xt7g4f1mkf4p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7g4f1mkf4p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650401  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  1, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  1, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7g4f1mkf4p section xt7g4f1mkf4p Grant Appointed
Editor Of Kernel

Walter Grant, a journalism major from Winchester, was named
of the 1965-6Kernel by the Hoard of Student Publications Wednesday.
Diane Sailing, a sophomore Arts and Sciences student from Lexington, was named alitor of the
Grant, who will be a junior,
will form liis staff duringthe next
month and they will be announced later.
He is a transfer student from
Gent re College where he was a
member of Sigma Clu fraternity.
He is currently serving as associate news editor on the Kernel
and has worked professionally
with the daily Winchester Sun.
Miss Sailing was named as the
editor responsible for revitalizing
the
the freshman handbook, after several years of not
publishing.
Money for the book will be
furnished by Student Congress.
Also named to the
i
staff were: Kathy Goodman,
Caroll Haley and Judy
Hippe, activities editors; Charlie
WALTER GRANT
Goodman, fraternities editor;
Frankie Sanders, governments editor; Peggy Lee Herbert, layout
editor; Jim Grad and Bill Cooms, men's life editors; Gay Gish and
Blithe Runsdorf, publications editors; Linda Duvall, religious life
editor; Mary Ann Fetner, sorority editor; Linda Thomas and Dick
Kimmons, sports editors; Suzanne Park, in charge of writing; Anne
Storey, womenVlife editor; Lynn Anderegg, secretarial supervisee
editor-in-clii-

(ketrnd!

6

University of Kentucky
APRIL

Vol. LVI, No. 100

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY,

V

-

New Student Center
page. 12.

Junior Board members pictured on

Eight students were elected to the Student Center Board
as committee chairmen Wednesday.
Committee chairmen elected
The new Social Committee
were: Forum, Suzi Somes, sophoChairman elected was Bill Eigel,
more in Arts and Sciences, who sophomore agriculture
major.
has served on the Forum com- The runner-uwas Dale Smith.
mittee and was on the committee
Recreation Committee Chairfor the Quiz Bowl. The runner-uman elected was Bob Penny,
to Mis Somes was Richard freshman zoology major. His runnDetner.
er-up
was Dave Williams.
Visual Arts Committee ChairPerforming Arts Committee
Chairman elected was Kay Leo- man elected was Connie Elliott,
nard, sophomore education major sophomore education major. The
and past secretary of the Fine runner-u- p
to Miss Elliott was
Arts committee. The runner-uDane Bridgewater.
to Miss Leonard was Chardell
Thompson.
Personnel Committee Chairman newly elected was Sandy
President Oswald will enterBugie, freshmen an the College
of Arts and Sciences. Runner-utain the junior class with a recepto Miss Bugie was Carol tion at the Alumni House from
4:30 to 6 p.m. April 15.
Haley.
.

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Cochairmen, President Confer

Pres. John W. Oswald confers with the new co- chairmen of the Student Centennial Committee,
Claudia Jeffrey and Arthur Henderson, after ask- -

ing if they would serve in the two key positions
for the remainder of the year's celebration.

Claudia Jeffrey, Arthur Henderson Named Chairmen

Oswald Appoints 16 Juniors
To Centennial Committee
Arthur Henderson, Maysville
and Claudia Jeffrey, Avondale
Estates, Ga., were named yesterday as new cochairmen of the
University's Student Centennial
Committee.
Fourteen other University students were also named to the committee by UK President John W.
Oswald in a special ceremony in
the Student Center.
The new committee, named
after nearly three months of
screening more than 150 student
applications by a student-facultevaluating committee, will plan
y

Student Centennial Committee

Members of the new Student Centennial Committee
are shown at a reception In their honor when they
were asked to serve on the committee for the
Centennial celebration. First row, from the left:
Hob Youn;, Frank Ilailey, Willis llright, Hobby Jo

Twelve Pages

X

Vs

-

&nm

Student Center Board
Members Are Elected

15

-

r

fj

I,

Guinn. Second row: Tres. John W. Oswald, Linda
Lampe, Sandra Johnson, Art Henderson, Claudia
Jeffrey, cochairmen; Sally Gregory, Dede Cramer,
l,
Iletsy Clark. Third row: Tom Woodall, Dan
Fur-cel-

