, Kate Elliston, Janice Engsberg, Susan Furnari,

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Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during th
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published bv the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4tt.
Begun as the Cadet in 18M and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
advertising should
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES
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iiMmpn mmm

J

* Penny Ante

It is difficult to take issue with the current SDS and CARSA plan
to pay for food in the Grille with pennies. Their goal is entirely commendablethat of attempting to further the grape boycott and improve
the scandalous living conditions of the migrant grape workers.
Nevertheless, the
plan cannot be approved, not just
because it apparently does not register with the Grille personnel, but
also because it creates inconvenience for other students waiting in line.
Perhaps most of these students do not really merit sympathy in this
matter, but their rights must be considered anyway.
Paying by pennies for food in the Grille is a bit inconsiderate,
but buying grapes anywhere at this time is insensitive and inhumane.
pay-by-penni-

cs

YAF-I- n
If it were not for the display
of gross lack of humanistic concern,
last Wednesday's Young Americans
for Freedom (YAF) meeting would
have been ridiculously funny.
YAF, after having launched a
campaign last semester against the
Kernel based on untruths and inaccuracies, announced plans to
start the battle all over again. In
characteristic flair, YAF appointed
to head its "Reform the Kernel
Committee" a student who feels
the Kernel is one of the best student newspapers in the country.
Another YAF member, Rusty
Booth, is one of the leaders in the
group's plans to fight the grape
boycott and to voice opposition
to SDS and CARSA's penny protest
activities.
Coincidentally, Booth is a Grille'
cashier.
But this is not to indicate that
the only reason YAF is fighting the
grape boycott movement is out of
sympathy for Grille cashiers. No,
YAF' s commitment goes far beyond
that.
YAF is so committed to defeat

ing the grape boycott, in fact,
that it toasted its plans with grape
juice. (While the act certainly effectively symbolized YAF's disdain
for the plight of the grape workers,
the members apparently did not
realize that their act of defiance
was a bit ridiculous because grape
juice is not even affected by the
boycott.)
Students who have been unaware of YAF's real goals and "concerns" should know by now what
the group stands for the perpetuation of a reactionary economic system at whatever cost necessary
in terms of human beings.
Perhaps YAF's anti grape-boyco- tt
movement should indeed be
referred to as the "Grapes of Wrath"
and not as the "Grapes of YAF,"
as suggested by the conservative
group's adviser, Dr. Wasley Krog-dah- l,
in an attempt at humor. The
issues involved in the grape boycott, you see, are much the same
as were portrayed so sensitively
in Steinbeck's novel of the very
title on which Dr. Krogdahl ironically based his pun.

KUACs Jack
It is reassuring to hear that
Gov. Nunn at least has a sufficient sense of priorities not to
continue to pour money down the
drain and into the
Activities
Kentucky
Committee (KUAC).
The committee already has
squandered $48,000 of the public's
taxes in its ludicrous and undemocratic hearings. To date KUAC
has dealt with the fairly recent
Louisville civil disorders and with
the activities of Pike County poverty workers, as well as touching
an

on matters
College.

concerning Pikeville

On the whole KUAC has demonstrated a propensity toward violating the rights of dissidents and
minority groups. This tendency fortunately has been restrained, however, by the committee's lack of
funds and the threat of lawsuits.

It is only a shame that the
money already spent by KUAC
could not have gone instead toward solving some of this state's
many pressing problems.

fVlW t

t.
'Welcome To The United
States Of America!9
M&t

Tin

lilbw

W

iKernel Forum: the readers write!ii
Nascent GSA
To the Editor of the Kernel
I should like to address this letter
to those students who may have concluded from reading the very welcome
Kernel coverage of the efforts to form
a Graduate Students Association that the
sole concern of the nascent CSA is with
parking. The unanimous parkng resolution was passed not out of some desire
to create a specially privileged student
caste, but rather because those of us who
attended the Monday meeting realized
that the proposed changes in UK parking policy would very seriously affect
some grad students, and that any effective protests must be made very soon,
or not at all.
All graduate students have had at
least four years of experience in a university setting, and most of them have
probably concluded that many reforms
are needed, both here at UK and elsewhere. Institutional reforms are not likely
to be the result of individual protests;
hence the CSA parking resolution should
be seen as an initial collective protest
against a sympton of a more basic attitude concerning the nature, role, and
.responsibilities of the graduate student.
Charles Hart wig
Graduate Student

