xt7g7940t72z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7g7940t72z/data/mets.xml The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. 1976 bulletins  English The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletins Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletin, Vol. 52, No. 2, Autumn 1976 text Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletin, Vol. 52, No. 2, Autumn 1976 1976 2014 true xt7g7940t72z section xt7g7940t72z FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE
  QUARTERLY BULLETIN
‘ VOLUME 52 AUTUMN, 1976 NUMBER 2
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  THE THREE DIRECTORS OF FNS

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COVER PHOTOGRAPH I
"The Three Directors of FNS" — Mrs. 1
Mary Breckinridge, Miss Helen E.  
Browne, Dr. W. B. Rogers Beasley. At  
Wendover — 1958. 1
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  i ,
ERoNT1ER NURSING SERVICE QUARTERLY BULLETIN _
Published at the end of each quarter by the Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. a`
Wendover, Kentucky 41775 ·
Subscription Price $2.00 a Year I
Edit0r’s Office, Wendover, Kentucky 41775  
VOLUME 52 AUTUMN, 1976 NUMBER 2 3;
Second-class postage paid at Wendover, Ky. 41775 and at additional mailing offices  
Send Form 3579 to Frontier Nursing Service, Wendover, Ky. 41775 .  
Copyright 1977, Frontier Nursing Service, Inc.  
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  CONTENTS
  ARTICLE AUTHOR PAGE
  A New Look at Couriers Denny Doak 18
  , A REport)From the Boston Committee Elizabeth B. Dawson 39
us.
l A Tribute to Dr. Anne H.E.B. 21
gi American Public Health Association The Nation's Health 47
‘ [ » Convention
  ANA Primary Care Conference Lillian Link 13
= Beyond the Mountains 41
IY "Brownie" 3
_ Disaster Drill The Leslie County News 11
· Field Notes 53
? In Memoriam 27
I Leslie Coal Association Honors Edward A. Mattingly 37
 ~ Helen Browne Jack Maggard
` Old Courier News 23
Old Staff News _ 33
 · On Being a Volunteer Jim F ulmer 7
I Once Over Lightly W. B. Rogers Beasley 2
I "Painting in Wool" (lllus.) 29
E Reflections Goldie Davidson 5
  The City Committee Chairmen Kate Ireland 9
{ Meeting
f Trends in Infant Feeding: What Has Karen Gordon 14
Happened to Breast Feeding?
Q Settlement Institutions of Appalachia Denny Doak 31
l Urgent Needs 4
Brief Bits
A Shepherd’s Version of the The Countryman 48
· Twenty—Third Psalm
Q A Well-Known Conductor Modern Maturity 50
i Alabama Law 52
Artful Dodger Modern Maturity 36
Be Prepared Modern Maturity 36
e· Here I Sit. . . Mary Breckinridge 40
 i I Heard a Bird . . .(verse) William Alexander Percy 26
*  "In Recognition" KNA Newsletter 51
‘ Obvious, Really The Countryman 38
'  Real Heaven The Countryman 61
 I Rural Health Care Washington Post 49
 ‘ Sharing Modern Maturity 17
4 Snow on the Water The Countryman 26
 _ Statement of Ownership 63
i Sunday School Lesson Modern Maturity 10
\ Tabitha Modern Maturity 17
A Taste the Difference The Countryman 30
l "The Woman . . ." Oliver Wendell Holmes 22
Unsuspected Modern Maturity 50
Wanted The Countryman 10
. White Elephant 62
 

