xt7g1j977g28 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7g1j977g28/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19341113  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 13, 1934 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 13, 1934 1934 2013 true xt7g1j977g28 section xt7g1j977g28 Best Copy Available

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

Y

f

UNIVERSITY

VOL. XXV.

KENTUCKY

OF

s

BOOK WEEK
TO BE OBSERVED ON

CAMPUS THIS WEEK

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1034

News Flashes
HAS NOT BOOKED PASSAGE

R.O.T.C. CADETS,

BAND MARCH IN
ANNUAL PARADE

Glasgow, Nov. 12 (INS) Betty
Oow, nurse to the kidnaped Lindbergh baby, may be going to the Two

United States to testify against
Bruno Hauptmann, but she has not
yet booked steamer passage, International News Service learned to-

Battalions of UK Cadets
Help Celebrate Armistice Day

day.
LOCAL DRILL UNITS
comd
Efforts to obtain
ALSO PARTICIPATE
ment from Miss Oow on the statement of the New Jersey prosecutor Twenty-on- e
Sections in All
that she would be an Important witComprise Downtown
ness at Hauptmann's trial met with
failure, but inquiry among the vaCelebration
rious steamship lines revealed no
Lexington observed Armistice Day
have yet been purchased.
tickets
yesterday with an impressive paTWO SHOCKS FELT
rade and program in which the
University of Kentucky band and
Lisbon, Nov. 12 (INS) Thousands R. O. T. C. regiment participated,
of residents raced In terror Into the making up three of the 21 sections
streets, parks, and other open areas of the colorful parade.
today when two violent earthquake
The two University R. O. T. C.
shocks rattled the city at 8:30 a. m. battalions began to form on the
Damage was slight, and no serious parade ground in front of the Ad
Injuries were reported.
ministration building at 10 a. m.
At 10:40 a. m. the battalions moved
ARMISTICE PROGRAM
ON
from the field to Limestone street
on
Oakland, Cal., Nov. 12 (INS) Sir and turnedwas to Euclid avenue.
formed in front of
Austral- The band
Charles Klngsford-SmttMusic building, and
ia's great aviator and Transpacific the place at the front of then took
the batflier, was guest of honor here today its
talions.
at the Armistice Day celebration.
and
The noted Australian upon his ed The bandEuclidcadets then marcheast on
to Rose and then
f ftolrlanrl alrrwirt. In t.h
nrfml
monoplane "Lady Southern Cross" north on Rose to Main. The R. O.
T. C. sponsors were at the corner
ls
from Honolulu promised city
he would return from Los An- of Rose and High streets and
geles to participate In the celebra- Joined their sections at this point.
The University of Kentucky section.
Yesterday Sir Charles Landed at tions Joined the remainder of the
parade at Main Street.
Oakland airport again and immediFirst In the parade came James
ately was whisked away by the Armistice Day committee to the home M. Sever, grand marshall, and R.
of his brother, R. H. Kingsford-8mlt- h. J. H. Spurr, marshal, followed Immediately by a police escort of the
local police department. Behind the
police came a platoon of local fireREPORTS ATTACK
men.
The University of Kentucky band
San Diego, Cal., Nov. 12 (INS)
Coronado police and the sheriff's and battalions followed. Next in
inline were the veterans of past wars:
office today are continuing the
vestigation of the reported kidnap- Oreenda'.e Band; county school
of Mrs. W. children; Picadome school band;
ing, robbery and attack
C. Ennls, 24, wife of a Naw lieuten- city school children; boy scouts:
ant aboard the U.S.S. Alden.
Man o' War Post drum and bugle
Mrs. Ennls reported she was kid- corps; U. 8. Veteran's Hospital
naped, robbed and attacked after nurses; Legionnaires from Man o
laving her husband at a parking lot War Post; visiting legionnaires:
near the ferry slip on the Coronado veterans of foreign wars; Transylside of the bay. A description of vania college band; Fayette county
the man she said mistreated her patrol; mechanized machine gun
was riven to Coronado police and company of Harrodsburg; and a
sheriff's deputies.
troop of cavalry from the Kentucky
National Guards.
FREAK STORM SUBSIDES
The parade was now completely
formed. The groups moved west
Juneau, Alaska, Nov. 12 (INS)
on Main. At one minute of 11, the
Huge waves that battered the waterfront here yesterday causing thous- traffic lights began to flicker as a
ands of dollars damage had sub- signal, and the parade halted. There
was one minute of silence, during
sided today.
The freak windstorm and minia- wnicn taps were played in observance of November 11, 16 years ago.
ture tidal wave took no lives.
(Continued on Page Four)
PLANE CRASHES
first-han-

