xt7g7940vp37 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7g7940vp37/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670328  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7g7940vp37 section xt7g7940vp37 Tie Kentucky Kernel
The Soulh's Outstanding College Daily

Tuesday Evening, March 28, 1907

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

m
i

A. B.

"HAPPY" CHANDLER IN

A

FAVORITE POSE

'Happy,' On The Go,
Points To His Record

By JOHN ZEH
Kernel Associate Editor
When A. B. "Happy" Chandler talks about wanting to be governor of Kentucky, he talks about the future, but he also discusses
the past.
"I've plowed this ground be
Speaking before a statewide fi
fore," the colorful Kentucky po- Kappa Alpha convention reChandler
litician remindsyou,"andIknow cently, the
lectured, "I took a generation of
where the stumps are."
Having twice served as gov- young men down there (to Frankernor, Mr. Chandler has a uni- fort) with me in 1935 so we could
operate state government soberly,
que position among the candidates in the Democratic primary. sensibly, and decently. Many are
still there, or have gone on to
better things."
Primary Profiles
"Records are what count, not
opinions," he went on. "I've had
He not only can talk about promises the future holds for youth 13 wins and two losses in stateas do his opponents, but also wide races over 40 years. Man
of War did slightly better."
can boast of his past accomplishIn other talks, Mr. Chandler
ments as the commonwealth's
has indicated he feels the state
chief executive.
The oldest candidate entered, is giving too large a share of
he realizes "this is not a dash, its educational funds to colleges
but a distance run," and that and universities, and not enough
he must find a special way to to elementary and secondary
appeal to youth. Hence, he uses schools. The "feeder" systems
he past record as proof of his need more money and, he told
Assincerity and intentions of the the Kentucky School Boards resociation this month, "if this
next four years.
quires us to readjust the delicate balance of appropriate funds,
then we must be prepared to take
the necessary steps."
He reiterated his statement by
telephone Monday, pointing out
that he feels a strong foundation is necessary if a student is
Special To The Kernel
to get the most out of college.
ANN ARBOR, Mich. ob-ben
"Although I strongly endorse
Fleming, chancellor of the our programs for continuing proUniversity of Wisconsin, was gress in higher education," he has
named president of the Universaid, "I believe it is growing inof Michigan today.
sity
creasingly apparent that we once
Fleming's appointment ends again focus our attention toward
speculation around the Univermaintaining high standards for
the elementary and secondary
sity and Lexington that the Michigan post would be offered to feeder systems."
UK President John Oswald.
"We must pay serious attenattortion to the growing need for inFleming, a
creased classroom facilities, for
ney and a labor relations expert
before entering the field of higher
e
centers operated through
education, was selected by the the public schools, and for specUniversity of Michigan Board of ial education and vocational education."
Regents and immediately acCritical of Kentucky's financcepted the post.
Michigan won out over the ial status since he left the Governor's Mansion, Mr. Chandler
University of Minnesota in bidding for Fleming's services. Mincalls the state debt a "Mortgage"
nesota had offered him an idention youth's future. He labeled the
cal post.
state sales tax "the meanest one
UK's Dr. Oswald was reported in the U.S." because there are
in consideration for the post last no exemntions.
fall when the list of contenders
"Now I'm not talking about
The lists
numlered
getting rid of it (the tax). But
to the regents by faculty, (money can be saved) by reoralumni, and student committee ganizing government. You cannot
originally numbered about 200. continue to tax, tax, tax, spend,
At Michigan, Fleming will spend, spend."
The former governor, who also
succeed Harlan Hatcher, 69, who
served six years in the U.S. Senis retiring after 15 years as head
ate and as commissioner of baseof the nation's 13th largest unithe Pike speech he
versity. The university has 34 ,000 ball, said in
students.
Continued On Pate 7

Fleming Named

To Presidency
At Michigan

-R-

day-car-

75-10-

d

Vol. LVIII, No. 122

100 Hear SG Candidates
Fire Their Opening Salvos
As Election Date Nears

Nearly 100 students heard the
leading candidates for the top
positions in Student Government
restate their platforms last night.
During adebate, sponsored by
the governing body of the men in
the complex, the candidates proceeded to expound their positions
with only limited conflict with
their opponents.
"There is not a whole lot
of difference in the platforms,"
Sheryl Snyder, candidate for
president said, "but the differences are pretty important."
Steve Cook, another presidential candidate, said that he did
not agree with this point.
The candidates supported by
SDS, and the newest addition
to the field, Dave Holwerk, an
independent, were not participants in the debate, but were
present.
Holwerk's handouts refer to
his position as a "Kernel colum-

nist."

