xt7g1j97971v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7g1j97971v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19651123  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 23, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 23, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7g1j97971v section xt7g1j97971v Inside Today's Kernel
How's your "masculinity image?" Poge
Two.
Kernel

Vol. LVII, No. 48

reader criticises Thanksgiving

library hours: Poge Four.

University of Kentucky
1965

Senator Dirksen seems sparked with

LEXINGTON, KY., TUESDAY, NOV. 23,

Eight Pages

individualism:

Poge Five.

Coach Brad thaw will meet with Athletic Board Ihursdoy to discuss continued employment: Poge Sii.
Dean ol Women discusses changing
ottitudes of college students: Page
Seven.

Senate Approves Academic Program
By FRANK BROWNING

Assistant Managing Editor
The University Senate Monday night
approved the biggest academic overhaul
Kentucky has known in its century-olhistory.
Meeting in a broken session for over
four and one-hal- f
hours, the Senate approved with some minor amendments all
20 recommendations put before it by the
Senate Council in "The University of
Kentucky Academic Program: Curricula,
Policies, and Organization."
Enrollment of all entering freshmen in
the Arts and Sciences College and reorganization of University requirements for
the baccalaureate degree both effective
September 1966 were two key issues approved by the Senate.
Speaking informally at the Senate meet
ing, UK President John W. Oswald called
d

the Arts and Sciences enrollment "the
central part of the overall program before you."
As enacted, the provision will register
freshmen with A8cS fall semester 1966;
freshmen and sophomores will register
there fall semester 1967. Those students
already enrolled at the University will
continue under the present system, however.
Formal transfer to a specific professional
college will be made at the beginning of
the junior year, although each entering
student will have an adviser in his prospective major as soon as he enters the
University.
Doubt over administration of advisory
programs with individual students was
expressed by some Education and Agriculture college faculty.
New University requirements for grant- -

ing of every baccalaureate degree were
adopted by the Senate. They include four
study components: (1) general studies;
r
or
studies;
(2)
(3) major or professional studies; and (4)
free electives.
Two semesters of English composition
will still be required of all students unless they demonstrate proficiency to bypass the courses.
The general studies component, which
will replace current "lower division requirements" and be effective for freshmen entering in September, 1966, includes eight study areas: (1) Mathematics-Philosophy- ;
(2) Physical Sciences; (3) Biological Sciences; (4) Foreign Language;
(5) Humanities; Literature, Art, and Music; (6) History; (7) Social Sciences; (8)
Behavioral Sciences.
Five of the eight areas will be required
pre-majo-

f0(

I

for graduation with a baccalaureate degree.
As a mechanics of academic organization and curricula study, four councils
have been established to replace the Senate's old Curriculum Committee.
The Councils are: a Graduate Council
responsible to the Dean of the Graduate
Council reSchool, an Undergraduate
sponsible to the Provost, an Academic
Council for the Medical Center responsible to the Medical Center vice president, and a Community College System
council responsible to that system's dean.
Approval was given to the concept of
a residential complex of classrooms, student facilities, and lecture rooms to be
located south of Cooper drive. The recommendation was amended to include
similar projects for graduate and interdisciplinary programs.