Challenges Argument
Mr. Gross, representing the attempt
of a weak mind to express itself forcefully, is indicative of the need for those
who disagree with the views of others
to say more than "all I can say is 'Good,
Lord, Cillihan." If that's all you can
say in answer to my "verbal garbage,"
what does your letter equal? Not much.
If you don't agree, then let's see why

not. How about the merits? Or don't
they count? Is it, "Lord" Gross, that
you consider your conclusions to be so
sacrosanct that they need make no sense,
for, after all, why worry about reason
in matters of faith, i.e., your beliefs?
d
And your
attempt to defend one "whose sin was to write what
her feelings were in a few short paragraphs" is hardly moving and less than
d
credible. It seems obvious that this
exercise in nonsense is really a
result of the fact that your beliefs were
challenged in what I wrote and yet rather
than battle on the merits you must hide
behind someone's skirts and yell "mean-ie.-"
That won't cut it in court. (By the
way, it's not words that cannot express.)
F. Charles Cillihan
Law Student
weak-knee-

thin-veile-

Amateur Editor
In your Wednesday. Feb. 27th, edition
you hinted that Miss Bonnie Cox resigned
her editorship of The Kentucky Review
because one of the members of the Board

of Student Publications (Mr. Herbert
Creech) questioned her knowledge of the
field.
The Kernel must have mixed its facts.
Certainly Mr. Creech and the Publications
Board members are aware that Miss Cox's
Kentucky Review gained national recognition as a scholarly journal after her first
number, its contents were certified professional enough for inclusion in the Publication of the Modem Language Association Bibliography (national in scope,
and totally unconcerned with second-rat- e
journals) as well as the Index to Little
Magazines.
If Miss Cox is unprofessional as an
editor, then I hope that her successor is
equally amateur.
David J. Burt
Graduate Student

Kernel Soapbox: McSurelys vs. McClellan'
EDITOR'S NOTE: Following is a statement delivered to the Senate's Permanent Investigations Subcommittee this
week by Alan and Margaret McSurely,
workers. The McKentucky
Surelys, along wkh their personal records,
were subpoenaed by the subcommittee,
chaired by Sen. John McClellan
The McSurelys have filed suit against
McClellan and others to recoverdamages,
and they refuse to testify before a closed
committee meeting.
anti-pover- ty

(D-Ark.-

Sen. John McClellan:
We represent two distinct

)

classes
you and I.
You are a product of the southern
planters class. You own a bank and a
television company. Your law firm represents, gas, oil, railroad, lumber and other
private corporations. To protect the interests of your class, you must continually

attack and vote against the interests of
the working people; against the interests

of people who have been forced out of work
by mechanization and automation (currently called "poor people"); against the
interests of black people who have been
forced to the bottom of employment lists
by racist practices; against the interests
of students and teachers who might expose
the corruption of your class.

with looking for foreign agitators, conspiracies, communists, poverty workers
for anyone but yourself and other members
of your class behind the frustrations
and hostilities in our cities.
You see nothing wrong with entering
into a conspiracy with proven law break-er- a
in Eastern Kentucky to harass
workers there a conspiracy
which, directly or indirectly, led to the
attempted dynamite murder of my
son, my wife and myself three
months ago.
On the other hand, we are products
of the other class of people, the people
who do not own banks. Instead of profits,
we value life, love, honesty and justice.
Our lives are tied to the destinies of the
poor and working people of the world
over. As they are oppressed, we are oppressed. As you malign them, you malign
anti-pover-

ty

one-year-o- ld

Because you have been trained to protect the interests of your class, you see
nothing wrong with calling black men
"boy." Your class sees nothing wrong
with ridiculing and imprisoning black men
who would organize the confused and
frustrated energies in our black ghettoes
into political forms. You see nothing
wrong with turning poor white people
against poor black people through your
racist institutions. You see nothing wrong

us.