Holwerk has written an occasional humor piece for The
Kernel but is not a staff member. His column has been stopped
while he is a political candidate,
according to Kernel Editor
Walter M. Grant.
Snyder, running on a ticket
with Kendall Thrclkeld, inserted
three new planks in their platform.

Cook opposed the enactment
of old projects that Student Government has not carried out in
the past year.
He said that he would like to
see the formation of a summer
employment service, noting that
the old serv ice "didn't have time

to function."
He said that they should go
to work now to form a system

for next summer.
He also said that there should
be a housing placement and rating service on campus.
Miss Threlkeld said that one
of the reasons that "Student
Government isn't recognized as
a governing body is it isn't in-

fluential enough."
She proposed that Student

Government form an academic
review board because "too many
students receive grades they honestly don't deserve."
She also said that the Student
Publications Board "should take
a more active role in the managing of The Kernel and the forming of the staff."
Both parties have planks in
their platform which deal with
the parking problem, but Snyder
said that this is one area where
there is a difference between the
two proposals.
"You can see exactly what we
want to do," he said. "We re
not just talking out of our hats."
He said that he has sent a
letter to Attorney General Robert
Continued on Page

2

United States Accepts
Thant Peace Proposal

BULLETIN
UNITED NATION'S, N.Y. The United States disclosed today
that it has accepted U. Thant's latest Vietnam peace proposals
calling for a general truce. It said it was prepared to begin discussions immediately to work out details.
The response of the U.S. to it would be desirable and con- Thant's plan was made public tributory to serious negotiations
if an effective cessation of hostilishortly after the U.N.
unveiled his plan ties, as the first element in the
general
three-poiat a news conference.
proposal, could be
In short, the plan envisages promptly negotiated.
to be followed by prea cease-fir- e
"It would, therefore, be esliminary talks aimed at conven- sential that the details of such
ing a new Geneva peace con- a general cessation of hostilities
ference.
be discussed directly by both
Thant said he sent his pro- sides or through the secretary-generathe Geneva conference
posals to all of the parties director otherwise as may
ly concerned on March 14 and
that some had replied. He said be agreed.
he did not consider any of the
"The United States is preanswers as a categorical rejec- pared to enter into such distion.
cussions immediately and conThe U.S. reply said:
structively."
The U.S. note said it was
"The United States accepts
the three-ste- p
proposal in the assumed that the government
of the secretary-generof South Vietnam would be "apof March 14, 1967.
propriately involved through"The United States believes out the entire process."
secretary--

nt

First, he said that he would
act to reinstate the names of the
instructors in the schedule book.
The omission of these names
is new this semester.
He said he has recognized a
need for a shuttle bus on campus and would support action
to form such a system.
Snyder said that he was also
opposed to forcing sophomores
to stay in the dorms as is planned
next year.
"Any type of movement made
by the University that will force
sophomores to live in the dorms
we will oppose as violation of
students rights," he said.

l,

aide-memoi-

al

Knapp, Graler Named Editors
William F. Knapp Jr., a second year law student from Dry
Ridge, and Thomas W. Graler,
a junior English major from Cincinnati, were elected yesterday
as editors of The Kernel and
respectively.
The Board of Student Publications unanimously accepted
the recommendations of committees that screened candidates for
the two positions.
Knapp has a wide range of
Kernel experience ranging from
his days as an undergraduate
sports writer to business manager, a job he has held for the
last three semesters.
attended the
The editor-elec- t
of Massachusetts for
University
three semesters and transfered to
UK as a sophomore after service
in the U.S. Army.
Of Knapp, Walter Grant, retiring Kernel editor, said, "His
experience in journalism is extremely broad, and he has demonstrated deep perspective on the
problems of newspaper work and
the major problems facing both
the University and the world. 1
think he is well qualified to as
Ken-tucki-

sume the duties and responsibilities of Kernel editor."
Knapp said he "was deeply
honored to be selected editor
of the South's 'outstanding college daily' at a time when many
of its most capable staff members
are returning. I view the year
ahead as one of tremendous opportunity and promise."
Graler has served on the Ken- -

trff
l

'

i

'

WILLIAM KNAPP JR.