Trustees Request
Budget Increase

The Board of Trustees Friday asked for a record $95,710,400
from the Kentucky Ceneral Assembly to complete a total $156,592,600
budget for the 1966-6- 8 biennium. grams; graduating the second
Four basic reasons were given and third classes of doctors, the
by the Administration for the second and third classes of nurses
amount asked, which shows a and the first class of dentists;
$37,193,500 increase over the
completion and occupancy of
1964-6- 6
biennium. They were: new academic buildings for the
1. A predicted 22 percent enAgricultural Sciences, Law, Edrollment increase.
ucation, Engineering and Comfaculty-stude2. An
improved
merce; increased financial aid
ratio of
(the present in loans and scholarships and
ratio is
other services to students."
3. Expanded
research proOn the list of expanded opergrams including urban studies, ations covered
by the budget are
adwater resources and public
new community colleges, one at
ministration.
Louisville and oneinthellazard-Blacke- y
4. Expansion of the service
area, both of which
programs to the Commonwealth
would open in the fall of 1967.
in which agricultural extensions
And The Band Plays On
What do you do in the middle of halftime cere-- just what freshman Leslie Combs did you bite and University extensions would
monies when your hat falls off and it looks doomed your tongue. Looking on in fascinated anxiety is provide greater service to the
people.
for trampling by fellow band members? You do Bob McIIendrix, also a freshman.
Aside from state appropriations for the two-yea- r
period,
the Board is counting on
$12,679,600 from student fees,
$16,899,000 from auxiliary services income and $9,324,600 in
Federal appropriations.
Leader
Senate
Minority
In his letter of transmittal,
Everett M. Dirksen
which accompanied the
address a special Centennial
budget request to the Board,
President John W. Oswald said Convocation honoring the late
reduction of U.S. forces
"The Vietcong disappear like
gradual
By BILL KNAPP
Alben W. Barkley in Memorial
in part:
in Vietnam. Following each refish in water and the U.S. should
Kernel Staff Writer
"I am pleased for several Coliseum at 3 p.m. today.
duction of troops, an equal numnot look to the fish but rather
The situation in Vietnam
Senator Dirksen was to arrive
reasons to commend this request
would take a new look if pro- ber of Vietnamese soldiers would try to clear the water."
at Blue Crass Field at 1:10 p.m.
to you. The document depicts
the withdrawing AmeriMr. Dinh believes the war in
where he will be met by Uniposals of Tran Van Dinh, tonnei replace
cans.
Vietnam is a people's war. To
A related story on the Univeracting Ambassador of Vietnam
versity President John VV. Oswald
"American leaders must prove
win, the people's problem must
sity's budget request appears on and Covernor Edward T. Breathto the United States, were acpage five. Additional information
to the Vietnamese that UJS. be solved, and to solve the probitt. He is expected toarrivcinthe
cepted.
about Friday's meeting of the Student Center about 1:30
relem the Vietnamese must be conforces are in Vietnam foe. a defiA.
treaty,
p.m.
Board of Trustees appears on page
vinced they are under an inde
duction of U.S. forces, cessation nite purpose and for a limited
President
Student
Congress
three.
indiof bombing raids, reunification time." he said, adding "the treaty pendent government, he
Winston Miller and Art Hendercated.
of Vietnam, and making die must ie submitted to a national
an extension of the progress made
son and Claudia Svara,
Vietnamese fight their own war referendum among the Vietnamof the Student Centennial
"The history of Vietnam shows
through the financial support
are just a few of the changes ese."
Committee will meet him there.
our national character to be one
provided by the Commonwealth
Senator Dirksen is expected to
in the 1964-6- 6 biennium. Notable
that diplomat turned newsman
Further revision of current of a people fiercely seeking inleave Lexington late Tuesday
Dinh recommends.
in the advancement of the Unidependence and unification unpolicies in Vietnam would inafternoon.
der a just regime," he explained.
Speaking at the University clude the cessation of bombing
versity during the last biennium
of its first century ore these
Classes will be dismissed from
Mr. Dinh sees the present
Monday night, the former Brigadie- raids and artillery bombardment
r-General
3 p.m. to 4 p.m. today to enable
in the Vietnamese of Vietcong positions.
attainments: four new communstruggle in Vietnam as the out"If you use artillery and aviaity colleges opened to extend students and faculty to attend the
growth of a social revolution bearmy called for the signing of a
convocation.
educational opport unities to 2,000
tween the country peasants, classtreaty between the U.S. and tion to deal with a guerilla probPlatform guests for the proified as "have nots," and the city
additional Kentucky youth; an
South Vietnam.
lem you are lost. You have fallen
increase of approximately 3,400
"I wih the U.S. would sign for the Communist strategy, dwellers, the "haves."
gram will be President Oswald,
Gov. Breathitt, Sen. John Shermore students at the University
Communist strategy in Vieta treaty with South Vietnam, which forces you into this blundman Cooper
Miller,
nam has been to tell the feasant in Iexington; improved economic
er," he said.
specifying the number of trooi
Alumni Association President,
condition of the faculty; a greater
was begun in Febhe is unhappy because he is exto be on Vietnamese soil, and
Bombing
Bichard Cooper of Somerset, and
volume of research, particularly
how long they are going to stay," ruary 1965 to halt Vietcong inploited by his own government,
e
Professor Thomas Clark, chairMr. Dink said.
filtration from the north, but which receives money from the. through
support; further
man of the Faculty Centennial
activation of Hospital facilities
of the pro- the infiltration has not ceased,
U.S. to foster exploitation, Mr.
Further provisions
and the Medical Center pro
Committee.
Dinh said.
posed treaty would call for the he said.
nt