George Dexter, Mike Fields, Fred Myers.

activities throughout the remainder of the UK
Centennial Year as well as execute those programs already planned by the present committee.
Henderson, a junior engineering major, and Miss Jeffrey, junior topical major, succeed this
year's cochairmen James Svara,
Jefferstown, and Sandra Brock,
Newburgh, Ind.
Other students named to the
committee are Tom Bersot, Linda
,
all
Lampe, and
of Louisville; Willis Bright, Dede
Cramer, Sally Gregory, Sandra
Johnson, and Tom Woodall, Lexington; Frank Bailey, Winchester;
Betsy Clark, Paducah; Ceorge
Dexter Jr., Greenville; Michael
Fields, Ashland; Fred Myers,
Madisonville, and Robert Cuinn,
Paint Lick.
In the meeting with both members of the present committee
and the new appointees, President Oswald told the group the
SCC has set an outstanding precedent in that people are wondering if the many projects already
initiated will be held annually.
"The response from everyone,
be they alumni, students, faculty
or townspeople, has been tremendous to your programs, and
they have asked if these programs will be continued annually," he added.
To the outgoing committee,
Oswald said:
"You have far surpassed my
farthert dream that a student
committee can take on activities
and develop a scries of events
in which students can be involved in the overall fabric of
the University.
"The major task, if it be your
student-relate-

d

Cheryl-Miller-

desire

and I am sure it will-w- ill
be to find ways and means

to plug the present SCC programs into part of the present

University activities," he told
the new appointees.
In referring to the two new
cochairmen, Dr. Oswald told
Henderson and Miss Jeffrey "you
will be filling some pretty big
shoes in succeeding Jim Svara
and Sandy Brock."
Miss Brock told the new committee members they have "no
idea of the' experience ahead of
you. You have an opportunity
few University students hav e, and
I hope you will both realize
and take advantage of tliis," she
concluded.
Svara echoed Miss Brock's
promises of SCC endeavors and
announced a meeting with the
new committee members at 3
p.m. Sunday in the President's
Room in the Student Center.
Henderson, a member of the
Honors Program, is also a
member of the Centennial Shakers Bureau and the SCC research
subcommittee. He is also active
in the Patterson Literary Society,
Phi Eta Sigma, Student Fonun
Executive (Committee, the University YMCA and the Engineering Student Council.
Miss Jeffrey, also an SCC
subcommittee member with the
faculty evaluation group, is vice
president of Pi Beta Phi sorority
president of Pi Beta Phi sorority.
Women's Advisory Board, YMCA
Cabinet, AWS House, Links,
Mortar Board, the Kernel editorial loard, and the campus committee on human rights.
UK

A p pi ication s A vail a hie
Applications for position on the Kernel editorial hoard will
be available in Room 11( of the Journalism Building Friday.
The applications should he returned by 5 p.m. next Friday.

* KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday. April

2-- TIIE

A

1, 1965

Review

Hilly Kit Wheeler

Bergman Not Ready
Yet To Do Comedy
By SCOTT NUXLEY
Kernel Art s Editor
g
has
Ingmar Bergman's turning from serious to comic
not been successful, but it is not as big a turn as it might seem.
"All These Women," currenthave made Italy's name in the
ly playing at the Cinema, represents several firsts for Bergman. field.
But Fellinfs gift is one of poIt is his initial color film, demetic lyricism and irony, a method
that

L

film-makin-

Bergman
onstrating clearly
has decided to conquer that medium, and giving amply promise
that he will finally do so.
This movie is also his first
to be billed as pure comedy. But
the familiar Bergman caustic satire actually retains the upper
hand. Here the object is the Critic and the attack is devastating.
What separates "All These
Women" from the many earlier
Bergman films to sustain similar
attacks is the medium; burlesque
instead of mood. Burlesque, unfortunately, is being done on the
screen today by an expert director, Blake Edwards, and by a far
finer comic actor thai Bergman
had at hisiisrxwaiCiCtSlIers.
; BVrgroanV attempt
therefore
is prejudiced in our eyes by what
these men have been able to accomplish. No longer are we left
to ask, "Can it be done?" as was
the case with Bergman's earlier
cinematic masterpieces. Instead,
knowing it can be done, we approach the movie asking, "Can
Bergman do it?"
The answer is no, not yet.
Why suppose that he could? Because Ingmar Bergman has established himself as oneof the talented giants of modern experimental
filmdom.
Despite w hat ultramodern experimentalists may be trying in
the United States, it is in Europe
that the movie first assumed the
strange haunting power to confuse and delight that we associate
with its better examples today.
And of these early artists, Bergman was the leader.
Of course, this position is
rightly challenged bymanyinthe
19G0's, men such as the Italian
Federico Fellini whose "La Stra-da- "
and "La Dolce Vita" alone