tuckian staff for two years, currently as associate editor. He is
a corridor adviser in Bowman
Hall and is on the Honors Program Advisory Committee.
Sam Abell, outgoing Kyian
editor, said Craler had set himself apart from the staff by his
performance and was the obvious
choice for the position.
Continued On Page

p

TT

-

8

1

THOMAS GRALER

* KEKNF.L, Tucvl.i), Manli 28,

Till; KENTl'CKV

J

l!Ci7

Four Selected For Quiz Bowl Trip
Four students were chosen
Monday night to represent UK
on the General Klcctric College
Howl in May.
Fred Christensen, senior history major; Dave Mathews, senior
English major; Charles Nichols,
senior zoology major; and lk)b
Howell, freshman history major
will be the four students sent
to New York.
These four were chosen from
a team of eight students who
had shown superior ability in
the UK Quiz Bowl. There had
been three previous practice
rounds to see how the eight
members competed against each

first was a science round. These
questions were answered on an
individual basis.
After these scores were

tab-

ulated there were four more
rounds played, but this time a
team basis. For each of the four
rounds, the teams were rearranged so that the teams were

composed of different members
each round.
The final choice of the team
was left up to the Forum Committee and Dr. Robert K. Thorp,
associate professor of journalism.
"The decision was a hard one
to make," said Laura Muntz,
chairman of the Forum Com-

mittee. "However, we had to
Monday night's session was consider the different areas which
divided into five rounds. The we need someone in."
other.

v

X

"All the students who participated had a phcnominal amount
of knowledge covering a variety
of fields, that is why the decision was a difficult one to
make' Miss Muntz added.
Since the team is made up of
three seniors and one freshman,
the problem had arisen with what
to do if the team should win its
first three games in New York.
The College Bowl does not run
over the summer and its rules
do not permit graduating seniors
to return to finish the final round.
Miss Muntz said in case this
should happen, the three other
undergraduates who comprised
the team of eight would go as
the alternates.

,

i

--

Ai

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1

"

h

:

1

L

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L
PERCEY FOREMAN

WHITNEY YOUNG JR.

Foreman, Young, Combs
Highlight Law Program

an Urban League
nationally known criminal trial lawyer,
will be among the speakofficial and a former Kentucky governor,
Day program Friday and Saturday.
ers for the annual
subject will be "New Challenges
observance
Tim lfith annual
the College of Law also will In Civ il Rights."
by
A news conference has been
feature an awards luncheon, a
followand the finals of the scheduled by Mr. Young
symposium,
the luncheon, at about 3
school's mock trial series that ing
p.m., in the Student Center.
legan last fall.
Former Kentucky Governor
Percy Foreman, noted HousBert Combs, recently nominated
ton trial attorney, will be the
by President Lyndon Johnson to
keynote speaker at 8 p.m. Fria federal judgeship on the 6th
day in Memorial Hall. In 1966 U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals,
defended Mrs.
he successfully
will be the speaker at the annual
Candacc Mossier of Miami, Fla.,
Day Banquet at 6
of her
accused of the murder
p.m. Saturday at the Phoenix
husband, in a trial that attracted Hotel Convention Hall. A renationwide attention.
ception will follow.
A reception for Mr. Foreman
At 10 a.m. on Saturday a
will be held following the speech,
symposium on "Legal Aid and
at about 10 p.m., in the law colthe Poor" will be held in the
lounge.
lege's student-facultlaw college courtroom.
At 12:30 p.m. Saturday WhitPanelists will be Earl Johnney Young, executive director of
son Jr., director of Legal Services
the National Urban League,
Program, Office of Economic OpWashington, will address an anportunity, Washington; Jean C.
Stunual awards luncheon in the
Cahn, professor of law at Howard
dent Center Ballroom.
University; T. Edward Austin,
Mr. Young, a native of Kenpublic defender, Jacksonville,
Fla., and Samuel Milner, a Lextucky, has been executive director of the League since 1961. His
ington attorney.
A

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FOR

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BOOK

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or
Must be 20 or over. Call
ask for Mrs. Buchignani.
Salary open. Male or female. 9Mtf

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claimed in Room 9 Kinkead Hall,
through Friday, 8 a.m. till
Monday 1
5 p.m.
black umbrella; 1 clear
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ladies gloves; 2 textbooks;
gloves;
notebook; 1 pair ladies glasses.