LfNJ

Sen. Dirksen

Talks Today

Changes In Vietnam Situation
Proposed By Former Diplomat

At Assembly

83-pa-

(H.-Ky.- ),

non-stat-

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Nor. 23.

15
Recently Wed

Note To The Males:

How's Your 'Masculinity Image?
The next time you hear a man
complain about his lack of sex
appeal to the gals, tell him he
might be projecting a false image
of "masculinity."
What
makes
some men
symbols of masculinity while
others (often biggerand brawnier)
are not?
The impression of masculinity, conveyed as much by a
man's altitudes as by his actions
and physique, is quite a subtle
thin?.
The psychologists. tell us that
many men are at fault becauseof
their own ideas on the subject.
Many of them cling to false or
outworn notions of masculinity.
They may even deplore as
"unmanly" the very traits that
women like most in a man.
Now that we've introduced
you to the subject, how about
d
quiz to
taking this
determine
your "masculinity
quotient." It's derived from information the studies of psychologists, sociologists, historians
and other experts. The more
"yes" answers you get, the higher
the score and this may give you
an idea of how successfully you
n
image to those
project a
around you.
Have you given up wishing
your shoulders were broader and
your biceps bulgier? Congratud
lations! You're a
realist w hich is considered to be
very masculine in contemporary
American society. Besides, you've
grasped the essential fact that
conquering heroes come in all
sizes. Remember Napoleon? Then
there was the 18th century gentleman whom the ladies admired
despite his jug ears and narrow
shoulders. His name? Casanova.
Do you take an interest in
men's fashions? The notion that
don't care about clothes
may have gone over big in the
past, but it's a little outmoded
today.
Women and likewise, bosses
and personnel men, not only
appreciate good grooming and
clothes sense in a man, but many
of them consider male sloppiness
an insult.
The idea is to give careful
thought to your appearance while
seeming casual and offhand about
it.
Do you think scents for men
make good sense? That noble
Roman warrior and lover, Marc
Antony, would have agreed. So
would have Cleopatra. She .went
vild Over1
of mint and
marjoram witn which he anointed
himself. Some $44 million worth
of aftershave lotions are sold each
year in the U.S.
Do you ever feel you just don't
understand women? This may be
a good sign. Men have long
suspected, and many psychologists are now agreeing, that men
and women really do speak
different languages.

;;;;..;