h,

oni-cla-

Butte, Mont., Nov.

12 (INS)

The
bodies of Henry
King, 24. John Madden, 45, and Alfred Paquette, 40, killed as the plane
In which they were flving crashed
on the outskirts of Butte, awaited
burial here today.
Hundreds of horrified residents of
the neighborhood saw the plane slip
Into a spin and plunge to the ground
near the airport. King had taken
the other two men for a pleasure
ride.
badly-mangl-

FIRE

INVESTIGATE

Chicago, Nov. 12 (INS)

Authori-

ties today were investigating

passi-

lncendiaryism
In connection
with the fire which swept a four
story warehouse, adjoining residential buildings, and caused $100,000
damage here yesterday.
The fire followed three mysterious
explosions.
Three firemen were Injured.
ble

If you have a strong scholastic
standing, a demonstrated interest
in politics and government, qualities of character and ability, espe-

cially those having to do with leadership,' and good health, you are
qualified to apply for the internship offered by the National Institution of Public Affairs of Wash- -,
ington, D. C, for February and
March, 1935.

The Institution Is Inaugurating a
of training and study in
the practical and human elements
program

NOTED SPEAKER
TO VISIT CAMPUS

tive-d;i-

'Cats, Paced by Johnson,
Smash a Feeble S'western
Team by a 33-- 0 Margin

Freshman Team Scores Twice
to Defeat Inferior Rat
0
Eleven,

J. PEARSON
(Editors note: During the summer months Dr. Alfred J. Pearson,
professor at Drake University, spent
a great deal of his vacation tour
ing in Europe and Germany. The
following article, written for the
By DR. ALFRED

I

I

rd

rd

I

Associated Collegiate Press, gives
his views on the present world political situation as he sees it in
light of the investigations he made
during the summer.)
Last year the world spent approximately $4,500,000,000 on arma
ments. The race for increased armaments is on among all the larger nations. They are obsessed with
it. It has become a mania with
them. In their madness they are
headed for the abyss. This year
the total expenediture for the same
purpose will be over five billion.
Nothing but a fundamental change
in their attitude, a complete change
of heart, will save them and civ
ilization from complete ruin.
Mussolini rattled the sabre at
Bologna some weeks ago. In a public address he declared
with his

one-yar-

rd

ed

rd

hard-heart-

ed

rd

ed

--

WYNNE INJECTS

Increased Armaments Race
Is On Among Large Nations

ed

st

-

.