UNITARIAN
CHURCH
Hfgbee Mill Road
at Clays Mill Road

10:45 a.m.

Speaker

.2

Cincinnati Concert Set Saturday

rul. and Mary, the folkslnfinj
audiences at Memorial Coliseum last
reter,

3 in

Saturday, April

of establishing depths of human
character that lends itself easily
to exploring the comic in the human situation. Fellini does not
need to abandon warmth to
achieve humor, to depend upon
the exaggeration of a burlesqued
sty le for liis comic success.
however, with
Bergman,
"Wild Strawberries" in 1937 and
"Through A Class Darkly" in
1961, defended a raw, moody,
penetrant brand of impressionism
to the world. The Swedish director's films almost seemed to be
external results of his own internal personality. If so, Bergman's
sense of humor must be pitiful.
"All These Women" is funny
in spots. Pratfalls, and slapstick
can even today stir us to occasional laughter. In better hands
they have been refined to amazing heights. But Bergman's
hands do not seem suited to this
task, at least not yet.
He would still rather drag his
subjects, here Critics, Womankind, even the Artist himself, over
coals far too brutally to be

trio that delighted University
spring, will appear in Cincinnati

use the

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The Kentucky Kernel
The

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Pubhbhed four timet weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Hoard
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Stephen Palmer,
secretary.
ttegun as the Cadet in 184, became the Kecord in liX), and the Idea
in ll08. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1V15.
SUBSCRIPTION KATES
Yearly, by mail $7.00
Per copy, from file- s- $ .10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
2321
Editor
News Desk, S ports. Women's Editor,
2320
Socials
Advertising, Business, Circulation 2319

CR0WTHER.

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ituiNiuvLUir

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DR. MELVIN U DeFLUER
UK Department of Sociology

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Billy Edd Whcclcr
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FIVE THOUSAND MILES OF
INCREDIBLE ADVENTURE!

Cow

-

the Music Hall at 8:30 p.m. Tickets will be
available at the door.

Strange things are
happening to

Service and
Church School
SUNDAY, APRIL 4

X

Billy Kdd Wheeler, once ;a
dramatist at Bcrca College and
now a famed writer of folksongs
for such groups as The Kingston
Trio, headlines the WI,AP Folk
Festival this Saturday April 3 in
McAlister Auditorium at 7:30
p.m. on the Transylvania College campus. Along with Billy
Fdd will appear Avo and Hay,
I'at and Preston, Ben Story and
the Story Singers. Tickets are
oh sale at Kennedy's and The
University Shop.

Mrs. Jack Lctnmon

OPEN
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STARTS TONIGHT

PAUL

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday. April

The
Merry

Go-Roun-

pusOld

d

and the brothers will
secede from the University.
After shooting off their cannon (if whoever stole the gun
would be so kind as to return it)
the tradition-makerwill finish
the day with the Old South Ball
at 8 p.m.
If the fellows and their dates
last, there is also a jam session
on Sunday in Versailles.
To complicate matters, there
may be some fancy footwork as
the ADPi's try to work in Old
South and their own formal Friday night. The dance is formal
and will be held at the Holiday
Inn-Eas- t
with music provided by
the Monarchs.
Two fraternities are going out
of town this weekend for their
dances. The ATO's will be at
Park Mammoth Resort, and the
Lambda Chi's plan their formal
at Jenny Wiley Park.
FarmHouse fraternity will hold
its founders day banquet in the
Student Center Ballroom on
Saturday, and then they too will
have their spring formal. It will
be at the Holiday Inn and Ray
Rector's Orchestra will make
music for the dancers.
God bless spring if it ever decides to warm up!
s