light-hearte-

as a gToup had larger vocabularies gals may love you for it.
and spoke in longer sentences.
In a poll conducted by a
Do you hate to waste words leading toiletries maker; 80 perassociation test given by Dr.
Catherine Cox Miles, provoked on gossip? Of course you do. cent of the women interviewed
different male-ferruEveryone know s that onl) women said they enjoyed catering to a
responses.
It made most men subjects think gossip. Mentelleachctherwhat's
man's taste in food, fashions
of "door," while most women new with Smith or Jones. But a and decor. Over 75 percent said
rose by ar.y other name. . . the they associated a man with the
thought of "clothes."
fact is that a startling number of aroma of the cologne or afterAnd as for the word "no"
one authority says: "To a man. men enjoy a pastime that bears a shave lotion he used and voiced
'no' usually means 'no and that's remarkable resemblance to gos- a preference for masculine scents.
that. But a woman feels she can sip. And this activity doesn't do
If you're not a Don Juan,
alw ay s reopen the subject later."
anything for the masculinity are you glad instead of sorry
So don't worry about your ima ge.
about it? A great many men
Are you decisive? Down consider the Don Juan type
communications problems with
the opposite sex. They may just through the centuries, the ability
Surprisingly, most
show how- - masculine you are. to make a decision and stick to psychologists disagree. Clinical
Are y ou a man of few er words it has been tagged a manly trait psychologist Dr. Albert Ellis says
than the women? Again, this is a (and it's opposite attribute, sothe the Don Juan "is an emotiongood sign. Though the "strong, men claim, to the female).
ally weak. . . individual who is
silent type" is not necessarily the
Do you have a definite pertrying to reassure himselC
and keep
epitome of maleness, there seems sonal style? The man who's
Are you
to be some scientific evidence for individualistic (whether rugged your temper pretty well under
the male belief that women out-tal- k or not) may convey a more mascontrol? Gentleness is more a
men. What's more, they do it culine impression than the one masculine trait than many men
at every stage of life. Cirl babies who blends in with the crowd. think. The "tough guy" is often
tend to talk earlier and more
Do you have definite,
trying to compensate for his
distinctly than baby boys.
opinions on politics,
feelings of inadequacy. The truly
studied modern art, women's fashions?
who
Sociologists
male is usually
young children found that when Are you a "type" (tweedy or strong enough psychologically to
boys and girls of similar back- sophisticated) in the way you resist the temptation to bully
grounds were compared, the girls dress .and groom yourself? The persons weaker than them.
the

Even

word

everyday

"closet," fx example, in a word
le

Judi Rockwell, senior education major at Shippenburg College from Waynesboro, Pa, to
Frank Martin, senior Journalism
major from Pen Mas, Pa, and
a member of Alpha Tau Omega
Fraternity.
Lindy Hull, senior education
major from Louisville, to Phil
Hathaway, senior business administration major from Louisville, and a member of Alpha
Tau Omega fraternity.

n

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The Kentucky Kernel
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Kentucky Kernel. University
SUtion, Univertity oi Kentucky, Lex
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Nov. 23, !:-- ::

New
By LINDA MILLS
Kernel Executive Editor
A

Complex Approved

Office-Classroo- m

office-classroo-

complex, perhaps topped by a
glassed-ilounge for student-facult- y
use, will shoot up soon
in the center of the campus.
The Board of Trustees Friday
approved the $10 million project
which will include a 3,300 student
three-stor- y
classroom building
and a
office tower for
more than 500 faculty offices.
The glassed-ilounge was an
addition suggested to architects
Brock, Johnson, andHomanowitz
by UK President John W. Oswald.
Included in the building will
be 10 electronic laboratories for
oral foreign language instruction.
The buildings w ill have a common basement and will be joined
by covered walkways. Also provided in the tower will be offices
for some 375 graduate student
teaching and research assistants.
Classroom
walls may be
moved to change the sizes of
teaching areas. The buildingwill
be fully equipped for television
reception and other electronic
teaching devices.
The proposed building is first
in a series planned in accordance
e
with the University's
plan for physical development,
which also received general
approval from the Trustees Fri- n

n

long-rang-

Board Okays
Two Degrees
Supreme Court Chief Justice
Earl Warren and Centennial
Professor Dr. Hugo Theorell will
receive honorary degrees from the
University Dec. 4.
The Board of Tru stees authorized the two degrees Friday.
The degrees will be conferred
at dedication ceremonies for the
new law building, where Justice
Warren will deliver the keynote
address.
Justice Warren will receive
a doctor of laws degree. Dr.
Theorell, a Nobel Prize winning
biochemist, will receive a doctor
of science degree.
Dr. Theorell won the Nobel
Prize in 1955 for a study of
enzymes. He has been at UK
for the entire fall semester.

day. The developmental scheme
was prepared by Crane and
Gorwick, urban planners.
The Trustees made two major
administrative appointments, including naming former Trustee
Cilbert Kingsbury to the post
of assistant vice president for University Belations. Mr. Kingsbury,
whose resignation from the board
was accepted minutes before his
appointment, also will serve as
director of public relations.
Another appointment in the
Department of University Belations under Vice President

Clenwood Creech was the naming
Edward
of UK alumni
J.
Brumfield as associate director
of alumni affairs, effective Jan. 15.
Dr. Brumfield now serves as
registrar at Auburn University.
The Trustees also authorized
several organizational changes in
the Medical Center, including
placing the College of Fharrr.acy
under the direction of the Medical
Center. The College, now independent, will join the Medical
Center administration Jan. 1.
The Trustees relieved Vice
President for the Medical Center

FOR SALE
vertible St. S..