1.3--

By ELIZABETH ANN MILLARD
"Francesca Da Rlmlnl," the Oulg-nol- 's DAVIS AND SIMPSON
second play this season, diEACH TALLY ONCE
rected by Frank Fowler, and enacted by a brilliant cast, was
Simpson Intercepts Pass and
last night by anenthuslastic
Gallops 77 Yards for
and appreciative audience.
Marker
The play, an Italian tragedy by
Oeorge H. Boker, unfolds the story
Although they lacked the polish
of the houses of Malatesta, Lord of
of an experienced team, the UniRimini, and Ouido, Lord of Ravenna. Francesca, daughter of Ouldo, versity of Kentucky freshman footis to form an alliance between the ball squad had enough power to
win over the
two houses by marrying Lanciotto, pound out a 13-- 0
hunchback son of Malatesta. The strong yearling team from the Uni
Tennessee, Saturday
i two have never
met and when the versity ofon Stoll field before af-a
time comes to fetch Francesca from ternoon
sm all crowd.
Kavenna, Lanciotto sends as a depAgainst the same Tennessee team
uty his handsome brother, Paolo, to
"woo by proxy." Francesca Is de- that whipped the Vanderbilt freshmen, the Kittens showed flashes of
lighted with the appearance of
Paolo, not realizing that he is rpt potential ability in the manner of
Lanciotto, and he cannot tell her both their attack and defense They
a few scoring chances but
of Lanclotto's affliction but only muffed
completely stopped
of his bravery in battle and his fense in its only that Rat of
threat on the
skill with the sword. When she Kentucky goal.
meets her future husband the shock
The Kittens threatened right at
is almost too great to bear but she the outset when they recovered
manages to pretend she loves htm .Bryson's fumble after he had run
anyway and so they are married. the ball back IS yards on the kick- How the inevitable love of Paolo off. Tennessee was penalized five
and Francesca asserts itself, and yards and the ball was placed on
how Lanciotto avenges his honor Is their
line, Davis made it
romantically developed in the third first down on the
line.
act.
Simpson and Robinson carried the
But the fact remains that with all ball to the nine-yar- d
line for first
its external glamor, the play Is down. On three plays Kentucky
nothing less than the story of a made eight yards but-lothe ball on
faithless young wife, and a dishon- downs on the
d
line.
orable younger brother, so garMidway in the second period, the
nished with languorous words as to Kittens gained the ball on the Tenobliterate all perspective. The plot nessee
line after in ex- -'
might well apply to a Tom, Jane, change of punts. Davis cut off
and Bill of today as well as Fran- tackle for eight yards and Wadling-- I
cesca, Lanciotto, and Paolo of yes- ton gained three yards and a first
terday.
UUWJ1.
KJLl tile
piuy XXUUII1SUU
The action of the play takes fumbled and the Rats recovered.
place in Malatesta's palace at Rim- Skaggs blocked Mill's kick and
ini and the gardens of Guido's pal- Sympson recovered on Tennessee's
three-yar- d
ace in Ravenna, which are realisline. On the second
tically created and cleverly made play, Davis ran wide around left
into a book. The leaves of which end for the score Sympson place-kickform the scenes. The furnishings
the extra point.
are very simple and quite in harThe opening of the last quarter
mony with the costumes.
found the Rats in possession of the
line.
"Francesca." as portrayed by Lola ball on Kentucky's
Robinson, is too loyely, too gra- After making a first down, Tennessee failed to gain on two line plays.
cious, and too romantic to make
analysis of this play Jefford faded back and passed to
an easy task. Mrs. Robinson's ex- Bequette but the heave was intercellent interpretation of the role cepted by Red Sympson on his own
line nad he dashed the reis proof that her acting ability
maining 77 yards to cross the goal
should receive great tribute.
Dr. O. K. Brady as the hunch- line standing. This wasofthe most
single play
the afback "Lanciotto," gives the superb spectacular
performance of a polished actor. ternoon. Otis failed to convert.