Friday night the KA's
- Ball will
be held at
Danccland. The music should
be spectacular, for the Little
Boys will play and the Vibrations will provide the songs.
At 11:30 on Saturday the Old
South Parade begins. Starting at
Donovan Hall, and slowly winds

ing its way down Rose Street,
procession will arrive at the

courthouse a little after noon.
There Lt. Gov. Harry Lee
Waterficld will present the new

Engagements

Sharon Lloyd, graduate student at Bowling Green State University from Ft. Wright, and a
member of Gamma Phi Beta
sorority, to Ralph Marquette,
senior history major from South
Ft. Mitchell and a member of
Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity.

T'';
i

vyi !hy
n
WWW

Ssf-- Jr

M

i

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Hi

IK

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To Be Or Not To

If anyone ever thought a day In the life of the

society editor could be fun and easy, take a look
at what they have done to Gay Gish, the Ketnel's

-

:

Be9 Society

Editor

social and women's page editor. Could it be that
they habitually stuff her into desks and file her
no! April fool!
away for a rainy day? Yes

...

METHODIST
STUDENT
CHURCH

Coach Rupp
Feted At
Dorm Dinner
the
"This

Maxwell

at Harrison

MORNING
WORSHIP

is
first time anyone
has done this for the basketball
team since I became coach in
1932." said Coach Adolph Rupp.
These words of thanks were
given Tuesday night to the girls
on the second floor of Holmes

EACH SUNDAY

Sunday School, 9:45

candlelight dinner
in Blazer Hall's private dining
room for the varsity team.
"Perhaps if we's had more food
like this, we'd have won more
games." added Rupp with a
Hall after

a

Morning Worship,
10:50
REV. TOM FORNASH

Minister

smile.

The dinner was attended by
the coach and managers, the
team, and about fifty freshman

JOIN US IN
STUDENT WORSHIP

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Whether spring ljfccs jt or not(
it has arrived. And if
you have
any doubts about it, just ask the
various fraternities and sororities
that arc having their formal
planned this weekend.
The affair to which every KA
and his lady look forward, began Wednesday night with the
issuing, in true Southern style,
of invitations to one of the few
traditions remaining on this cam-

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-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, April

1, 1963.

Communist Gunfire Downs American Helicopter
The Associated Press
SAIGON, South Vietnam
Communist gunfire downed an
American helicopter and killed
a U.S. Army pinner on another

helicopter in an operation 20
miles west of Saigon today.
Crewmen aboard the downed
aircraft were reported safe. The
other helicopter had just unloaded

American killed in combat in

Vietnamese rangers and was taking off when its door gunner was
hit. The helicopter make it safely
hack to base.
The Army man was the 316th

Oregon University Asks
Reaction To Overnight Stays
By The Associated Press
EUGENE, Ore. -- The University of Oregon will try again
at getting parents' reaction to
women students checking out for
overnight stays.
But it isn't likely to ask again
whether it's all right for the
girls to sign out for overnight
stays in men's apartments.
The Legislature is in session
and State Rep. Stafford Hansell
said he has asked the chancellor
to explain to the Ways and
Means Committee, which decides
the fate of higher education's
budget, why the university had
put that question to parents.
"Out of line," he said.
The committee meets today
but the explanation was set over
until next week when it discusses
the budget for dormitory construction.
University officials say that

until Chancellor Roy Lieuallen
goes before the committee, they
will not go beyond a statement
issued by the office of President
Arthur Flemming saying the
university has never approved
or permitted such conduct.
But a source close to the university said, "I don't think they
expected parents to say it was

o.k."

Whatever they expected, when
the replies started coming back,
a number were marked in the
"yes" square opposite the question on whether women students
could check out of their campus
living quarters for a night at the
home of men friends.
Francis B. Nickerson, associate dean of students, said a
surprising number of cards had
been so checked. He said he
didn't know how many. The

president's office said it didn't
know either, adding: "The cards
haven't been tabulated."
Questionnaire cards have been
used at Oregon for 21 years as a
guide on parents' wishes. New
categories including the new.
overnight questions were added
this year "to ascertain more precisely the wishes of parents under
all possible circumstances," the
statement said.