 ONCE OVER LIGHTLY ._
Since our October Board of Governors meeting, the administrative staff, with  
direction from Evelyn Peck, has been concentrating on several fiscal matters._  
Staffing patterns have been reviewed and staff allocated according to cost centers; ·’, •
a purchasing procedure was established to allocate supplies and equipment to  I
these cost centers; thus, departmental budgets will emerge for our next fiscal year. '
Controller Charles Thombury’s computerized billing service has significantly V
increased patient income, and the accompanying collection procedure designed by if "
Adminstrator Kenneth Palmer has been implemented by our cashiers and { =l_ .
business office staff.  
Payment for the services nurses provide is a persistent problem; we have  
continued meeting with Health Commissioner McElwain and Commissioner ff
- Huecker of Social Insurance to explore a proposal for servicebased reimbursement `
for Medicaid patients. Our legal counsel is reviewing an opportunity to enter a z
reimbursement demonstration for nurse practitioner services to Medicare .
patients. ;·
We report this intensive staff concentration on fiscal affairs in the same  
moment that we report the activities of our City Committees in Philadelphia (page Q
29) and Boston (page 39) for the support of the Frontier Nursing Service. A new {
activity of Leslie County support is reported by (Governor) Edward Mattingly Q.
(page 37). Y
Staff stability is improving but not yet optimal. The goal of at least a year’s ;
commitment for nurses (in the hospital, in the Primary Care Center, on the  
districts, in the Home Health Agency, and on the faculty) is about 80% achieved.  
By next summer we may need to replace two of our eight physicians.  
The faculty has worked unceasingly twelve months a year for the past six years  
in the expanded midwifery and family nursing program. A new School calendar  
has been developed which will provide the faculty some vacation time by limiting L
teaching to two semesters out ofthe possible threein each calendar year. Plans are  
drawn to initiate training of family nurses at district centers beginning in  
February of 1977, probably at Oneida and Beech Fork. Clinical space at Beech »
Fork is very limited, and we are searching for a method to expand that space. Q
Educational activities for the staff are not limited to the mountains. Three Q
` nurses attended a Nurse Practitioner Conference in Colorado (page 13); others the t
annual meeting of the Settlement Institutions of Appalachia (page 31). A  
summary of President-elect Carter’s speech to the American Public Health E
Association, attended by staff`, is presented on page 47. is
Following a discussion by the FNS Advisory Committee, and with the F_
recommendation of the Board of Govemors, staff is designing a questionnaire to  
identify and elucidate short and long range goals for the entire Service. These E.
questionnaires will be offered to Governors, Chairmen of Committees, local  
citizens and staff. ig:
There have been four recent surveys of FNS activities by both official and l
professional groups. A grant application has been filed by Dr. Gertrude Isaacs l
with the Bureau of Health Manpower, requesting support for the education ‘
program. Hospital occupancy has increased steadily and the number of outpatient ~
services are stable. Intensive effort and thought has been given by Denny Doak ’
(page 18) to the expansion of courier services. More and more community activities = 
are involving the hospital; a dramatic illustration is that of the Disaster Drill J
reported on page 11. The long-standing relationship with our older friends is  
described by Goldie Davidson on page 5.  
Cordially,  
LU.  Qvgns    
Director i

 l
» QUARTERLY BULLETIN 3
; , "BROWNIE"
gl "Dear Patsy,
  i` Thank you again for inviting me to your dinner party for
  Brownie. I had a delightful time and enjoyed every one there. No
  wonder the Frontier Nursing Service is such a success; it always
I has such special people working for it. No one could have been
i more perfect to carry on after Mrs. Breckinridge died than
j Brownie. I honestly feel her part of the continuing greatness of
; that Service is as great as any other person’s, even Mrs.
Q Breckinridge’s. She has seen it through those difficult, changing
f years when it could have just gone down in history, and is leaving
  it stronger, more qualified, more needed and able to cope with the
  changing world there. What a contribution for one woman to
  make! She can be very proud.
  Affectionately,
  /s/ Frances"
  .....
  Helen E. Browne—"Brownie"—will be leaving the Frontier
  Nursing Service in January of 1977. If ever a person has earned
  retirement it is Brownie but her friends are saddened by her
  decision.
ig Brownie’s address, after the middle of January, will be
l 2 Front Street
s  Milford, Pennsylvania 18337
  Brownie, the gratitude of those who know you best, and know
  best what you have done for Frontier Nursing Service and for
 ,  nursing, knows no bounds. Good luck and thanks for the
  memories.
·~\