We know that it is too late for you
to understand the feelings of despair
and frustration which the
system which you have spent your life
protecting has caused in the mountains
and cities of our beloved nation.
racist-capitali-

st

However, we hoped that you would
have the courtesy to allow the people
of America to listen to what we have
to say in a public hearing about the
causes of the urban disorders which is
what this committee is supposed to be
investigating. It is for this reason that
we have traveled twice to Washington,
leaving our work in the mountains.
And it is also for these reasons, and
the ones which our counsel has stated,
that we refuse to take part in any sort
of star chamber proceedings.
Alan 6c Margaret McSurely

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, March

10,

l9-- 5

Property Rights At Stake In 2 Supreme Court Cases
WASHINGTON (AP)-- A policeman battling a sniper takes
cover behind your car. The sniper
spots him and sends a bullet
smashing through the windshield.
Can you force the city to pay
for a new one
Or consider the National
Guardsman on riot duty, taking
up a position in front of a clothing store. A brick sails past his
shoulder and through the window.
Can the haberdasher collect
for the damage?
These not uncommon big city
events are far removed from the
.Panama Canal Zone riots of January 196-4- when about 700
under fire from some 3,000
Panamanians, retreated to the
YMCA building and the Masonic
Temple in the Cristobal Colon
area and the buildings became
Jthe targets of snipers and were
set ablaze with firebombs.
But the government is telling
the Supreme Court that if it
makes the Treasury pay the
$245,000 demanded in compensation the principle will be established for what could be a
national calamity.
Local, state and federal governments could find themselves
liable for the damage to the car
behind which the policeman
crouches, the guarded store which
sold-'ier- j,

The case, heard last week by
becomes the target of a brick was underscored in 1840 by
Similarly, in 1871 the Supreme
the Supreme Court, taes on spea Supreme Court Court said the government must
or firebomb.
Joseph Story,
cial importance because of the
Riots are expensive. The one justice and one of the country's compensate the owner of steamboats seized to transport Union
minds.
in the Panama Canal Zone cost great legal
parallel drawn by the government to urban riots.
forces during the Civil War.
more than $2.1 million in stolen,
He said, "In a free governThe troops in the Canal Zone,
But two important court decidamaged or destroyed property,
ment . . . almost all other rights sions point in the opposite directhe government argument goes,
and public.
private
were trying to deal with a pubThe Newark disorder of July would become utterly worthless tion, shielding the government
if the government possessed an from having to pay for property
lic emergency. They didn't draw
1967 cost some $10.2 million in
the rioters to the area; the riotto uncontrolled power over the pri- it took over or destroyed in
property damage according
ers were already there.
the Kemer Commission; the De- vate fortune of every citizen."
troit riots of the same month,
$40 million to $45 million.
Two sometimes conflicting
principles, both centuries old,
are involved in the court case
which will be decided by June.
They are:
The right of the State to
take private property for the public good, especially in wartime;
The right of the individual
to be protected by the payment
of just compensation.
Doth principles are part of the
fundamental law of the United
States.
The first is not stated explicitly in the Constitution, but has
been recognized repeatedly by
the courts.
The second was written into
U.S. GOVERNMENT
ESSO
the Constitution. It is the Fifth
BORON
Amendment provision that says:
SUNRAY DX
ATLANTIC RICHFIELD
CHEVRON
"Nor shall private property be
MIDWEST BANKCARD
SIGNAL
DX
taken for public use without just
CITGO
compensation."
BANK AMERICARD
FIRST NATIONAL
FLEETWING
The importance of the right of
SOHIO
SKELLY
citizens to be fairly compensated
(Lexington)
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* KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, March 10,

fi-- TIIE

19

UK Win Over Vols One Of Best
nCE JET SON
Kernel Staff Writer
Coach Adolph Rupp said that
Kentucky would have to keep
their floor errors down, shoot
over 50 percent from the field,
and control the boards to beat
Tennessee.
The Wildcats achieved all
three goals in beating the Volunteers Saturday,
"It was one of the best games
since I've been here," said Rupp.
By CEO

84-6- 9.

"We'll have to start showing
that to the alumni." UK hit
70 percent in the second half.

The game wasn't really the
piece of cake that the final score
Would indicate, however. Tennessee trailed by only one point at
halftime, and though the Vols
never managed to take the lead
in the second half, they did tie
the score four times.
But when Larry Steele hit a
Jump shot with 11:36 to go in

Cassica

Jt

ALL STEREO

minute mark.
The final moments of the game
amounted to a picnic for the
crowd,
heavily
which had been having a boisterous time of it all afternoon, even
during the freshman game.
When senior Phil Argentowas
replaced by Bob McCowan and
walked off the Memorial Coliseum floor for the l