HELP! Babysitter needed.
boy. Tuesday and Thursday, 2:45-4:0- 0
for rest of semester. My home near
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IN COMPLEX DINING ROOM
A

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Production

Antonioni's

100 Hear SG Candidates
Restate Their Platforms
Continued From Page

1

Matthews about the legitimacy
of towing away student cars and
expects an answer soon.
Both sets of candidates have
said that they will work to have
the planning and construction
of the student parking garage
hurried.
Rafael Vallebona, Cook's running mate, said that Student
Centur,

0i

LOW-U- P
Vanessa Redgrave
COLOR
Recommended

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for mature audiences

Premier Productions Co., Inc. Keleose

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SHOWING!

Career in the Airlines?

A representative of American Airlines will be on
campus

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 1967
for employment interviews.

The girls will flock to meet the
Kingsmen ... so head them off!
$2.00 per person
Tickets: Complex Office & Student Center
Call 1110 for information
Sponsored by Coopcrstown Complex

ni

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Pontiac Hearse. DeCall
pendable transportation.
all day weekends, after 6 p.m.,
23M5t
weekdays.
FOR SALE 1959 Porsche Super convertible. Red, with red leather upholstery; radio; 62,000 miles. ExcelOwner has new
lent condition.
27M5t
Porsche. Call
FOR SALE
Four tickets to Andy
Williams' show on April 6 in Louisville. Will sell all or part. Call
28Mlt
at night.
1959, 1006
FOR SALE
3 tops,
left rear fender damaged.
Call Leland
Runs good.
FOR SALE

Law-Alum-

The Airline is looking for a qualified secretary
for a position in their Louisville Sales Office.
Basic requirements: typing 60 wpm; shorthand
110 wpm; good English and composition; personable; good telephone speaking voice. For
further information contact Placement Director,
or sign up for interview in the Placement Office.

Government ought to consider
"rejoining a regional or national
organization" similar to the National Student Association.
Their platform states that Student Government "should take
stands on local and national importance" that relate to stands.
At present this practice is
not carried out. Snyder has not
taken a stand on this matter,
however.

"Our platform was not formed
to impress people during election," Cook said.
Miss Threlkeld, expressing
much the same feeling, said the
proposals she made were "not
limp sounding ideas we wrote
down to impress you. We really
believe in these things."
The hotest the debate got
was when Carson Porter, the
incumbent SG president, questioned a statement Vallebona
had made concerning the nonprofit book store proposal of the
past election.
The excitement "soon ceased,
however, when neither party
could corner the other.

The Kentucky

1ernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University ol Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 49ttfl.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

RATES

$8.00
Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files
$.10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports ....
News Desk
Advertising, Business,
Circulation

2321
2320
2447
231$

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, TikmI.iv. M.imIi

2H. IW.- 7- ;

Caped Crusader' Enters SG Campaign

The list of candidates for Student Government president revv to four this week
as David II. Holwerk, A & S sophomore,
announced.
Running without a vice president, Holwerk said he will endorse all of those students now running for the secondary slot.
"I feel it is time the Populist Agrarian
element on this campus receives some responsible leadership," he charged.
Claiming full sincerity in his campaign
(which many consider a joke), Holwerk
outlined a simple, straightforward campaign

sity we hope to get to the seat of recent
Student unrest," Holwerk had "nocomment"
when asked what he was referring to.
The English major from Lexington explained
plans as directed at
comparing UK toilets to the
"perfect toilet" designed by an architect at Cornell University last year on a federal grant.
"Loudly" and "in costume" the new
candidate promised to campaign. In filing
his application for office he signed his name
"David (Brand X.) Holwerk."
"My sincerity is surpassed only by my good
platform:
looks," the frequent campus pundit and puns"I'm running with the endorsement oft he ter recently recovered from mononucleosis
Big John Potty (sic). My campaign program exclaimed. "1 also think my chances forelec-tioconsists of kissing babies and inspecting
are increasing every day liecause the
toilets on campus.
other candidates refuse to accept me as a
"By inspecting every toilet at the Univer serious contender."
"ins-ction-

"

d

n

DAVID HOLWERK

"Caped Crusader"

From Tuesday until election day (April
Holwerk plans to wear a "voluminous"
cape to classes proclaiming himself as the

()).

"('aped Crusader."