Both teams played raggedly at
His wonderfully worked out
times but the green-cla- d
Kittens
on Page Four)
had the advantage throughout.
They constantly harrassed the Rat
defense and were several times in
scoring position. For Tennessee, the
line play of Rice and Koleas and
the ball carrying of "Red" Harp
was outstanding. Harp gave the
Kentucky linesmen trouble all the
time he was In the game.
In the Kitten lineup, the play
of government and politics for the of several men was predominant
benefit of selected college students Bob Davis ,ex Dayton high perand graduates. The two months will former, showed occasional flashes
be spent in laboratory training of of brilliance In his
public affairs, stressing the Interne-shi- p and got off several punts. Simpson
i Wadlington,
Robinson and Boland
plan.
The winners of appointments to all demonstrated their offensive
ability. In the line, Nicholas and
the Institution's inaugural training
program, will be brought to Wash- Hagen at ends played a strong de- ington for practical experience de- tensive game, as did Skaggs, f or- -'
mer Ashland tackle. Binkley, Kur-- !
signed to supplement
classroom
study for political science In the achek and Hinkeben all played a
preparation for leadership in public hard defensive game.
aiiairs ana general citizenship.
The National Institution is a
privately financed, and
organization enjoying the cooperation
of the Federal Government In Its
training and study program.
Juniors, seniors, graduate students, and recent graduates of ac- Alpha Zeta and Phi Upsilon
Omicron, Honorary Ag Fracredited institutions who have pursued a substantial study of political
ternities, Announce Neoscience and related subiects are
phytes at Assembly
eligible for these internships.
A faculty selection committee at
Pledges to Alpha Zeta, honorary
each college and university will agricultural fraternity, and to Phi
nominate the respective institution's Upsilon Omicron, honorary home
quota of candidates for the intern- economics fraternity, were announc- ships. These candidates will com- ed at the general assembly of the
pete for final appointments to be College of Agriculture which was
made by the Institution on a re- held last Friduy in Memorial hall.
Alpha Zeta pledges were: Paul C.
gional basis determined by distriMcComas. Burkesvtlle;
John W.
bution of student population.
Irvine, Danville; Eugene Culton,
The program of study and training will be under the direction of Parksvllle; Morton Henshaw, Hen- Bardstown, and
Ernest
the Institution's educational direc- shaw; Watson, Janes,
Science Hill. The
tor and a staff of social science Noel for
medal
the boy who made the
professors brought to Washington
highest standing as a freshman
on leave of absence from their re- went to William S. Reed, Covington,
spective colleges for the duration of who had an average standing of
the program.
three. The awards were made by
Most of the appointments will Harold Miller, chancellor of Alpha
cover the entire charge, others will Zeta.
Include the transportation to and
Nell M. Shearer. Lexington, "reI
from Washington.
ceived the Phi Upsilon Om'cron
Is in medal for the highest standing as
Dr. Amry Varidenbosh
charge of the applicants from the a freshman in home economics.
University of Kentucky. Any stu- Pledges to the sorority were Ellza- -l
dent who Is interested in the In- beth Whitaker, Eva Mae Nunnelley,
ternship should see Doctor Vanden-bos- h on4 Uurv T. Rhparpr all nf I v- Faye Allen, president of
ington.
immediately.
the chapter, made the announcements.
NEW STOKERS INSTALLED
Mrs. Joesephine Proctor, LexingThe American Supplier's Com- ton, a graduate in home economics
in the class of 1928. was the speaker.
pany. South Limestone street, subsidiary of the American Tobacco James Toy. a student In agriculture,
company, recently have Installed rave a ban to solo, and Bruce Pound- mechanical stokers at the cost of stone, of the College of Agriculture,
led the singing, with Mrs. Pound-ston- e
$8 000 to eliminate the smoke nuisat the piano.
ance which the plant causes.