Dean Nickerson said he
thought the whole episode an unfair reflection on students. Only
IV2 percent of the student body
is ever called in for discipline,
he said. And he added tha in
one
stretch this year
not a single student had been
arrested.
two-wee- k

"What other community of

10,000 has so good a record?"
he asked.

Estes Argues That
TV Hindered Trial

Viet-

miles north of Saigon, failed because of thunderstorms.
The rain put out fires from
tons of napalm, incendiary bombs
and fuel oil that had been poured
over the 19,000 acres of woods
honeycombed with Victcong
caves, tunnels, and fortifications.
One source said heat from the
e
forest fire caused air
currents that touched off the
thunderstorm.
Newsmen flown over the area
today were greeted by heavy Victcong ground fire.

1961.

nam since December
Intelligence reports indicated
that 100 to 200 Vietcong were in
the area. There were no immediate reports on the status of the
battle.
Two American helicopter crewmen were killed Wednesday, 17
were wounded and four helicopters were shot down in fighting
for control of Vict An, a strategic
center in the mountains south of
the Da Nang air base.
The fighting at Viet An appeared to have died down today.
Nine South Vietnamese troops
were killed and 20 missing. But
U.S. sources said at least 50
also were dead. Two of the
downed helicopters were recovered.
A quantity of explosives blew
up today in the U.S. Marine ammunition dump at Da Nang air
base. No one was injured.
Authorities said they did not
know the cause of the explosion,
but apparently they ruled out sabotage. Personnel and vehicles
were evacuated from the area until the fire burned itself out.
There were no further explosions.
The U.S. Air Force announced
that its huge scorched earth raid
Wednesday on Boi Loi forest, 20

X

252-020-

dawn explosion, blasted the rear
of the home of a Negro public
accountant today, injuring one
person and possibly more.
The blast occurred near the
garage of the home ofT. L. Crow-ein northwest Birmingham.
Neighbors reported that windows in several houses on the
block were rattled and some
cracked and broken out by the
explosion's concussion.
The FBI sent agents to the
scene and spokesmen said "it
was probably dynamite, but we
are not sure what really caused
the explosion."
ll

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By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON The Supreme Court hears arguments today
ADDO-ADDING MACHINES
on a complaint by Billie Sol Estes that live television coverage
OLIVETTI ADDERS AND
prevented him from getting a fair trial on swindling charges in a
PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
Texas court.
A defendant in a criminal
Canon 35 of the American Bar
CARBONS, RIBBONS,
case, his counsel says, may not Association's Canons of Judicial
OFFICE SUPPLIES
be needlessly humiliated and Ethics opposes photographing or
387 Rose St.
7
Ph.
commercially exhibited when ob- broadcasting of trial proceedings.
jection is made to television or
any technique that does not have
some reasonable relation to the
determination of guilt or innocence.
Basic standards of fair trial,
Estes counsel stated in a preliminary brief, are violated by
"the idea that because a man
HAMPTON COURT, 8 ROOMS,
BATHS
has been accused of a crime he
EACH
$14,500
becomes a public character, subhimself to being exploitPhone John Kindred 266-288- 7
jecting
ed by the news media, and for
or Jack Bunte 299-717- 9
Evenings
educational purposes, and commercialized for the sale of soft
drinks, soap and soup, and as
a substitute for the late TV
show."
SAVE YOUR MONEY FOR THE REALLY
Waggoner Carr, Texas attorBIG WEEKEND
ney 'general, in a reply brief said
he "detects an unmistakable hysteria in the clamor to ban all
television of court proceedings."
The answer, Carr contends
lies in the same rules now applied to trials covered by the
press and open to spectators, in
which the trial judge keeps all
APRIL 23 and 24
elements under reasonable

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* Of Rooms And Babysitters

Fights a never ending battle for truth,
justice and the American way. . .
..

The Margaret I. King Library
staff luts announced that hours for
the reserve book reading room will
be extended to midnight beginning
April 18 and continuing throughout the final examination period.

to do their reading after classes
g
and after
meetings.
The room was generally used during the period of extended hours
before last semester's final examinations.

The extended closing hours will
be a convenience to the students
and definitely is a convenience they
should have throughout the year.