 4 Fnormrn mmsmc smzvxcs ‘
URGENT NEEDS  _
2 Audiometers @ $297.50 each ................. $ 595.00 ~
At the ENT Clinic in early December, a total of 97 _
children were screened, and there will be a §  `
surgical follow-up in January for those needing 5
surgery. The audiometers are most urgently need- A
ed.
1 I-Vac .......................................... $ 759.00
An I-Vac is the instrument needed to control the -
rate of I.V. fluids and is extremely important for
obstetrical patients when an induction has to be
done, or to control the flow of fluids for infants
and other patients who may be dehydrated, or for
acutely ill patients who need precise control of l
fluids and medications. At present we have only *
one I-Vac and it is in such demand that we really ‘
must have a second.  
1 Large Food Mixer for the Dietary Depart- F
ment of the Mary Breckinridge Hospital ..... $1,525.00
This equipment is used for such things as meat
loaf, potatoes, donuts and cinnamon rolls. The
demand from the public for the cinnamon rolls
and donuts became so great that these two items
have had to be discontinued from the cafeteria Q
menu until larger equipment can be obtained.  ·
1 Spectrophotometer for the Laboratory at the  
Mary Breckinridge Hospital .................. $4,000.00  ·
For blood chemistries and other blood work  {
which presently must be sent to a laboratory in N
Lexington. Our excellent laboratory tech-  
nologists have increased the volume of work done
in the lab. and have decreased the work which :. 
must be referred elsewhere. A Spectrophotometer  
would decrease the work referred out even more. 1
All of these "urgent needs" will pay for themselves in time but .
our budget will not allow FNS to make the initial expenditure
without help. ‘

 I QUARTERLY BULLETIN 5
  , REFLECTIONS
 , by Goldie Davidson
·. · Today I visited the new hospital here in Hyden. As I sat in the
7 lobby, I noticed all the people passing back and forth—to see the
i doctor or to visit someone in the hospital, and I thought how good
it was to know that we have such a nice place to go when we need
help. Someone from almost every family in the county will depend
on the Mary Breckinridge Hospital for some sort of care or help
before a year is out.
Most people in this county knew Mrs. Breckinridge. She was
the greatest thing that ever happened to us. Before she came and
started the work at Wendover, people didn’t have any way to get
medical services. She loved all the people and wanted to help
I everyone. I can remember when families had no way of buying
 I food and all they had to do was to go to Wendover and she would
 “ give them some kind of work which would help them feed their
g families. When a woman was expecting a baby, all she had to do
  was visit one of the FNS clinics and register and from then on she
I was closely attended as long as she needed care—and, in the
beginning, the cost was only $5.00 or $10.00 for a new baby and a
nice big layette.
Mrs. Breckinridge was concerned about all of her patients. I
have seen tears in her big blue eyes when she was worried about a
I sick child—tears that she would wipe away on her apron. I can
. remember when she broke her back in a horseback accident but
.4  that didn’t stop her for long. She was like a cowboy—after a time
ji she was back on Teddy Bear, going about the job that needed to be
 I done! One time when she came to our house to visit it was so cold
 •> that her feet were frozen to the stirrups and daddy had to take a
{ hammer to break the ice before she could get off the horse. She
went through hell and high water for people here in this county
· and left a trail behind her, showing the good she had done. There
 . is Wendover, and the old Hyden Hospital, and all the outpost _
 ' centers, still helping people every day—doing all they can for us.
` Now let us try to help the FNS.
— I remember when a nurse would be called out for a home
, delivery. She would stay all night and into the next day to make
sure the mother and baby were safe—and she would cook and help
I with the other children while she was waiting for the mother to