ODK

POINTS ARE

DUE WEDNESDAY
Lists Must Be Turned in at
3 p. m. to Committee;
Point Basis Is

RESERVES AFTER

customary vehemence that "Italy
will arm. Italy must be prepared
not for the war of tomorrow but
for the war of today." This is in
defiance of a deficit in the Italian
treasury of 550,000,000 lire and despite the fact that maximum taxation in Italy has already been
reached.
And only recently Mussolini made the further statement
that boys are to be given military
training from the age of eight
years.
The Italian government is now
resorting to cuts in wages and the
reduction of salaries for the purpose of reducing the cost of production. By this means, Mussolini
hopes to counteract the unfavorable trade balance. This wage reduction is lowering still further
the standard of living.
The expenditures for the Italian
navy for the next five years, beginning 1935, have been Increased
lire and for the strengthening of the air fleet the sum of
1.000,000,000 lire has been appropriated.
In this connection it is significant to note that on June 5, 1934,
the French Chamber of Deputies
approved the government's budget
calling for 3,000,000,000 francs to

strengthen the national armaments.
On July 19, 1934, Mr. Baldwin,
acting Prime Minister, announced
that in the next five years Great
Britain will spend $100,000,000 In

adding 41 new squadrons containing 460 fighting planes to its air
fleet.
Germany has recently increased
Unchanged
her budgetary armament 33 per
cent. The women, by a
PLEDGING TO BE SOON edict, are relegated to the recent
home,
there to raise large families. For
Points for membership in Omi- what? Apparently for purpose of
cron Delta Kappa, national honorwar.
the
ary leadership fraternity, must be schools Teachers in by the common
governare ordered
turned in by 3 p. m tomorrow, ac- ment to impress nupon their pupils
cording to James Shropshire.
(Continued on Page Four)
The points may be turned in to
either Cameron Coffman, William
Cundiff, William Eversole, or James
Shropshire.
The same number of
points will be required this year as
18
namely,
formerly,
have been
points for any Junior and 18 points
for a senior.
A new system of awarding points
for activities, inaugurated last year, Library Science Department
will be continued this year also. No
Directs Book Display, Feadecision has been made regarding
tured at University for Rethe awarding of one point toward
mainder of Week.
of the
membership for all members
cheering section formed this year,
The library science department,
according to Mr. Shropshire.
Delta under the direction of Miss MilNu chapter of Omicron
Nadred
Kappa was founded on the Univer- tional Semmons, will observe today,
Book Week, beginning
sity campus more than a decade with book displays for
adults and
ago. Pledging and initiations are
children
library science deheld twice a year, once In the fall partment in the
quarters in Room 313 in
and once In the spring. Member- the library.
ship is awarded by giving numoers
Mrs. Nellie Dye, chairman of the
of points for certain honoraries and
committee, is In charge of the chilNew members are anactivities.
nounced by placing their names on dren's display. She is assisted by
a large reproduction of the key of Dorothy Whitworth, Kitty Hunter,
the organization hung on a tree be- Mary Louis Irvine, Naomi Naive,
and Wylie Wilson. Miss Willie
tween Alumni hall and the AdminHughes Smith will be in charge of
istration building.
the adult display, and will be assisted by Tressa Dietz, Mary Nooe,
Mrs. Cecil Davis, Bernardina Collins,
May Rogers, and Virginia Murrill.
The displays will be open from 8
till 5 p. m. each day this week. The
public is invited to visit the displays.
The University library has Just
Thursday afternoon at 3 p. m. in
received two Important additions to Room 313, Miss Susan Miller, Hengrowing collection of ry Clay High school, will give a
its rapidly
historical volumes and manuscripts. talk on "Some Literary PersonaliOne group of 250 volumes has ties; Reminiscence of the Bread-loman Jr., Lexington alumnus of the
Writer's Conference, Summer
been presented by Winston
1934, Vermont".
Dr.
It consists of Greek and Lexington bibliophile, C. W. Trapp,
will speak on
Roman class'cs and German phil- the subject. "Collecting
Ediosophy published between 1740 and tions, A Joyous Hobby." First public
The
1880. Most of the books are in
Greek, Latin and German, and is Invited to attend these lectures.
Following the program, a tea will
among them is an old Persian elementary reader. Mr. Colman also be given for the library science
gave the University his book on students, staff members and visiting librarians. Committee in charge
"Masonry in the Blue Grass."
composed of Jean
Miss Nancy Haydon. Carroll, and of this affair is
Kitty Hunter, Marie
Miss Mary 8. Carroll, Lexington, Foxworth,
Ruth Martin. The
presented 47 volumes on general Boitnott and charge of
committee in
the publicisubjects, among which Is an
ty is Jane Ann Matthews and Berold Guthrie arithmetic,
Assi- nardina Collins.
Schoolmaster's
"American
stant" printed in Paris, Ky. in 1817.
STACK TO BE REPAIRED
Another volume which the library
considers valuable is one on a desmokestack
The
bate betwetn Alexander Campbell University heating plant will of the
be reand N. L. Rice on "Christian Bap- paired
the latter part of this week
tism." An old song book with shaped notes called "Ind'an Harmony" or the first of next week for tiie
and published in Madison. Ind., in first time since lu construction In
1882. The top section of the brick
1823 is included in the collection.
smokestack will be rep.aced. The
work Is being done by the departW. A. A. SPONSORS DANCE
ment of buildings and grounds of
The Women's Athletic association the University.