5
V- -.

277-84-

Oldsmobile conVery clean. Call
HN5t

FOR SALE Wurlltzcr portable
tric piano. Good shape, rugged,
for rock. Call (or Stan,
6:30 p.m. beginning Sunday.

elec-

ideal

Auburn: Ware Jewelert
Birmingham: Bromberg't
Birmingham: Bromberg't (Mt. Brook)
Florence: Roger t Fine Jky Dept.
Gsdsden: C. F. Hoffman A 5 on, Inc.
Huntsville: Bromberg't
Mobile: Claud Moort, Jeweler
Montgomery: Bromberg't
Opelika: La Mont Jewelert
Tallsdegt: Griffin' $ Jeweky
Talladega: Raff 'a Jewehrt
Tuscaloosa: Fine hat A Otmanl, Jewehrt

LOST
REWARD for return of contact lenses
in a small green case, probably lost
after
in McVey Hall. Call 252-418N4t
4 p.m.
FOB BENT
ROOM FOR RENT Females only. 352
Linden Walk. Bed linens furnished,
kitchen privileges, laundry facilities.
17N4t
Call

Three room apartment
and bath, unfurnished. 441 North
after
Limestone. No. 10. Call

FOR RENT

8

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p.m.

UW8 class ring, B S. degree,
near SUnton, Ky. Call Miss Mayes,

FOUND

UK ext. 2319 for more Information.

1BN41

TYFINO
WILL DO TYPING at home, 50 cnts
Ave.
per page. Mrs. 1111, 330 Clifton 23Nlt
i'hon 255-50-

ARKANSAS
Camden: St In son's Jewelers
Crossett: Llllotft Jawahft
El Dorado: Elliott' $ Jawalatt

Fayetteville: Underwood's Collaga Jks.
Fort Smith: Miller' a Jawalatt
Hot Springs: DeCoursey Jawalatt
Jonesboro: Purvis Jawalatt
Stuttgart: floyd A. Danman

OHIO
Cincinnati:

ALTERATIONS of dresses, skirts and
coats for women. M1LDKED COHEN
253 E. ftUxwell. s'hone

tufr

MANUSCRIPTS TYPED IBM Carbon
Ribbon. A1m Ditto masters, stencils,
niuitiuths. Guides: Manual for Style;
MLA Style Sheet, tio cents pp. cents
p.m.
per cmi Un. Daily after10 ta.m. -- 11
Saturdays and Sundays Mill. Ph.
p.m. UiVENS', 17 North
ITStf

Hatschada Jawalars- -4 Stores

OKLAHOMA

FLORIDA

Brooksville: A. G. Frldy Jawalatt
Clearwater: Trkkels Jewelers
Coral Gables: Carroll' t Jawalatt
Daytona Beach: Wm. A. Ritil A Sont
Fort Lauderdale: Carroll' t Jawalatt
Fort Myers: fithal A Dowdy Jawalatt
Fort Pierce: Charlat G. Rhoads A Son Inc.
Fort Walton Beach: Ratcliff Jawalatt
Gainesville: Robertson Jawalatt
Hialeah: Major' t Jlrt. A Silversmiths
Hialeah: Snow't Jawalatt
Hollywood: Major' t Jlrt. A Silversmiths
Jacksonville: Undatwood Jawalatt Inc.
Storaa
Kendall: Major' t Jlrt. A Silvartmitht
Lakeland: John I. Latan Jlr.
Miami: Major' t Jlrt. A Silversmiths
Mulberry: Mulbatry Jawalatt
No. Miami: fart Jawalatt
North Miami Beach: Major't Jlrt. A
Silvartmitht
Ocala: Gauta A Son
rt
Jawalatt
Orlando:
Panama City: Cogburn's Jawalatt
' Pensacola: CI bath Jeweky
Perry: Walla Jawalatt
Plsnt City: Cratcant Jawalatt
Rockledge Cocoa: lawton A Co. Jawalart
St. Augustine: Moallar't Jawal Shop
St. Petersburg: Bruca Wattart Inc.
-- T Storat
Tallahassee: Putnam Jawalart
n
Jawalart
Tampa:
Tampa: Yatat Jawalatt. Inc.
West Palm Beach: Gilhtpie Jawalart
Winter Haven: City Jawalart
Calvin May Jawalart
Winter Park:

Bartlesville: Jotef Derrybetry Jewelers
Idabel: Anderson' t Jeweky
Enid: Morgan's Diamond Shop
Miami: Williams Jeweky
Oklahoma City: B. C. Clark, Jewelers
Oklahoma City: 5. C. Clark, May fair Inc.
Shawnee: Sperry's Jewelers

SOUTH CAROLINA
Anderson: Cochran Jewelry Co.
Charleston : Hamilton Jewelers
Charleston: Charles Harrison, Jewelers

i

Columbia: Gudmundton and Buyck
Greenville: Cochran Jewelry Co.
Orangeburg: Cleo's Jeweky and Gifts
Summerville: Dor chatter Jewelers

IAMOND

TENNESSEE
Chattanooga: Fischer-Evan- s
Clarksville: Joy't Jewehrt

RINGS

Dyersburg

'

'

,

j

GEORGIA
Athens: fottat't Jawalatt Inc.
Atlsnta: Malar A Berk la Inc.

College Park: Travis M. Harbin, Jawalar
Columbus: Kir ran' t Una Jawaky
Decatur: Maiar A Berkeh Inc.
Gainesville: Mintt Jawalatt
Gordon: Dannit Jewehry Co.
Macon: Karnaghan Inc. Jawalart
Moultrie: Cranford Jawalatt
Rossville: Rostvilh Jly. Co.
Savannah: Desbouillonst Storat
Storat
Savannah: Lavy Jawalart
Valdosta: Gkatdin Jawalart
Jamat C. Hart Jkt.
Waycross:

t

TEXAS

LOUISIANA
Alexandria: Schnack't
Bogalusa: Gayht Jawahtt
Breaui Bridge: Robert a Jawaky
Covington: Tim Wilton Jawalart
Da Oumcy: . W. Rodgatt Jawaky Co.
Houma: Wayl't Jawaky Stora
Lafayette: faul t Jawaky Stora
Metairie: Aucoln-HaJawaky Co.
New Iberia: Pfittat Jawaky Co., Inc.
New Orleans: An tin' t Jewehrs- -t Storat
Opelousss: Mornhivag A Catlilla
Ruston: Grigtby't Jawalart
Shreveport: McCary't Shreve City Jlrt.
n
Shreveport: McCary

f

VIRGINIA
Clifton Forge: Hodges Jewelry Stora
1
Covington: Hodges Jeweky Store
Danville: Hod net t A Speer Co.
Falls Church: Winthrop Jewelers
Fredericksburg: Crown Jewelers
Lynchburg: Phillips Bros. Jewelers
Marion: Jack C. Hudson, lour Jewler
Norfolk: O. P. Paul Co.
Pulaski: Crown Jewelers
Richmond: Schwartschild Bros.
Roanoke: George T. Hitch, Jeweler
South Boston: A. R. Via A Bio.
Staunton: H. L. Lang A Co., Jewelers
Suffolk: Brewer Jeweky io. Inc.
Waynesboro: Hodges Jewelry Stora
Wytheville: Crown Jewelers

MARYLAND
Chevy Chste: R. Hatrlt and Company
Wheaton: Winthrop Jawalatt

VICTORIA

Biloii: Elliott Jawaky Co.
Corinth: Waitt Jawaky Stora
Grenada: Stoker Jawaky
Hattietburg:: Pan it Jawalatt
Hattiesburg Rollingt Jawaky Company
Jawalart
Jsckson: Strautt-SlallmMcComb: Hat net Jewelers
Mendan: Rot Jawalary
Oxford: Crouch Jawahrt
feltt
Patcagoula:Strautt-Stallin- Jewelers
g
Co.
Vicktburg:
West Point: Rowatt Jawalart