 6 Fnommn NURSING smzvics
deliver the new baby. The FNS nurses have played a big part in
our lives and I know many of us remember this. These are good "
memories. At Christmastime Santa Claus would visit everyone in •
the community, sometimes at the pageant at Wendover,
sometimes on a sled drawn by "Old Blue", the Wendover mule. At i `
Easter, we would all go to Wendover for our annual egg hunt, with I
Mrs. Breckinridge there to see that we had a good time, and to
touch us all before we left. FNS made it possible for the young girls
in our community to learn to sew and knit and quilt and helped us
make clothing for school—and there was hot chocolate and
cookies at the end of the classes because Mrs. Breckinridge said
this would keep us warm on the way home. I can remember going v_ 
with her to feed her chickens when I would carry her basket and
help gather eggs. Once, on a winter day, when my father had to go
to the clinic at Wendover, Mrs. Breckinridge was afraid he was
cold so she found him an overcoat and a wool scarf and buttoned  
him up herself so he would be warm on the way home. »
You d0n’t forget things like that easily. It wasn’t just my  .
family—most of the older people who were here could tell how the Q
FNS has helped them and their families. Many of us will
remember others at Wendover—Agnes Lewis, Lucile Hodges,  
Betty Lester who is still with us in Leslie County and loved by ·
everyone. There were J ahugh Morgan and his wife, Belle, and Lee
Morgan, and Hobert Cornett who all spent many years at  V
Wendover. I wish I could remember them all because they were
good, faithful workers.
I wondered what in the world we would have done without our
hospital. Anyone who has not taken the time to visit the new .
hospital should do so and see what is being done there. One day I 5
walked into one of the rooms and saw an old lady holding the  ‘
hand of her son who was dying. If he had had to go to Harlan or  *i
Hazard or Lexington, she would not have been able to be with him i
and comfort him in the short time he had left. Sometimes we I
grumble and complain about things at the hospital but we always "
go back when we need help!  
The FNS needs our help now to continue to serve us. If each of I
us gave a small amount in remembrance of all the joy that has
come to us from FNS, it would be a large amount for FNS and I
would mean a better Christmas for us all.

 QUARTERLY BULLETIN 7
,_ ON BEING A VOLUNTEER
, by Jim Fulmer
, _ All my life I’ve heard and read about volunteers. Volunteers
volunteer for everything—wars, peace demonstrations, libraries,
V political campaigns, charity drives, fire departments, Rotary
Clubs, civic bands, even hospitals. There are so many volunteers
sniffing around for things to volunteer for that itis getting almost
as hard to land a job for no pay as it is to find paid employment.
When I received my degree in English from a fine liberal arts
college in Massachusetts, with extracurricular background in
»·  radio, TV, drama, writing and cartooning, I had three choices:
find a job for pay, find a reason to attend graduate school, or find
myself with no money and no clothes and no food. I opted for the
first choice. It took me a year to figure out that good jobs with pay
  are tough to get, even if you think you would be ten times as good
` as anyone else with a job. Finally, one organization did reply
L  favorably. They could offer room and board, and they offered a
R surprising number of other things I was looking for in a paying
  job. That was FNS, so here I am: a volunteer.
I During one of many enlightening conversations I have had
since my arrival in early September, it was suggested that in every
» job there are rewards. No matter how trivial a job may seem, at
· least there is always the pay check. Except for the volunteer. The
volunteer, by definition, looks for a reward other than money.
Most of the time the reward is "experience", whatever that means.
Other choice phrases include a chance to help people, a sense of
LQ responsibility, a need to leam.
 p The rewards of the volunteer are difficult to measure. In most
 gi cases, he (or she—let’s assume "he" means anyone) must know
T exactly what he wants as a reward in order to gauge how
 · successfully his time is being spent. The members of the organiza-
·. tion also must have a clear idea of how their time with the
  volunteer can reward them. It is the responsibility of the volunteer
, to inform the organization what talents he has and what rewards
he seeks; in other words, what he wants to get out of all this
y volunteer work. It is the responsibility of the organization to
determine where the volunteer can help the most and still reap the
benefits he desires. To do this well requires more effort than many
people already established in a paid job care to provide. Luckily