NATIONAL BOOK

WEEK OBSERVED

Receives
PLEDGES NAMED LibraryDonations Of
New
Rare Old Volumes
BY HONORARIES

n,

Genoa. Nov. 12 (INS) Acting at
the request of French police, Genoa
authorities today arrested a Croatian named Mile Budak.
Budak, it was learned. left Berlin Miss Anne Wiffgin Scheduled
to Deliver Series of Lecon October 7 and entered Italy
tures; First Appearance to
with a false Czechoslovaktn passport. He denied any complicity in
Be Wednesday
the' assassination of King Alexander of Yugoslavia at Marseilles, deMiss Anr.e Wlggln, nationally
claring the first he knew of the in- known lecturer in the field of incident was when he read of It in the ternational relations and former
newspapers at Bologna.
member of the national staff of
the YWCA, will come to the camnus
FIFTEEN PERISH
this week under the auspices of the
y
university YWCA, for a
Mexico City. Nov. 12 (INS) Luis visit, during which time she will
Freg, one of Mexico's most famous give a series of lectures to various
bull fighters, was among a party university and local groups.
of 13 plcknlckers who perished in a
Miss Wlggln will arrive Wednesstorm off the coast of the state of day morning and her first appeardisCampeche yesterday, it was
ance will be at a meeting of the
closed In dispatches reaching here Pitkin club at Maxwell Presbytertoday.
ian church at noon Wednesday.
Several other bull fighters were She will also speak at 3 p. m. that
among the victims of the tragedy, af ternoon at a meeting of the social
which occured when their launch service group of the university
foundered. The party was return- YWCA In the Woman's bullduig,
ing from the Isle of Carmen.
and at a meeting of the world fellowship group at 4 p m.
TO PLEAD INSANITY
Thursday, Miss Wlggln will address Dr. Ainry Vandenbosch's poliNew York. Nov. 12 (INS) An In- tical science class in International
sanity defense was forecast today law, an assembly at Hamilton colfor Patrick Downey, charged with lege, and will attend a cabinet dingirl ner meeting of the combined YMCA
the slaying of a
at Rlverhead. L. I., whose trial was and YWCA of Transylvania and
to get under way with the selection tiie University at Boyd hall. Friof Jurors.
day's program consists of an adThe father of two children. dress to Sarah O. Blundlngs cla s
Downey was secured of luring little in world politics, a luncheon with
Rita Lazzerl Into his automobile the Dutch Lunch club at Patterson
and then assaulting and strangling hall at noon, and an address to the
her.
(Continued on Page Four)
ld

Brilliant Student Cast Performs in "Francesca da
Rimini"

Public Affairs Institute
To Offer Training Studies

SUSPECT ARRESTED

seven-year-o-

First Showing KITTENS SHOW
Of Tragedy Is GREAT POWER IN
Well Received TENNESSEE TILT

NEW SERIES NO. 17

,

af

lnter-estU-

department

Marks

Victory

WHdcats's

Fifth Triumph of 1931
Season

LYNX' AERIAL ATTACK
IS THEIR BEST BET

Pritchard Returns to Aid
Johnson; Later Scores
Three Times
With a running and passing attack that clicked with machine-lik- e
precision, Kentucky's Wildcats
crushed a weak Southwestern team
to a 33 to 0 defeat Saturday to win
their fifth game of the season.
"Powerhouse" Johnson added to
his fame by scoring three touch

downs, one of which was on a
run. Little Abie Ayres was
second high point man, scoring
once and place kicking three extra
points. Hay made the other touchdown on a smash through the cen
ter of the line. "Warhorse" Pritchard returned to the lineup after
a week's layoff and gave a brilliant
exhibition of open field running.
The Memphis lads were no match
for the Big Blue team from Kentucky, and they were outplayed
throughout the entire game with
the exception of a few minutes of
the first quarter. The Wildcats
could have scored more points than
they did, but Coach Wynne sent In
second string men after the first
period, although he left Johnson
and Pritchard In long enough for
them to show the spectators their
stuff.

rd

Southwestern's running

attack

did not click, but their aerial combination was fairly successful In
that they completed 14 passes out
of a possible 32. In running plays
the Lynx only gained 18 yards.
As was forecast, it was a rest
game for the Wildcats, but it was
much easier than expected. Kentucky was slated to win by a couinasmuch as
ple of touchdowns,
Southwestern
had defeated
ee

and had held Birmingham-Souther- n
to a 7 to 0 score
In the first few minutes of play
the Lynx proved to be an aggrespass,
sive team when a
Jones to Elder, was complete and
brought the ball to Kentucky's
marker. On the next play
Jones passed to Rasberry for 10
more yards. This somewhat serious threat was stopped when
"Hammerhead" McClurg intercepted a pass and returned the ball to
rd

rd

mid field.