WASHINGTON. D.C.
Washington: f art's Jewelers

Washington, DC:

R. Harris and Company
Downtown, Georgetown A Chevy Chata
Washington: Chat. Schmatt A Son

Albemarle: Starnat Jawaky Stora
Asheville: Laa't Jawahrt
Asheville: Got don't Jawahrt
Csnton: Gordon' t Jawahrt
Chapel Hill: Wentworth A Sloan
Charlotte: field t Jawalatt, Inc.

DY

Lewit Jeweler

Amarillo: Wagner's Jewelers
Downtown and Suburban
Austin: Joe Koen A Son
Bryan: Caldwell, Jewelert
Commerce: Bilnkk Jewelert
Corpus Christi: Roberta Jewelert
Corpus Christi: Taylor Brother t
Dallas: Owent Bros. Jewehrt
El Paso: HoUtworth Jeweler
El Paso: Sheldon Jeweky
Fori Worth: Haltom't Jewelers
Galveston: Itenberg't Jeweky Stores
Downtown Medical Center
Garland: Oghtby Jeweky A Gifts
Ridge Wood Shopping Center
Garland Shopping Canter
Hereford: Cowan Jeweky
Houston: Billingt Jeweky I Storat
Houston: Walitl Jewelry- -t Storet
Killeen: Keen's Jewehrt
Longview: Bennett's McCarhy't
Lubbock: Anderson Bros. Downtown A
Monterey Center
Msson: Peter man n Jewelers
Mc Allen: Jones Jeweky
Pasadena: Michaels Jewelry
Port Arthur: Turnbull's Jeweky
San Antonio: Leopold Jewelers
San Antonio: Shaw's Downtown, Gunter
Hotel; Suburban, Wonderland
Shopping City
Temple: L. S. James Jeweler
Waco: Armstrong Jewelers

KENTUCKY
Bowling Green: Howard Jawalart
Covington: Motch Jawahtt
Hopkinsville: Joy't Jawahtt
Lexington: Victor Boqaert Co.
Louisville: Lamon A Son, Jawalatt
Richmond: McCotd Jawaky

SOLO

:

Johnson City: Beck net t Jeweky'
KnoiViile: KmfcaM
.awrancabjrg: Dowoey A Jooet
Lebanon: McGee-JenninLewisburg: Downey A Jonat

Memphis: Graves Steuwer
Murfreesboro: Aultman Jewehrt
Murfreesboro: Bell Jeweler t
Nashville: George T. Brodnat
Green Hillt Village A Madison Square
Nashville: Phil Brodnat 6th Avenue
Oak Ridge: Kimball 't
Pulaski: Rotl Jewehrt
Shelbyville: Henning Jeweler t
South Pittsburg: Hall Jeweler t
Springfield: Downey A Jonas
Tullahoma: Henning Jewelers

NORTH CAROLINA

MISCELLANEOUS

:

Lumberton:

MISSISSIPPI

FOUND

The

Dallingat't JawalShop, Inc.
A. J. Holmat, Jawalar
Morganton: Gregory Jawahrt
Raleigh: John ton's Jawalatt
Raleigh: Jolly's Jeweler t- -t Storat
Reidsville: Mace's Jawaky-Gi- fls
Rocky Mount: Gahman's Jawaky Stora
Salisbury: Bishop C. Leonard, Jewelers
Sanford: Wagoner's Jewehrt
Southern Pines: Parkinson's Inc. '
. Wilson i Churchwell't Inc.
Winston-SaltmMcPhailt Inc.
:

Kings Mountain

after

18N2t

'use

NORTH CAROLINA
Durham: Jones A Frashr- -t Storat
Fayetteville: Hatchat't Jawalatt
Gastonia: Morrit Jawahrt
Goldsboro: Garrlt Jawalatt
Greensboro: Schlffman Jawaky Co.
Hendersonville: Gordon' t Jawalatt
High Point: Par kin ton' t Jawaky Co.