 6 Fnonnsn NURSING smzviois
deliver the new baby. The FNS nurses have played a big part in
our lives and I know many of us remember this. These are good l'
memories. At Christmastime Santa Claus would visit everyone in I
the community, sometimes at the pageant at Wendover,
. sometimes on a sled drawn by "Old Blue", the Wendover mule. At i `
Easter, we would all go to Wendover for our annual egg hunt, with
Mrs. Breckinridge there to see that we had a good time, and to
touch us all before we left. FNS made it possible for the young girls
in our community to learn to sew and knit and quilt and helped us I
make clothing for school—and there was hot chocolate and
cookies at the end of the classes because Mrs. Breckinridge said .
this would keep us warm on the way home. I can remember going  .
with her to feed her chickens when I would carry her basket and
help gather eggs. Once, on a winter day, when my father had to go
to the clinic at Wendover, Mrs. Breckinridge was afraid he was
cold so she found him an overcoat and a wool scarf and buttoned .
him up herself so he would be warm on the way home. 4
You don’t forget things like that easily. It wasn’t just my g
family—most of the older people who were here could tell how the ,
FNS has helped them and their families. Many of us will g
remember others at Wendover-Agnes Lewis, Lucile Hodges, i
Betty Lester who is still with us in Leslie County and loved by I
everyone. There were J ahugh Morgan and his wife, Belle, and Lee I
Morgan, and Hobert Cornett who all spent many years at .;
Wendover. I wish I could remember them all because they were »
good, faithful workers.
I wondered what in the world we would have done without our .
hospital. Anyone who has not taken the time to visit the new `
hospital should do so and see what is being done there. One day I  
walked into one of the rooms and saw an old lady holding the _ 
hand of her son who was dying. If he had had to go to Harlan or ”
Hazard or Lexington, she would not have been able to be with him
and comfort him in the short time he had left. Sometimes we .
grumble and complain about things at the hospital but we always . °‘
go back when we need help!  
The FNS needs our help now to continue to serve us. If each of *
, us gave a small amount in remembrance of all the joy that has ‘
come to us from FNS, it would be a large amount for FNS and p
would mean a better Christmas for us all.

 QUARTERLY BULLETIN 7
,_ ON BEING A VOLUNTEER
, by Jim Fulmer
, , All my life I’ve heard and read about volunteers. Volunteers
volunteer for everything—wars, peace demonstrations, libraries,
political campaigns, charity drives, fire departments, Rotary
Clubs, civic bands, even hospitals. There are so many volunteers
  sniffing around for things to volunteer for that itis getting almost
as hard to land a job for no pay as it is to find paid employment.
When I received my degree in English from a fine liberal arts
  college in Massachusetts, with extracurricular background in
 ` radio, TV, drama, writing and cartooning, I had three choices:
find a job for pay, find a reason to attend graduate school, or find
myself with no money and no clothes and no food. I opted for the
first choice. It took me a year to figure out that good jobs with pay
 i are tough to get, even if you think you would be ten times as good
V as anyone else with a job. Finally, one organization did reply
  favorably. They could offer room and board, and they offered a
{ surprising number of other things I was looking for in a paying
  job. That was FNS, so here I am: a volunteer.
. During one of many enlightening conversations I have had
since my arrival in early September, it was suggested that in every
° job there are rewards. No matter how trivial a job may seem, at
L least there is always the pay check. Except for the volunteer. The
` volunteer, by definition, looks for a reward other than money.
Most of the time the reward is ‘ ‘experience", whatever that means.
I Other choice phrases include a chance to help people, a sense of
, responsibility, a need to learn.
  The rewards of the volunteer are difficult to measure. In most
 s cases, he (or she—let’s assume "he" means anyone) must know
exactly what he wants as a reward in order to gauge how
successfully his time is being spent. The members ofthe organiza-
1-. tion also must have a clear idea of how their time with the
  volunteer can reward them. It is the responsibility ofthe volunteer
, to inform the organization what talents he has and what rewards
~ he seeks; in other words, what he wants to get out of all this
volunteer work. It is the responsibility of the organization to
I determine where the volunteer can help the most and still reap the
benefits he desires. To do this well requires more effort than many
people already established in a paid job care to provide. Luckily