With the ball in the center of the
field, the Wildcats started a
march down the field that
ended with Hay taking it over for
the first touchdown. In the third
rd

(Continued on Page Four)

Kampus
Kernels
There will be an important meeting of the Kentuckian staff this
afternoon at 3 p. m. In Room 64
of McVey hall.
Movies sponsored by the German
club will be shown tonight at 8 o'clock In the Training School auditorium.

The women's forum will meet at
tonight in the recreation room of Patterson hall. Dr.
Rodman Sullivan, will speak to the
group on "Militarism and Pacifism."

7:15 o'clock

The Spanish club will meet
Thursday at 3 p. m. in the Women s
building. All members are requested to be present.

ig

ot

and Intramural

FIRST QUARTER

will

sponsor a dance Saturday night In
the Alumni gymnasium. Andy Anderson and his orchestra will furnish the music. The hours of the
dance are from nine o'clock unfll
twelve. Guests of honor will be
members of the Tulane University
football squad. Admission charge
will be one doUar per coupl

BOOK CLl'B TO MEET

Interested students are invited to attend a meeting of the Community Book club Tuesday evening
at 7:45 p. m. In Room 104 of Morton
Junior High school. Rev. Fattier
Oeorge O Bryan will discuss "The
Educational Value of Reading."
All

The meeting of the W.SO.A.
council, which was set for Monday
evening, has been postponed until
Thursday evening. The council w.ll
meet at 7:15 o'clock in the reading
room of Boyd hall.
There will be a meeting of the
Horticulture club tonight at 7:30
o'clock In the Dairy building. All
members are urged to be present.
Lances, honorary Junior organization, will hold its second meeting of
the year at 7 o'clock tonight at the
Phi Kappa Tau house. '
EX

HI--

Y

MEN WILL MEET

plans to held Its
The ex Hl-first In a series of luncheon meetings in the Pat'o, 8. Limestone
street at noon Tuesday. Sponsor-e- d
by the YMCA.. the fellowship
Y

group Is conducted by a

commute,

with Robert Trigg as chairman.

* Best Copy
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Vagc Two
try would be disastrous not only for
us but for Europe. They know that
nationalism leads but to the battle
publisiisd on Tuesdays akd Fridays field and Internationalism to per
Mrmbrr
manent reconciliation. It Is not only
Llnirton Board of Commf rr
a moral question, It Is political and
National Ooliro Press Association
economical.
Kmtuckf Intrrolldrmt Prrs Aoc1tlon
Certainly one docs not have to
International Nrwa Brylf
emphasize the moral necessity of
A mmrr of the M)or Collrire Public-tlorrprcwntrd by A. J. Norrls Hill Co- Internationalism; It is staring one
York City, 1SJ W. In the face. The economic necessity
B.
nd St.. N
lts
Madlnon 81., Chlcaso; 1004 Jnd Aw.. Srat-llIs likewise obvious for have not
10S1 S. Broadway, Los Ansrlrs; Call
graduates from every university
Bl1 , San Francisco.
during the last five years been the
victims of the greatest distinction
OITICIAt, HIW8PAMR Of THE STUDENTS OF 1HI UNIVERSITY OF
In history? The hollow period of
KENTUCKY. LEXINGTON
prosperity
which followed the
Yrar. Enttrrd
World War was but an aftermath
Subscription S1.00
Lexington. Kj., PostoSlos A Second
as Is the depression today.
Qia Mall Mattsr
There Is no middle course. It
HERE SHALL THE KERNEL ALL must be nationalism with all the
S.TJDENTS R1QHT8 MAINTAIN povslble bloodshed, or internationalism with the resultant concilia
1. "BTTNNY
.Managing tutor tion.
MTJTH