He said he plans "to confront other candidates with the issues at every opirtunit "
He would not elaborate on what tliese
"issues are." Holwerk made his first
at a debate between leading contenders Steve Cook and Sheryl Snyder at the
Dormitory Complex.
The new candidate candidly said were he
elected, he "would give Steve Cook half the
money and let him run it. As Kenneth Bould-insaid, you have to be crazy to want
political Kwer. I'm not crazy."
Why is he running? "It's a gas!"
"In reality I've dropped down to
six hours and I don't have anything to do."
.

g

Murrell, Wheeler Platform Favors
Beer, Lottery Instead Of Vote
A
campaign platform including selection of Student Government representatives by a random lottery was announced Monday by one of the four slates
vying for the SG top administration.

The

candidates,

William

Murrell and Martin Wheeler, both
endorsed and at least partially
sponsored by Students for a
Democratic Society, said the
lottery method is "the most accurate way possible of choosing
a Student Government which is

truly representative."
The representation plan, one
of seven points of the SDS drafted
platform, is based on the premise
that "the average guy on campus
can do just as good a job of
representing the students as the

Candidates
Murrell
and
Wheeler promised an investigation of the legality of serving
beer in the Student Center and
fraternity house. The candidates
said they will reopen and investigate the argument that state
law forbids beer on University
property.
Pledging support for the Off
Campus Student Association,
Murrell and Wheeler said they
would urge OCSA to implement
a program to force a reduction
in rental rates. The candidates
said they would investigate the
rationale for on campus rent rates,
and resist "any administration
attempt to force any class of
students to live in dormatories."
Concerning the Student Center, the candidates said they
would reopen the coffee house,
and endorsed longer opening
hours, dancing in the grille, and
a wider selection of food.

student politician
types who inevitably end up
being the only ones to run for
election."' According to the plan,
names would be drawn from the
Claiming experience in carrystudent directory and an arbitrary
number would be named repre- ing out programs, the candidates
said they would initiate such
sentatives by a computer.
cooperative programs as bookPositions for SG president and stores, housing units, and cafevice president would still be terias. "If the administration
selected by a popular election, the does not find it feasible to support
this (cooperative bookstore), we
candidates said.
Other topics of the platform
include beer in the Student Center, a rent reform, cooperative
bookstores, cafeteria, and housing units, the merger of AWS
and SG, use of the Student Center, and SG allocations.

KENTUCKY TYPEWRITER
SERVICE Authorized Dealer

Olivetti Portable Typewriters
Sales, Service and Rentals
Carbons, Ribbons, Office Supplies
Sales E.W. & LB. McDaniel
387 Rose St., Lexington,
7

will run it in competition with
the University bookstore," the
platform says.
The candidates
endorsed
elimination of the dichotomy between men and women, and promised uniform regulations for
men and women, and use of
alcoholic beverages in dorms. The
platform says the merger of AWS
and SG is consistent with the
merger of the Deans of Men and
Women and attempts to eliminate
the dichotomy between men and
women.

The candidates criticized SG's
allocation of funds to student
groups, saying, "We do not feel
that the average student enjoys
any benefits from his
nly
not the full value."

w VI
Maliivies Campaigns On Campus

Robert Matthews, standing at left, a candidate for lieutenant governor, came to the University Monday with his pledge to "get young
people interested and involved" in state government. Introducing him
to students in the Grille is Charles Ben Ashby, a UK student.

money-certai-

DICK
GREGORY
Humorist
Civil Rights Leader

Speaking on
BLACK POWER
A

Thursday, March 30
8 p.m.
Memorial Hall
Admission Free
Sponsored by
Student Government
Student Center Board

252-020-

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OHIO
U.

U.( Ohio

BOWLING GREEN SU.
UNIVERSITY

U.

EASTERN KY. U.

W.VIRGINIA

U.

.of CINCINNATI
OF KENTUCKY

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* The Kentucky

Iernel

The Smith's Outstanding College Daily

Univf.rsity of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

TUESDAY, MAHCH 28, 1907

1894

Editorials represent

t)c ojnnions

Waltkh

of the Editors, not of the University.

M. GnANT,

Editor-in-Chi-

William

Sikvf. IUxco, Editorial Vagc Editor

KNArr, Business Manager

War Crimes, 1967
and their

Bertrand Husscll's plan to hold

a

"trial" in London to investigate

"war crimes" charges against President Johnson and other American

officials has received considerable
publicity in the nation's press on
"slow" news days.
Of course, no one takes the
philosophers trial seriously and
hardly anyone thinks about war
crimes anyway. After all, you can't
decide who has committed a crime
until the war has ended.

their homes destroyed
country ravaged. The Administration has built a case about how all
of this is just as necessary in Vietnam and how we are doing it all
for their own good.