 s moxmaa Nuasmo smavios
for me, at FNS people have been willing to spend time explaining
things and helping me start towards my interests. *·
One of the hardest questions to answer for many volunteers is 1
"what exactly are you doing here?" One reason is that some
volunteers have no descriptive title. "Courier" satisiies most  *
people. So does "administrator", "nurse", "secretary", "doctor".
The role of a volunteer is often nebulous. All "volunteer" tells you =
is that you’re not getting paid for whatever in heaven’s name  
you’re doing. Try to explain exactly what you do without using  
your descriptive title! 1
From September to December a descriptive title in my case  
might have been "Observer and Health Education Initiate". ’
When I iirst arrived I worked in seven or eight departments in the
hospital and in home health to get an overall picture of the FNS
system. This, in addition to helping with brief radio spots in .· 
p Hazard and working in the audio-visual department, has . 
prepared me for working on Special Health Education Projects. Q 
One of the projects in which FNS is interested is to begin a radio  *
serial, the content of which is undetermined. Other projects  5
include newspaper articles on many of the departments in FNS,  ’
various audiovisuals, and an attempt at creating brief animated  
cartoons. These activities are chiefly in collaboration with the  
health education department. Ideas, suggestions, advice from the =}
staff or from former staff members are indispensable.  .
Now that I have "made it" in the volunteer world, I believe I  
can safely suggest a systematic approach to volunteerism for 3 
budding volunteers:  
1. Know why you are volunteering  
2. Know your talents  j
3. Know the organization you are getting into  I _
V 4. Make sure the organization knows what you want to get out F'?
of volunteering and what talents you have
5. Work with the organization to create an appropriate
program that suits your needs and theirs _ °l
6. Do what you came to do. Q 
It will take more than three months to become a veteran volunteer  b
at FNS. There are plenty more months to come. Bring on 1977I Q

 QUARTERLY BULLETIN 9
,_ THE CITY COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN
1 MEETING
By Kate Ireland
At the suggestion of the Development Committee of the FNS
, Board of Governors, all of the FNS City Committee Chairmen
; were invited to Wendover last September for a two day meeting.
  Six cities (Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Lexington, Louisville and
  Washington) were represented by nine committee members, four
We  of whom were chairmen. Members ofthe Blue Grass Committee in
  Lexington showed true "Southern Hospitality" by meeting the
out-of-state members at the airport and giving them "bed and
breakfast". Everyone arrived at the Mary Breckinridge Hospital
_,  in time for lunch in the cafeteria where Dr. Beasley and I outlined
 , the plans for the visit.
 ’ As the district nurses, stationed at the outpost centers, are the
{  vital link in the FNS system of health care, trips to the centers
Qi  were first on the schedule. The group was divided with three
 » people going to Beech Fork, three to Bob Fork and the remaining
 · three to Brutus. Of the nine committee members, three were ex-
  couriers, two had visited before, and four had come for their first
  visit to FNS. All returned to Wendover that evening more
Q; knowledgeable of the capabilities of the family nurse and full of
ig  enthusiasm for the district work.
ij  During tea, Brownie was asked to give an account of her
t,_. audience with H. M. Queen Elizabeth II when she was presented
  with the insignia of a Commander of the British Empire. A
  delicious Wendover dinner was followed by lengthy discussions
 V on donors, Hnances and couriers. The inevitable questions were
L;} asked: "How do we find new donors? How can we interest people
in contributing to the FNS when they are so far removed from the
Held of action?" Dr. Beasley and Brownie discussed some of the
·; changes in the FNS program and the increase in expenses. An
j_  explanation was given as to why nurses are not reimbursed for
  their services by third party payors and the reasons, therefore,
{  that there is a specific need for an increase in contributions to
jj cover the delivery of health care. Methods of stimulating interest
  and raising money by various cities were reported and
  suggestions were made as to how the courier program could be
‘ made more meaningful.