Students often check out books
the night before closing hour,
indicating that student interest in
reading these materials does not
end at 9 p.m. Hooks are charged
out beginning at 8:15 p.m., meaning that a publication may become unavailable for that night
to all but one student.

early-evenin-

for

The 9 p.m. normal closing hour
is an awkward deadline, considering that the women's dormitory
does not close until 10:30 on week-nighand the entire library does not
close until midnight. It is difficult to understand why one of the
rooms used most by students is one
of the first to close. The current
periodical reading room, which includes less required-readin- g
material, remains open until midnight.
It, like the reserve book room, requires one staff member.
ts

It would be little strain on the
library budget to hire the one or
two extra babysitters to keep the
reserve room open an extra three
hours each evening. At least the
room could be opened later during the midterm examination
period.
And one more thing perhaps
more zeroxed copies of the more

At any hour in the evening
more students visit the reserve room
than at any hour during the class
day hours. Many students prefer

heavily used readings would help
the great war for before-te-

lessen

st

knowledge.

,

Millions For Inadequacy
For some 20 years, the American
Medical Association spent ever-largsums to tell the people they
had no need or desire for old age
hospitalization insurance financed
through a Social Security payroll
tax. With the Administration's
bill undergoing congressional debate again, the association has begun another of its
sporadic campaigns of "education."
Strange but true, this time it is
ostensibly promoting a bill that
promises everything.
Newspaper, magazine, television, radio and waiting room
advertising is not sounding the old
tocsin about legislation that costs
top much. Now the emphasis is
on how much more health protection one would be offered under
"eldercare"
the AMA's

plan, sponsored in Congress by
Representatives Curtis and Herlong.
This Kerr-Milextension is indeed
broader than the Social Security
plan. It is also so expensive to
the general taxpayer that it has
very little chance of being adopt-

er

King-Anders-

i

How the AMA is paying the
prodigious freight for this propaganda blitz is fairly clear. Having run into some static from New
Jersey, Michigan and District of
Columbia doctors at its House of
Delegates' Miami meeting last Dec.
2, the AMA's smaller board of
trustees met 10 days later at Chicago. Behind locked doors, it gave

itself a virtual blank check, limited only by the estimated $4,000,-00- 0
ceiling on funds available to
undermine the Social Security
hospitalization plan.
"Eldercare" and its several variations still incorporate some sort
of income means test, which clearly is no measure of hospital costs
for extended future illnesses. Nor
has any alternative to
been proposed that would so
effectively spread the mounting
risks of a people whose span continues to lengthen, while at the
same time restricting benefits to
the payroll tax levied to pay for
has been
them. Where Kerr-Miltried most widely is where the
"spots"
pamphlets and
will be most promptly discreditKing-Anders-

ls

one-minu- te

ed.
recent Gallup poll confirmed
that a majority of Americans want
legislation now. It
also showed that, no thanks to
the AMA, some would expect more
benefits than any such payroll plan
can provide. Hut the alternative if
AMA strategy works would be continued inadequacy. For that is what
the doctors will spend millions to
A

King-Anders-

preserve.
The St. Louis Fast

Barnhart in the University of Minnesota Daily

'Drab And Ugly'
In government, as in many places, the right hand frequently does
not know what the left hand is doing. While President Johnson stated
in his message on cities that "I
intend to take further steps to insure that Federal construction does
not contribute to drab and ugly

the agency resarchitecture,"
for Federal construction,
ponsible
the General Services Administration, was taking steps to guarantee that "drab and ugly" would
be the Federal norm.
The G.S.A. was just about to
break out of the drab and ugly
with some vastly improved designs.
A handful of important buildings
now in the construction and working-drawing
stage represent a spectacular breakthrough in the standards of governmental architecture.
Inasmuch as the Federal construction program puts up some of the
largest buildings in major American cities at the rate of $200 million a year, this is no small matter.
This miracle has occurred under
the direction of an able architect,
Karel Yasko, who came in during
the Kennedy Administration and
has bullied, bluffed, cajoled, teased and coaxed these projects
through to realization.

But now all this will be changed. The 1966 Federal budget proposes to cut Mr. Yasko's authority,
salary and freedom to make professional judgments by downgrading his present position and putconting it under

trol. If there is one thing that
G.S.A. does not need, it is more
administrative design decisions. Or
more pressure to turn architectural
commissions into political hay. O