The Kentucky Kernel

r:

leaders. The boy who sits next to
us In the classroom today, tomorrow may be President or 8enator or
Oovernor. It is to him that we
make this appeal: be honest, upright, conscientious; be loyal to
your country and fair to your people; be sympathetic and understanding; be democratic! Until we
do have men of character In executive offices, neither the man on
the street nor the college graduate
will prosper.
Our salvation lies In unity: Individualism must perish. If this be
socialism, then thank heaven for
socialism I We prefer to call It de
mocracy. democracy In the true
sense. It is our hope, our freedom.
our life I

STUDENT
OPINION

tiltor-tn-Cht-

'o"

Brn F. Taylor
lark Wild

St. ,ohB

AFTER COLLEGE, WHAT?

EDITORS

ASSISTANT

Delmar Adams
Halwr Olrdler
Frank BorrUl
ASSOCIATE ETJITOnS
LMererf Idltof
DOROTrTY WHALErl
Asst. Lit. Editor
LUCY JEAN ANDERSON
oc(rt Editor
WnXIl H. BMTTH
Afft. Society Editor
NANCY BECKER

WRITERS
Mary Chick
Franen Smith

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BcUY Ann

Elisabeth

A.

Krlesel

LoutM Payne
LORRAINE

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LEPERS

WRITERS
Mary Rees Land
Jans M. Hamilton
Bill Carrel
Cameron Coffman
SPECIAL

ED SHANNON
ASSISTANT
Tom B. Atklna
Day Salyer

Neics Editor
EDITORS
Leo Spenos

NEWS

Sports Editor
SPORTS WRITERS
Joe Qulnn
Bill Huston
Norman Oarllnc
Max Lancaster
LUCIAN

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ED GILBERT
NED

Morgue

Walter Rehm
ERNIE SHOVE A

Librarian

Alllltant

TURNBULL- BUSINESS

DAVE DIFFORD
IKK MOORB

this nation remains torn apart,
homes destroyed, businesses ruined
children starving, men and women
pleading for any kind of work?
What right do we have to demand
a life of ease when the stench of
poverty pervades every community,
when famine exists in a land of

Virginia Robinson

REPORTERS
John BarneU
Lawrence Edmonson
Betty Earle
Dorothy Wunderllcn
Ed Lancaster
Miriam Rosen
Mary 8harberg
Quentln Houston
Pan! Lrdrldjra
James Rash
Capel McNash
Ross Chepeleff
Theodora Hadelsteln Mary Afnea Brand
H. O. Skinner
Catherine Jones
Leslie Scott
Elvis Btahr
O. T. Hertxsch
John Christie
Frances Reld
Isabel Preston
Dorothy Appleton
Anne Phelps
Elizabeth MlTJ.ard
Jesse WUmott
Betty A. Pennington
Martha Mcure
JAY

What is to become of us, we college students? After college what?
Never before has our great country settled so deeply into the mire
of failure, of disillusionment, and
of despair; never before has the
call to youth been so urgent.
Plainly, America looks to us for
guidance.
The knots have been
tied; now, it is our Job to unravel
the tangled mass. Where our eld
ers have tried and failed must we
fail also?
What chance for Individual per
formance do we have as long as

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Ant. Business Manager
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Steve Featherstone
Circulation Jfanaoer

WHAT PRICE NATIONALISM ?
As another Armistice Day is

cele-

brated with marching throngs and

plenty?
IT IS OUR JOB TO HELP OUR

SELVES BY HELPING OTHERS I
Yes, we are selfish. We are all
of us selfish. Through this period of
depression, whose welfare have we
considered; for whose ultimate gain
have we labored? Sadly enough. It
has not been for "the other fellow."
The age-ol- d
law of self preservation
has prevailed through the centuries
and even today holds true.
Ten years ago, with the graduation of a young man or young woman from college, it was only reasonable to presume that a position
of some sort, oftentimes of an executive capacity, would be