 10 raormm NURSING ssnvicrz  Q
On Friday morning there was a comprehensive tour of the  i
Mary Breckinridge Hospital, including the new dentistry depart-   _·
ment, the new mental health clinic, and the new Home Health ·_ 
Agency at the old hospital. The committee members then saw a
film made by the Kentucky Educational Television and a carousel  i~
of slides which could be used in the various cities. At the final  
windup, more questions were asked, more suggestions made and  ·
challenges were given. All of the committee members spoke ofthe  
enthusiasm and dedication of the FNS staff who combined  Q
efficiency with compassion for their patients. As one committee Y
member stated: "I’ve never believed in ghosts, but if they exist,  E
then surely the ghost or spirit of Mary Breckinridge, and all of  
those who believed in her and followed her, is very much in ’
evidence."  
Sunday School Lesson , 
The youngster was telling his family about his Sunday school 5
lesson: Moses crossing the Red Sea.  ,_
"Moses had his engineers build a pontoon bridge across the  ¥
sea," he related. "Then his people crossed it. Then his recon-  {
naissance planes radioed and told him an Egyptian tank corps  
was about to cross the bridge, too. So Moses ordered his jets to y 
blow the bridge up. They did. So Moses and his people were safe."  ,;
"Are you sure that’s how your Sunday school teacher told the J, 
story?" asked his father.  _
"Well, not exactly," admitted the boy. "But the way she told it,  
you wouldn’t believe it!"  
—M0dern Maturity, August-September 1974 ll
‘Wanted,’ said the notice in the village shop window, ‘a chest of  =
old fashioned drawers: any size and condition suitable for ~
painting,’ —Mrs. E. Pellew-Harvey, Lincs. i
—The Countryman, Spring 1976 Edited by .
Crispin Gill, Burford, Oxfordshire, England. ‘
Annual subscription for American readers  `
$7.50 checks on their own banks.  

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The place: Hyden Elementary School.
l The time: Approximately 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, November 9.
‘ Twenty eighth graders lay strewn across the hard tile floor of
A the main lobby, a mass of bodies and limbs and hair. Some
coughed, some moaned, a few simply collapsed against a wall and
_; stared. Suddenly, one girl, bent over with what seemed like severe
ig stomach pains, straightened up. "Do we keep acting after the
ambulance takes us to the hospital?"
· The unusual scene was in preparation for a disaster drill held
.»'_ by the Frontier Nursing Service in cooperation with the Leslie
_ County 4H Extension Service, the Hyden Elementary School, the
Walker Funeral Home ambulance service and the State Highway
Patrol.
  According to Mary Breckinridge Hospital Administrator Ken
i-  Palmer, the semi-annual drills serve a dual purpose. First, they
i allow hospital personnel to design or reform a plan for handling a
 t large number of emergency cases in the hospital that would
5  realistically meet the need of the community. Second, frequent
 · repetitions of the drills assure people in the area that the hospital
2 is ready to serve them in case of a real disaster.

   l
On the morning of the mock fire, 4H County Extension Agent ;
Rufus Fugate briefed twenty members of Mrs. Regina Sizemore’s ,
eighth grade class on what to expect. Each "casualty" wore a tag  ,
noting the injury and was instructed on how a patient with such
injuries would react. Later, upon notification that a twenty 1 ~
casualty "fire" had taken place, appointed head nurse Lillian
Link began implementing the hospital disaster plan. Each
member of the staff had an assigned task or role to play during the
entire operation, from the employees in the business office to the
doctors and nurses to the switchboard operator. Two nurses were H
sent to the school to determine the order in which patients would
be sent to the hospital emergency room.
Then the action began. Ambulances arrived. A girl choked and l
gasped desperately. Several "burned" casualties cringed when
touched. There was one boy "dead" on arrival. The hospital staff
lined up at the emergency door and wheeled the patients into the j
emergency room for initial assessment. From there, the casualties T
were sent to various other departments for further treatment. In _. 
less than an hour and a half, what had been a collection of  
staggering, gagging, burn and smoke inhalation victims sat in g
p the hospital cafeteria drinking punch and gulping cookies. .
For the eighth graders, the experience was over, except for oral  
reports to other classes about the morning’s events. "I’ve never E
been in an emergency room before," said one. Another wondered L
T what it would be like in a real disaster. But for the hospital, the
experience was just beginning. Soon after the drill ended, Dr. ·
David Coursin, Lillian Link, and hospital switchboard operator ~
Sue Hightower recommended several alterations in the old ·
disaster plan. Peggy Burden, Nursing Care Coordinator, noted
that "even though you’re playing somewhat, it (the drill) does `
rehearse people and has to sharpen procedures." There would be  d
extensive reviews of the plan and a staff meeting to discuss how to  _;
utilize more effectively the hospital facilities to meet the need of g ,
casualties during a real disaster. Drills similar to the one on  “
Tuesday will be prepared again in the future, says Mr. Palmer, `
but, for now, the Frontier Nursing Service thanks again all those
A who organized and participated in last week’s drill