But one historical point interests us.

The prevailing logic of the commission which heard the cases of
Nazi "war criminals" at Nuremberg was that regardless of whom
the order came from, the individual
had a responsibility to humanity
not to obey a criminal order.

International law notwithstanding, war crimes are something
charged to the vanquished by the
victors. We merely raise the quesHitler, of course, was never
to point up what may have tried at Nuremberg. But if one
tion
occurred to others when they view accepts the principle of the chain
of command and allegiance to the
the American role in Vietnam.
Fatherland that was embeded in
Gen. David M. Shoup, the reeach German from birth, Hitler
tired Commandant of the U.S.
and Hitler alone was responsible
Marine Corps strongly stated his
for he gave the orders.
case last May when speaking to
a gathering of young people:
"Not so," said the court of
"You're preached to, that it is nec- world opinion. "The German peoessary that we have our armed ple committed crimes against the
forces fight, get killed and maimed, world," logic at that time went,
and kill and maim other human "and they should be punished."
beings including women and chil- Thus we, the Allies, the victors
dren because now is the time we in World War II, deal with the
must stop some kind of unwanted question of which should be
ideology from creeping up on this obeyed the order or one's connation . . .
science. A man must follow his
own conscience, for in the final
"The reasons fed to us (for
doing this) are too shallow and instance a man is responsible to
narrow for students, as well as other humanity and not to the FatherI believe that if we land.
citizens
had and would keep our dirty,
This brings us to Vietnam.

...

fingers out

bloody,
of the business of these nations so
The U.S. Government has at
full of depressed, exploited people, its legal disposal a means to punish those who refuse to accept its
authority. Five years for the draft
dodger, hard labor for the private
who won't shoot at "Charlie," no
White House invitations for the
maverick senator, and so on down
the line.
dollar-crooke-

d

"We've Shown That We're Willing
To Go More Than Half Way"
Letters To The Editor

Sivartz Gave

Non-Repl-

Editor's Note: The current debate between Mr. Urquhart and Mr.
Swartz began as a result of a decision by Dr. Frederick J. Fleron,
instructor of political science at the
University, to seek impeachment
g
of two
officials of the
Americal Political Science Association because they were involved in
the multi-millio- n
dollar CIA fund
controversy. In Letters to the Editor
earlier this month, Swartz took a
stand opposed to Fleron s actions,
whereas Urquhart defended Flerhigh-rankin-

on s actions.
To the Editor of the Kernel:
I was pleased to see in the
March 23 Kernel that Karl Swartz

had written another of his letters
on the topic of "Many Fallacies
We Often Make." Again, Ignora-ti- o
Elenchi and Ad Hominem are
Yet, if we are to follow the
well represented. But by far the
logic we helped impose upon the
vanquished, all of this is ridicu- main attraction was the exhibition
of

lous.

non-repl-

y.

This is when a reply is not a
reply to anything, and thus must
be a
The example goes
like this: Swartz thinks
the doctrines and interpre"that
something
but he
tations it has created are more just that my point is
and compelling than those of the disagrees with it, maintaining his
United Nations" and that "the original position. But his original
United States increasingly has be- position is in disagreement with
come the sole judge of the necesmy main point, and one would
and merit of its own actions." have thought that if it was well
sity
taken that he would be in agreeThe whole situation is highly
ment with it. However, his disamusing, of course, since one who
is in basic agreement
has studied history could never agreement
with my main point, which perbuild a case for the United States
indicates why he feels it is
as a
world power. haps
well taken. Therefore we can conThe facts are quite the opposite. clude
that he disagrees with a well
We play the rough and tough game
taken point, but is in agreement
of world power, and we play it
with it, and maintains a position
well.
which in contrary to it; or, he
When someone gets in our way maintains his disagreement with a
. . . well, you know.
position he agrees with.
Arkansas Sen. J. W.
Fulbright was quite right when he
noted the U.S. Government believes
Perhaps

Conrad in The Los Angeles Times
"Afterthoughts on a napolm drop on a little
poem."
girt s anti-wa- r

they will arrive at a solution of
their own. That they design and
want. That they fight and work
for.

"And if unfortunately their revolution must be of the violent type
because the 'haves' refuse to share
with the 'have-notby any peaceful method, at least what they
get will be on their own, and not
the American style, which they
don't want and