ALABAMA

INDIANA
New Albany: Ray's Jawaky

FOR SALE
1B63

--

Anniston: Couch's Jeweky Co.

i

CLASSIFIED

Health Bcsource Development to
in
UK
handle
participation
federal programs.
The Board accepted a tract of
land adjacent to Prcstonsburg
Community College from the Big
Sandy Development Association.
The plot was valued at $31,000.

William B. Willard from the dean-shi- p
of the Medical School at
Dr. Willard's suggestion. Dr.
Willard recommended that, in
view of growing responsibilities
of both jobs, the two positions
be separated.
A committee to seek a replacement for Pharmacy Dean Earl
Sloan, who soon will retire, was
established by the trustees.
A school of allied health personnel was established to train
nonprofessional health workers
and to set up under the vice
president's office a Division of

WEST VIRGINIA
Charleston: Galpatin Jeweky Co.
Huntington: Rogers A Company
Morgantown: Robert A. lagh, Jewehrt
Wheeling: Potmt Jewehrt

PINE

JEWELERS

THROUGHOUT

AMERICA

.

'
'

* "Dean, Wlial Does Your Sensitive Antenna Say About
Stories?"
Reaetion To Our Latest lVess-Age-

No Eulogy For Hate
An old familiar figure on the
American social scene is passing,

and we do not mourn his demise
in the least.
The segregationist, for more
than 100 years a prominent voice
in America, is now uttering his
last cry before sinking into oblivion.
His Southern protest vote in
1964 might be viewed as the last
strong cloudburst before clearing
in a long thunderstorm.

nt

The segregationist simply is
finding no "new blood" to carry
his banner as he and his genecohorts become too
rations-old
worn out for the task. Those youths
who do not object to segregation on
grounds are
Mot willing to make the sacrifices
it takes to be a segregationist these
days.
Such sacrifices include economic
shorteducational
retardation,
changing, and even social
moral-humanitari-

ostra-cicatio-

n.

Those states in which the last
tribes of the nearly-extinsegregationists hide arc the nation's
lowest economically, educationally
and in a variety of other ways.
Residents of other states look upon
them with scorn and distaste. The
younger generation, including those
of their own breeding, flock away
from its borders to greater opportunities elsewhere.
Especially its Negro youth, more
valuable than ever with increased
educational advantages to this
d
land.
group, flees its
few

ct

"
v

'

hate-infeste-

So we can find no sympathy
with the dying segregationist. We
see no "nobility" in his fight, nor
any "grandeur" in his struggle.
We might only wish to hasten
the silence of his venemous lips.

Letters To The Editor:

Library Closed Most Of Thanksgiving Break

To The Editor:
the need to salary more than two
I would direct your attention library employees will be elimto a familiar sight on campus that inated. This saving of University
can be witnessed every Sunday money can be better used for the
afternoon in front of that bastion Little Kentucky Derby or a reof intellectual activity, the King union for the Class of 1916.
It is comforting to know that
Library. Here we see a number of
students waiting with quiet vex- the library of a university that is
ation for the doors of our state trying to establish itself among the

library to open.
Of course, I can understand the
principle behind this practice, since
it is common knowledge that our
scholars are either reflectingquietly
in the morning church services or
making use of the early afternoon
hours to recuperate from Saturday
evening's merriment.
Indeed it would be insane to
compel the library staff to appear
before 2 p.m. simply to cater to
a few stodgy graduate students.
This Sunday, however, those
who arrived early discovered a
notice announcing that the library
would be open for a total of 13
hours during the Thanksgiving
holidays.
Students were reassured that
they would have time to zerox
all pages they needed before going
home. If more students go home,

better institutions of this country
would handle the need for library
hours so eagerly. Not only does
the plan enable those who would
use the library to drop in for a
while over the holidays to go home,
but it saves the state the sum
e
maintenecessary for
nance.
JOHN C. WAGNER
Graduate Student in Englisli
full-tim-

Profile Of AWS'er
cannot help but feel that an
member is the same kind of
ha